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(The New York Times)   Parents wish snowflakes' screen time was more educational   (nytimes.com) divider line 33
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2331 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jan 2014 at 5:22 PM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-24 04:24:57 PM
Yeah, well if they were really "parents" they would "parent" and nix that crap right in the kibosh pit.
Being a breeder doesn't automatically make one a "parent"
let alone a good one.

Kick your little crotch crabs outside and make them read a book outside.
Out side, where the world is.

Not on a a screen. Like a farking zombie.

And they don't need farking cell phones, either. Tie a farking onion on their belts, and tell them it's the new style.
then kick then outside.
 
2014-01-24 04:36:11 PM

vudukungfu: Kick your little crotch crabs outside and make them read a book outside.
Out side, where the world is.


But it's like minus seven out right now.

/reminds me to get the second grader to go get the trash can off the road
 
2014-01-24 05:29:50 PM
I love that at no point in the article did any of the parents try a BOOK.  those still exist!
 
2014-01-24 05:30:26 PM
The survey said lower-income families reported that their children spent more time with educational programming on screen than middle-income and higher-income families did. Families earning less than $25,000 said 57 percent of their children's screen time was educational, while families earning $50,000 to $99,000 said it was 38 percent.

I have no idea of sampling survey or it's statistical evidence, but it's almost seems like those poorer parents want more for their kids. Bootstrappy indeed.
 
2014-01-24 05:34:56 PM
Unless the formula is displayed with every slingshot pull, then it's not teaching anything
 
2014-01-24 05:36:11 PM
If only they had some way to influence their own children.
 
2014-01-24 05:37:15 PM
"Have you ever tried simply turning off the TV, sitting down with your children, and hitting them?"
 
2014-01-24 05:39:39 PM

Dragonflew: If only they had some way to influence their own children.


LOL. This.
 
2014-01-24 05:40:05 PM
I have just the show for little snowflakes:
www.webdesign.org
 
2014-01-24 05:41:17 PM
Oh FFS...
 
2014-01-24 05:42:00 PM

Dahnkster: The survey said lower-income families reported that their children spent more time with educational programming on screen than middle-income and higher-income families did. Families earning less than $25,000 said 57 percent of their children's screen time was educational, while families earning $50,000 to $99,000 said it was 38 percent.

I have no idea of sampling survey or it's statistical evidence, but it's almost seems like those poorer parents want more for their kids. Bootstrappy indeed.


Poor people don't have cable
 
2014-01-24 05:45:42 PM
By the way, if you are subject to epilepsy, please don't look at the above GIF when you regain consciousness.
 
2014-01-24 05:46:14 PM

Dragonflew: If only they had some way to influence their own children.


Oh, but they do, they do! Sure, parents in the past may have taken the easy way out by acting as informed and responsible gatekeepers for their children and chose what media they believed was both nurturing and appropriate for their individual offspring, but the parents of today boldly take steps outside and demand that anything that might not be for their children or fit their beliefs must be destroyed. Or even if they only think it's so because someone forwarded them an email about that hardcore porn simulator for the Xbox* For the sake of the children.


*Mass Effect. I haven't played it myself cos I don't have the console but two minutes of research and a lifetime of what I once called common sense but now in response to society term simple sense have shown me these paranoid and ignorant rantings were quite obviously hewn from the very purest of bollocks.
 
2014-01-24 05:47:54 PM
FTFA "They spend less time doing educational activities, with 8- to 10-year-olds spending about half the time with educational content that 2- to 4-year-olds do. "

At 8-10, there is an entire new world of entertaining video games and there is a lack of educational software that is fun.  The balance tips around 5-6 years old.

"Where in the World is Carmen San Diego?" needs a reboot goddamnit. FP detective game.
 
2014-01-24 05:48:04 PM
You could try talking to them. Maybe even going for a walk in the park.

/Radical ideas
 
2014-01-24 05:49:01 PM
I watched Looney Toons on a black and white TV. Look how great I turned out.
 
2014-01-24 05:49:56 PM

Phony_Soldier: You could try talking to them. Maybe even going for a walk in the park.



I like the park idea, but what if they find their way back?
 
2014-01-24 05:53:18 PM

Dragonflew: If only they had some way to influence their own children.


I was joking with my kids, 9 and 7, that they are probably the only kids in their grades not allowed to play Call of Duty.

I got a completely serious  "Yeah, most of them do get to play it" from both of them.

Terraria is about as mature a game as they are allowed to play at the moment, and it's rated T for teen.

They're currently both working through Chrono Trigger though, lol.
 
2014-01-24 05:54:59 PM
meat0918! when i was reading the article I was totally thinking of where in the world/us/time/anything is carmen sandiego! I LOVED THAT GAME! totally snuck in education in an entertaining way. :)
 
2014-01-24 06:04:03 PM

meat0918: "Where in the World is Carmen San Diego?" needs a reboot goddamnit. FP detective game.


This is exactly my damn comment.  Where the fark is World of Mathcraft? A crazy addictive MMORPG where instead of casting spells by pressing F1 for hot keys, you solve increasing difficult math problems (level 80 Archmage who casts spells by solving parts of multivariable calculus problems).  Get together all the bastards that know how to squeeze every ounce of addiction out of gamers for profit and have them do something that finally benefits society at large. Hire people to play the game. Get the best names in acting and voice acting to do cut scenes and record voiceovers. "Oh, Linsdey Lohan, this is your forth dui, well it looks like you need to record 1000 hours of voice acting in World of Mathcraft for your community service as bar wench 254...."
Hell, take that prison population and put them to work as voice actors.

And then market the crazy hell out of it. Market it more than any war simulator.  We'd have more scientific breakthroughs than that time we tried to go to the moon.
 
2014-01-24 06:11:39 PM

meat0918: I was joking with my kids, 9 and 7, that they are probably the only kids in their grades not allowed to play Call of Duty.

I got a completely serious  "Yeah, most of them do get to play it" from both of them.


Good.   I hate it when stupid people put their stupid kids in front of games intended for adults then complain when their kids see sex, drugs, or murder.  I don't believe that the ratings need to be strictly followed though.  I've met quite a few kids who were mature enough to handle games intended for an older audience but when I hear co-workers talking about how terrible GTA V is and how it should be banned then turn around and talk about Game of Thrones I have to shake my head.  They have a mental block the puts video games into the 'for kids' category but somehow they don't seem to think that it's odd that all other forms of media can be tailored to more mature audiences.

Also those little bastards are why I don't play online games much any more.  The little shiats from the UK being the worst of the bunch.
 
2014-01-24 06:25:20 PM
less than half the time that children age 2 to 10 spend watching or interacting with electronic screens is with what parents consider "educational" material

The survey allowed parents to assess whether a game or program taught social and emotional skills, as well as cognitive learning related to vocabulary, math or science.


Of course. Because parents are the absolute authority on whether something is educational or not. What was this study supposed to tell us again?
 
2014-01-24 06:35:22 PM

meat0918: Dragonflew: If only they had some way to influence their own children.

I was joking with my kids, 9 and 7, that they are probably the only kids in their grades not allowed to play Call of Duty.

I got a completely serious  "Yeah, most of them do get to play it" from both of them.

Terraria is about as mature a game as they are allowed to play at the moment, and it's rated T for teen.

They're currently both working through Chrono Trigger though, lol.


Ditto- all my kids' friends get to play CoD. (12 & 9). I'm old fashioned but I'd rather they didn't deal with that much realistic violence. I have let them play KOTOR, but most of the rest of their time is minecraft, ace of spades or various sports games.

Can't seem to get them interested in blowing up Kerbals though...
 
2014-01-24 06:39:48 PM
I wish adult programming was more educational. I miss the old history channel, learning channel, and national geographic. Too much crap "reality" shiat these days.
 
2014-01-24 06:44:17 PM
vudukungfu:
Out side, where the world is.

That's where paedophiles are!  You must be a paedophile trying to take my precious child from me!!!!!1111eleventy.

Unfortunately there are plenty of parents who do actually believe this.
 
2014-01-24 06:45:32 PM
No tv in my house because I literally don't have a tv.

meat0918: FTFA "They spend less time doing educational activities, with 8- to 10-year-olds spending about half the time with educational content that 2- to 4-year-olds do. "

At 8-10, there is an entire new world of entertaining video games and there is a lack of educational software that is fun.  The balance tips around 5-6 years old.

"Where in the World is Carmen San Diego?" needs a reboot goddamnit. FP detective game.


My 7 yo plays driving simulators, from buses to trucks to trains. He's currently addicted to Euro truck and is driving across Europe. I let him play these games in hopes that when his feet can reach the pedals of my car, I'll let him drive me across Europe and he can also drive me home when I'm drunk...
 
2014-01-24 06:50:35 PM
coming from the MTV set, no less
 
2014-01-24 06:51:56 PM

Dahnkster: The survey said lower-income families reported that their children spent more time with educational programming on screen than middle-income and higher-income families did. Families earning less than $25,000 said 57 percent of their children's screen time was educational, while families earning $50,000 to $99,000 said it was 38 percent.

I have no idea of sampling survey or it's statistical evidence, but it's almost seems like those poorer parents want more for their kids. Bootstrappy indeed.


Self reporting.

They probably watch exactly the same shows, but the more well off (i.e. more educated) parents aren't as deluded into thinking some shows are educational.
 
2014-01-24 06:56:22 PM

Mark Ratner: I wish adult programming was more educational. I miss the old history channel, learning channel, and national geographic. Too much crap "reality" shiat these days.


I figure out would cost basically nothing to just have a channel (or even an on demand service) that shows old History Channel stuff from back when they had shows about history. Why can't they make this happen?
 
2014-01-24 06:58:46 PM
You know what's educational?

cmruikka.files.wordpress.com

But it can hardly be expected that the kids read them when their mouth-breather parents can't be bothered to.
 
2014-01-24 09:13:37 PM

BMFPitt: Dahnkster: The survey said lower-income families reported that their children spent more time with educational programming on screen than middle-income and higher-income families did. Families earning less than $25,000 said 57 percent of their children's screen time was educational, while families earning $50,000 to $99,000 said it was 38 percent.

I have no idea of sampling survey or it's statistical evidence, but it's almost seems like those poorer parents want more for their kids. Bootstrappy indeed.

Self reporting.

They probably watch exactly the same shows, but the more well off (i.e. more educated) parents aren't as deluded into thinking some shows are educational.


this. taking notes during cops or maury isn't "education"
 
2014-01-25 01:36:30 AM
upload.wikimedia.org
For general education things,

and

ecx.images-amazon.com
For math.
 
2014-01-25 04:05:40 PM
Kids spend hours every weekday in school, they bring home piles more homework than I ever had to at their age.  My 7 year old has about 30 minutes of written work M-Th and 15-30 minutes of online work. Then they have their few chores to do, weekly sports and instrument practice... I'd say that plenty of their day is already scheduled, busy and "educational."  If they want to veg out in front of a video game or tv show for a couple of hours, let them for fark's sake.  Every single moment of their lives doesn't have to be crammed with structured activities and contrived programming meant to produce good little workers.  And then people wonder why depression and anxiety seem to dominate so many peoples' lives.  Let your damn kids relax and be kids.
 
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