If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Huffington Post)   President of Yale University: "The challenge is that college education costs a lot" and sometimes you're stuck with a worthless Harvard degree at the end of it all   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 91
    More: Obvious, Salovey, Harvard, higher educations, HuffPost Live at Davos, World Economic Forum, Duke University School of Medicine, multivitamins, David Agus  
•       •       •

3176 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Jan 2014 at 10:03 AM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



91 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-01-22 11:06:36 AM  

lennavan: HaywoodJablonski: lennavan: HaywoodJablonski: In my opinion, there has to be a reckoning at some point. Eventually enough people will realize a 4-year bachelors at Ivy U isn't worth $400k(is this the max?) of debt

The reckoning is currently happening in the Ivy leagues and began many years ago.  Harvard decided tuition dollars were a negligible source of income for them, so they have spectacular financial aid.

If your parents make $65,000 a year or less, you attend completely free.
If your parents are making $150,000 a year, you qualify for a $40,000 a year scholarship.
If your parents are making $250,000 a year, you still qualify for a small scholarship.

Harvard considers $250,000 a year or less financial hardship.  Harvard went first years ago, now the other Ivy league schools are following suit so they can still try to compete.

That's great that Harvard does that. But many other schools need to do the same for there to be a noticeable push down on actual costs/loans for the students.

Your post was about Ivy League schools.  I told you what the Ivy League schools are doing.  See for instance Harvard, or this article about Yale University or the president of Yale arguing the exact same thing you are.  I think you have a great point but Ivy league schools are about the only example where you're wrong, so I have no idea why you'd shiat all over them.  I was guessing it was just because you didn't know.  Now you know.  I don't know what more you want the Ivy leagues schools to do.


Fair point. I mixed my messages.
 
2014-01-22 11:06:42 AM  

MindStalker: fireclown: Fano: And is there any reason the cost keeps skyrocketing? at UVa I could say that the pharoahs of old had nothing on college presidents, always building something new whether it was needed or not.

The reason is that when they raise prices, various governments respond with more subsidies, loans, grants, and whatnots.  There isn't much in the way of downward pressure on prices.

I'm calling BS, most states have seriously curtailed college funding since the crash of 2008.


No BS.  GI bill and a job with decent educational benefits.  I gots zero educational debt.
 
2014-01-22 11:08:22 AM  
Oh, wait. You can play a children's game rather well? Why didn't you say so? Welcome, your money's no good here, feel free to use any of the coeds at your leisure, and let us know when you want a new ride.
 
2014-01-22 11:14:50 AM  

HaywoodJablonski: CujoQuarrel: Curious

Has anyone else here had 'vet' recent college grad resumes for job openings? I did it a few times (we used a sorting system where you went through the pile and gave them a numerical rating is categories. Top scorers were asked in for interviews)

If I looked at your courses and you had lots of the 'studies' courses or even worse a major in something like that then you're off to the bottom of the pile -- no interview for you.

// And yes we would collect the doozies and pass them around to people for laughs

I do a lot of recruiting/hiring for my job and do pretty much the same thing.

I take it a step further and promote those who worked 10-20 hours a week while taking classes and also those whose resume's are very well put together. If you have any typos or misspelled words, that's a big red flag.

Finally, even though I'm an Ivy grad, I prefer to hire strong candidates from state schools since their work ethic and lack of sense of entitlement usually translate into better employees and (yes) future leaders


Pretty much did the same. Ivy league grads seemed to have a sense of entitlement once they were hired. I'd much rather have a candidate from a good state school (who like you said, worked their way through)

"But of course I'm worth the money, I went to [insert big name school here]"
"Yeah. But your GPA was barely above that of someone who didn't attend classes at all"
 
2014-01-22 11:15:42 AM  
Consider that the average adjunct professor pay is below $3k per 3 unit course and most adjunct professors can't get more than 2 courses per term (for those who can't do math, that's about $2,000 per month or $24,000 per year), and considering that the average cost of administration is increasing with the average college president making over $400,000 per year.

Most colleges cost too much because we spend too much on administration.

Why can't we just require that all the higher level administration positions also have teaching requirements? We already do that with researchers; nearly every research position at a tier one university has teaching requirements. Typically two classes a year.  Just make the heads of every department, as well as a couple positions below that all have teaching requirements.

Maybe then - just maybe - we'll get some administration who actually cares about teaching and paying the teachers well.

/My alma mater's newest president gave herself a $250,000 dollar raise the same year she cut educational funding due to the recession and a lack of funds.
 
2014-01-22 11:22:15 AM  

yakmans_dad: Rapmaster2000: Sir, you have the boorish manners of a Yalie.

Harvardling and Yalie in the men's room. The Yalie just walks out after taking a leak. The Harvardling calls to him to stop. "At Harvard," he says unctuously, "we are taught to wash our hands after a bathroom break."

Yalie turns to leave but pauses to reply, "At Yale, we're taught not to pee on our hands."

[Old jokes are the best. You've heard that one 10 times? 20? More than 50?]



How many Yalies does it take to change a light bulb?


None. New Haven looks better in the dark.
 
2014-01-22 11:33:48 AM  
Be a Politician. The real money is in politics. Get into office then rape the Nation. It's legal and lucrative.
 
2014-01-22 11:44:02 AM  

Acravius: @mike_d85

Actually only 10% of colleges benefit from high powered football programs.
45% break even
and 45% are actually costing the college money.

http://www.ohio.com/editorial/richard-vedder-price-of-a-touchdown-a- co st-benefit-analysis-1.456658
http://www.bizjournals.com/birmingham/blog/2012/08/which-college-foo tb all-teams-get-the.html


Huh, that's newer that what I'd seen (back 10 years when I went to a school with no football team).  What I saw then was that football teams functioned as a fundraising center for alumni groups.  Basically, it was a great excuse to get alums in the door to donate.

Hmm... neither of those links seem to account for alumni donations facilitated through football programs.  That's odd.
 
2014-01-22 12:04:37 PM  

Fano: And is there any reason the cost keeps skyrocketing? at UVa I could say that the pharoahs of old had nothing on college presidents, always building something new whether it was needed or not.


Ahh, but see, if they didn't constantly erect buildings and buy land, then they'd have nothing to spend all that revenue on. They either risk their "non-profit" status (guffaw!) or have to lower tuition costs, and neither one of those has a snowball's chance.
 
2014-01-22 12:05:21 PM  

Space Station Wagon: What is 200k to the 1%?
They spend that on automobiles.

They just price smart poor kids out of making ivy league contacts.


NO.

MIT, Harvard, and (I believe) the rest of the Ivies are very committed to needs-based financial aid and needs-blind admission.  For at least the first two, smart poor kids will get enough aid to get through.  This isn't empty talk -- they genuinely are serious about this (and Harvard and MIT compete very very seriously between themselves for the smart kids).  At least for a while before the big crash, MIT guaranteed that a family income less than some decent threshold (I think it was $75,000) would mean no tuition costs to the student.

Bad business models for American University education might price smart kids out of a lot of networking at a lot of places, but the Ivies (and MIT) really are different, and price alone should NEVER scare any family away from them.

The other side of the coin, of course, is that those who can afford it get stuck, and stuck hard.  Strike a blow for the proletariat!  The more poor kids go to MIT or Harvard, the more the 1% suffer!  Who can't get behind that for a manifesto?
 
2014-01-22 12:09:03 PM  

mike_d85: hasty ambush: [25.media.tumblr.com image 620x1060]

I can't stop thinking about doing dirty things to that dirty hippie.  I don't know why an ill-fitting bra would turn me on.


"A Lap Dance Is So Much Better When The Stripper Is Crying "
 
2014-01-22 12:23:24 PM  

mike_d85: Actually, football programs RAISE money for colleges overall.  As in: the actual learning institution is making money.


Almost never, actually.  Each year there are a handful (~20-25) schools whose athletic programs turn a 'profit'.   There are about 340 schools total in NCAA Div I.  Other than those few, the athletic department doesn't cover its own cost, and takes money from the school at large.  There are about 380 more schools in the lower divisions of the NCAA who don't have a prayer of even noticeable revenue, let alone profit, from sports.
 
2014-01-22 12:24:55 PM  

yakmans_dad: Why are we having difficulty? Because we don't view an educated public as a common good.


This is 'merica. It's dog-eat-dog.
 
2014-01-22 12:26:46 PM  
 
2014-01-22 12:26:50 PM  

proteus_b: Actually he said something far less sensible. He said that he's troubled that the average student paying in-state tuition at a state university pays more than does a student attending Yale.

Tuition, room, board and expenses at Yale:
$58,600

57% of students receive financial aid, with an average value of $35,500.
(0.43*58,600)+(0.57*23,100)=38,400

so the average Yalie pays $38,400 to go to Yale, after financial aid is reflected.
http://admissions.yale.edu/faq/what-current-tuition-yale

Tuition, room, board and expenses at University of Missouri:
$22,800
http://admissions.missouri.edu/costs-and-aid/costs/index.php
and that's before taking financial aid into account.

I don't think he needs to trouble himself...


The difference with Yale is that EVERYONE gets financial aid on a sliding scale basis, based on family income, but it's not loan based.  Other universities will give you aid, but a lot of it you have to pay back.  Makes a Yale degree a lot more attractive from a parent's perspective (as in, my wallet).
 
2014-01-22 12:28:12 PM  

Space Station Wagon: I would guess that having a bowl winning team helps to increase popularity amoung non athletic students.


I'd be surprised if ticket revenues from NCAA game days even came close to covering the programs' operating expenses.

The real financial value in having a dominate sportsball program is the effect on alumni giving.  For some reason a lot of people feel a sense of personal pride when their alma mater enrolls kids who are good at sportsing, and open up their wallets to keep that feeling coming.
 
2014-01-22 12:34:42 PM  

hasty ambush: As UC president, Napolitano will receive a base salary of $570,000 and an auto allowance of $8,916. As a condition of her employment and for the convenience of the university, Napolitano will be required to live in housing leased by UC or later, if one becomes available, a university-owned home. She also will receive a one-time relocation fee of $142,50. Her salary is below the 25th percentile of cash compensation for comparable systemwide university presidents, which stands at $617,000


There are 236,000 students in the UC system.  That's what, like $3.00 per student to pay her salary and benefits?
 
2014-01-22 12:43:03 PM  
www4.images.coolspotters.com

What about the buffoon lessons? The four years at clown college?
 I'll thank you not to refer to Princeton that way.
 
2014-01-22 12:55:15 PM  

Sliding Carp: mike_d85: hasty ambush: [25.media.tumblr.com image 620x1060]

I can't stop thinking about doing dirty things to that dirty hippie.  I don't know why an ill-fitting bra would turn me on.

"A Lap Dance Is So Much Better When The Stripper Is Crying "


Actually the lap dance is so much better when the stripper is really in to it and is giving it to you for free.

I miss that girl
 
2014-01-22 01:00:15 PM  
So says the guy who's school has a $20 billion dollar endowment.
 
2014-01-22 01:04:08 PM  

Sliding Carp: Space Station Wagon: What is 200k to the 1%?
They spend that on automobiles.

They just price smart poor kids out of making ivy league contacts.

NO.

MIT, Harvard, and (I believe) the rest of the Ivies are very committed to needs-based financial aid and needs-blind admission.  For at least the first two, smart poor kids will get enough aid to get through.  This isn't empty talk -- they genuinely are serious about this (and Harvard and MIT compete very very seriously between themselves for the smart kids).  At least for a while before the big crash, MIT guaranteed that a family income less than some decent threshold (I think it was $75,000) would mean no tuition costs to the student.

Bad business models for American University education might price smart kids out of a lot of networking at a lot of places, but the Ivies (and MIT) really are different, and price alone should NEVER scare any family away from them.

The other side of the coin, of course, is that those who can afford it get stuck, and stuck hard.  Strike a blow for the proletariat!  The more poor kids go to MIT or Harvard, the more the 1% suffer!  Who can't get behind that for a manifesto?


Good to know :)
 
2014-01-22 01:09:59 PM  
To reiterate what has been posted.

Brown graduate here.  Met my wife at Brown.
My tuition was a full ~185k.
Wife's tuition was $0 (not even loans, just straight up $0)
Only stipulation was that she had to do some sort of work-study (I ended up doing some as well for some spending cash).

Basically if you're poor and want to get the best education and not pay a dime, do well in school and go to an Ivy.  If you can't do well in school, don't bother with a middle of the road private institution.
 
2014-01-22 01:22:16 PM  

lennavan: hasty ambush: As UC president, Napolitano will receive a base salary of $570,000 and an auto allowance of $8,916. As a condition of her employment and for the convenience of the university, Napolitano will be required to live in housing leased by UC or later, if one becomes available, a university-owned home. She also will receive a one-time relocation fee of $142,50. Her salary is below the 25th percentile of cash compensation for comparable systemwide university presidents, which stands at $617,000

There are 236,000 students in the UC system.  That's what, like $3.00 per student to pay her salary and benefits?


So  you are arguing that based on cost per customer teh CEO's pay at xyz corp may not be excessive?


Forget about fi a public employee should be pais that much (She did nto even make that much as a cabinet secretary, not including graft and bribes).  A system that can pay that much certainly cannot claimt be impoverished. There is also the cost of all the underlings  Department heads, assistants etc and down stream costs  like pensions:



UC president to act on executive pension demand

Edley, who earned $350,000 last year, has defended the demand for higher pensions, saying it is both financially important to his family, and a promise made by the regents in 1999 that UC is obligated to carry out.

The standoff among Yudof, the regents and the senior employees began in December 2010, when the 36 executives wrote the regents that UC had a "legal, moral and ethical obligation" to spend tens of millions of dollars so that employees earning more than $245,000 could receive higher pensions.

Calling the issue urgent, the executives said UC should calculate their pensions as a percentage of their entire salary instead of the federal limit of $245,000. They said UC hasn't been subject to the federal limit since 2007, so failure to grant the higher pensions would trigger a lawsuit on behalf of about 200 senior employees earning more than the limit.


Soaring UC pension costs raise pressure for more cuts, tuition hikes

The cost of pensions and retiree health benefits is soaring at the University of California, increasing pressure to raise tuition and cut academic programs at one of the nation's leading public college systems.

The UC system faces spiraling pension costs for 56,000 current retirees and an additional 116,000 employees nearing retirement.

As of May, there were 2,129 UC retirees drawing annual pensions of more than $100,000, 57 with pensions exceeding $200,000 and three with pensions greater than $300,000, according to data obtained by The Associated Press through a state Public Records Act request.

The number of UC retirees collecting six-figure pensions has increased by 30 percent over the past two years, according to Californians for Fiscal Responsibility, an advocacy group that has analyzed UC pension data.

Topping the list is Marcus Marvin, a retired professor of dentistry and public health at UCLA, who receives an annual pension of $337,000.

If UC President Mark Yudof, 67, serves for seven years, he would receive an annual pension of $350,000 - in addition to regular benefits he accrues through the UC Retirement Plan, according to university documents.


The university caps employee pensions at the IRS limit of $250,000, but that ceiling does not apply to the "supplemental retirement benefits" promised to Yudof.

In the coming year, the university is expected to contribute about $240 million to its retirement fund from a roughly $6 billion core operating budget. That amount is expected to more than double to about $500 million annually by 2015-16, according to UC official

The university also faces skyrocketing costs for its retiree health care benefits.

The unfunded liability for its retiree health program was $14.6 billion in July 2011. UC is expected to spend $270 million on retiree health care this year, and that amount is expected to rise significantly over the next several years, according to UC documents
 
2014-01-22 01:32:06 PM  

hasty ambush: So you are arguing that based on cost per customer teh CEO's pay at xyz corp may not be excessive?


Oh my farking god.  I posted:

hasty ambush: lennavan: Fano: And is there any reason the cost keeps skyrocketing?

States fixing their budgets by giving less and less tax dollars to the Universities.


How the fark did we go from tuition is going up because states are giving Universities less tax dollars to "CEO pay is not excessive?"

WOW that's a lot of stupid.  No, no I will not follow you on your stupid derp rant.  Go sit in the corner and feel bad about yourself.
 
2014-01-22 01:42:47 PM  

Space Station Wagon: Sliding Carp: Space Station Wagon: What is 200k to the 1%?
They spend that on automobiles.

They just price smart poor kids out of making ivy league contacts.

NO.

MIT, Harvard, and (I believe) the rest of the Ivies are very committed to needs-based financial aid and needs-blind admission.  For at least the first two, smart poor kids will get enough aid to get through.  This isn't empty talk -- they genuinely are serious about this (and Harvard and MIT compete very very seriously between themselves for the smart kids).  At least for a while before the big crash, MIT guaranteed that a family income less than some decent threshold (I think it was $75,000) would mean no tuition costs to the student.

Bad business models for American University education might price smart kids out of a lot of networking at a lot of places, but the Ivies (and MIT) really are different, and price alone should NEVER scare any family away from them.

The other side of the coin, of course, is that those who can afford it get stuck, and stuck hard.  Strike a blow for the proletariat!  The more poor kids go to MIT or Harvard, the more the 1% suffer!  Who can't get behind that for a manifesto?

Good to know :)


I try to make sure that gets into every thread I see that complains about high cost of good schools.

Hell, even TFA refers to it, where the Yalie says a middle- or working-class kid will pay less at Yale than at a state school.  I think it's really worth emphasizing as strongly as possible that the best schools are serious about education, and affordable education.

In addition, I can't quantify it in any way but my opinion, based on some experience, is that the top schools are a hell of a lot more dedicated to educating undergrads than most or all of the big state schools.

If you're a high-school kid thinking about where to go, or if you have kids, or know someone who has kids - don't aim low because of cost alone.
 
2014-01-22 01:48:03 PM  
I should point out that we're emphasizing $0 tuition for poor kids.  All these top schools have  sliding scales; you don't suddenly pay full freight just because your family earned an extra $100 this year -- the commitment from the school is that if you can get in, they will ensure you can afford it.  And the financial aid isn't based on tuition alone; they know you need to eat and pay rent and live a little, too, and that all gets factored in.
 
2014-01-22 01:54:22 PM  
The real joke is that by the time you're 32-35 or so, nobody cares where you went to college, yet you're still paying it off...
 
2014-01-22 01:55:05 PM  

lennavan: hasty ambush: So you are arguing that based on cost per customer teh CEO's pay at xyz corp may not be excessive?

Oh my farking god.  I posted:

hasty ambush: lennavan: Fano: And is there any reason the cost keeps skyrocketing?

States fixing their budgets by giving less and less tax dollars to the Universities.

How the fark did we go from tuition is going up because states are giving Universities less tax dollars to "CEO pay is not excessive?"

WOW that's a lot of stupid.  No, no I will not follow you on your stupid derp rant.  Go sit in the corner and feel bad about yourself.


The argument was a University systems President pay is not excessive based on cost per student, by that same logic, or lack there o,f and if you are arguing that approx $600K a year is not excessive for an employee of the tax payers a CEOs pay may not  excessive if figured out on the basis of cost per customer or even cots per shareholder.

You would defend $600K for and employee of the tax payers (most of whom earn much less) based on cost per student but  we cannot apply that same standard to a CEO who is earning much more than his employees but probably is not getting tax payer dollars but those of investors and customers.

Fact is, as I just posted those high University system salaries and resulting pensions are part of the reason for high tuition costs.

But the high pay of the CEO of XYZ corp has minimal impact on your tuition costs but you are more upset about that.
 
2014-01-22 01:55:15 PM  

GodComplex: Fano: And is there any reason the cost keeps skyrocketing? at UVa I could say that the pharoahs of old had nothing on college presidents, always building something new whether it was needed or not.

If you can charge whatever you want for something and someone will still buy it, then you're going to charge whatever you can until people stop buying it. They have zero incentive to lower their prices as long as there is a profit. Supply and demand is a biatch.


See also: healthcare.
 
2014-01-22 02:06:52 PM  
dok9874:
The difference with Yale is that EVERYONE gets financial aid on a sliding scale basis, based on family income, but it's not loan based.  Other universities will give you aid, but a lot of it you have to pay back.  Makes a Yale degree a lot more attractive from a parent's perspective (as in, my wallet).

Stanford does something similar.  A coworker asked me to write a letter explaining that his moving expenses were not regular, continuing wages and that his salary was $XXXX and he received a bonus of $XXXXX.

/I do payroll.
 
2014-01-22 02:36:23 PM  

hasty ambush: The argument was a University systems President pay is not excessive based on cost per student


If you want to have that stupid argument with someone, go right ahead.  I was discussing why tuition costs are high.
 
2014-01-22 02:42:53 PM  

/csb


One of my favorite jokes sorta fits here.
A Yale man travels to Egypt to do research at a local library. A cab driver asks him for a hint to pick up more Americans as they tip more. A phase is given. A year later needing to do follow up, the man returns and gets the same driver. The driver tells him "I yell your phrase, some people get rude, others grin and hand me much money. What does "Princeton Sucks!" mean?"
 
2014-01-22 03:01:31 PM  

proteus_b: Actually he said something far less sensible. He said that he's troubled that the average student paying in-state tuition at a state university pays more than does a student attending Yale.

Tuition, room, board and expenses at Yale:
$58,600

57% of students receive financial aid, with an average value of $35,500.
(0.43*58,600)+(0.57*23,100)=38,400

so the average Yalie pays $38,400 to go to Yale, after financial aid is reflected.
http://admissions.yale.edu/faq/what-current-tuition-yale

Tuition, room, board and expenses at University of Missouri:
$22,800
http://admissions.missouri.edu/costs-and-aid/costs/index.php
and that's before taking financial aid into account.

I don't think he needs to trouble himself...


I think you need to learn more statistics.

From your numbers, without knowing any distribution, we can estimate the median Yalie pays about 23,100.  Somewhere in the ballpark of half are likely to pay less, some considerably less.
 
2014-01-22 03:26:10 PM  
One of the main problems is incentives.

What is the incentive for the schools heavy on legacy and exclusivity to admit students who compete with their legacies for admission?

What is the incentive to continue supporting degrees in fields that do not produce skillsets for the 21st century?

Where are our public schools failing to teach kids about critical thinking and basic economics to let them have at least a sliver of insight into the choices to go to said schools?

When would we fix a public school system that might generate overwhelming competition for those who pay for private school in order to advance their children's chances of success?

Why pursue a career outside of college which probably does not (but actually can) pay well, is seriously looked down on, and is often done by "those people"?

How do you recruit people without lucrative retirement/pension packages like we had in the 1980s/1990s when some thought the economy might never slow down again?

Overall the major benefit of the Ivy League and similar schools is the network they provide.  I know of some cases where college students already have a cushy job lined up after undergrad thanks to family or family friends and all they need is a BS in *something* to qualify for it.

Krustofsky: Nice one Yale prez...I went to a small private school a stone's throw from Yale and even had some Yale instructors in some of my courses.  They were some of the worst instructors I ever had.  Married (and divorced) a Yale grad.  My dad was laid off by them.  At least my old landlord tried to redeem Yale by being a pretty good guy, but I fear that is more the exception and not the rule.

So needless to say, Yale doesn't impress me at all.  It's all about $$ and connections.


This.  I have worked with Yale grads and while they turn out some good people I am not impressed by either their grad schools or their undergrad products.


fireclown: No BS.  GI bill and a job with decent educational benefits.  I gots zero educational debt.


Your service and commentary are appreciated.
 
2014-01-22 03:47:20 PM  

lennavan: hasty ambush: The argument was a University systems President pay is not excessive based on cost per student

If you want to have that stupid argument with someone, go right ahead.  I was discussing why tuition costs are high.


Which brings right back to pay- part of the reason is the compensation for the college faculty and staff that you say is not that much wen divide d up per student:



Soaring UC pension costs raise pressure for more cuts, tuition hikes
 
2014-01-22 06:47:34 PM  

lennavan: Fano: And is there any reason the cost keeps skyrocketing?

States fixing their budgets by giving less and less tax dollars to the Universities.


That only explains price hikes at public universities.  What about price hikes at private universities?

Indeed, skyrocketing private tuition is the only reason that it's politically possible for states to cut public tuition subsidies.  State college tuition can double as long as it's still cheap compared to private tuition.

I think a more likely culprit is demand, coupled with the fact that some students are willing to pay pretty much any price tag on credit.
 
2014-01-22 06:58:35 PM  

Fano: at UVa I could say that the pharoahs of old had nothing on college presidents, always building something new whether it was needed or not.


You might be confusing cause and effect.  Tuition isn't rising because of that pointless new construction; rather, the pointless new construction happens because they have all this extra tuition revenue, which they can invest in infrastructure.

Colleges also spend that excess revenue on hiring famous professors or paying more lab startup, giving out more and bigger PhD stipends, granting tuition discounts to poorer students, etc.  But a college can't simply hike prices in order to pay for those things, lest they price themselves out of the market; there are plenty of colleges that can't command a UVa-level tuition rate, and they can't afford to pay TAs.  Those colleges that can command high tuition are simply investing that surplus money in building their reputation.
 
2014-01-22 08:51:46 PM  

hasty ambush: Meet Kelli Space. She went to Northeastern University to get a degree in sociology. And she graduated in $200,000 of student loan debt.

Link

Laquinda Settles, New York Institute of Technology a degree in Communication Arts $80K

Aleesha Nash, New York University, Master's degree in Speech and Interpersonal Communications
$104K




Why are people taking out these exorbitant amounts of money for these degrees with notoriously low employment rates? People, do research!!!!
 
2014-01-22 09:06:03 PM  

Xcott: Fano: at UVa I could say that the pharoahs of old had nothing on college presidents, always building something new whether it was needed or not.

You might be confusing cause and effect.  Tuition isn't rising because of that pointless new construction; rather, the pointless new construction happens because they have all this extra tuition revenue, which they can invest in infrastructure.

Colleges also spend that excess revenue on hiring famous professors or paying more lab startup, giving out more and bigger PhD stipends, granting tuition discounts to poorer students, etc.  But a college can't simply hike prices in order to pay for those things, lest they price themselves out of the market; there are plenty of colleges that can't command a UVa-level tuition rate, and they can't afford to pay TAs.  Those colleges that can command high tuition are simply investing that surplus money in building their reputation.


UVa was actually one of the best bargains in the country (for instaters)
 
2014-01-23 11:51:23 AM  
He doesn't get paid as much as ASU's president and he probably does more.
 
2014-01-23 01:11:49 PM  

inglixthemad: lennavan: Fano: And is there any reason the cost keeps skyrocketing?

States fixing their budgets by giving less and less tax dollars to the Universities.

HR departments requiring 4 year degrees for jobs that you should be able to get after graduating high school.

HR departments: the biggest driver of pointless degree inflation in America.


This and more of THIS. Employers are the drivers behind attendance and the resultant college cost inflation.
Supply and demand... they demand, and you had better supply of you won't get the job.
 
Displayed 41 of 91 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report