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(NPR)   Why is this question even being asked? Of course farmers should willingly give their information and data to John Deere and Monsanto; how else will farming be perfected?   (npr.org) divider line 7
    More: Obvious, John Deere, Monsanto, weather predictions, commodity markets, farming, farmers, American Farm Bureau Federation  
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4326 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Jan 2014 at 1:35 AM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
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2014-01-23 12:20:56 AM
2 votes:
My insurance company mounted a webcam in my car. I get a lot of email from Kleenex and Auto-Tune.
2014-01-23 06:06:10 AM
1 votes:

OscarTamerz: The variation of yield in a single field is fascinating. The next step would be to do soil sampling and see what was causing the variation. If John Deere had an automatic soil sampler to attach to the combine as it harvested and it said the difference correlated with fertilizer levels and/or herbicide levels and they used the maps to increase fertilization or herbicide in the areas that needed it automatically the following spring then that would be a good thing. There's no point in collecting the data and crunching the numbers if you can't do something helpful with the results.
  What well maintained Deere equipment looks like.
[allthemanswers.com image 444x613]


Real time yield monitoring and subsequent fertilizer and seed application already exists.  Tractors with planters can be GPS controlled so that the operator doesn't even have to drive.  Seeding rate, based on soil type, and historical yield information, is varied as the planter drives across the field.  Sprayers change the rate of application for various chemicals based on pest or weed populations.

All of this gives the farmer plenty of time to look at pictures of well maintained Deere equipment on his laptop without ending up with crooked rows.
2014-01-23 02:48:02 AM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: Because corporations having all your data is okay; but the government having all your data is bad somehow.

I don't want ANYBODY having all my data, thanks.


The difference being corporations don't have subpoena powers. They can't arrest you and throw you in jail.

Yet.
2014-01-23 01:59:21 AM
1 votes:

Gyrfalcon: Because corporations having all your data is okay; but the government having all your data is bad somehow.

I don't want ANYBODY having all my data, thanks.



"If we ever owned the data we own it still, for we never sold it. In the treaty councils the commissioners have claimed that our data had been sold to the government. Suppose a white man should come to me and say, Joseph, I like your data, and I want to buy it. Then he goes to my neighbor and says to him; Joseph's data. I want to buy it, but he refuses to sell. My neighbor answers, Pay me the money and I will sell you Joseph's data. The white man returns to me, and says, Joseph, I have bought your data and you must let me have it. If we sold our data to the government, this is the way it was bought." --Chief Joseph-Nez Perce
2014-01-23 01:53:35 AM
1 votes:
Monsanto is welcome to monitor my toilet.
2014-01-23 01:50:01 AM
1 votes:
Monsanto thinks it can help farmers come up with the perfect prescription of seeds for their soil and weather because the company will have more data than any one farmer can collect or analyze.

I bet it'll be Monsanto GMO seeds, what do you guys think?
2014-01-23 01:37:00 AM
1 votes:
Because corporations having all your data is okay; but the government having all your data is bad somehow.

I don't want ANYBODY having all my data, thanks.
 
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