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(Guardian)   Almost one in three computer users now using privacy and anonymity tools to prevent hackers and government agencies spying on them   (theguardian.com) divider line 24
    More: Interesting, computer users, private networks, hackers, YouTube videos, photo sharing  
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1459 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Jan 2014 at 10:48 AM (38 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-21 10:50:06 AM  
Why so low?
 
2014-01-21 11:00:39 AM  
What percentage have the tools and skills to actually pull it off?
 
2014-01-21 11:13:07 AM  
NSA response:  LOL, you all are so cute when you do that.
 
2014-01-21 11:13:09 AM  
I used to be this paranoid but gave up about 8 years ago. What the hell. Take my information. Take it all and choke on it you sons of biatches.
 
2014-01-21 11:42:20 AM  
And I'm sure it's all very effective.
 
2014-01-21 11:51:11 AM  
 
2014-01-21 12:10:10 PM  

wxboy: NSA response:  LOL, you all are so cute when you do that.


That.
 
2014-01-21 12:24:25 PM  
That's cute but if the Police tell you to decrypt it for their investigation you'd better do it; it's incarceration if you don't and you'll be there until you change your mind.

Encryption includes password protected zip and MS-Office documents.

If you're doing stuff really naughty it's probably better to 'Spock' your computer as they're breaking down the door.

/That'd only get you destruction of evidence and perverting the course of justice.
 
2014-01-21 12:25:36 PM  

Vaneshi: That's cute but if the Police tell you to decrypt it for their investigation you'd better do it; it's incarceration if you don't and you'll be there until you change your mind.

Encryption includes password protected zip and MS-Office documents.

If you're doing stuff really naughty it's probably better to 'Spock' your computer as they're breaking down the door.

/That'd only get you destruction of evidence and perverting the course of justice.


In before obligatory XKCD $5 wrench comic.
 
2014-01-21 12:34:56 PM  

Vaneshi: That's cute but if the Police tell you to decrypt it for their investigation you'd better do it; it's incarceration if you don't and you'll be there until you change your mind.

Encryption includes password protected zip and MS-Office documents.

If you're doing stuff really naughty it's probably better to 'Spock' your computer as they're breaking down the door.

/That'd only get you destruction of evidence and perverting the course of justice.


You cannot be made to incriminate yourself. They have they bolt cutters to the safe it's their job to open it
 
2014-01-21 12:37:47 PM  

Warlordtrooper: Vaneshi: That's cute but if the Police tell you to decrypt it for their investigation you'd better do it; it's incarceration if you don't and you'll be there until you change your mind.

Encryption includes password protected zip and MS-Office documents.

If you're doing stuff really naughty it's probably better to 'Spock' your computer as they're breaking down the door.

/That'd only get you destruction of evidence and perverting the course of justice.

You cannot be made to incriminate yourself. They have they bolt cutters to the safe it's their job to open it


Not in the UK.
 
2014-01-21 12:50:29 PM  
img.fark.net

/oblig
 
2014-01-21 12:58:10 PM  
1 in 3 looks ridiculously high. Either the numbers are tremendously skewed by Chinese users, or an email password is considered a "privacy and anonymity tool" for this poll.

Maybe 1 in 30 in the US could name an actual privacy or anonymity tool like Tor.
 
2014-01-21 01:13:34 PM  

jaytkay: 1 in 3 looks ridiculously high. Either the numbers are tremendously skewed by Chinese users, or an email password is considered a "privacy and anonymity tool" for this poll.

Maybe 1 in 30 in the US could name an actual privacy or anonymity tool like Tor.


Just about every antimalware package includes some blubbering about privacy protection.  It's probably that.
 
2014-01-21 01:18:51 PM  
First rule, don't bring attention to yourself.

/this includes posting on some comments section.
 
2014-01-21 01:21:31 PM  

wxboy: NSA response:  LOL, you all are so cute when you do that.


Basically. You really think those goofy tools aren't neutered versions of what the NSA uses already?
 
2014-01-21 01:22:40 PM  

Vaneshi: That's cute but if the Police tell you to decrypt it for their investigation you'd better do it; it's incarceration if you don't and you'll be there until you change your mind.

Encryption includes password protected zip and MS-Office documents.

If you're doing stuff really naughty it's probably better to 'Spock' your computer as they're breaking down the door.

/That'd only get you destruction of evidence and perverting the course of justice.


I don't think even the NYPD has anywhere near the resources the NSA does, plus decryption isn't one of the primary things they do.
 
2014-01-21 01:36:17 PM  

Far Cough: jaytkay: 1 in 3 looks ridiculously high. Either the numbers are tremendously skewed by Chinese users, or an email password is considered a "privacy and anonymity tool" for this poll.

Maybe 1 in 30 in the US could name an actual privacy or anonymity tool like Tor.

Just about every antimalware package includes some blubbering about privacy protection.  It's probably that.


lol

"Privacy and anonymity protection? Oh, you mean the Ask Toolbar! Yes, I use that."
 
2014-01-21 02:32:55 PM  
I hear Blackberry is coming out with an encrypted Blackberry which is being sold as "NSA-proof" (see link below). Seeing as it used to be the darling of political wonks and bureaucrats, including Obama, maybe it will be good enough to re-boot Blackberry's fortunes.

Personally I suspect that nothing is NSA-proof unless you are an elite hacker yourself and can use tin-hat Linux among other things of that sort, but you never know. Good enough is good security.

For somebody whose email isn't worth reading, a Blackberry might be just fine. One asset that Blackberry still has is a large network of secure servers which allegedly can not be hacked by the NSA. It was a bit out-of-touch with the trends of the day and a few crashes set it back with consumers, but now it might be the basis for a resurgence.

I've never had a Blackberry myself and would probably lean to the large screen of something like a Galaxy Tablet if I were to buy a smart phone.

FTA:  "We think it's NSA-proof," Misek told CBC's business program Lang & O'Leary Exchange. "That security is so good, it takes four million years on brute compute force to hack it."
Link:   http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/blackberry-s-nsa-proof-encryption-a-v a luable-asset-for-buyers-1.1700752

Things that make you go hmmmm ... will Obama get a cellphone that can't be hacked by the NSA? Has he got one now? Very interesting.
 
2014-01-21 07:54:02 PM  

mrhollywoodgates: [img.fark.net image 455x300]

/oblig


Did you ever wonder how many proxies the NSA could afford to host given their budget?
 
2014-01-21 08:49:18 PM  

Crotchrocket Slim: I don't think even the NYPD has anywhere near the resources the NSA does, plus decryption isn't one of the primary things they do.


NYPD can piss on the 3rd rail for all I care I'm nowhere near their jurisdiction; I'm talking about the Police, Plod, the rozzers, the fuzz, pigs, bacon and GCHQ.

And what I said can, does and has happening in the UK.   So best remember the password to that 12yr old zip file you stashed on a floppy.

/You'll also get slapped with a contempt of court charge for not decrypting.
 
2014-01-21 09:56:45 PM  
1 in 3 users are fooling themselves.
 
2014-01-22 12:58:17 PM  

brantgoose: I hear Blackberry is coming out with an encrypted Blackberry which is being sold as "NSA-proof" (see link below). Seeing as it used to be the darling of political wonks and bureaucrats, including Obama, maybe it will be good enough to re-boot Blackberry's fortunes.

Personally I suspect that nothing is NSA-proof unless you are an elite hacker yourself and can use tin-hat Linux among other things of that sort, but you never know. Good enough is good security.

For somebody whose email isn't worth reading, a Blackberry might be just fine. One asset that Blackberry still has is a large network of secure servers which allegedly can not be hacked by the NSA. It was a bit out-of-touch with the trends of the day and a few crashes set it back with consumers, but now it might be the basis for a resurgence.

I've never had a Blackberry myself and would probably lean to the large screen of something like a Galaxy Tablet if I were to buy a smart phone.

FTA:  "We think it's NSA-proof," Misek told CBC's business program Lang & O'Leary Exchange. "That security is so good, it takes four million years on brute compute force to hack it."
Link:   http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/blackberry-s-nsa-proof-encryption-a-v a luable-asset-for-buyers-1.1700752

Things that make you go hmmmm ... will Obama get a cellphone that can't be hacked by the NSA? Has he got one now? Very interesting.


So not only are they terminally incompetent business people who blew a zillion dollar franchise by refusing to ever significantly update their technology, they also think people are complete idiots.  Gotcha.

"We think it's <redacted>-proof"?  Seriously??  As if they wouldn't be plugged into their crazily centralized service from day 1, as usual.  If he's whipping out the "millions of years to decrypt" line you know he's stupid, desperate, and full of shat.

RIM/Blackberry has ALWAYS been the least secure and most vulnerable service conceivable, because every last bit of communication, even for those with enterprise servers, had to pump through RIM's data center in Canada first.  Insane.  I have no idea how it past muster with federal agencies, let alone the POTUS.

(corrections welcome; spin unwelcome)
 
2014-01-22 12:59:04 PM  
"PASSED muster", dammit.
 
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