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(Scotsman)   Airport screeners stop kilted man after finding something even deadlier than plastic explosive in his luggage -- Haggis   (scotsman.com) divider line 13
    More: Amusing, airport security, Department for Transport, Inverness  
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3740 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jan 2014 at 5:00 AM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-25 08:56:58 AM
2 votes:
I'll be having an American-made haggis tonight, to celebrate Burns Night. It's nowhere near as good as the real thing, since it's missing several vital ingredients.
Fun fact, an authentic Haggis isn't legal in the US, so you can't import them, and have to buy the peely-wally local kind.
It's strange that the country that brought the World such culinary delights as the 'McRib' should ban a wholesome delicacy like the Haggis.
Ah weel.....

Happy Burns Night, ye crawlin' ferlies.
2014-01-25 12:48:21 AM
2 votes:
A weapon of gastric destruction
2014-01-25 12:45:40 PM
1 votes:

wildcardjack: Rinse the stomach thoroughly and soak overnight in cold salted water.

Rinse the liver, heart, and tongue. In a large pot of boiling, salted water, cook these parts over medium heat for 2 hours. Remove and mince. Remove any gristle or skin and discard.

In a large bowl, combine the minced liver, heart, tongue, suet, onions, and toasted oats. Season with salt, pepper, and dried herbs. Moisten with some of the cooking water so the mixture binds. Remove the stomach from the cold salted water and fill 2/3 with the mixture. Sew or tie the stomach closed. Use a turning fork to pierce the stomach several times. This will prevent the haggis from bursting.

In a large pot of boiling water, gently place the filled stomach, being careful not to splash. Cook over high heat for 3 hours.

Serve with mashed potatoes, if you serve it at all.


...so essentially Scottish scrapple, only with lamby bits instead of piggy bits, I take it?  (And scrapple ain't bad stuff.  Nor is goetta, which is the Cincinnati variant of scrapple.)
2014-01-25 10:44:03 AM
1 votes:
I don't get the haggis-hate. Must be this "ew, foreign cooking" thing. I had haggis several times when I visited Scotland, and I liked it.

Haggis, tattis, and neeps FTW.

upload.wikimedia.org
2014-01-25 08:28:11 AM
1 votes:
Although airport staff were concerned about the harmless haggis, they failed to notice that Mr Blake, a keen kilt-wearer, was also carrying a sgian dubh, the knife worn as part of the traditional Highland dress.


img.fark.net
2014-01-25 07:33:42 AM
1 votes:

robohobo: I've never had haggis, though I've always kinda wanted to try it. What does it really taste like, snark aside? The ingredients don't seem all that offensive.


I've been to Scotland three times, and have eaten haggis every time. It's like a spicy meat hash. Has a texture not unlike a slightly dryer (though that depends on who's making it) corned beef hash.

Honestly, as long as you aren't thinking about the process of which it was made, you'd never even know it was made in a stomach and would find it quite delicious.

/Scotland was one of my absolute favorite places to visit while I lived in Europe
2014-01-25 07:26:00 AM
1 votes:
Haggis is great!  Very good as part of a Scottish fry-up.

The last time I had it (Edinburgh in September) it was a bit spicy but sausage-like.  Tiny little chunks all sort of mashed together.  Good.  I also had it prepared at (a) home with Drambuie over it, for Christmas dinner '09.  First time I had it then and I enjoyed it as well.
2014-01-25 06:38:00 AM
1 votes:
2014-01-25 06:37:56 AM
1 votes:
That's offal :-(

robohobo: I've never had haggis, though I've always kinda wanted to try it. What does it really taste like, snark aside? The ingredients don't seem all that offensive.


In all honesty, your traditional Burns Night dinner is pretty crap. Chappit neeps and tatties, with haggis. I always end up blending the three together on my plate, and that's fine enough. Thank goodness for the whisky.

Haggis itself? It's quite tasty. A well seasoned meat pudding. Better to get it fae a chipper, though; it's nicer battered and deep fried.

/What isn't?
2014-01-25 06:29:39 AM
1 votes:
Haggis is delicious!  And that recipe up there is accurate!
2014-01-25 05:30:26 AM
1 votes:
Rinse the stomach thoroughly and soak overnight in cold salted water.

Rinse the liver, heart, and tongue. In a large pot of boiling, salted water, cook these parts over medium heat for 2 hours. Remove and mince. Remove any gristle or skin and discard.

In a large bowl, combine the minced liver, heart, tongue, suet, onions, and toasted oats. Season with salt, pepper, and dried herbs. Moisten with some of the cooking water so the mixture binds. Remove the stomach from the cold salted water and fill 2/3 with the mixture. Sew or tie the stomach closed. Use a turning fork to pierce the stomach several times. This will prevent the haggis from bursting.

In a large pot of boiling water, gently place the filled stomach, being careful not to splash. Cook over high heat for 3 hours.

Serve with mashed potatoes, if you serve it at all.
2014-01-25 05:13:35 AM
1 votes:
I've never had haggis, though I've always kinda wanted to try it. What does it really taste like, snark aside? The ingredients don't seem all that offensive.
2014-01-25 12:33:32 AM
1 votes:
fta But in this day and age I think scanners should be able to recognise the sonsie face of the haggis.

Someone's face is an ingredient?
 
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