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(Daily Mail)   Cancer has stage-4 Bernie Madoff   (dailymail.co.uk ) divider line 153
    More: Sick, Bernie Madoff, Virginia GOP, heart attacks, European Economic Area  
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13828 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Jan 2014 at 9:50 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-23 12:04:37 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: You buy my video. 100% guarantee if you not happy and rich after 30 days. You see how you can become happy and rich like me. Then you understand this not a scam.


Ahh Tom Vu I miss his infomercials. Funny enough he plays poker these days.
 
2014-01-23 12:12:04 AM  

linda7900: They felt lucky to be able to invest with Madoff, as it was so hard to buy in, but it was delivering good, consistent returns. They were sold an incredible line of BS from a master, and the exclusivity and perceived pedigree and safety of the investment is what kept the facade going. I'm sorry I can't get you more details, it's been a few years.


I wish you could find it too, because I have a difficult time believing that these investors could think that such "good consistent returns" would have been possible over such a long time with the volatility that's been happening in the markets and the economy over the past 20+ years. It's like having a glass of wine filled to the rim on a table on a rolling ship in a hurricane that never spills a single drop. The physics don't add up.

/maybe it's because I naturally trust no one
//especially with my money
///NO ONE
 
2014-01-23 12:19:41 AM  

rewind2846: linda7900: They felt lucky to be able to invest with Madoff, as it was so hard to buy in, but it was delivering good, consistent returns. They were sold an incredible line of BS from a master, and the exclusivity and perceived pedigree and safety of the investment is what kept the facade going. I'm sorry I can't get you more details, it's been a few years.

I wish you could find it too, because I have a difficult time believing that these investors could think that such "good consistent returns" would have been possible over such a long time with the volatility that's been happening in the markets and the economy over the past 20+ years. It's like having a glass of wine filled to the rim on a table on a rolling ship in a hurricane that never spills a single drop. The physics don't add up.

/maybe it's because I naturally trust no one
//especially with my money
///NO ONE


Keep in mind- he had been doing this for *40 years*, and had been well-vetted. In the crowd he was in, he had like Warren Buffet Credibility... if you got offered a chance to invest with Buffet tomorrow, how much more vetting would you need to do? He came with a pedigree and a LONG successful history. I'm just making the point that he was so good at his lie that you could not find a weakness until it all came down, he had such incredible books, statements, records, and infallibility supporting him. Granted, some people did not do their homework and were lemmings as some have said. However others did their homework and were given incredibly convincing falsified documents.

I'm remembering stuff from a few years ago, so I'm sorry I don't have better details. However, I do remember Matt saying that the statements they got were very detailed each quarter, and that the net average return was something like 9% over time, with ups and downs, and that nothing seemed out of the ordinary or questionable at all.
 
2014-01-23 12:23:10 AM  

linda7900: Keep in mind- he had been doing this for *40 years*, and had been well-vetted. In the crowd he was in, he had like Warren Buffet Credibility... if you got offered a chance to invest with Buffet tomorrow, how much more vetting would you need to do? He came with a pedigree and a LONG successful history. I'm just making the point that he was so good at his lie that you could not find a weakness until it all came down, he had such incredible books, statements, records, and infallibility supporting him. Granted, some people did not do their homework and were lemmings as some have said. However others did their homework and were given incredibly convincing falsified documents.



Yeah this was the financial sector equivalent of finding out your favorite Presidential candidate is a kiddy diddler. It was almost inconceivable to those in the business.
 
2014-01-23 12:42:19 AM  

Boojum2k: linda7900: Keep in mind- he had been doing this for *40 years*, and had been well-vetted. In the crowd he was in, he had like Warren Buffet Credibility... if you got offered a chance to invest with Buffet tomorrow, how much more vetting would you need to do? He came with a pedigree and a LONG successful history. I'm just making the point that he was so good at his lie that you could not find a weakness until it all came down, he had such incredible books, statements, records, and infallibility supporting him. Granted, some people did not do their homework and were lemmings as some have said. However others did their homework and were given incredibly convincing falsified documents.


Yeah this was the financial sector equivalent of finding out your favorite Presidential candidate is a kiddy diddler. It was almost inconceivable to those in the business.


so back to clinton?
 
2014-01-23 12:46:34 AM  

Popular Opinion: so back to clinton?



Pretty sure he only diddled legal-age women.
 
2014-01-23 12:50:02 AM  

That Guy Jeff: all he took was possessions


"Do you understand what I'm saying?"shouted Moist. "You can't just go around killing people!"

"Why Not? You Do." The golem lowered his arm.

"What?" snapped Moist. "I do not! Who told you that?"

"I Worked It Out. You Have Killed Two Point Three Three Eight People," said the golem calmly.

"I have never laid a finger on anyone in my life, Mr Pump. I may be--all the things you know I am, but I am not a killer! I have never so much as drawn a sword!"

"No, You Have Not. But You Have Stolen, Embezzled, Defrauded And Swindled Without Discrimination, Mr Lipvig. You Have Ruined Businesses And Destroyed Jobs. When Banks Fail, It Is Seldom Bankers Who Starve. Your Actions Have Taken Money From Those Who Had Little Enough To Begin With. In A Myriad Small Ways You Have Hastened The Deaths Of Many. You Do Not Know Them. You Did Not See Them Bleed. But You Snatched Bread From Their Mouths And Tore Clothes From Their Backs. For Sport, Mr Lipvig. For Sport. For The Joy Of The Game."
 
2014-01-23 12:51:35 AM  

Boojum2k: Popular Opinion: so back to clinton?


Pretty sure he only diddled legal-age women.


immoral is immoral, but that is just my opinion.

/perhaps not the popular opinion.
 
2014-01-23 12:52:03 AM  

That Guy Jeff: What's that thing people say whenever someone gets shot while stealing... oh yes, "possessions aren't worth a human life". So we should all feel bad cause all he took was possessions, and this is a human life we are talking about, right?


Hey, he got cancer. We didn't give it to him.

rewind2846: Didn't anyone ever ask why that was, or were their eyes clouded with so much greed that they simply couldn't see that he was screwing them royally? And did that greed make them at least partially culpable in this whole mess?
The axiom "If something looks too good to be true, it probably is" comes foremost to my mind. Didn't it pop up in anyone else's?


I heard a story on This American Life about two investors. One was getting crazy returns on his investments and told his friend to get in on it--I think it was his father. His father didn't trust the numbers, even though he knew several people who were invested with Madoff and they all loved the guy. He passed, and he also told his son to pull his money out, it was just too good to be true. The son really didn't want to do it, because he was making so much money, but he did eventually. So they were both safe before the whole thing fell apart. The son had made a ton of money, and It was kind of stolen money, but he didn't care. The father who had not invested was just glad that he hadn't been taken in--but other friends of his had lost everything. The father was incredulous that so many people had been taken in by Madoff, very smart people who should know better. But they were just blinded by greed and....peer pressure? Something like that. They all wanted to get on the Madoff bandwagon.
 
2014-01-23 12:58:39 AM  
Dude deserves stage 5 cancer
 
2014-01-23 01:01:34 AM  

ThatDarkFellow: Dude deserves stage 5 cancer



No one deserves cancer. But Madoff might deserve Ebola.
 
2014-01-23 01:07:52 AM  
Nope. Not seeing a problem here. Deprive him of morphine and tape his screams. I'd pay $7.99 (plus shipping and handling) for that album.
 
2014-01-23 01:09:46 AM  

Boojum2k: ThatDarkFellow: Dude deserves stage 5 cancer


No one deserves cancer. But Madoff might deserve Ebola.


Ew, Madoff soup in a bag.
 
2014-01-23 01:25:52 AM  

MattyFridays: Richard C Stanford: Just stick him in general pop. Rapey rapey time for Bernie...
/See, this is why I believe in Hell. So I know that Bernie's gonna have his genitals seared in molten gold forever and ever and ever.
Good riddance.

You are a moron.  Wanna know why?  Never mind the fact you're advocating sexual assault (which really pisses me off about people like you) but a lot of the other prisoners LOOK UP TO HIM LIKE A FARKING ROCK STAR.


*favorited!.*

Buh-bye, guy.
 
2014-01-23 01:27:44 AM  

Boojum2k: ThatDarkFellow: Dude deserves stage 5 cancer


No one deserves cancer. But Madoff might deserve Ebola.


Whoah whoah whoah, what's Ebola ever done to YOU?
 
2014-01-23 01:29:27 AM  

Smirky the Wonder Chimp: Whoah whoah whoah, what's Ebola ever done to YOU?



Killed my dog. Long story.
 
2014-01-23 01:38:17 AM  

Another Government Employee: For the audacity and nerve Madoff has, there is still one thing that bugs me.  The only reason he does hard time is he scammed the 1%.  All those other bozos who scam us laugh from their yachts.


He didn't just scam the 1%.  He scammed the 10%.  Also, protest WallStreet should have been more about protesting the .01% or so.

MattyFridays: 65 billion dollar fraud, 4,800 investors, and half of them didn't lose money, disregarding the fictitious profits.

You are confusing Madoff with things like Enron, where that actually was middle class victims. You don't get to invest with someone like Madoff unless you have a shiat ton of money to begin with.



$65B only on paper, $18B lost.  He had at least 13.5k accounts, and that number isn't listing 3 firms worth of individual investers.  Many were perhaps 'Well heeled', but there were an awful lot of individuals that put their life savings into his scheme.  Remember that advice today is that for a 'middle class' retirement today you 'need' around a million in the bank(provides roughly $50k/year inflation adjusted) for a comfortable retirement.

If you 'only' have a few hundred thousand, wouldn't you go for a 'safe' investment?  As others noted, Bernie was noted for good consistent returns, not insanely high ones.

Then you get into that some of the accounts were for pension funds, trade union retirement accounts, etc...

rewind2846: Didn't anyone ever ask why that was, or were their eyes clouded with so much greed that they simply couldn't see that he was screwing them royally? And did that greed make them at least partially culpable in this whole mess?

The axiom "If something looks too good to be true, it probably is" comes foremost to my mind. Didn't it pop up in anyone else's?



It did; those people didn't invest in him.  He was subject to some investigations over it long before the mess finally popped.  However, most ponzi frauds of this nature show returns above 20%, his only averaged 10%.  During the worst of the downturn he only presented profits of under 5% - when markets were losing 30%.  You have to remember that even during the worst of the downturn there were still climbing companies, funds, so it was really easy to simply think that Madoff was very, very good at his job(or incredibly lucky).

rewind2846: This is exactly the type of thing I asked about. There were many many other people they could have invested with. Why Madoff? Was it his line of bullsh*t? Was it the returns he was supposedly getting for others? Didn't these people compare his stated returns to other investment people before they decided to give him their money?
No one deserves what happened to them because of Madoff... but I am curious as to how it did happen from the investors perspective. Why did they do it?



Read the wikis.  It's called an 'Affinity scam', he sold a line via a golden tongue 'Hey, I'm Jewish, You're Jewish, we have to stick together, you can trust me'.
 
2014-01-23 01:46:50 AM  

TheGreatGazoo: Well, it isn't ass cancer.

But I'm sure prison cancer treatment isn't fun.


They can pretend it's ass cancer and try to help him by grinding it out with a dirty and rusty 2" drill bit.
 
2014-01-23 01:53:48 AM  

Firethorn: Read the wikis.  It's called an 'Affinity scam', he sold a line via a golden tongue 'Hey, I'm Jewish, You're Jewish, we have to stick together, you can trust me'.


yeah, I don't think it was really mentioned in the This American Life episode, but you could tell--those people were all Jewish.
 
2014-01-23 02:10:24 AM  
I might be called a terrible person for saying this, but I can't think of a more deserving SOB douche nozzle like Bernie Madoff.
 
2014-01-23 03:23:38 AM  
Congratulations! I couldn't of happened to more worthy guy. I hope he has many days to enjoy the constant pain and the knowledge his death is imminent.
 
2014-01-23 03:26:55 AM  
Great!   Now start kicking him in the head and balls, someone get the jock itch ready for his armpits!
 
2014-01-23 03:53:24 AM  

That Guy Jeff: What's that thing people say whenever someone gets shot while stealing... oh yes, "possessions aren't worth a human life". So we should all feel bad cause all he took was possessions, and this is a human life we are talking about, right?


Depends on how much you steal.

My wallet? Meh.
My entire retirement and literally a significant percentage of my life's time?

Now multiply that by thousands. A certain level of stealing approaches a value on par with taking lives, and could even directly translate not into the victims owning less toys or skipping a few dinners out, but failing to afford healthcare.
 
2014-01-23 04:09:40 AM  

Prophet of Loss: Congratulations! I couldn't of

HAVE happened to A more worthy guy. I hope he has many days to enjoy the constant pain and the knowledge his death is imminent.

FTFY

Also, if you want him to have MANY DAYS. How imminent can his death be? You can't have both.
 
2014-01-23 05:26:07 AM  
He actually stole very little of the money. Most of it went to his early investors, who did very well indeed out of the scheme. How many of them have offered to pay back their ill-gotten gains?
 
2014-01-23 05:46:16 AM  
I believe bernie madoff became the fall guy or was pointed to as the mastermind. But I still think he pissed off his cronies and someone fed him to the wolves.


/Conspiracy theorists to the end.
 
2014-01-23 05:51:23 AM  
Tho, sadly, the head of Social Security is still in good health.
 
2014-01-23 06:29:11 AM  
This was his plan, he'd take the fall and die in prison and his family would be left alone.
Check his son's offshore accounts
 
2014-01-23 06:47:09 AM  

rewind2846: As much an asshole as Madoff is (and probably his kids too), I have yet to get the answer to one question: I have watched interviews with some of the people who invested their money with him, and the one thing I did not see was a recognition that the "returns" they were supposedly getting from Madoff were well above the average for investments of that type and at that time. Totally off the charts. Mad stupid money. Big ducats. Crazy dollars.

Didn't anyone ever ask why that was, or were their eyes clouded with so much greed that they simply couldn't see that he was screwing them royally? And did that greed make them at least partially culpable in this whole mess?


Yes. They knew. And they didn't care. They were too greedy, they just looked the other way and thought they could cash out before the other suckers would.

You have to keep in mind that it wasn't just honest people and pensions and investors putting money into his fund. He had organized crime syndicates and Russian blood money and other unsavory capital pouring into it as well. Because the returns were so great and he was evading regulation and oversight so it was a good place to hide/launder money. So he probably couldn't shut it off even if he wanted to. He knew he was in over his head probably a few years into operation, and kept it going out of fear for his own life and safety, as well as his family's.

Remember that it wasn't some big secret. This guy knew about it since its very inception

www.examiner.com

And he warned the SEC about it for EIGHT YEARS. He filed dozens of reports: BIG PONZI SCHEME. VERY BAD. SHUT IT DOWN. And the SEC did nothing. Ignored it because they were Bush croneys and they were paid to look the other way. And some of them probably had money in it as well.

Greed corrupted everything. This is the result.

/that guy above, btw, is Harry Markopolos. He was the Lieutenant Gordon of this shiat, the last honest man in finance. Here's his congressional hearing. Well worth it to watch the full thing.
 
2014-01-23 07:22:35 AM  

TV's Vinnie: A lot of people rage at Bernie Madoff, but let's remember the facts here; he ripped off only rich people who wanted to get even richer and not have to pay any taxes.

IMO, the greedy selfish suckers got what they deserved.


You have no idea what happened.
 
2014-01-23 07:25:14 AM  

viscountalpha: I believe bernie madoff became the fall guy or was pointed to as the mastermind. But I still think he pissed off his cronies and someone fed him to the wolves.


/Conspiracy theorists to the end.


Ponzi schemes always collapse, eventually.  Kind of like the "housing bubble" a few years back.  One of the signatures of a scam and indicators of a Ponzi scheme is the phrase "too big to fail".  2008 was the first time I ever heard that term used by "legitimate" financial people.
 
2014-01-23 07:52:35 AM  

linda7900: once I find a fund that the SEC has said is OK and that is SIPC insured


In what unholy dimension is the SEC or insurance even remotely credible?

linda7900: In the crowd he was in, he had like Warren Buffet Credibility... if you got offered a chance to invest with Buffet tomorrow, how much more vetting would you need to do?


A lot.  Warren Buffet is good at what he does, but what he does is make Warren Buffet rich.  The guy is not out to make other people rich.  The first rule of Wall Street is that no one is your friend.

I guess I get what you're saying, but "nobody could've predicted" is an excuse I hear a lot.  A LOT.  When my mother asked me about investment advice around 2005-06 I did some basic research, saw ridiculously unsustainable numbers and told her to stay the fark out and focus on paying off her debts.  2-3 years later the market crashed.  And guess what everybody said?  "Nobody could've predicted. . ."  I'm not some genius of finance; I honestly didn't know how the market was doing when she first asked so I poked around and it didn't me long to get a very bad vibe.  No one listens (well except maybe my mom, whose life savings were spared), and when I say "I told you so" everyone refuses to believe I said because they'd rather lose everything than learn.  Cassandra's Curse is a biatch.

I guess being a social outcast all my life I'm relatively inoculated from bandwagons but the excuses are getting ridiculous.  I see it as people not wanting to admit they were foolish.  Oh no, it's not like I got sucked onto the bandwagon because my brain was turned off; NOBODY could've predicted. . . !
 
2014-01-23 08:25:15 AM  
Great headline subby.
Yeah, fark Bernie Madoff.
 
2014-01-23 08:28:15 AM  
greed
don't pretend it was anything else.
B-B-but the little guy...
yup, him too

that said, hooray cancer!
(I don't get to say that very often)
 
2014-01-23 08:37:33 AM  

The My Little Pony Killer: That Guy Jeff: What's that thing people say whenever someone gets shot while stealing... oh yes, "possessions aren't worth a human life". So we should all feel bad cause all he took was possessions, and this is a human life we are talking about, right?

Your television =/= some old person's pension.

/had me laughing near the end though, so I'll give you 8/10 for this one



When someone breaks into your home and steals your things it makes it difficult to ever really feel safe in your home again as you know how easily it is then for someone to just come in and take/destroy everything you have.

And plenty of people have had heirlooms stolen because it could be sold to a pawnshop for some drugs.

Which makes the people that do break into homes to steal things seem pretty awful as they are destroying someone's peace of mind and possibly taking from that person plenty of irreplaceable things.

So you could say: Losing ability to feel safe at night != some old person's money

Doesn't mean both aren't pretty awful things to lose due to someone stealing from you.
 
2014-01-23 08:44:23 AM  

rewind2846: linda7900: They felt lucky to be able to invest with Madoff, as it was so hard to buy in, but it was delivering good, consistent returns. They were sold an incredible line of BS from a master, and the exclusivity and perceived pedigree and safety of the investment is what kept the facade going. I'm sorry I can't get you more details, it's been a few years.

I wish you could find it too, because I have a difficult time believing that these investors could think that such "good consistent returns" would have been possible over such a long time with the volatility that's been happening in the markets and the economy over the past 20+ years. It's like having a glass of wine filled to the rim on a table on a rolling ship in a hurricane that never spills a single drop. The physics don't add up.

/maybe it's because I naturally trust no one
//especially with my money
///NO ONE


Madoff made sure all the all the documents for his investors showed low returns. It was kept low enough that people would just think he was just working his magic to be able to keep making such money, and the consistency is what really enticed everyone. Since that was really what seemed so incredible, it wasn't people making some huge fortunes by investing with him, it was that he was making it look like his investors were making "consistent" returns. He also made it fairly difficult to ever invest with him, which helped with the whole facade that he was just so incredible because of his grand financial skills that he didn't really have time to just be taking anyone's money.

He would really just deal with people that were referred to him by a guy that knew a guy so it seemed like this really exclusive thing that people wanted to get in on, similar to how Facebook initially did the nonsense about only letting certain college kids sign up for their site, and then gradually let more and more people on by playing on that initial sense of exclusivity from using their site.
 
2014-01-23 09:21:01 AM  
www.angryflower.com
 
2014-01-23 10:20:08 AM  
Couldn't have happened to a nicer guy
 
2014-01-23 10:28:34 AM  
Not a tear is shed, and nothing of value is lost.
 
2014-01-23 10:33:48 AM  

Ishkur: rewind2846: As much an asshole as Madoff is (and probably his kids too), I have yet to get the answer to one question: I have watched interviews with some of the people who invested their money with him, and the one thing I did not see was a recognition that the "returns" they were supposedly getting from Madoff were well above the average for investments of that type and at that time. Totally off the charts. Mad stupid money. Big ducats. Crazy dollars.

Didn't anyone ever ask why that was, or were their eyes clouded with so much greed that they simply couldn't see that he was screwing them royally? And did that greed make them at least partially culpable in this whole mess?

Yes. They knew. And they didn't care. They were too greedy, they just looked the other way and thought they could cash out before the other suckers would.

You have to keep in mind that it wasn't just honest people and pensions and investors putting money into his fund. He had organized crime syndicates and Russian blood money and other unsavory capital pouring into it as well. Because the returns were so great and he was evading regulation and oversight so it was a good place to hide/launder money. So he probably couldn't shut it off even if he wanted to. He knew he was in over his head probably a few years into operation, and kept it going out of fear for his own life and safety, as well as his family's.

Remember that it wasn't some big secret. This guy knew about it since its very inception

[www.examiner.com image 373x512]

And he warned the SEC about it for EIGHT YEARS. He filed dozens of reports: BIG PONZI SCHEME. VERY BAD. SHUT IT DOWN. And the SEC did nothing. Ignored it because they were Bush croneys and they were paid to look the other way. And some of them probably had money in it as well.

Greed corrupted everything. This is the result.

/that guy above, btw, is Harry Markopolos. He was the Lieutenant Gordon of this shiat, the last honest man in finance. Here's his congressional he ...


To be fair, even in the CNBC documentary, the kids (supposedly) turned on Madoff when they found out, and did end up contributing a ton of evidence to the investigation. IDK whether or not they really turned as soon as they knew, or once they thought the heat was coming, but without evidence they helped gather, the prosecution would have been much more difficult.
 
2014-01-23 11:16:49 AM  

orbister: He actually stole very little of the money. Most of it went to his early investors, who did very well indeed out of the scheme. How many of them have offered to pay back their ill-gotten gains?


Several have *had* to. I refer you to the Mets...
 
2014-01-23 11:23:53 AM  
www.boomantribune.com

I wonder if cancer found this crook yet??
 
2014-01-23 11:47:01 AM  

Four Horsemen of the Domestic Dispute: [www.boomantribune.com image 342x258]

I wonder if cancer found this crook yet??


If there's anyone who I want to see DIAF more than Lloyd Blankfein, it's this jowly sack of sh*t.
 
2014-01-23 01:03:25 PM  
To paraphrase a classic quote:  "I've never wished a man dead, but I will read his obituary with great pleasure."

/fark him
 
2014-01-23 01:17:29 PM  
Don't care who he is or what he did.  It wasn't bad enough to deserve cancer.  Money can be re-earned end things can be replaced.  A human life cannot.
 
2014-01-23 01:19:02 PM  

Jurodan: I worry that this is building towards a review for compassionate release. I hope not. I hope he dies in prison, alone and unloved. He deserves no less for the lives he ruined with his thievery.

/He deserves quite a bit more actually


Came to say this.  Sorry you have cancer, but you lived the good part of your life on the backs of the people you farked. Lights out in 10.
 
2014-01-23 01:47:21 PM  

chrisco123: Money can be re-earned end things can be replaced.



It's a good thing people have infinite lifespans to do so, and don't get old or sick or anything.
 
2014-01-23 02:02:03 PM  

chrisco123: Don't care who he is or what he did.  It wasn't bad enough to deserve cancer.  Money can be re-earned end things can be replaced.  A human life cannot.


Right, tell that to the people whose money went up in smoke thanks to this guy.  Word of warning:  don't expect sympathy from them over his plight.
 
2014-01-23 03:23:45 PM  
t4.imagechef.com
 
2014-01-23 03:34:35 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1a3LahlPzs

For those who dont remember what he did.
 
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