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(Stuff.co.nz)   Transgendered woman and professional golf club designer Dr. V kills self after having redesigned putter outed and I swear to God this will all make complete sense after reading the article   (stuff.co.nz) divider line 150
    More: Strange, gods, putters, golfers, Bill Simmons, outing  
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1699 clicks; posted to Sports » on 23 Jan 2014 at 10:05 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-23 10:00:49 AM
It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.

Also, FTA:

Simmons denied that Grantland hounded or harassed Vanderbilt or used the knowledge of her gender identity to force greater cooperation. However, Hannan did out Vanderbilt to one of her investors, a disclosure Grantland says it regrets.

"To be clear, Caleb only interacted with [Vanderbilt] a handful of times," he said. "He never, at any time, threatened to out her on Grantland. He was reporting a story and verifying discrepancy issues with her background. That's it. Just finding out facts and asking questions. This is what reporters do. . . . There was no hounding. There was no badgering. It just didn't happen that way."


Y'know what?  I don't give a flying f*** if he directly threatened to out her.  He did out her once, and there was no expectation that he would not do so again in his article.  Her transgender history had no relevance to the story, except as a reason why the journalist was having difficulty getting records (did he try checking the male name?).

Personally, I don't hide my history.  I also don't make a big deal out of it.  But (having been threatened and discriminated against professionally) I can understand how others might be so afraid of being outed that they suffer horribly from doing so.

/This story infuriates me.
 
2014-01-23 10:10:01 AM
Outing a transsexual is not only a violation of privacy but also dangerous.

Not if you put yourself in the public eye. Dr. V apparently made false claims about the credentials she held, and when the reported did his due diligence, other facts came to light. I really do not care that other transgendered people in the reporting business disagree, it is part of the story.
 
2014-01-23 10:10:44 AM
weknowmemes.com
 
2014-01-23 10:14:34 AM

Exception Collection: Her transgender history had no relevance to the story,


I have to disagree with you there. I completely understand the desire for privacy, but how many articles have you read about an emerging technology where they have a personal interest section about "the man/woman behind the ___?" It's pretty standard in longer articles about pretty much anything, especially when the person has a more interesting or unusual life. This journalist smelled a unique backstory and started looking into it, that's what journalists do. How was he supposed to know what parts of her life he was supposed to avoid without her explanation and before he found out himself?
 
2014-01-23 10:15:40 AM
What about outing her as a fake physicist fraud? Was that OK?
 
2014-01-23 10:17:28 AM

fatalvenom: [weknowmemes.com image 540x739]


I agree, this is one of the most poorly written pieces Ive seen in a long time.
 
2014-01-23 10:18:29 AM
Oh, and I should say it's especially of interest if the person's history involves lying and fraud. The journalist found that the person was lying about large portions of their life. Would these same people who are angry say the journalist wasn't doing their job if the secret was that they were a fugitive from justice with a new identity? That could have been the story, how was the journalist to know until he investigated?
 
2014-01-23 10:18:59 AM

nmrsnr: This journalist smelled a unique backstory and started looking into it, that's what journalists do.


Very true. We're not talking about some type of a protected group here.
 
2014-01-23 10:19:20 AM

nmrsnr: Exception Collection: Her transgender history had no relevance to the story,

I have to disagree with you there. I completely understand the desire for privacy, but how many articles have you read about an emerging technology where they have a personal interest section about "the man/woman behind the ___?" It's pretty standard in longer articles about pretty much anything, especially when the person has a more interesting or unusual life. This journalist smelled a unique backstory and started looking into it, that's what journalists do. How was he supposed to know what parts of her life he was supposed to avoid without her explanation and before he found out himself?


Which is most likely why Dr. V. requested that the story be about the technology, not the person.  In any case, I can understand the journalist *researching* it.  Outing her to an investor?  Writing about it in a news article?  No.  Her transgender history (by itself) had no relevance to the story.

R.A.Danny: Outing a transsexual is not only a violation of privacy but also dangerous.

Not if you put yourself in the public eye. Dr. V apparently made false claims about the credentials she held, and when the reported did his due diligence, other facts came to light. I really do not care that other transgendered people in the reporting business disagree, it is part of the story.


No, the story is about the false credentials.  The reporter could have reported on that, and left it at that.  Instead, the reporter claimed that the transgender history was just one more lie, just one more part of a con.
 
2014-01-23 10:22:45 AM
So does the putter work or not?
 
2014-01-23 10:25:09 AM

Exception Collection: No, the story is about the false credentials.


No, it is about way more than that. If you put yourself in the public eye you need to be ready for the can of worms that ensues. You are not protected because you got a special interest group wants to cover crap up.
 
2014-01-23 10:26:25 AM

Exception Collection: Which is most likely why Dr. V. requested that the story be about the technology, not the person. In any case, I can understand the journalist *researching* it. Outing her to an investor? Writing about it in a news article? No.


But here the timeline is crucial. When she requested the article not be about her, did he know her story? She was hiding something, and he had suspicions that she was a fraud, of course she wouldn't want him looking into her backstory, she wouldn't want her lying to be discovered. When he outed her, was it deliberate? He contends it was an accidental result of trying to reconcile conflicting aspects of her story.

As for the publication, she had already commit suicide at that point, and that, along with the investigation, became the story, as we are talking about it right now, so omitting it would also be bad journalism.
 
2014-01-23 10:27:51 AM

fastbow: So does the putter work or not?


No, it got cut in half during the operation.
 
2014-01-23 10:32:12 AM

fastbow: So does the putter work or not?


well it doesnt shatter when it hits a ball. So it works as well as the golfer works it.
 
2014-01-23 10:34:49 AM

nmrsnr: Exception Collection: Which is most likely why Dr. V. requested that the story be about the technology, not the person. In any case, I can understand the journalist *researching* it. Outing her to an investor? Writing about it in a news article? No.

But here the timeline is crucial. When she requested the article not be about her, did he know her story? She was hiding something, and he had suspicions that she was a fraud, of course she wouldn't want him looking into her backstory, she wouldn't want her lying to be discovered. When he outed her, was it deliberate? He contends it was an accidental result of trying to reconcile conflicting aspects of her story.

As for the publication, she had already commit suicide at that point, and that, along with the investigation, became the story, as we are talking about it right now, so omitting it would also be bad journalism.


How do you *accidentally* out someone, other than misgendering someone you knew before?  He called up the investor, said "hey did you know that the person you invested money with used to be a man, and oh by the way is lying about other things as well?"...  that's not an accident.

R.A.Danny: Exception Collection: No, the story is about the false credentials.

No, it is about way more than that. If you put yourself in the public eye you need to be ready for the can of worms that ensues. You are not protected because you got a special interest group wants to cover crap up.


Yes, because it's quite clear that the person that refused to be in commercials, wasn't the public face of the product, and aside from talking to investors was effectively on the "research & science" side only was thrusting herself into the public eye.
 
2014-01-23 10:37:03 AM
He did check under the original male name. Nothing at all checked out. I think the fact she is transgender actually is a relevant part of the story. But, I don't think it wasn't the huge twist they were making it out to be. And if Dr. V hadn't fabricated her entire backstory it probably never gets mentioned. Its just becomes an odd story about a lady that makes a new type of putter. But the simple fact of the reporter verifying credentials (how this was not done by any of her investors, etc I do not understand) What still jumps out to me is the fact that McCord put the Vice-President on the phone with Dr. V and they talked like they were old friends and several higher up knew Dr. V?!!? Something is up with that part of the story. The story still blows me away, and I was actually legitimately saddened when read about the suicide. I'm sure it could have been handled a little more 'gently'. But the reporter did nothing malicious in my eyes and in fact the reporter was threatened by Dr. V at one point. Amazing story, I have read it a few times and its all so big and all so fake. Every time I finish reading it all I can say is "wow". A reporter doing a throw-away story on some new putter fad and it leads to Vice-Presidents, Stealth bombers, lies, harassment lawsuits, and actually got McCord to shut-up.  Dr. V made up her entire education and work history, yet still made a product that did what she claimed.
 
2014-01-23 10:40:42 AM

Exception Collection: How do you *accidentally* out someone, other than misgendering someone you knew before?


While investigating the fraud: "Did you know Dr. V before she changed her name? Or has she always represented herself to you as Dr. V?"

"She changed her name? I was not aware of that. What was it before?"

"Yes, it used to be Fred."

Really not that hard to see it coming up without malice, especially when the person's identity is at issue.
 
2014-01-23 10:42:13 AM

mikaloyd: What about outing her as a fake physicist fraud? Was that OK?


A charlatan marketing golf equipment of dubious functionality? No way, man. Not buying it for a second
 
2014-01-23 10:43:13 AM

Exception Collection: Yes, because it's quite clear that the person that refused to be in commercials, wasn't the public face of the product, and aside from talking to investors was effectively on the "research & science" side only was thrusting herself into the public eye.


She attached Dr. to her name. Falsely. We got to find out the rest of her story. That is what reporters do.
 
2014-01-23 10:44:29 AM
Dr. V was already dead when the article appeared, and the writer seems to have been surprised that it would matter that he outed a dead person.

It seems from TFA that people are assuming Dr V committed suicide (something she had attempted before any of this happened) because she was being outed as a transsexual, but that hadn't happened when she killed herself (and might not have happened if she hadn't). But it seems clear that she was definitely going to be outed as a fraud; maybe that's why she committed suicide.
 
2014-01-23 10:51:38 AM

MFAWG: mikaloyd: What about outing her as a fake physicist fraud? Was that OK?

A charlatan marketing golf equipment of dubious functionality? No way, man. Not buying it for a second


i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-23 10:53:05 AM

Robert1966: Dr. V was already dead when the article appeared, and the writer seems to have been surprised that it would matter that he outed a dead person.

It seems from TFA that people are assuming Dr V committed suicide (something she had attempted before any of this happened) because she was being outed as a transsexual, but that hadn't happened when she killed herself (and might not have happened if she hadn't). But it seems clear that she was definitely going to be outed as a fraud; maybe that's why she committed suicide.


There was a time in my life when the thought that someone might out me was horribly stressful (not suicide-level stress, but certainly breakdown-level stress).  Just knowing that an (apparently hostile) journalist was out there with the information would be incredibly terrifying.  (This is one of those "privilege" items:  Nobody that has not been closeted can understand how bad it can feel to know that you might be outed against your will.)
 
2014-01-23 10:53:23 AM

R.A.Danny: fastbow: So does the putter work or not?

No, it got cut in half during the operation.


And turned inside out.
 
2014-01-23 10:54:38 AM
Nananananananananana
Dededededededededede
Bidibidibidibidibid-uh-oh
 
2014-01-23 10:54:48 AM

www.doctorwhotv.co.uk

RIP DR V

 
2014-01-23 10:57:52 AM
I read the original story, the Simmons' piece, and the Christine Kahrl's piece. This is just a whole confusing and sad mess.
 
2014-01-23 10:58:48 AM

nmrsnr: Exception Collection: How do you *accidentally* out someone, other than misgendering someone you knew before?

While investigating the fraud: "Did you know Dr. V before she changed her name? Or has she always represented herself to you as Dr. V?"

"She changed her name? I was not aware of that. What was it before?"

"Yes, it used to be Fred."

Really not that hard to see it coming up without malice, especially when the person's identity is at issue.


I didn't really know that it was such a big deal.  If I found out somebody had their gender switched I would naturally ask other people that knew them what they thought about it.  It's terrible we treat our fellow humans so poorly sometimes that some feel the need to hide who they are.  That's what we need to fix.
 
2014-01-23 10:59:34 AM

R.A.Danny: Outing a transsexual is not only a violation of privacy but also dangerous.

Not if you put yourself in the public eye. Dr. V apparently made false claims about the credentials she held, and when the reported did his due diligence, other facts came to light. I really do not care that other transgendered people in the reporting business disagree, it is part of the story.


Except she didn't especially put herself in the public eye.  The story was the putter.  For Grantland.  A sportcentric site.  Caleb Hannan way overstepped what was going to be a relatively pedestrian article about a unique putter and was given way too long a leash by his editor.  He had all the credential fudging in a draft that was still meh, and then outed her to the investor (which was none of his business to do) to shake out some more story.
He's a relatively young writer and ambitious, which is fine in and of it's self, but an editor should have stepped in and stopped him when the sports story was no longer a sports story.  The apology from the editor that admitted he had no clue about the potential ramifications, was basically 'opps my bad, were cool now right?'
Dr. V's sexuality was hers to share or not, just like yours or mine of our own.  Hannan had no business to out her to anyone.  And for what, a(n off topic) story for a website.
 
2014-01-23 11:01:23 AM

Robert1966: Dr. V was already dead when the article appeared, and the writer seems to have been surprised that it would matter that he outed a dead person.

It seems from TFA that people are assuming Dr V committed suicide (something she had attempted before any of this happened) because she was being outed as a transsexual, but that hadn't happened when she killed herself (and might not have happened if she hadn't). But it seems clear that she was definitely going to be outed as a fraud; maybe that's why she committed suicide.


Actually it had, to the investor.
 
2014-01-23 11:04:20 AM

sno man: R.A.Danny: Outing a transsexual is not only a violation of privacy but also dangerous.

Not if you put yourself in the public eye. Dr. V apparently made false claims about the credentials she held, and when the reported did his due diligence, other facts came to light. I really do not care that other transgendered people in the reporting business disagree, it is part of the story.

Except she didn't especially put herself in the public eye.  The story was the putter.  For Grantland.  A sportcentric site.  Caleb Hannan way overstepped what was going to be a relatively pedestrian article about a unique putter and was given way too long a leash by his editor.  He had all the credential fudging in a draft that was still meh, and then outed her to the investor (which was none of his business to do) to shake out some more story.
He's a relatively young writer and ambitious, which is fine in and of it's self, but an editor should have stepped in and stopped him when the sports story was no longer a sports story.  The apology from the editor that admitted he had no clue about the potential ramifications, was basically 'opps my bad, were cool now right?'
Dr. V's sexuality was hers to share or not, just like yours or mine of our own.  Hannan had no business to out her to anyone.  And for what, a(n off topic) story for a website.


I cannot fathom how anyone can think there should be a leash on the press. You cannot tell me that a sports writer must stick to fluff, and that details that the public will find to be interesting must be held back.
 
2014-01-23 11:05:16 AM

Exception Collection: There was a time in my life when the thought that someone might out me was horribly stressful (not suicide-level stress, but certainly breakdown-level stress). Just knowing that an (apparently hostile) journalist was out there with the information would be incredibly terrifying. (This is one of those "privilege" items: Nobody that has not been closeted can understand how bad it can feel to know that you might be outed against your will.)


On the one hand, you're absolutely right - you never know how your family, your close friends, your coworkers, acquaintances, or society in general will react to your coming out.

On the other, stories like this are exactly why closets are killers. You build a "safe space" for yourself because the second you step outside, everyone is immediately going to shun, assault, rape, or murder you; and when it invariably happens, the consequences you've feared become the reality you fear.

And while it's easy for me to say "Maybe a conversation had in confidence with the journalist where she explains WHY she doesn't want her parts of her past examined publicly might have helped," that's sort of the opposite of why she'd be closeted in the first place.

I had a conversation with a coworker yesterday. He told me that before he came out (while he was still curious or questioning), he started seeing ads for gay dating sites on Fbook/Google. The ad companies knew he was gay before he'd come out - those ads might have "outed" him if, for example, he'd wanted to show some funny cat pic someone shared, and there's the "Hot Young Guys Now" (or whatever) screaming from the lower-right corner.

While it's easy to mark off things like gender ID and sexual identity as being "too hot button" to dig into, it's very easy to see how those get wound up in other issues (like in TFA). It gets real messy, real fast; and apart from making rules that you can't look into a trans* or gay person's past, we're going to have to keep using our best judgement.

Which means journos should tread lightly with "sensitive" social topics, and people with things to hide shouldn't fabricate credentials to invite further scrutiny.
 
2014-01-23 11:05:45 AM

Exception Collection: It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.



From your profile:

"I'm a Christian transgendered lesbian"
 
2014-01-23 11:06:47 AM

Dr Dreidel: You build a "safe space" for yourself because the second you step outside, everyone is immediately going to shun, assault, rape, or murder you; and when it invariably happens, the consequences you've feared become the reality you fear.


"it invariably happens" = "you invariably get outed"

// not assault or worse
// Jesus, Doc, lrn2clarity
 
2014-01-23 11:07:42 AM

Bareefer Obonghit: Exception Collection: It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.


From your profile:

"I'm a Christian transgendered lesbian"


Forget it. It's rolling.
 
2014-01-23 11:08:14 AM

Bareefer Obonghit: Exception Collection: It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.


From your profile:

"I'm a Christian transgendered lesbian"


westernrifleshooters.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-01-23 11:08:47 AM
Apparently, it's Don't Ask, Don't Tell, when it comes to transgendered folks.  Good to know.
 
2014-01-23 11:08:51 AM

Robert1966: Dr. V was already dead when the article appeared, and the writer seems to have been surprised that it would matter that he outed a dead person.

It seems from TFA that people are assuming Dr V committed suicide (something she had attempted before any of this happened) because she was being outed as a transsexual, but that hadn't happened when she killed herself (and might not have happened if she hadn't). But it seems clear that she was definitely going to be outed as a fraud; maybe that's why she committed suicide.


He didn't publicly out her in the article prior to her death, but he did to her investor.  And then when asked to sign a non-disclosure agreement about her past, the author declined.  It would not be an unreasonable assumption that she was going to be outed in the article.

On the other hand, even if being trans didn't appear in the article, her company was still probably ruined.

But on the third hand, (I've been thinking about this a lot) the piece probably doesn't even get published if they leave the trans stuff out.  Then its just an article where some author ruins a company you've never heard of anyway, which seems both pointless and not very interesting.
 
2014-01-23 11:08:59 AM

Bareefer Obonghit: Exception Collection: It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.


From your profile:

"I'm a Christian transgendered lesbian"


There was an adjective change operation since she last updated her profile.
 
2014-01-23 11:13:49 AM

R.A.Danny: sno man: R.A.Danny: Outing a transsexual is not only a violation of privacy but also dangerous.

Not if you put yourself in the public eye. Dr. V apparently made false claims about the credentials she held, and when the reported did his due diligence, other facts came to light. I really do not care that other transgendered people in the reporting business disagree, it is part of the story.

Except she didn't especially put herself in the public eye.  The story was the putter.  For Grantland.  A sportcentric site.  Caleb Hannan way overstepped what was going to be a relatively pedestrian article about a unique putter and was given way too long a leash by his editor.  He had all the credential fudging in a draft that was still meh, and then outed her to the investor (which was none of his business to do) to shake out some more story.
He's a relatively young writer and ambitious, which is fine in and of it's self, but an editor should have stepped in and stopped him when the sports story was no longer a sports story.  The apology from the editor that admitted he had no clue about the potential ramifications, was basically 'opps my bad, were cool now right?'
Dr. V's sexuality was hers to share or not, just like yours or mine of our own.  Hannan had no business to out her to anyone.  And for what, a(n off topic) story for a website.

I cannot fathom how anyone can think there should be a leash on the press. You cannot tell me that a sports writer must stick to fluff, and that details that the public will find to be interesting must be held back.


Outing her was over the line, especially to hope to stir up more shiat, because there simply wasn't enough to make the story interesting up to that point.  And that the story still didn't have enough to get published (after 7 months) until she finally committed suicide suggests that maybe it wasn't much of a story in the first place and should have been killed maybe two months in when someone else might have figured that out.
 
2014-01-23 11:14:12 AM

mikaloyd: Bareefer Obonghit: Exception Collection: It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.


From your profile:

"I'm a Christian transgendered lesbian"

There was an adjective change operation since she last updated her profile.


Now I don't feel like I have to walk on eggshells anyway since I admit that I am ignorant to the vernacular and do not want anyone to think I am being disrespectful.
 
2014-01-23 11:16:49 AM

sno man: Outing her was over the line,


No.

sno man: until she finally committed suicide


Having a small sector of the sporting world know she was not only a fraud, but also had a sex change isn't why she killed herself.
 
2014-01-23 11:17:15 AM
It's just as likely she killed herself to avoid going to jail for 20 years for mail fraud
 
2014-01-23 11:18:22 AM

elguerodiablo: I didn't really know that it was such a big deal.


It shouldn't be, but it is. I've known a few transgender people and when they decide to come out the conversation starts like they're going to tell you someone has died.

When my uncle* decided to undergo gender reassignment my parents called us in to have a family meeting, and I swear for the first five minutes I thought they were going to say he had terminal cancer. When our collective response was "oh, is THAT all?" my parents were a bit shocked at how not important it was to us. Maybe it's generational thing.

*not blood uncle
 
2014-01-23 11:19:26 AM

mikaloyd: Bareefer Obonghit: Exception Collection: It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.


From your profile:

"I'm a Christian transgendered lesbian"

There was an adjective change operation since she it last updated her its profile.


FTFY and I don't give a f*ck
 
2014-01-23 11:19:29 AM
ftfa:  "By any professional or ethical standard, [Vanderbilt's gender identity] wasn't merely irrelevant to the story, it wasn't [Hannan's] information to share," Kahrl wrote. "Like gays or lesbians - or anyone else, for that matter - trans folk get to determine for themselves what they're willing to divulge about their sexuality and gender identity. As in, it's not your business unless or until the person tells you it is, and if it's not germane to your story, you can safely forgo using it. Unfortunately, he indulged his discovery."


I agree that you shouldn't just randomly out people for no good reason* but I disagree with the notion that the "information" involved belongs solely to the person it's about.  And I disagree with the implication therein that all people get to completely control what others say and know about them.

NOBODY has that much power, transgender or not.That's a fact of life for any person at any age.  It seems naive and wishful to insist otherwise.
 I think what's more accurate is that some PREFER it the way Kahrl describes.  From what I can tell there isn't even agreement about the "ethical standard" of outing among LGBT, correct?  Some are in favor of coming out to increase awareness and thus oppose living in shame and secrecy, while those with more radical opinions are in favor of forced outings?


Either way, seems like a dick move by the journalist.  Which is par for the course.

*(a good reason maybe being a hypocritical bigot lawmaker whose actions affect a lot of people and run counter to his own behavior...)
 
2014-01-23 11:20:22 AM

mikaloyd: Bareefer Obonghit: Exception Collection: It's transgender woman, not transgendered woman.  Transgender's an adjective, not a noun.


From your profile:

"I'm a Christian transgendered lesbian"

There was an adjective change operation since she last updated her profile.


No, when I made the profile I was under the impression transgender was a noun and transgendered the adjective version.  I just forgot to update it when I learned otherwise.

/Sometimes this shiat's confusing to those of us involved in it as well.
//What do I identify as now?  MAAB (Male assigned at birth)?  AMAB (Assigned male at birth)?  MtF?  Transwoman?  Transgender woman?  Transsexual woman?
///Trick question, those are all terms that while not synonymous can be treated as such.
 
2014-01-23 11:22:48 AM

sno man: R.A.Danny: sno man: R.A.Danny: Outing a transsexual is not only a violation of privacy but also dangerous.

Not if you put yourself in the public eye. Dr. V apparently made false claims about the credentials she held, and when the reported did his due diligence, other facts came to light. I really do not care that other transgendered people in the reporting business disagree, it is part of the story.

Except she didn't especially put herself in the public eye.  The story was the putter.  For Grantland.  A sportcentric site.  Caleb Hannan way overstepped what was going to be a relatively pedestrian article about a unique putter and was given way too long a leash by his editor.  He had all the credential fudging in a draft that was still meh, and then outed her to the investor (which was none of his business to do) to shake out some more story.
He's a relatively young writer and ambitious, which is fine in and of it's self, but an editor should have stepped in and stopped him when the sports story was no longer a sports story.  The apology from the editor that admitted he had no clue about the potential ramifications, was basically 'opps my bad, were cool now right?'
Dr. V's sexuality was hers to share or not, just like yours or mine of our own.  Hannan had no business to out her to anyone.  And for what, a(n off topic) story for a website.

I cannot fathom how anyone can think there should be a leash on the press. You cannot tell me that a sports writer must stick to fluff, and that details that the public will find to be interesting must be held back.

Outing her was over the line, especially to hope to stir up more shiat, because there simply wasn't enough to make the story interesting up to that point.  And that the story still didn't have enough to get published (after 7 months) until she finally committed suicide suggests that maybe it wasn't much of a story in the first place and should have been killed maybe two months in when someone else might have figured t ...


Finding out that this was the design work of a charlaton rather than a physicist Doctor was a bit like shooting fish in a barrel I guess. But somebody had to tell the golfers it was bullsheet and sugar pills that they were buying.

0.static.wix.com

Its like somebody needs to tell consumers that payday loans and check cashing services are a bad idea.
 
2014-01-23 11:23:09 AM

Lost Thought 00: It's just as likely she killed herself to avoid going to jail for 20 years for mail male fraud


Sorry. I couldn't resist.

/first class ticket, please.
 
2014-01-23 11:24:10 AM

Exception Collection: /Sometimes this shiat's confusing to those of us involved in it as well.


Good to know. Please have patience with those of us that are still trying to wrap our heads around it.
 
2014-01-23 11:24:13 AM

elguerodiablo: I didn't really know that it was such a big deal.  If I found out somebody had their gender switched I would naturally ask other people that knew them what they thought about it.  It's terrible we treat our fellow humans so poorly sometimes that some feel the need to hide who they are.  That's what we need to fix.


Yes that was my take reading all three stories about it.  I would have done exactly what the original author did, not for malice, but because I didn't know it was such a big deal.  Dr. V. was in the public eye by trying to sell a product with her name on it.  You can't decide when you are or aren't in the public eye once you go public.
 
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