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(Mother Nature Network)   The 6 foods you should never give to a child. Yes, your kid's entire diet is on the list   (mnn.com) divider line 136
    More: Interesting, microwave popcorn, food additives, Steer Clear, Honey Nut Cheerios, BPA  
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13406 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jan 2014 at 7:50 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-24 08:39:43 AM

Xavier99: HotWingConspiracy: And for a great post-soccer game recovery drink, try chocolate milk - it has the perfect blend of carbs and protein to help little bodies repair and replenish.

Who the hell wants to drink milk after playing soccer on a hot day? Barf

That was literally my first thought - hot + tired + thirsty + milk = Puke city.


That's why I've never understood the Indy 500 tradition of the winner drinking milk. I'd puke all over the place.

/good thing I don't drive Indy cars, huh?
 
2014-01-24 08:40:33 AM

ongbok: Sports drinks. I remember a time when the only sports drink was Gator Aid, and it came in just 3 flavors, Lemon, Lemon Lime and Fruit Punch. Back then it was truly an acquired taste, and tasted nothing like the sugar filled stuff it is now.


At summer camp, we referred to lemon-lime GatorAid as "Bug Juice".  I was really happy the year that we had the orange flavor available.
 
2014-01-24 08:42:00 AM

Kyro: I'm not a parent, nor an extraordinarily healthy eater.  But I always wonder why you see parents giving a 5-month-old ice cream, or cake, or candy.  They have no benchmark on junk food.  Why not cram their gullets with as much wholesomely unappealing vegetables you can until they discover sugar on their own?  I mean yeah the gig will eventually be up, but  this seems like an avoidable problem to me.


That's what I did.  I'm fat, but I don't want fat kids.  So I made my own baby food and that's what they ate.  Lentils, chick peas, tons of stews and casseroles, every vegetable under the sun.  Neither like broccoli though.

Now, they eat crap occasionally, but they'll also eat anything someone is serving, which is nice.  And they're not fat.
 
2014-01-24 08:43:30 AM
Gatorade is good for kids when they're sick and need fluids/nutrients. It the same thing as that Pedialyte stuff and costs far less.
 
2014-01-24 08:44:24 AM
"should avoid" != "should never"

I should avoid speeding through yellow lights.
I should never run over pedestrians.
 
2014-01-24 08:45:36 AM
Shut up, Nature, you twat.
 
2014-01-24 08:45:47 AM

Arkanaut: I should never run over pedestrians.


Seriously, dude? Everything in moderation. Only a Sith deals in absolutes.
 
2014-01-24 08:46:03 AM
Wasnt the BPA thing proven to be way overblown?

Oh, wait, mother nature news. I should expect that.
 
2014-01-24 08:48:15 AM

HotWingConspiracy: And for a great post-soccer game recovery drink, try chocolate milk - it has the perfect blend of carbs and protein to help little bodies repair and replenish.

Who the hell wants to drink milk after playing soccer on a hot day? Barf


images3.makefive.com

I made a bad choice
 
2014-01-24 08:49:19 AM
Everything I was raised on.

Hey but I turned out...Meh.
 
2014-01-24 08:49:34 AM

genepool lifeboat: Want to keep your kids healthy?  Let them go outside to play.


but OMG CRIME!!!11!eleventy11!!1111!!!
 
2014-01-24 08:52:05 AM

Donnchadha: Arkanaut: I should never run over pedestrians.

Seriously, dude? Everything in moderation. Only a Sith deals in absolutes.


Okay, but only if they're being assholes.
 
2014-01-24 08:52:40 AM

kroonermanblack: Fat is bad and causes colon cancer in children?


Nowhere in the article does it say that. Your reading comprehension is atrocious and your entire rant is based on what you imagine you read. It says that the high amount of fat, in addition to the other things referenced in the sentence, are bad for kids. Which is correct. A single hot dog can easily have more than a quarter of a day's recommended fat limit for an adult yet provides less than 1/10 of the calorie need.

As for the colon cancer claim, it's been well known for some time now that the high level of nitrites in processed meats is a contributor to increased risk of colorectal cancer. This isn't new.

Because I'm betting that colon cancer is such a diminishingly rare issue for children that it can't be declaratively and definitively linked to your farking hot dogs.

Yea, right. It's so hard to quantify it only takes one Google result to start getting solid numbers.

An NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study found that processed red meat was associated with a 10 percent increased risk of prostate cancer with every 10 grams of increased intake. A study in Taiwan showed that consumption of cured and smoked meat can increase children's risk for leukemia. A study in Australia found that women's risk for ovarian cancer increased as a result of eating processed meats.
It's almost like the transition from kid to adult at 18 doesn't magically wipe the slate clean and restart everything. As if the choices made in the first 18 years still have consequences and can compound with what the person chooses as an adult.

Wild idea, I know, but if you go sit quietly and think about it for a moment, I'm sure you'll figure it out.
 
2014-01-24 08:53:08 AM
Rev. Skarekroe:Breast milk is not the equivalent of ice cream or cake.
But you knew that.


Of course but he's saying that babies "have no benchmark for junk food" when he's clearly saying sweet things.  Babies love ice cream because it's just as sweet as the milk they are used to.

And to the other poster about rocky road and nuts..... do you really think babies eat that kind of ice cream?  Most of the time people give soft serve vanilla.
 
2014-01-24 08:53:17 AM

Kyro: I'm not a parent, nor an extraordinarily healthy eater.  But I always wonder why you see parents giving a 5-month-old ice cream, or cake, or candy.  They have no benchmark on junk food.  Why not cram their gullets with as much wholesomely unappealing vegetables you can until they discover sugar on their own?  I mean yeah the gig will eventually be up, but  this seems like an avoidable problem to me.


I watch my sister raise my nephew on nothing but junk.
When he was a baby, the doctor said he was a little underweight. And the kid hated eating, it took over 2 hours to feed him a few spoonfuls of yogurt or baby food. So I think at first, she fed him high-calorie sweet stuff just to get him to eat, because GODS FORBID you have a child that doesn't meet 100% of every benchmark and percentile your supposedly individual kid is supposed to hit. But now, the kid eats a nonstop supply of sugar, sugar, and more sugar (except when he's eating chicken nuggets and fries).  He's not fat, and he does get a healthy, home-cooked meal every night (but if he doesn't like it he gets sugary yogurt and chocolate granola bars.)  It just seems to me that some parents find it so much easier and more convenient to just give the kid what they want to shut them up.

THANKFULLY my husband and I chose not to have kids. I would have been that kind of mom too. I am lazy as hell and can't be buggered so I DID NOT HAVE KIDS because I know how I am. If I hadn't had that abortion when I was 19, Little Hippie Jr. would be stoned out of his mind, serving you your fries right now with a side of saliva, because that's probably the kind of ill-mannered, neglected little brat I would have raised. YOU ARE WELCOME.

/When I'm President, there will be an abortion clinic on every street corner
 
2014-01-24 08:53:29 AM
my kids do freak out over spicy hot food though. pretend to put the sriracha in their stuff & they get all riled up.

i guess i probably shouldnt do that at the dinner table.
 
2014-01-24 08:54:21 AM
To be fair, the article does discuss moderation, and  uses "sparingly" instead of "never."   Seems like reasonable advice.

As a divorced dad, I was always trying to focus on home cooked meals, family meal time, and of course to compensate for the evil ex who would barely bother to feed them.  They rarely had any processed foods at my house.  Want a cookie?... let's go bake.

My kids were allowed to have one actual serving size of sugary cereal, and they had to augment their breakfast with other healthy options like whole grain toast, fruit, yogurt or such if they were still hungry.

I've never liked microwaved popcorn, it smell delicious, but always tastes fairly nasty.  I'm surprised Ramen noodles didn't make this list.
 
2014-01-24 08:55:06 AM

Arkanaut: I should never run over pedestrians.


static3.businessinsider.com
 
2014-01-24 08:59:39 AM

Punk Rock Hippie: /When I'm President, there will be an abortion clinic on every street corner


You have my vote.
 
2014-01-24 08:59:47 AM

TNel: Rev. Skarekroe:Breast milk is not the equivalent of ice cream or cake.
But you knew that.

Of course but he's saying that babies "have no benchmark for junk food" when he's clearly saying sweet things.


But they specifically said junk food. How you've determined that they're "clearly" saying something else remains a mystery.

  And to the other poster about rocky road and nuts..... do you really think babies eat that kind of ice cream?

Yes.

Most of the time people give soft serve vanilla.

Most of the time? So what about the rest of the time?
 
2014-01-24 09:01:12 AM

Arkanaut: I should never run over pedestrians.


Why not?  That was my favorite game back in the day.
lh3.ggpht.com
 
2014-01-24 09:03:17 AM

hitmanric: Do these people actually get paid? Or is it more of a self righteousness thing?


More the latter.  The very same anti-vaxxers, naturopaths, and anti-GMOers are the first to scream anti-intellectual" and "anti-science" at the climate change deniers.
 
2014-01-24 09:03:35 AM

Ker_Thwap: To be fair, the article does discuss moderation, and  uses "sparingly" instead of "never."   Seems like reasonable advice.

As a divorced dad, I was always trying to focus on home cooked meals, family meal time, and of course to compensate for the evil ex who would barely bother to feed them.  They rarely had any processed foods at my house.  Want a cookie?... let's go bake.

My kids were allowed to have one actual serving size of sugary cereal, and they had to augment their breakfast with other healthy options like whole grain toast, fruit, yogurt or such if they were still hungry.

I've never liked microwaved popcorn, it smell delicious, but always tastes fairly nasty.  I'm surprised Ramen noodles didn't make this list.


instant ramen? next you'll say fish has the mercury.

/millions of jappos cant be wrong!
 
2014-01-24 09:04:42 AM

Punk Rock Hippie: I watch my sister raise my nephew on nothing but junk.
When he was a baby, the doctor said he was a little underweight. And the kid hated eating, it took over 2 hours to feed him a few spoonfuls of yogurt or baby food. So I think at first, she fed him high-calorie sweet stuff just to get him to eat, because GODS FORBID you have a child that doesn't meet 100% of every benchmark and percentile your supposedly individual kid is supposed to hit. But now, the kid eats a nonstop supply of sugar, sugar, and more sugar (except when he's eating chicken nuggets and fries).  He's not fat, and he does get a healthy, home-cooked meal every night (but if he doesn't like it he gets sugary yogurt and chocolate granola bars.)  It just seems to me that some parents find it so much easier and more convenient to just give the kid what they want to shut them up.


My nephew is 5.  They started him off garbage early on.  Now he won't eat any vegetables or meat.  He'll only eat macaroni, cheese and bread.  His diet is like 95% carb.  He's not fat yet, but I don't see how it can be anything but a matter of time at this point.
 
2014-01-24 09:04:49 AM
I heard the chocolate milk thing on the radio last summer.  I started drinking a glass after my runs and it actually FEELS awesome.  Like your body just rested 20 minutes in a few gulps.  You do have to cool down first, though.

/WTF tomato?
 
2014-01-24 09:08:26 AM
I saw a friend post on Facebook a picture of her 2 year old kid drinking a huge Mountain Dew energy drink. That's ok, right?

Only thing on the list I've given my boy is canned tomatoes, he loves my home made bolenaese.
 
2014-01-24 09:10:19 AM
Years ago, there was a fantasy-science fiction TV show that had one vignette I will long remember.

An up and coming successful businessman, elitist snob, is walking down the street when a deranged, foul smelling, drunken, homeless man comes babbling inanities at him.  He pushes the insistent man away and ducks into an open doorway and closes the heavy door behind him, which locks.

He finds himself locked in a concrete room illuminated by fluorescent bulbs in the high ceiling, but with no other doors or windows.  He cannot open the door, and nobody on the sidewalk can hear him pounding on it.  In one corner is a foul smelling hole in the floor, and there is a narrow panel low to the floor.  After a few hours he is hungry, and the panel opens and an unlabeled bottle of cheap wine rolls out.

Eventually, his hunger gets to him and he drinks the wine and passes out.  He wakes up to find the empty bottle gone, and uses the foul smelling hole as a toilet.  Then, perhaps once or twice a day, another bottle of wine rolls out.  His beard grows, his clothes become filthy and tattered, he is malnourished.

On his last legs, suddenly the door opens and he runs out onto the sidewalk, by all appearances a deranged, foul smelling, drunken, homeless man.  People shy away from him as he desperately seeks their help.  As he tries to get away, a successful businessman tries to dodge him by ducking into the empty doorway and closing the door behind him, but the first man is out of his mind, and runs off into the darkness.

The reason I mention this story is because a fate like this is what I hope happens to people who write articles like "The 6 foods you should never give to a child."
 
2014-01-24 09:12:17 AM
I'm sorry, I just hate crap like this.  Tons of claims, zero source material.  Let's go to the breakdown!

1. Microwave Popcorn (PFOA) -
I can't find any corroborating scientific evidence on this. I've found info on perfluorooctanoic acid (a carcinogen) being used in the manufacture of teflon, but it is not used in the manufacturing process of teflon cookware. I can't find anything (other than sites like MNN) stating this is being used in microwave popcorn.  In order to break down teflon, it needs to be heated to about 500 degrees Fahrenheit, and a 1959 FDA study showed that the toxicity of fumes given off by the coated pan on dry heating was less than that of fumes given off by ordinary cooking oils.[1]

2. Meats (fats, nitrates and other preservatives) -
Sodium Nitrate was a common preservative in meats, this is true. The first documented cases of reaction with meats to cause a strand of nitrosamine (of which there are 18, 10 being carcinogenic) was in the 1970s, when it was used to preserve fish reacting with the dimethylamine in the fish and produced dimethylnitrosamine.[2] In the past 20 years meat manufacturing has all but eliminated sodium nitrate as a preservative, opting instead for ascorbate and erythorbate, both known to deplete residual nitrite and inhibit the production of N-nitrosamines.[3]

3. Canned Tomatoes (BPA) -
Cans were commonly lined with bisophenal-A (BPA). So were many other things, the one pointed to most often during legislative hearings over the substance was baby formula containers. In 2009 The Endocrine Society released a statement expressing concern over potential health risk, which fueled legislators in the US and abroad to act. Bisphenol A is an endocrine disruptor, which can mimic the body's own hormones and  may lead to negative health effects.[4][5] An editorial in the same issue the mentioned Lang Study was published in noted that while this preliminary study needs to be confirmed and cannot prove causality, there is precedent for analogous effects in animal studies, which adds biological plausibility to the results reported by Lang et al.[6] Due to it's prolific use, many of us already have it at some level in our systems. Studies by the CDC found bisphenol A in the urine of 95% of adults sampled in 1988-1994[93] and in 93% of children and adults tested in 2003-04.[6]

The issue here is that there has been no causal link between BPA and any of the negative health effects that have been attributed to it. There just aren't adequate studies yet. The FDA and the Consumer Product Safety Commission both agree, given present data, BPA is safe.[7] This has caused much controversy, as one would expect. However, as I mentioned, legislators are "preemptively" acting[9] (whether you think this to be good or bad is a matter of personal belief). Most countries have banned the use of BPA in baby products that contain consumables as well as in pacifiers. A handful of states have as well. US manufacturers of infant products have also stopped using BPA voluntarily.

4. Kids Yogurt (Artificial colors and sugar) -
I honestly can't find ANY information on artificial colors being bad for human consumption. If you find some, please let me know. I would like to learn about that. There is a lot of info about the potential link to ADD and ADHD, but that has been mostly refuted. I found an article about how blue food dye helped rats with spinal injuries regain or retain motor control.[8] That's actually pretty damn cool.

As for the added sugars, yeah probably bad.  So bad it negates the positive effects?  Show me the studies please.  The advise given is sound though.  Buy good high-protein yogurt with active cultures and add your own sliced fruit.  It's better anyway.

5. Sports Drinks (no discernible reason given) -
The obvious scapegoat here is the salts that can cause kidney damage with over consumption.  So, yeah, that's bad.  But on a hot day with rigorous outdoor activity, your body needs to replenish those salts.  The solution here is not avoidance, but proper application.

6. Sugary cereals (they are sugary) -
Duh.  This one simply combats obesity, and potential future heart disease.  I'll allow it.


[1] -  http://www.enotalone.com/article/7805.html
[2] -  http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/f-w00/nitrosamine.html
[3] -  http://www.medem.com/?q=medlib/article/ZZZ80XEN0IC - Login required
[4] -  http://www.iupac.org/publications/pac/2003/pdf/7511x2099.pdf
[5] -  http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/300.11.1353
[6] -  http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2007/10753/abstract.html
[7] -  https://pubs.acs.org/action/showLogin?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fpubs.acs.org%2 F isubscribe%2Fjournals%2Fcen%2F86%2Fi22%2Fhtml%2F8622gov1.html - Login Required
[8] -  http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/07/28/spinal.injury.blue.dye/index.htm l
 
GBB
2014-01-24 09:14:00 AM

Kyro: Punk Rock Hippie: I watch my sister raise my nephew on nothing but junk.
When he was a baby, the doctor said he was a little underweight. And the kid hated eating, it took over 2 hours to feed him a few spoonfuls of yogurt or baby food. So I think at first, she fed him high-calorie sweet stuff just to get him to eat, because GODS FORBID you have a child that doesn't meet 100% of every benchmark and percentile your supposedly individual kid is supposed to hit. But now, the kid eats a nonstop supply of sugar, sugar, and more sugar (except when he's eating chicken nuggets and fries).  He's not fat, and he does get a healthy, home-cooked meal every night (but if he doesn't like it he gets sugary yogurt and chocolate granola bars.)  It just seems to me that some parents find it so much easier and more convenient to just give the kid what they want to shut them up.

My nephew is 5.  They started him off garbage early on.  Now he won't eat any vegetables or meat.  He'll only eat macaroni, cheese and bread.  His diet is like 95% carb.  He's not fat yet, but I don't see how it can be anything but a matter of time at this point.


Because your body doesn't store carbs.  Your body uses carbs.  Carbs are energy.  Fat is what your body stores.  It stores it because your body can break fat down into carbs and use the carbs as energy.  So a diet of 95% carbs will keep you skinny, but not necessarily healthy.
 
2014-01-24 09:14:06 AM

Crackers Don't Matter: I saw a friend post on Facebook a picture of her 2 year old kid drinking a huge Mountain Dew energy drink. That's ok, right?

Only thing on the list I've given my boy is canned tomatoes, he loves my home made bolenaese.


i could not imagine my boy on that much sugar and caffeine.
 
2014-01-24 09:16:45 AM

Rev. Skarekroe: Canned tomatoes?  Who feeds their kid canned tomatoes?


If I want San Marzano tomatoes for my red sauce, I have to use canned.
 
2014-01-24 09:18:53 AM

Swiss Colony: I'm surprised by the canned tomatoes. We use them quite a lot for casseroles., stews and of course pasta sauces.


I'm guessing the author is writing about the cans with that white plastic lining, which is where the BPA was being used.  I made chili last night and the diced tomatoes I used were in a plain metal can.

ongbok: Sports drinks. I remember a time when the only sports drink was Gator Aid, and it came in just 3 flavors, Lemon, Lemon Lime and Fruit Punch. Back then it was truly an acquired taste, and tasted nothing like the sugar filled stuff it is now.


Somebody let my kid drink a sports drink at a sleepover and it was all she talked about for a few days.   But, you haven't seen anything until you've seen a mom fill their baby's bottle with Mountain Dew.

kroonermanblack: Chocomalk is just as high in sugar as your nemesis sport drinks. If not more. It's a soda.


Sure, exactly the same, except for the calcium, protein, potassium, vitamins A and D, etc...

8oz of Dean's TruMoo LowFat Chocolate Milk versus 8oz of Coke

Calories:  140 versus 90
Protein: 8g versus 0
Sugars: 18g versus 23
Calcium: 300mg versus 0
Vitamin D: 100IU versus 0
Vitamin A: 500IU versus 0
Vitamin B12: 1.2mcg versus 0
Potassium: 400mg versus 0
Magnesium: 25mg versus 0
Phosphorus: 200mg versus 0
Riboflavin: .4mcg versus 0

Odin's Other Eye: but why anyone would give their kids ..... kid yogurt I don't understand.


"Adult" yogurt isn't much better than kids yogurt when they are compared to the plain yogurt always mentioned in articles like this on.
 
2014-01-24 09:20:12 AM

ginkor: Years ago, there was a fantasy-science fiction TV show that had one vignette I will long remember.

An up and coming successful businessman, elitist snob, is walking down the street when a deranged, foul smelling, drunken, homeless man comes babbling inanities at him.  He pushes the insistent man away and ducks into an open doorway and closes the heavy door behind him, which locks.

He finds himself locked in a concrete room illuminated by fluorescent bulbs in the high ceiling, but with no other doors or windows.  He cannot open the door, and nobody on the sidewalk can hear him pounding on it.  In one corner is a foul smelling hole in the floor, and there is a narrow panel low to the floor.  After a few hours he is hungry, and the panel opens and an unlabeled bottle of cheap wine rolls out.

Eventually, his hunger gets to him and he drinks the wine and passes out.  He wakes up to find the empty bottle gone, and uses the foul smelling hole as a toilet.  Then, perhaps once or twice a day, another bottle of wine rolls out.  His beard grows, his clothes become filthy and tattered, he is malnourished.

On his last legs, suddenly the door opens and he runs out onto the sidewalk, by all appearances a deranged, foul smelling, drunken, homeless man.  People shy away from him as he desperately seeks their help.  As he tries to get away, a successful businessman tries to dodge him by ducking into the empty doorway and closing the door behind him, but the first man is out of his mind, and runs off into the darkness.

The reason I mention this story is because a fate like this is what I hope happens to people who write articles like "The 6 foods you should never give to a child."


You're a horrible person for wishing ill on an author who is spreading decent advice, karma isn't real, the article said nothing of the sort, you were apparently suckered by subby's misleading headline.
 
2014-01-24 09:24:48 AM

legion_of_doo: genepool lifeboat: Want to keep your kids healthy?  Let them go outside to play.

until they get kidnapped by the kiddy diddler down the street!!!!11!!!1


Well statistically that is likely to be either their father, grandfather, or uncle so at least you will know where they are.

DrBrownCow: Swiss Colony: I'm surprised by the canned tomatoes. We use them quite a lot for casseroles., stews and of course pasta sauces.

I'm guessing the author is writing about the cans with that white plastic lining, which is where the BPA was being used.  I made chili last night and the diced tomatoes I used were in a plain metal can.


You have cans with plastic lining on the inside? I was worried because I eat tinned tomatoes but I`ve never seen that. I was wondering how plastic got into a metal can. I`ll avoid those if I see them.
 
2014-01-24 09:26:20 AM
[9] -  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/13/AR200 9 031303507.html

Forgot that one.  Oops.

Most of my previous post is a cut and paste job from a debate I had in 2009.  So the above article is old and some states have probably banned BPA by now.
 
2014-01-24 09:26:28 AM

Odin's Other Eye: HotWingConspiracy: And for a great post-soccer game recovery drink, try chocolate milk - it has the perfect blend of carbs and protein to help little bodies repair and replenish.

Who the hell wants to drink milk after playing soccer on a hot day? Barf

I was at a Circle Jerks show with a couple of the lads back in the day - we were happy, sweaty and bruised at the end, and staggered into a bodega on the way home - buddy and I each bought a liter of water and chugged it - and my other friend bought a liter of V8 - freaking V8 - and downed it in like one gulp. I almost puked just watching it. Some people are... strange. 

Chocolate milk is sold as a sports drink here. Me, I don't get it.


Maybe they are caught in a time paradox?
 
2014-01-24 09:34:00 AM

Odin's Other Eye: Why does ANYONE eat microwaved popcorn? It takes maybe 5 minutes to make a big pot of real popcorn, and it tastes SO MUCH BETTER. Even with a ton of butter, it's one of the best snacks out there. 

My kid gets a fair amount of processed meat - you can't be a kid in Norway and not eat pølse (hot dogs) - but why anyone would give their kids "sports drinks", sugared cereal or kid yogurt I don't understand. Tomatoes here come in cartons, and BPA was outlawed a long time ago, so I think we're ok there.

But seriously. Kids will like plain yogurt with a little honey or jam in it. Kids will eat a lot of things if you don't make them afraid of it - they don't need special "kid food." Plain cereal is fine, or just eat some good toast or something. Feed your kids food - it doesn't have to be super organic kelp flakes, just regular old food - and run them like dogs. They'll do fine.


If you're extremely active you end up sweating up a storm which can make it helpful to drink something like a sports drink to help with quenching your thirst, since just drinking water on its own won't really hydrate you if there's no salts/electrolytes.

I remember hearing as a kid how some kids would get salt tablets from their coach to help out in longer games for instance.

So if you have kids that are really running around playing a large amount then it is somewhat sensible to try a sport's drink.
 
2014-01-24 09:38:18 AM

Xavier99: HotWingConspiracy: And for a great post-soccer game recovery drink, try chocolate milk - it has the perfect blend of carbs and protein to help little bodies repair and replenish.

Who the hell wants to drink milk after playing soccer on a hot day? Barf

That was literally my first thought - hot + tired + thirsty + milk = Puke city.


Having acquired a taste for skim milk, that stuff has become very refreshing. It's nearly got the consistency of water already, but 9g of protein per cup.
 
2014-01-24 09:39:46 AM

Demiglace: Odin's Other Eye: Why does ANYONE eat microwaved popcorn? It takes maybe 5 minutes to make a big pot of real popcorn, and it tastes SO MUCH BETTER. Even with a ton of butter, it's one of the best snacks out there. 

My kid gets a fair amount of processed meat - you can't be a kid in Norway and not eat pølse (hot dogs) - but why anyone would give their kids "sports drinks", sugared cereal or kid yogurt I don't understand. Tomatoes here come in cartons, and BPA was outlawed a long time ago, so I think we're ok there.

But seriously. Kids will like plain yogurt with a little honey or jam in it. Kids will eat a lot of things if you don't make them afraid of it - they don't need special "kid food." Plain cereal is fine, or just eat some good toast or something. Feed your kids food - it doesn't have to be super organic kelp flakes, just regular old food - and run them like dogs. They'll do fine.

If you're extremely active you end up sweating up a storm which can make it helpful to drink something like a sports drink to help with quenching your thirst, since just drinking water on its own won't really hydrate you if there's no salts/electrolytes.

I remember hearing as a kid how some kids would get salt tablets from their coach to help out in longer games for instance.

So if you have kids that are really running around playing a large amount then it is somewhat sensible to try a sport's drink.


I guess I can grant you that. But water works pretty ok, too. And usually when I see kids drinking "sports drinks" it is in a completely non-sports-related context. It's like Vitamin Water - the labeling makes you think it's good for you, when mostly, it's just another kind of sugar water.
 
2014-01-24 09:40:14 AM
GBB: Because your body doesn't store carbs.  Your body uses carbs.  Carbs are energy.  Fat is what your body stores.  It stores it because your body can break fat down into carbs and use the carbs as energy.  So a diet of 95% carbs will keep you skinny, but not necessarily healthy.

Yeah, those bastard cows eating all that fatty grass and oats to give them their high saturated fat content.  Red meat would be healthy if they'd lay off all those fatty foods.
 
2014-01-24 09:42:06 AM
DrBrownCow:

Odin's Other Eye: but why anyone would give their kids ..... kid yogurt I don't understand.

"Adult" yogurt isn't much better than kids yogurt when they are compared to the plain yogurt always mentioned in articles like this on.


Not much better, but a little better - but my real problem is why kids' yogurt in the first place? Kids don't need special food, with a little extra sugar and Spongebob on the label. Just give them regular food! You end up teaching them that they only should eat "kids' food" which is for the most part crap.
 
2014-01-24 09:42:37 AM

Kyro: I'm not a parent, nor an extraordinarily healthy eater.  But I always wonder why you see parents giving a 5-month-old ice cream, or cake, or candy.  They have no benchmark on junk food.  Why not cram their gullets with as much wholesomely unappealing vegetables you can until they discover sugar on their own?  I mean yeah the gig will eventually be up, but  this seems like an avoidable problem to me.


Rationally, it makes no sense. Then I see people giving birthday parties for one-year olds and you understand it has everything to do with them treating the kid as an accessory and not as a separate, rational being. Most parents grow out of that crap and the second child is better for it.

You can't explain to them that the kid doesn't care if there's cake or not, doesn't understand what's going on, and won't really be putting any of that food into their mouths. I was also under the impression that the desire for sweets doesn't come until later in life, and that babies prefer other foods.

I don't feed my cats junk food (human food) either. They eat healthier than I do. I may be getting chunky, but I make sure that they're getting exercise and not over eating.
 
2014-01-24 09:44:53 AM

dready zim: You have cans with plastic lining on the inside? I was worried because I eat tinned tomatoes but I`ve never seen that. I was wondering how plastic got into a metal can. I`ll avoid those if I see them.


The plastic lined cans weremarketed as a way to stop the contents from interacting with the metal.  I've always assumed it was in the cans with a white plastic lining, and I haven't seen those in awhile.    But, as I looked for a photo of one, a lot of the articles use stock photos of normal cans.  So, either the lining is invisible, or a lot of the authors are too lazy to track down can that is actually lined with a BPA plastic.
 
2014-01-24 09:45:01 AM

Odin's Other Eye: Demiglace: Odin's Other Eye: Why does ANYONE eat microwaved popcorn? It takes maybe 5 minutes to make a big pot of real popcorn, and it tastes SO MUCH BETTER. Even with a ton of butter, it's one of the best snacks out there. 

My kid gets a fair amount of processed meat - you can't be a kid in Norway and not eat pølse (hot dogs) - but why anyone would give their kids "sports drinks", sugared cereal or kid yogurt I don't understand. Tomatoes here come in cartons, and BPA was outlawed a long time ago, so I think we're ok there.

But seriously. Kids will like plain yogurt with a little honey or jam in it. Kids will eat a lot of things if you don't make them afraid of it - they don't need special "kid food." Plain cereal is fine, or just eat some good toast or something. Feed your kids food - it doesn't have to be super organic kelp flakes, just regular old food - and run them like dogs. They'll do fine.

If you're extremely active you end up sweating up a storm which can make it helpful to drink something like a sports drink to help with quenching your thirst, since just drinking water on its own won't really hydrate you if there's no salts/electrolytes.

I remember hearing as a kid how some kids would get salt tablets from their coach to help out in longer games for instance.

So if you have kids that are really running around playing a large amount then it is somewhat sensible to try a sport's drink.

I guess I can grant you that. But water works pretty ok, too. And usually when I see kids drinking "sports drinks" it is in a completely non-sports-related context. It's like Vitamin Water - the labeling makes you think it's good for you, when mostly, it's just another kind of sugar water.


TFA kind of tip-toes around this if you read it.  I'm not looking at the exact quotes, but: "If they are just thirsty sports give them water."  "If you want a recovery drink after sports, try chocolate milk."  They don't mention DURING the activity.  It's almost as if the author put in there "sports drinks are for during the game" and the editor had them redact it because then they'd be sending a mixed message.
 
2014-01-24 09:47:14 AM

DrBrownCow: dready zim: You have cans with plastic lining on the inside? I was worried because I eat tinned tomatoes but I`ve never seen that. I was wondering how plastic got into a metal can. I`ll avoid those if I see them.

The plastic lined cans weremarketed as a way to stop the contents from interacting with the metal.  I've always assumed it was in the cans with a white plastic lining, and I haven't seen those in awhile.    But, as I looked for a photo of one, a lot of the articles use stock photos of normal cans.  So, either the lining is invisible, or a lot of the authors are too lazy to track down can that is actually lined with a BPA plastic.


They look a little different - the lining makes the metal look a little extra shiny and slightly greenish.
 
2014-01-24 09:48:04 AM

blottoman: I want my Chocolate Covered Sugar Bombs!!


static1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-01-24 09:51:34 AM

legion_of_doo: TNel: Kyro: I'm not a parent, nor an extraordinarily healthy eater.  But I always wonder why you see parents giving a 5-month-old ice cream, or cake, or candy.  They have no benchmark on junk food.  Why not cram their gullets with as much wholesomely unappealing vegetables you can until they discover sugar on their own?  I mean yeah the gig will eventually be up, but  this seems like an avoidable problem to me.

Breast milk is very sweet so I guess we should stop using that too?

i have heard human breast milk has a lower lactose content than cow milk, and is less sweet.

*heard* this, mind you. not that i have drank breast milk recently or anything.


Other way around: human milk has more lactose, but less protein. The amount of fat depends on diet and how long you let the baby feed in a sitting (it starts out very watery but gets richer).

But their sense of taste does change over time, so that while they still like sweet, they're ready for non-sweet flavors by the time they want to try real food.
 
2014-01-24 09:51:43 AM
Full Disclosure: I eat a shiat ton of processed meats, which I know is contributing to my recent gain of 10 pounds.

Here's my take on processed meat. It's not necessarily the stuff they put in it that contributes to obesity or whatever. In my opinion, it's the processing. I don't have any data to back up this hypothesis (notice i didn't use the word theory) but here it is:

When you eat a steak, or ribs, or whole piece of chicken, your body takes longer to digest the material. You have to chew more, you need more fiber to get it to move or you will end up constipated. So it stands to reason that when you chew with your teeth, it's not all that efficient at breaking down the meat unless you are chewing for a really long time.

When we process meat, we are letting metal teeth "pre-chew" the meat for us. Then when we eat it, we chew the meat again, breaking it down even further. This is a very efficient way of digesting meat so we are able to draw more calories and nutrients from it than we normally would be able to. Since we've only been processing meat for a couple hundred years, humans haven't had enough time to adapt to that. So basically, we are making eating meat a lot more efficient than our bodies are used to, so we don't need to eat as much meat as we would if we were simply eating meat off the bone.

My thoughts and ideas. Doesn't mean they are right, just makes sense to me...
 
2014-01-24 09:53:36 AM
mike_d85:

I guess I can grant you that. But water works pretty ok, too. And usually when I see kids drinking "sports drinks" it is in a completely non-sports-related context. It's like Vitamin Water - the labeling makes you think it's good for you, when mostly, it's just another kind of sugar water.

TFA kind of tip-toes around this if you read it.  I'm not looking at the exact quotes, but: "If they are just thirsty sports give them water."  "If you want a recovery drink after sports, try chocolate milk."  They don't mention DURING the activity.  It's almost as ...


This looks like a pretty good article on the subject:

http://waterinschools.org/pdfs/RWJF_IBSportsDrinkFINAL6_2012_WEB.pdf

The depressing bits are:

"Adolescents who consume sports drinks 
more than once a day are more likely to be male, Black or 
Hispanic, eat at fast-food restaurants more than once a week, 
and be physically inactive. "

and

"According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children participating in vigorous exercise 
should drink water before, during, and after exercise. If children are participating in prolonged 
vigorous physical activity in hot, humid conditions for more than one hour, small amounts of 
sports drinks may be appropriate. However, for the typical child or adolescent engaging in routine 
physical activity for less than three hours in normal weather conditions, the use of sports drinks in 
place of water is unnecessary."

"According to a 2009 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey among students in grades 
9 through 12, in the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, only 18.4 percent of students 
participated in any kind of physical activity that increased their heart rate and made them breathe 
hard some of the time for at least 60 minutes per day on each of the seven days before the survey."
 
2014-01-24 09:57:54 AM

Odin's Other Eye: Not much better, but a little better - but my real problem is why kids' yogurt in the first place? Kids don't need special food, with a little extra sugar and Spongebob on the label. Just give them regular food! You end up teaching them that they only should eat "kids' food" which is for the most part crap.


I generally agree.  My kids will (and do) eat both kid and adult yogurt.    I'm just happy they are excited about eating with a relatively good nutritional profile.   The only kid yogurt we buy is the kind in a tube, and it is for that packaging reason more than anything else.   It really convenient to throw in a cooler or lunchbox for camping/hiking trips, in which case I'm not too concerned about the few extra grams of sugar.  We'd keep a box of adult yogurt in a tube in the back of the fridge if they sold it that way.
 
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