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(LiveLeak)   When piloting a helicopter, it pays to know that the switch for the speaker is labeled "SPEAKER" and not "HYDRAULICS"   (liveleak.com) divider line 34
    More: Fail, South Africa, Kroonstad, helicopters, switches  
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4604 clicks; posted to Video » on 23 Jan 2014 at 7:01 PM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-23 04:53:28 PM
Oh look, something is about to happen! Quick, move the camera all over so no one can see it!

/god dammit!
 
2014-01-23 05:54:33 PM
Huh. I didn't know that the R44 had a hydraulic boost system. Ya learn something new every day.
 
2014-01-23 06:11:10 PM
www.defordmusic.com

Musta been this guy..
 
2014-01-23 06:26:32 PM
Hit that one and you don't need a speaker

/everyone will hear the screaming
 
2014-01-23 06:29:57 PM

Old_Chief_Scott: Huh. I didn't know that the R44 had a hydraulic boost system. Ya learn something new every day.


The earliest R44's didn't have hydraulic systems but they all do now. That being said it'll fly just fine with hydraulics turned off, this guy just came in way too fast, looks like he entered vortex ring state and rolled it.

In other words, that guy is an idiot.
 
2014-01-23 07:08:00 PM
I'm more concerned about the major earthquake that occurred just as it was crashing.
 
2014-01-23 07:09:32 PM
A 3:30 lead-in before anything happens, and then, at the moment of action, the camera holder misses the crash?  That's some good camera work, Lou.

Not that I really blame the person in this instance, seeing how the helicopter damn near crashed right on top of him.
 
2014-01-23 07:21:37 PM
To be honest, I was expecting a bit more pre-crash decapitations.
 
2014-01-23 07:23:54 PM
Cameraman is in desperate need of a Steadiseg
 
2014-01-23 07:40:59 PM

markie_farkie: img.fark.net
Musta been this guy..


That is SO unrealistic.

The switch for the light would be on the light itself.

not to mention the call button.
 
2014-01-23 07:44:36 PM
Someone fill me in:  why is there a switch to turn off the hydraulics in the first place if they are needed to control the helicopter?  Just to make it more challenging?
 
2014-01-23 08:23:59 PM
Police there have a 1 second response time? Impressive.
 
2014-01-23 08:31:34 PM

Lsherm: Someone fill me in:  why is there a switch to turn off the hydraulics in the first place if they are needed to control the helicopter?  Just to make it more challenging?


Most aircraft aren't exactly 'turn-key and go'.
 
2014-01-23 08:34:47 PM
While I am not familiar with the specifics of this aircraft. Most aircraft typically have a safety cover to prevent inadvertently shutting down vital systems like hydraulics, fuel, electrical power. To confuse turning a speaker off to turning hydraulics off is beyond stupidity.
 
2014-01-23 08:36:59 PM

ActionJoe: While I am not familiar with the specifics of this aircraft. Most aircraft typically have a safety cover to prevent inadvertently shutting down vital systems like hydraulics, fuel, electrical power. To confuse turning a speaker off to turning hydraulics off is beyond stupidity.


the case of a severe malfunction it's nice to be able to disable it however I don't think there has been a single recorded case of a hydraulic system failure in an R44.

It's also there so you can easily practice a hydraulic failure without pulling a circuit breaker.
 
2014-01-23 09:05:17 PM
An honest mistake.

www.quickmeme.com
 
2014-01-23 09:36:06 PM
In a moment of severe smug, I'll imply that this could never happen to me.  Also, switchology usually dictates that ON or NORMAL all face the same way (forward or outboard) and the OFF position is in the opposite direction.  If the customary in-flight position of the speaker is OFF and the normal position of the hydraulics is ON or NORMAL, AND the switches are side by side, AND the pilot is not paying attention it's very possible to make this mistake.

/I'm still feeling smug
 
2014-01-23 11:07:28 PM
This seemed dangerous the whole way through. Hovering around an area that's clearly not a helipad, but an unsecured open field on the side of the road, people just walking casually around the helicopter, then hovering low and spinning around for a few minutes with the tail rotor at head height, and then of course being a huge idiot and almost killing someone on the ground as he crashes. It would probably be prudent to yank his license, but what do I know.
 
2014-01-23 11:22:18 PM

ActionJoe: While I am not familiar with the specifics of this aircraft. Most aircraft typically have a safety cover to prevent inadvertently shutting down vital systems like hydraulics, fuel, electrical power. To confuse turning a speaker off to turning hydraulics off is beyond stupidity.


Ah yes, the Molly guard heh.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_red_button#Molly-guard
 
2014-01-23 11:42:21 PM
Helicopters are one of those things that I always look at and think "holy shiat, what did we (humans) do?" I mean, flying machines are kind of crazy in the first place, but the principles of how a helicopter works and the fact that we monkeys build them is just farking madhouse.
 
2014-01-23 11:45:02 PM
Reminds me of my first time with heroin, an experience that coincided with jacking a copter in Grand Theft Auto V.

/J Edgar hover
 
2014-01-24 12:08:29 AM
I'm wondering why the hydraulic boot has an on/off switch instead of being always on like the power steering in a car
 
2014-01-24 02:02:35 AM

BenJammin: An honest mistake.

[www.quickmeme.com image 625x491]


s.mlkshk.com
 
2014-01-24 05:32:56 AM
Skip to the 3:20 mark to see shaky shiat
 
2014-01-24 07:07:05 AM
which button do I hit?  Eenie meenie minie moe, catch a tiger by the toe, if he hollers let him GO!
blogs.citypages.com
 
2014-01-24 07:35:02 AM
Pull back on the collective!

/ no idea what that means.
 
2014-01-24 08:26:47 AM

Bob The Nob: Pull back on the collective!

/ no idea what that means.


No!

"Reverse the Polarity!"

it always work on TV
 
2014-01-24 02:47:42 PM
www.atsb.gov.au
Makes a bit more sense when you see that it's a thumb switch on the cyclic. The channel select button is likely what he was going for.

Still some impressive stupid.
 
2014-01-24 03:47:37 PM
Can someone tell me why a pilot would want to kill their hydraulics? An emergency leak or something maybe, but why would it be a primary switch on the yoke? Do helicopter pilots regularly have to shut down the hydraulics in flight?
 
2014-01-24 04:11:40 PM

joonyer: Can someone tell me why a pilot would want to kill their hydraulics? An emergency leak or something maybe, but why would it be a primary switch on the yoke? Do helicopter pilots regularly have to shut down the hydraulics in flight?


The below is entirely speculation from a fixed wing pilot.

As far as I can tell, the hydraulics on the R44 exist entirely to damp the cyclic; ie, remove force feedback from the rotor system and make it easier for the pilot to maintain a given control input. That'd mean a hydraulic failure has the potential to make the cyclic stick do weird and wonderful things, so the pilot presumably has to have an easy/close at hand kill switch for that system. Same basic logic as putting the autopilot disconnect switch on the yoke - if it does something bad, you can correct it and shut off the offending system without having to move your hand very far.
 
2014-01-24 04:55:26 PM

costermonger: joonyer: Can someone tell me why a pilot would want to kill their hydraulics? An emergency leak or something maybe, but why would it be a primary switch on the yoke? Do helicopter pilots regularly have to shut down the hydraulics in flight?

The below is entirely speculation from a fixed wing pilot.

As far as I can tell, the hydraulics on the R44 exist entirely to damp the cyclic; ie, remove force feedback from the rotor system and make it easier for the pilot to maintain a given control input. That'd mean a hydraulic failure has the potential to make the cyclic stick do weird and wonderful things, so the pilot presumably has to have an easy/close at hand kill switch for that system. Same basic logic as putting the autopilot disconnect switch on the yoke - if it does something bad, you can correct it and shut off the offending system without having to move your hand very far.


But what a horrible place for that switch, and without any protection either.

Even if it's of such import that it needs to be on the cyclic, it's idiotic to place it right next to channel select especially where channel select is in the middle.

I don't know how important the loss of hydraulics were to losing this craft, but if it was critical, I'd be suing Robinson. OTOH, I wonder how many times this switch has been frobbed off incorrectly before?
 
2014-01-24 05:26:13 PM

RoyBatty: But what a horrible place for that switch, and without any protection either.


Yeah, but it's only in the last decade or so that anybody designing light aircraft cockpits for a living even learned how to spell ergonomics, so it's hardly surprising.
 
2014-01-24 05:44:56 PM

costermonger: RoyBatty: But what a horrible place for that switch, and without any protection either.

Yeah, but it's only in the last decade or so that anybody designing light aircraft cockpits for a living even learned how to spell ergonomics, so it's hardly surprising.


If that's a Robinson design from the factory, I'm still pretty shocked.

Googling I found this at copters.com explaining the problems of hydraulic failures confirming your speculation and adding some other scenarios:

http://www.copters.com/pilot/hyd_fail.html

Hydraulics Failure
Most helicopters use hydraulics to reduce the force needed to move the controls. Usually there is still a mechanical connection. In some helicopters there might not be a mechanical connection, or the control forces may simply be too high for the pilot to overcome with muscle. Generally those sorts of helicopters will have redundant hydraulic systems.
Both the Bell JetRanger/LongRanger and the Robinson R44 have boosted controls with mechanical backup. There are multiple ways such hydraulic systems can fail, but basically you can either have a failure where the entire system stops working, or a failure where a part of the system stops working.

Total Hydraulic Failure
Of the two failure modes, this is probably the easier to deal with. When the failure occurs, the pilot will notice that the control boost is gone, and he will have to fly the aircraft using much more force to move the controls. In the case of the cyclic and collective, he will also usually notice that they are connected, i.e. when he moves one control, the feedback from the rotor system will cause the corresponding control to also try to move. This effect is small and can easilly be overcome.
In a small helicopter such as the Bell or the Robiinson, the stick forces are low enough that the pilot can fly the aircraft with little difficulty. If the pilot has to fly for a significant amount of time before landing, he will probably be fatiqued and it may be difficult to avoid overcontrolling the helicopter while attempting to hover. The aircraft manufacturers generally recommend a running landing instead of attempting to hover in order to avoid this.
Partial Hydraulic Failure
A more difficult failure may be when one hydraulic servo fails, but the others continue to work. This means that his controls are boosted in some parts of their movement, but not in others. Such a failure could easilly result in an aircraft that is not flyable by the average pilot, so Bell and Robinson both provide a switch to allow the pilot to disable the hydraulic system. When the pilot activates the switch, the entire hydraulic system is defeated meaning that the pilot still has to contend with a total hydraulic failure, but at least all the stick forces are equally high, and the average pilot should be able to fly the aircraft with little trouble.
Both the Bell and Robinson hydraulic override systems are "failsafe". That is, it takes an electrical circuit to hold the hydraulic system in the override condition. If the electical system should fail, the hydraulics will continue to be boosted regardless of the position of the hydraulic override switch. The prevents loss of the aircraft electrical system from also causing a hydraulic systems failure.
Hardover Failure
Another failure mode of a hydraulically boosted control system is that one of the servos could be driven to one extreme position or the other by a failure within the servo. This would result in an unflyable aircraft. The pilot can recover from such a failure by turning off the hydraulic system, assuming that the hardover failure did not cause him to lose control of the aircraft.
 
2014-01-24 08:00:36 PM

abhorrent1: Oh look, something is about to happen! Quick, move the camera all over so no one can see it!

/god dammit!


this
 
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