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(Gizmodo)   Acclaimed architect designs "Tsunami House" elevated 9 ft on pilings, can withstand 85 mph winds. Florida pats him on the head   (gizmodo.com) divider line 40
    More: Amusing, piling, tsunamis, elevated, architects  
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3441 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Jan 2014 at 4:02 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-23 04:07:44 PM  
Bullshiat. Tsunami would pick up that house and plant it like a trophy on a hill 300 feet away.
 
2014-01-23 04:08:16 PM  
Incidentally, tsunamis have nothing to do with winds.
 
2014-01-23 04:10:38 PM  
That's nice. How does it stand up against wind- and water-driven debris? Yeah, that's what I thought.
 
2014-01-23 04:15:06 PM  
Lol, architects....
 
2014-01-23 04:15:37 PM  

Arkanaut: Incidentally, tsunamis have nothing to do with winds.


No, but on Florida coasts, it's not uncommon to design for 18 ft +/- waves as well as 160 mph or higher winds. This thing is a joke and the architect probably damned the homeowners out of a FEMA compliant house by having living space below Base Flood Elevation.
 
2014-01-23 04:19:28 PM  
How well will it stand up to "debris" carried by the wave:

japandailypress.com
 
2014-01-23 04:36:02 PM  

Arkanaut: Incidentally, tsunamis have nothing to do with winds.


While true, both introduce lateral loading that is dealt with the same way.

/Also, that's 85mph V3s, or 110mph under the current code. It's a "700" year storm.
 
2014-01-23 04:37:27 PM  
This just in, you can build cool shiat with a lot of money. Now, show me how to do that mass produced for your $250 - $450k homes. That is what annoys me about residential architects is that you don't get cool design that is able to be mass produced but for uber-rich clients.
 
2014-01-23 04:43:00 PM  
The only house on Bolivar Peninsula to survive Hurricane Ike:

ww3.hdnux.com

It looks 'shopped, but it's real.
 
2014-01-23 04:43:50 PM  
There's something heartless about that house.
 
2014-01-23 04:46:43 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: This just in, you can build cool shiat with a lot of money. Now, show me how to do that mass produced for your $250 - $450k homes. That is what annoys me about residential architects is that you don't get cool design that is able to be mass produced but for uber-rich clients.


Mass produced, not so much.  But I like this guy's work, and the prices are pretty decent:

http://oregoncottagecompany.net/cabins/
 
2014-01-23 04:55:36 PM  
I prefer this one:

www.pensacolabeachblogger.com
 
2014-01-23 04:57:28 PM  

Exception Collection: Arkanaut: Incidentally, tsunamis have nothing to do with winds.

While true, both introduce lateral loading that is dealt with the same way.

/Also, that's 85mph V3s, or 110mph under the current code. It's a "700" year storm.


110 mph is the current design wind speed for that area per ASCE 7-05. The 85 mph wind speed is apparently only the 50 yr storm.

Y'all got some funny "code compliance" up there.
 
2014-01-23 05:03:34 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: This just in, you can build cool shiat with a lot of money. Now, show me how to do that mass produced for your $250 - $450k homes. That is what annoys me about residential architects is that you don't get cool design that is able to be mass produced but for uber-rich clients.


For $250K, you could probably put together a workable design on pilings that exceeds this house (wind and water-wise), but it wouldn't be as fancy looking nor have all the wide openings and big windows for views and such.

For $450K, you could easily do something nice. You might even be able to afford an architect to design it.
 
2014-01-23 05:05:53 PM  
You either need a geodesic dome built into the side of a cliff or a floating sphere with multiple tethers.

I would like to have a geodesic dome built into the side of a cliff 50 feet above the ocean with a land entrance.  I would trust a structural engineer over an architect or preferably both working together.
 
2014-01-23 05:10:59 PM  
media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
It's not THAT the wind is blowin'....
 
2014-01-23 05:20:07 PM  
Bernard Tschumi?
 
2014-01-23 05:22:22 PM  
Saw this house on Extreme homes several months back. Neat in concept but F''d in real life.

Ooo my ground level garage doors will let all the water through.
 
2014-01-23 05:24:24 PM  

give me doughnuts: How well will it stand up to "debris" carried by the wave:

[japandailypress.com image 415x260]


www.shipschematics.net
 
2014-01-23 05:31:47 PM  
Acclaimed architect?
 
2014-01-23 05:38:10 PM  

foo monkey: give me doughnuts: How well will it stand up to "debris" carried by the wave:

[japandailypress.com image 415x260]

[www.shipschematics.net image 575x272]


1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-23 05:41:02 PM  
Even if it could live up to the claim, who would want to live in such an ugly thing?  My God, it's ugly.  I mean I've seen ugly houses before but that's the ugliest ugly that's ever uglied.  It looks like a cheap shed with some scrap wood slapped on part of it.
 
2014-01-23 05:50:43 PM  

jtown: Even if it could live up to the claim, who would want to live in such an ugly thing?  My God, it's ugly.  I mean I've seen ugly houses before but that's the ugliest ugly that's ever uglied.  It looks like a cheap shed with some scrap wood slapped on part of it.



The main picture is showing what is essentially a basement.  That's a very nice basement, with the open-out-to-the-yard esthetic and massively increasing one's enjoyment.  If a flood comes through the basement washes away, but the "proper" part of the house is in tact, and most likely in perfect condition.  If anything one could make the case this is an improvement on the older elevated houses in Florida that just use the first floor as a carport.

Old ideas are old, though.  Not sure why the article is making a big deal out of it.
 
2014-01-23 05:56:37 PM  

max_pooper: The only house on Bolivar Peninsula to survive Hurricane Ike:

[ww3.hdnux.com image 233x350]

It looks 'shopped, but it's real.


Yeah.... But it floated there.
 
2014-01-23 05:57:51 PM  
It reminds of the houses in the Outer Banks, NC. All of the panel boxes and electrical connections were on the second floor. The first floor was a pool table, a bed room and a spare fridge. All of the expensive equipment in the rental house was on the third floor.
 
2014-01-23 06:01:22 PM  

dryknife: Acclaimed architect?


There is only one requirement for you to describe yourself as 'acclaimed'

You have to be able to spell 'acclaimed'
 
2014-01-23 06:17:34 PM  
Is this built by the second little pig?
 
2014-01-23 06:19:18 PM  
It looks a lot like you could build that by welding two cargo containers together and mounting them on steel reinforced concrete stilts.

Wait a minute, I think I just thought of a way to "mass produce" these things.
 
2014-01-23 06:27:04 PM  
The furnishings may be "certified waterproof" but after those downstairs doors break as designed to they're not going to be in your house anymore. They're going to be a mile and a half away jammed up under a pile of toxic debris.
 
2014-01-23 06:43:31 PM  

max_pooper: The only house on Bolivar Peninsula to survive Hurricane Ike:

[ww3.hdnux.com image 233x350]

It looks 'shopped, but it's real.


Yeah, but still left uninhabitable after the storm.
 
2014-01-23 07:07:05 PM  
It's structure has been carefully created to withstand 7.8 scale earthquakes and 85 mph lateral winds

Future headline:

"Oh the fools! If only they'd built it to withstand 7.9 scale earthquakes and 86mph lateral winds... when will they learn?!!"
 
2014-01-23 07:18:55 PM  

max_pooper: The only house on Bolivar Peninsula to survive Hurricane Ike:



It looks 'shopped, but it's real.


Good ol' Ike. That storm taught me that all news orgs are attention whores with no benefit to society.

Jim Cantor and his bimbo sidekick can suck my cock.
 
2014-01-23 07:54:00 PM  
We have fishing camps near the coast here in Louisiana which are built higher and stronger than that house. That thing would never survive a hurricane with a good storm surge.
 
2014-01-23 07:56:04 PM  
And the roof on my house here, which is about 30 miles from the Gulf, has a roof built to withstand 140 mph winds.
 
2014-01-23 11:10:24 PM  

Buggar: max_pooper: The only house on Bolivar Peninsula to survive Hurricane Ike:

[ww3.hdnux.com image 233x350]

It looks 'shopped, but it's real.

Yeah, but still left uninhabitable after the storm.


They still live there.
 
2014-01-23 11:43:46 PM  

fickenchucker: jtown: Even if it could live up to the claim, who would want to live in such an ugly thing?  My God, it's ugly.  I mean I've seen ugly houses before but that's the ugliest ugly that's ever uglied.  It looks like a cheap shed with some scrap wood slapped on part of it.


The main picture is showing what is essentially a basement.  That's a very nice basement, with the open-out-to-the-yard esthetic and massively increasing one's enjoyment.  If a flood comes through the basement washes away, but the "proper" part of the house is in tact, and most likely in perfect condition.  If anything one could make the case this is an improvement on the older elevated houses in Florida that just use the first floor as a carport.

Old ideas are old, though.  Not sure why the article is making a big deal out of it.


It's not even an improvement over Florida's elevated houses. In Florida, we design "break-away walls" between the pilings so the storm waters will just rush through. We've been doing it this way for a long time. Garage doors, sliding glass doors, windows, all that. A lot of times, people will make some nice living space down there, but if the insurance adjuster or building inspector stops by and sees it, they're cancelled and reported to the building department, who may make them rip it all out. Because it's all illegal. You aren't allowed living space below base flood elevation. Parking and storage only. So to see an architect exclaiming about how he's made this nice little living area with his water-proof couch cushions, just ... guh.

/Florida laws
//your state may differ
///farking architects
 
2014-01-24 09:57:28 AM  
Why is it that all well known architect designed housed look like shiat? I have a neighbor with a house like this. Cost a fortune. Concrete and metal everywhere. Makes me think of an office building. Looks like a freaking box. I call them Frank Lloyd Wrongs.
 
2014-01-24 11:01:23 AM  

sxacho: Exception Collection: Arkanaut: Incidentally, tsunamis have nothing to do with winds.

While true, both introduce lateral loading that is dealt with the same way.

/Also, that's 85mph V3s, or 110mph under the current code. It's a "700" year storm.

110 mph is the current design wind speed for that area per ASCE 7-05. The 85 mph wind speed is apparently only the 50 yr storm.

Y'all got some funny "code compliance" up there.


No, the ASCE 7-05 wind speed for Washington was 85 mph.  Now that we've switched to the ASCE 7-10, it's 110 mph.  Why the big jump?  Because the code switched wind load from allowable load to ultimate load.  The allowable load in 7-10 is W*.6, while the LRFD load is W*1.  Doing a conversion between the two shows a difference of about half a percent (in pressure based on V3s wind, no coefficients accounted for), there are other changes as well but they mostly work out to "this is the same" for simple buildings.

/They changed wind load from one chapter to 6 chapters, and increased the page count of the entire reference (not counting commentary) from 245 to 370 pages.
//And in 99% of cases, those changes work out to "the answer will be the same."
///Well, 99% of cases I've run into.  I've been using the 7-10 for six months.
////In the NW section of WA, wind load generally only controls on long/light buildings or portions of buildings, like end units of townhomes.
//The Puget Sound area is full of fault lines.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puget_Sound_faults .  The building in question is on the island at one end of the UPF fault line.
 
2014-01-24 12:05:37 PM  

s2s2s2: [media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com image 236x177]
It's not THAT the wind is blowin'....


It's WHAT the wind is blowin'.  If your house gets hit by an oil tanker... doesn't matter how many pilings you put it on.
 
2014-01-24 01:09:03 PM  

Exception Collection: sxacho: Exception Collection: Arkanaut: Incidentally, tsunamis have nothing to do with winds.

While true, both introduce lateral loading that is dealt with the same way.

/Also, that's 85mph V3s, or 110mph under the current code. It's a "700" year storm.

110 mph is the current design wind speed for that area per ASCE 7-05. The 85 mph wind speed is apparently only the 50 yr storm.

Y'all got some funny "code compliance" up there.

No, the ASCE 7-05 wind speed for Washington was 85 mph.  Now that we've switched to the ASCE 7-10, it's 110 mph.  Why the big jump?  Because the code switched wind load from allowable load to ultimate load.  The allowable load in 7-10 is W*.6, while the LRFD load is W*1.  Doing a conversion between the two shows a difference of about half a percent (in pressure based on V3s wind, no coefficients accounted for), there are other changes as well but they mostly work out to "this is the same" for simple buildings.

/They changed wind load from one chapter to 6 chapters, and increased the page count of the entire reference (not counting commentary) from 245 to 370 pages.
//And in 99% of cases, those changes work out to "the answer will be the same."
///Well, 99% of cases I've run into.  I've been using the 7-10 for six months.
////In the NW section of WA, wind load generally only controls on long/light buildings or portions of buildings, like end units of townhomes.
//The Puget Sound area is full of fault lines.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puget_Sound_faults .  The building in question is on the island at one end of the UPF fault line.


My mistake. I meant to say 7-10. But yeah, the wind speed jumped big time but the loads stayed the same or decreased (mostly). It's a publishing racket.
 
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