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(Mother Nature Network)   "The feeling of anticipation that leads you to keep looking outside to see if anyone is coming," and other untranslatable words from various cultures   (mnn.com) divider line 43
    More: Interesting, cultures  
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3588 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Jan 2014 at 9:50 AM (12 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-21 09:10:16 AM
How about, "the action of completely abandoning a somewhat interesting web page that you were about a third of the way finished reading because a pop-up window asking you to enter your email address popped up in the middle of the screen." We need a word for that.
 
2014-01-21 09:47:47 AM
Backpfeifengesicht
 
2014-01-21 09:54:11 AM

Pocket Ninja: How about, "the action of completely abandoning a somewhat interesting web page that you were about a third of the way finished reading because a pop-up window asking you to enter your email address popped up in the middle of the screen." We need a word for that.


Annoying
 
2014-01-21 09:56:57 AM
I know where they got these.

http://betterthanenglish.com/
 
2014-01-21 09:59:22 AM

Pocket Ninja: How about, "the action of completely abandoning a somewhat interesting web page that you were about a third of the way finished reading because a pop-up window asking you to enter your email address popped up in the middle of the screen." We need a word for that.


Nosriptophobia?

Didn't encounter that.  (Firefox)
 
2014-01-21 09:59:58 AM
Bakkushan, baby.
 
2014-01-21 10:01:41 AM
That was pretty cool. The only one I had actually heard of was depaysement the feeling that comes from not being in one's own home country. I think the Inuit iktsuarpok can best be translated as cocaine paranoia.
 
2014-01-21 10:02:09 AM
Jayus:  All of Fark comments.
 
2014-01-21 10:03:20 AM
How about "interesting data presented in a hard to read typeface"?  Is there a word for that?
 
2014-01-21 10:05:35 AM
Wastingo'time - "the act of following an argument on Fark, between morans, who are actually talking about two different things"
 
2014-01-21 10:08:05 AM
I wonder what the Sanskrit word for "The act of calling something untranslateable and at the same time coming up with cogent, useful translative phrases while combining them with images that belong in a children's picture book to explain each and every example." is?
 
2014-01-21 10:08:47 AM
This belongs in every politics thread ever.

i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-21 10:10:26 AM
When I get the waldeinsamkeits, the komorebi is there to comfort me. Gotta love the Japanese beauty aesthetic.
 
2014-01-21 10:12:23 AM

blatz514: Jayus:  All of Fark comments.


Except the Politics tab. That's Rectocephaly.
 
2014-01-21 10:14:35 AM
Grief Bacon.
 
2014-01-21 10:15:55 AM

dionysusaur: blatz514: Jayus:  All of Fark comments.

Except the Politics tab. That's Rectocephaly.


*Goes to Urban Dictionary*

Ah yes, excellent word.
 
2014-01-21 10:20:35 AM
As interesting as this all is, isn't it just an example of how English uses multiple adjectives in describing something while other languages string them together as one word?
 
2014-01-21 10:20:41 AM
Those fools, this is English!  If your word doesn't translate, we take it.

img.fark.net
 
2014-01-21 10:24:24 AM

berylman: That was pretty cool. The only one I had actually heard of was depaysement the feeling that comes from not being in one's own home country. I think the Inuit iktsuarpok can best be translated as cocaine paranoia.


I think of iktsuarpok as Al Bundy waiting for a pizza.
 
2014-01-21 10:29:36 AM

CheetahOlivetti: berylman: That was pretty cool. The only one I had actually heard of was depaysement the feeling that comes from not being in one's own home country. I think the Inuit iktsuarpok can best be translated as cocaine paranoia.

I think of iktsuarpok as Al Bundy waiting for a pizza.


Or, "When the fark is she going to finally orgasm?"
 
2014-01-21 10:31:51 AM
How about that thing when midgets have dreadlocks, and they lay face down on the floor?
 
2014-01-21 10:33:02 AM
Schadenfreude ?
 
2014-01-21 10:42:07 AM
Better Than English, um sure, more like dumbarses without a thesaurus...

Waldeinsamkeit (German) = Secluded
Cualcino(Italian) = Ring (as in water stain)
Iktsuarpok(inuit) = Antici........Pation
Viraag (Hindi) = Longing
Gesichtsbremse (German) = Scud (see Wayne's World)
Spaegie (Shetland dialect) = Sore
Astre (French) = Star (as used by children)
Promaja (Serbian) = Draft
 
2014-01-21 10:54:00 AM

Laobaojun: Those fools, this is English!  If your word doesn't translate, we take it.

[img.fark.net image 464x464]


English is the result of Norman men-at-arms attempting to get dates with Saxon barmaids.  All the words from Latin, Greek, Hindu, Spanish, etc. that we appropriated later are just gonna have to look out for themselves.
 
2014-01-21 11:01:08 AM

Chabash: As interesting as this all is, isn't it just an example of how English uses multiple adjectives in describing something while other languages string them together as one word?


Not necessarily. German does, but some of them are just one word.

In Spanish, sobremesa means "over table" literally, but there is no word in English to describe the act of continuing to sit at the table to talk despite the meal being over.

Another example is "empalagado". It's when you get a heavy gross feeling in your mouth when you eat something that is overwhelmingly sweet and rich. The only way I can really describe it is to ask people to imagine eating a big slice of southern pecan pie without the benefit of coffee or milk.

This does not exist in English as a word and it comes as no surprise that people are able to tolerate overly sweet foods much more here. Mocha caramel pumpkin raisin sugarcane juice drinks at Starbucks are such an example, or eating a slice of pie with very sweet whipped cream on top and then decorated with super sweet caramel is another example. The pie alone is already sweet enough, but for my wife and I, eating it with caramel and whipped cream leaves us "empalagados". Saccharine comes close to describe a food that causes you to be empalagado, but it does not really convey the heavy almost nauseating mouth feel, nor is there an English term to describe having that feeling.

/always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?
 
Boe
2014-01-21 11:20:25 AM
They forgot Petrichor!
 
2014-01-21 11:35:04 AM
<a rel="nofollow" class="outbound_link" target="_blank" data-cke-saved-href="<a href=" href="<a href=" http:="" www.fark.com="" goto="" 8108529="" www.mnn.com="" lifestyle="" arts-culture="" stories="" say-what-11-untranslatable-words-from-other-cultures-infographic"=""> "The feeling of anticipation that leads you to keep looking outside to see if anyone is coming..."

Here in Canada we call that "paranoia."
 
2014-01-21 11:36:38 AM
Wow, what a mess. It's almost like somebody is trying to screw me around in some way.
 
2014-01-21 11:45:17 AM

rga184: Chabash: As interesting as this all is, isn't it just an example of how English uses multiple adjectives in describing something while other languages string them together as one word?

Not necessarily. German does, but some of them are just one word.

In Spanish, sobremesa means "over table" literally, but there is no word in English to describe the act of continuing to sit at the table to talk despite the meal being over.

Another example is "empalagado". It's when you get a heavy gross feeling in your mouth when you eat something that is overwhelmingly sweet and rich. The only way I can really describe it is to ask people to imagine eating a big slice of southern pecan pie without the benefit of coffee or milk.

This does not exist in English as a word and it comes as no surprise that people are able to tolerate overly sweet foods much more here. Mocha caramel pumpkin raisin sugarcane juice drinks at Starbucks are such an example, or eating a slice of pie with very sweet whipped cream on top and then decorated with super sweet caramel is another example. The pie alone is already sweet enough, but for my wife and I, eating it with caramel and whipped cream leaves us "empalagados". Saccharine comes close to describe a food that causes you to be empalagado, but it does not really convey the heavy almost nauseating mouth feel, nor is there an English term to describe having that feeling.

/always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?


IMO, this has more to do with the corruption of the American palate than with the terms we use to describe it.
 
2014-01-21 12:27:32 PM

Pocket Ninja: How about, "the action of completely abandoning a somewhat interesting web page that you were about a third of the way finished reading because a pop-up window asking you to enter your email address popped up in the middle of the screen." We need a word for that.


Russians would say "Nichevo!", and resume drinking their vodak..
 
2014-01-21 12:33:45 PM

Chabash: As interesting as this all is, isn't it just an example of how English uses multiple adjectives in describing something while other languages string them together as one word?


Agglutinative languages do this, but even then, the meaning of the final word is usually much more subtle and specific than the literal translation of the base words.

rga184: In Spanish, sobremesa means "over table" literally, but there is no word in English to describe the act of continuing to sit at the table to talk despite the meal being over.


In Italian, they have "passagiata"- the short stroll you take after a meal to help your digestion.
 
2014-01-21 12:40:23 PM

rga184: /always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?


I think people make words for things they experience frequently, and not the other way around.  There's a word in one of the FIlipino languages for "when it's raining on one side of the street, but the sun is shining on the other".  This happens all the time there, but not so much here, so they have a word for it and we don't.

Also, "empalagoso" is pretty close to "cloying", no?
 
2014-01-21 12:51:58 PM

Jekylman: rga184: Chabash: As interesting as this all is, isn't it just an example of how English uses multiple adjectives in describing something while other languages string them together as one word?

Not necessarily. German does, but some of them are just one word.

In Spanish, sobremesa means "over table" literally, but there is no word in English to describe the act of continuing to sit at the table to talk despite the meal being over.

Another example is "empalagado". It's when you get a heavy gross feeling in your mouth when you eat something that is overwhelmingly sweet and rich. The only way I can really describe it is to ask people to imagine eating a big slice of southern pecan pie without the benefit of coffee or milk.

This does not exist in English as a word and it comes as no surprise that people are able to tolerate overly sweet foods much more here. Mocha caramel pumpkin raisin sugarcane juice drinks at Starbucks are such an example, or eating a slice of pie with very sweet whipped cream on top and then decorated with super sweet caramel is another example. The pie alone is already sweet enough, but for my wife and I, eating it with caramel and whipped cream leaves us "empalagados". Saccharine comes close to describe a food that causes you to be empalagado, but it does not really convey the heavy almost nauseating mouth feel, nor is there an English term to describe having that feeling.

/always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

IMO, this has more to do with the corruption of the American palate than with the terms we use to describe it.


Sure, but is this corruption towards overly sweet possible because there is no negative identifier for it?
 
2014-01-21 12:57:57 PM

Z-clipped: rga184: /always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

I think people make words for things they experience frequently, and not the other way around.  There's a word in one of the FIlipino languages for "when it's raining on one side of the street, but the sun is shining on the other".  This happens all the time there, but not so much here, so they have a word for it and we don't.

Also, "empalagoso" is pretty close to "cloying", no?


Holy smokes, you got me there. It's so infrequently used that I didn't think of it. Kudos to your English skills.
 
2014-01-21 12:59:27 PM

rga184: Z-clipped: rga184: /always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

I think people make words for things they experience frequently, and not the other way around.  There's a word in one of the FIlipino languages for "when it's raining on one side of the street, but the sun is shining on the other".  This happens all the time there, but not so much here, so they have a word for it and we don't.

Also, "empalagoso" is pretty close to "cloying", no?

Holy smokes, you got me there. It's so infrequently used that I didn't think of it. Kudos to your English skills.


Is there a term for being "cloyed" though? I had thought saccharine also as close a term to empalagoso, but still can't think that there is a word to describe the feeling of being empalagado.
 
2014-01-21 01:28:54 PM

rga184: rga184: Z-clipped: rga184: /always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

I think people make words for things they experience frequently, and not the other way around.  There's a word in one of the FIlipino languages for "when it's raining on one side of the street, but the sun is shining on the other".  This happens all the time there, but not so much here, so they have a word for it and we don't.

Also, "empalagoso" is pretty close to "cloying", no?

Holy smokes, you got me there. It's so infrequently used that I didn't think of it. Kudos to your English skills.

Is there a term for being "cloyed" though? I had thought saccharine also as close a term to empalagoso, but still can't think that there is a word to describe the feeling of being empalagado.


I'm not fluent in Spanish or Portuguese, so I couldn't say, but:

cloy
kloi/
verb
past tense: cloyed; past participle: cloyed
1
.
disgust or sicken (someone) with an excess of sweetness, richness, or sentiment.
 
2014-01-21 01:45:19 PM

Pocket Ninja: How about, "the action of completely abandoning a somewhat interesting web page that you were about a third of the way finished reading because a pop-up window asking you to enter your email address popped up in the middle of the screen." We need a word for that.


How about "learntonoscriptnub"?
 
2014-01-21 02:17:25 PM
They missed uff-da.
 
2014-01-21 02:26:57 PM

rga184: Jekylman: rga184: Chabash: As interesting as this all is, isn't it just an example of how English uses multiple adjectives in describing something while other languages string them together as one word?

Not necessarily. German does, but some of them are just one word.

In Spanish, sobremesa means "over table" literally, but there is no word in English to describe the act of continuing to sit at the table to talk despite the meal being over.

Another example is "empalagado". It's when you get a heavy gross feeling in your mouth when you eat something that is overwhelmingly sweet and rich. The only way I can really describe it is to ask people to imagine eating a big slice of southern pecan pie without the benefit of coffee or milk.

This does not exist in English as a word and it comes as no surprise that people are able to tolerate overly sweet foods much more here. Mocha caramel pumpkin raisin sugarcane juice drinks at Starbucks are such an example, or eating a slice of pie with very sweet whipped cream on top and then decorated with super sweet caramel is another example. The pie alone is already sweet enough, but for my wife and I, eating it with caramel and whipped cream leaves us "empalagados". Saccharine comes close to describe a food that causes you to be empalagado, but it does not really convey the heavy almost nauseating mouth feel, nor is there an English term to describe having that feeling.

/always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

IMO, this has more to do with the corruption of the American palate than with the terms we use to describe it.

Sure, but is this corruption towards overly sweet possible because there is no negative identifier for it?


I seriously doubt it. I would guess that the answer lies more in Anthropology than Linguistics. In the harsh climate of the new world, you could only have fruits year round if you preserved them with sugar, for example. Survival strategies become traditions and then it escalates as children become exposed to more sweetness at an earlier age, affecting their tastes well into adulthood.
 
2014-01-21 03:14:11 PM

Jekylman: rga184: Jekylman: rga184: Chabash: As interesting as this all is, isn't it just an example of how English uses multiple adjectives in describing something while other languages string them together as one word?

Not necessarily. German does, but some of them are just one word.

In Spanish, sobremesa means "over table" literally, but there is no word in English to describe the act of continuing to sit at the table to talk despite the meal being over.

Another example is "empalagado". It's when you get a heavy gross feeling in your mouth when you eat something that is overwhelmingly sweet and rich. The only way I can really describe it is to ask people to imagine eating a big slice of southern pecan pie without the benefit of coffee or milk.

This does not exist in English as a word and it comes as no surprise that people are able to tolerate overly sweet foods much more here. Mocha caramel pumpkin raisin sugarcane juice drinks at Starbucks are such an example, or eating a slice of pie with very sweet whipped cream on top and then decorated with super sweet caramel is another example. The pie alone is already sweet enough, but for my wife and I, eating it with caramel and whipped cream leaves us "empalagados". Saccharine comes close to describe a food that causes you to be empalagado, but it does not really convey the heavy almost nauseating mouth feel, nor is there an English term to describe having that feeling.

/always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

IMO, this has more to do with the corruption of the American palate than with the terms we use to describe it.

Sure, but is this corruption towards overly sweet possible because there is no negative identifier for it?

I seriously doubt it. I would guess that the answer lies more in Anthropology than Linguistics. In the harsh climate of the new world, you could only have fruits year round if ...


Also, Americans are hardly the sweetest-toothed culture.  We love our sugar water drinks, but having lived in the Philippines, I can tell you that there are other cultures out there that eat MUCH more sugar than we do.  In everything, at every meal.

After the first few months, I asked a doctor how Filipinos didn't die of diabetes constantly.  He told me that the issue wasn't that sugar is so bad for you, just that the western European pancreas didn't evolve to handle the load.
 
2014-01-21 06:04:03 PM

rga184: Another example is "empalagado". It's when you get a heavy gross feeling in your mouth when you eat something that is overwhelmingly sweet and rich. The only way I can really describe it is to ask people to imagine eating a big slice of southern pecan pie without the benefit of coffee or milk.


This is awesome, now I don't have to flail around for words to describe that exact feeling. I'd say "cloying" is even closer than saccharine though. Now I just need a similar word for the gross feeling of having overeaten too-rich food; "glutted" is half-way there.

As for the article, someone needs to figure out the difference between "translation" and "pithy transliteration". They obviously did translate them! Untranslatable is a concept so foreign that it can't ever be described or conceived, like color to the colorblind. Hell, most of those can even be accurately restated in 2-3 uncommon English words, instead of a long sentence of common words.
 
2014-01-21 06:51:57 PM

Z-clipped: rga184: /always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

I think people make words for things they experience frequently, and not the other way around.  There's a word in one of the FIlipino languages for "when it's raining on one side of the street, but the sun is shining on the other".  This happens all the time there, but not so much here, so they have a word for it and we don't.

Also, "empalagoso" is pretty close to "cloying", no?


I've witnessed that when I was a kid.
 
2014-01-21 07:54:25 PM

Z-clipped: rga184: rga184: Z-clipped: rga184: /always wonder if language influences culture or culture influences language. Would desserts be as sweet here in the US if there was an equivalent term to empalagado?

I think people make words for things they experience frequently, and not the other way around.  There's a word in one of the FIlipino languages for "when it's raining on one side of the street, but the sun is shining on the other".  This happens all the time there, but not so much here, so they have a word for it and we don't.

Also, "empalagoso" is pretty close to "cloying", no?

Holy smokes, you got me there. It's so infrequently used that I didn't think of it. Kudos to your English skills.

Is there a term for being "cloyed" though? I had thought saccharine also as close a term to empalagoso, but still can't think that there is a word to describe the feeling of being empalagado.

I'm not fluent in Spanish or Portuguese, so I couldn't say, but:

cloy
kloi/
verb
past tense: cloyed; past participle: cloyed
1.
disgust or sicken (someone) with an excess of sweetness, richness, or sentiment.


I've always thought of cloying as describing a scent, not a taste.  A cloying perfume.  Or being metaphorical (the 'sentiment' part)
"Sickly sweet" does a good job of indicating foods that are too sugary.
 
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