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(Pajiba)   25 Easter Eggs and References You Might Have Missed In The Season 3 Premiere Of 'Sherlock'   (pajiba.com) divider line 47
    More: Cool, easter eggs, Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Vinnie Jones, premieres, Dr. Watson, Professor Moriarty, Mark Gatiss  
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5085 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 20 Jan 2014 at 2:37 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-20 12:48:44 PM  
I did catch a few of them, not all of them. It was wonderful.
 
2014-01-20 01:08:30 PM  
I caught a few of those too.  I think my favorites are when they incorporate elements from the original stories, like the old guy with the books.

I also appreciated the nods to the fans and all the crazy fanfics, like the crazy Riechenbach Fall theories featuring different relationships.  I once read a fanfic (a very good one) where Sherlock and Lestrade ride about the city on a motorcycle to solve a crime and take the stairs, sidewalks, etc as shortcuts.  Purely coincidence for the show to have that, I'm sure, but I smiled when I saw it.
 
2014-01-20 02:40:41 PM  
Not looking not looking, is it easy to watch this episode on some service? Is dr who up yet on Netflix? It's been like 3 years
 
2014-01-20 02:48:11 PM  

thecpt: Not looking not looking, is it easy to watch this episode on some service? Is dr who up yet on Netflix? It's been like 3 years


It'll be rerun tonight on my local PBS station at 4am eastern. Check your local listings.
 
2014-01-20 03:05:53 PM  
Mum's a bit of alright.
 
2014-01-20 03:06:31 PM  

sinanju: Mum's a bit of allright.


The missing L was for Lovely.
 
2014-01-20 03:11:06 PM  
couchtuner.eu has seasons 1-3 for your viewing enjoyment
 
2014-01-20 03:40:34 PM  

sinanju: sinanju: Mum's a bit of allright.

The missing L was for Lovely.


What's the missing space for?
 
2014-01-20 03:53:06 PM  
Lovely  couldn't take my eyes off it  full of wee bits of fan service, YET not so frenetically paced that it gave me retrograde epilepsy.

The only conclusion I can draw is that Moffett (and Gatiss for that matter) need and hour and a half to tell their stories and most of my growing beef with them in regards to Doctor Who is that they keep trying to jam 90 minutes of story into 42 minutes.
 
2014-01-20 04:00:50 PM  
I just learned what "penny for the guy" means!
 
2014-01-20 04:35:52 PM  
Moffat is eventually going to make a show that consists entirely of fan service and an audio track of him going "See what I did there?"
 
2014-01-20 04:48:25 PM  

onzmadi: Lovely  couldn't take my eyes off it  full of wee bits of fan service, YET not so frenetically paced that it gave me retrograde epilepsy.

The only conclusion I can draw is that Moffett (and Gatiss for that matter) need and hour and a half to tell their stories and most of my growing beef with them in regards to Doctor Who is that they keep trying to jam 90 minutes of story into 42 minutes.


This was never more apparent than The Power of Three and The Angels take Manhattan.  Both episodes were amazing big concepts that deserved multiple episodes to do right, and yet we got a 42 minute flipbook for each.

Really, there's no reason we can't have multiple two-part stories every season in Doctor Who.  Hell, if EVERY story was a multi-part I think I could quite happily live with that.
 
2014-01-20 05:51:09 PM  
SPOLIERS!

Did it bother anyone else that the the Underground carriage they find in the tunnel is clearly from a 1972 tube stock train when they enter it, but the interior is a D stock subsurface train - the correct type for the District line? Also, individual carriages of D stock can't really be uncoupled outside of a maintenance depot - it requires heavy machinery. The idea that one could simply detach from a train in service is laughable. Having said that, they clearly had only the single carriage by itself when filming, so somebody went to a great deal of effort.

The idea that there could be an abandoned station under the Palace of Westminster is also ridiculous. The palace in its current form was built in the 1840s - some 30 years before the District/Circle lines. Were they planning to demolish the seat of British government to make room for a station? I think not!

Finally, if that one carriage was stuck down there for hours/days/however long it took Sherlock to figure it out - why didn't any other trains hit it? There is roughly one train every 90 seconds on that part of the Underground, and stations do not typically have sidings, only the through tracks. If this station had a siding, how did the carriage get into it? How did the points move and what power source pushed it in there?


Right, right... I'll just get my coat...
 
2014-01-20 05:51:52 PM  
Someone does not understand what Easter Eggs are.
 
2014-01-20 06:10:42 PM  
Seriously, how have you people not watched ALL of them already?
 
2014-01-20 06:31:20 PM  
The first two seasons worth giving a watch?
 
2014-01-20 07:24:41 PM  

postnobills: SPOLIERS!

Did it bother anyone else that the the Underground carriage they find in the tunnel is clearly from a 1972 tube stock train when they enter it, but the interior is a D stock subsurface train - the correct type for the District line? Also, individual carriages of D stock can't really be uncoupled outside of a maintenance depot - it requires heavy machinery. The idea that one could simply detach from a train in service is laughable. Having said that, they clearly had only the single carriage by itself when filming, so somebody went to a great deal of effort.

The idea that there could be an abandoned station under the Palace of Westminster is also ridiculous. The palace in its current form was built in the 1840s - some 30 years before the District/Circle lines. Were they planning to demolish the seat of British government to make room for a station? I think not!

Finally, if that one carriage was stuck down there for hours/days/however long it took Sherlock to figure it out - why didn't any other trains hit it? There is roughly one train every 90 seconds on that part of the Underground, and stations do not typically have sidings, only the through tracks. If this station had a siding, how did the carriage get into it? How did the points move and what power source pushed it in there?


Right, right... I'll just get my coat...


Valid points, except for the implausibility of having an underground line under Parliament. Most of the London Underground was built by deep boring, tunnelling well under whatever happened to be above. Only some of the very first tunnels and a few newer sections were built by digging from the surface, laying track and then covering up again.

Parliament itself is a far newer building than many other London buildings, and there are underground tracks all over the place. Indeed when building the more modern, lower level, Westminster station they had to be very careful because it was more or less under Big Ben and they had to be avoid affecting the foundations. One of the entrances to the station is inside the grounds of Parliament, at the base of Big Ben and the track passes under the grounds of Parliament very close to Big Ben. It's not directly under the House but given a big enough explosion could certainly be close enough to bring the building down.
 
2014-01-20 07:25:23 PM  
One the article missed:

Holmes specifically describes a situation as "nebulous".

Nebulous is a radio comedy starring Sherlock writer/Mycroft portrayer Mark Gatiss.
 
2014-01-20 07:36:29 PM  

styckx: The first two seasons worth giving a watch?


Sherlock is one of the best shows on TV in the last decade.

The first two series (six episodes) range from "pretty good" to "my mind is blown".  I think Scandal in Belgravia is probably the best.  The weakest, maybe The Hounds of Baskerville.

Still HIGHLY recommended.
 
2014-01-20 07:53:55 PM  

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: thecpt: Not looking not looking, is it easy to watch this episode on some service? Is dr who up yet on Netflix? It's been like 3 years

It'll be rerun tonight on my local PBS station at 4am eastern. Check your local listings.


It's currently streaming on the PBS website & Comcast On Demand
 
2014-01-20 08:13:09 PM  

Flint Ironstag: postnobills: SPOLIERS!

Did it bother anyone else that the the Underground carriage they find in the tunnel is clearly from a 1972 tube stock train when they enter it, but the interior is a D stock subsurface train - the correct type for the District line? Also, individual carriages of D stock can't really be uncoupled outside of a maintenance depot - it requires heavy machinery. The idea that one could simply detach from a train in service is laughable. Having said that, they clearly had only the single carriage by itself when filming, so somebody went to a great deal of effort.

The idea that there could be an abandoned station under the Palace of Westminster is also ridiculous. The palace in its current form was built in the 1840s - some 30 years before the District/Circle lines. Were they planning to demolish the seat of British government to make room for a station? I think not!

Finally, if that one carriage was stuck down there for hours/days/however long it took Sherlock to figure it out - why didn't any other trains hit it? There is roughly one train every 90 seconds on that part of the Underground, and stations do not typically have sidings, only the through tracks. If this station had a siding, how did the carriage get into it? How did the points move and what power source pushed it in there?


Right, right... I'll just get my coat...

Valid points, except for the implausibility of having an underground line under Parliament. Most of the London Underground was built by deep boring, tunnelling well under whatever happened to be above. Only some of the very first tunnels and a few newer sections were built by digging from the surface, laying track and then covering up again.

Parliament itself is a far newer building than many other London buildings, and there are underground tracks all over the place. Indeed when building the more modern, lower level, Westminster station they had to be very careful because it was more or less under Big Ben and they had to ...


Might want to check your dates. (re)construction of the Houses of Parliament began in the 1840s, on the site of the ancient palace. The Metropolitan District Railway was built through the area in conjunction with the construction of the Victoria Embankment which happened 1865-70, so even if the Parliament buildings weren't totally complete they knew damn well there wasn't going to be any space for a station by that time. That's why Westminster station is where it is - close as they could get without mucking it up.

The deep-level tube lines came later. The City & South London Railway (now partially incorporated into the Northern line) was the first, in 1890, but for legal reasons even the tube lines had to be dug under roads for many years after that.
 
2014-01-20 09:27:30 PM  

DemonEater: styckx: The first two seasons worth giving a watch?

Sherlock is one of the best shows on TV in the last decade.

The first two series (six episodes) range from "pretty good" to "my mind is blown".  I think Scandal in Belgravia is probably the best.  The weakest, maybe The Hounds of Baskerville.

Still HIGHLY recommended.


Read up on it.. Grabbed both seasons. Also grabbed Ray Donovan Season 1..

/sucker for Crime Drama
 
2014-01-20 09:38:44 PM  

postnobills: Valid points, except for the implausibility of having an underground line under Parliament. Most of the London Underground was built by deep boring, tunnelling well under whatever happened to be above. Only some of the very first tunnels and a few newer sections were built by digging from the surface, laying track and then covering up again.

Parliament itself is a far newer building than many other London buildings, and there are underground tracks all over the place. Indeed when building the more modern, lower level, Westminster station they had to be very careful because it was more or less under Big Ben and they had to ...

Might want to check your dates. (re)construction of the Houses of Parliament began in the 1840s, on the site of the ancient palace. The Metropolitan District Railway was built through the area in conjunction with the construction of the Victoria Embankment which happened 1865-70, so even if the Parliament buildings weren't totally complete they knew damn well there wasn't going to be any space for a station by that time. That's why Westminster station is where it is - close as they could get without mucking it up.

The deep-level tube lines came later. The City & South London Railway (now partially incorporated into the Northern line) was the first, in 1890, but for legal reasons even the tube lines had to be dug under roads for many years after that.



I'm not saying there is an abandoned station there, merely that there could have been. Many buildings in London are way older than Parliament and have underground stations under them. And in the show it wasn't an actual station that was right under ground. When they found the carriage positioned ready to blow up it was in a tunnel, not a station.

The original Westminster station and it's line was built with cut and cover. Many later lines were built by tunnelling, so what was above them hardly mattered. The deepest tunnels are over two hundred feet below ground level.
 
2014-01-20 09:45:03 PM  

postnobills: Did it bother anyone else that the the Underground carriage they find in the tunnel is clearly from a 1972 tube stock train when they enter it, but the interior is a D stock subsurface train - the correct type for the District line? Also, individual carriages of D stock can't really be uncoupled outside of a maintenance depot - it requires heavy machinery. The idea that one could simply detach from a train in service is laughable. Having said that, they clearly had only the single carriage by itself when filming, so somebody went to a great deal of effort.


Apparently the entire carriage, inside and out was a set built in a studio in Wales.  I'm neither English nor a train spotter, so it had me fooled until I looked into how they filmed those scenes.

My favorite thing is that the BBC store already had "I don't Shave for Sherlock" T-shirts available on New Year's Day.

I'm really tempted to buy one of these:

www.bbcshop.com
 
2014-01-20 09:54:15 PM  

nuqneh: I caught a few of those too.  I think my favorites are when they incorporate elements from the original stories, like the old guy with the books.

I also appreciated the nods to the fans and all the crazy fanfics, like the crazy Riechenbach Fall theories featuring different relationships.  I once read a fanfic (a very good one) where Sherlock and Lestrade ride about the city on a motorcycle to solve a crime and take the stairs, sidewalks, etc as shortcuts.  Purely coincidence for the show to have that, I'm sure, but I smiled when I saw it.


Or not.  When Moffatt was made showrunner of Doctor Who, it quickly came out that he'd been posting on Doctor Who Listservs from the mid-1990s on.  He was very involved in the fan community even before he started writing Doctor Who novels, and he's clearly involved in the fan community and their excesses for both shows.  He would not be above stealing what he thought was a good idea from fanfic, knowing full well that very few would get the joke or make the connection.
 
2014-01-20 10:05:55 PM  
It is nice to be here... away from the idiots who actually think "Elementary" is a "good" show on any level.  You see, These are the people who understand...  who have actually read the stories of Sir Arthur Ignatius Canon Doyle.  The Greatest "fanfiction" I have ever seen, was produced by the BBC.

postnobills: Flint Ironstag: postnobills: SPOLIERS!

Did it bother anyone else that the the Underground carriage they find in the tunnel is clearly from a 1972 tube stock train when they enter it, but the interior is a D stock subsurface train - the correct type for the District line? Also, individual carriages of D stock can't really be uncoupled outside of a maintenance depot - it requires heavy machinery. The idea that one could simply detach from a train in service is laughable. Having said that, they clearly had only the single carriage by itself when filming, so somebody went to a great deal of effort.

The idea that there could be an abandoned station under the Palace of Westminster is also ridiculous. The palace in its current form was built in the 1840s - some 30 years before the District/Circle lines. Were they planning to demolish the seat of British government to make room for a station? I think not!

Finally, if that one carriage was stuck down there for hours/days/however long it took Sherlock to figure it out - why didn't any other trains hit it? There is roughly one train every 90 seconds on that part of the Underground, and stations do not typically have sidings, only the through tracks. If this station had a siding, how did the carriage get into it? How did the points move and what power source pushed it in there?


Right, right... I'll just get my coat...

Valid points, except for the implausibility of having an underground line under Parliament. Most of the London Underground was built by deep boring, tunnelling well under whatever happened to be above. Only some of the very first tunnels and a few newer sections were built by digging from the surface, laying track and then covering up again.

Parliament itself is a far newer building than many other London buildings, and there are underground tracks all over the place. Indeed when building the more modern, lower level, Westminster station they had to be very careful because it was more or less under Big Ben ...

 
2014-01-20 10:08:03 PM  
I'm thinking the Derren Brown cameo had something to do with the joke made about him in the "Day of the Doctor"

/would you rather appear in an episode of Sherlock or get flowers?
 
2014-01-20 10:38:33 PM  

postnobills: Finally, if that one carriage was stuck down there for hours/days/however long it took Sherlock to figure it out - why didn't any other trains hit it? There is roughly one train every 90 seconds on that part of the Underground, and stations do not typically have sidings, only the through tracks. If this station had a siding, how did the carriage get into it? How did the points move and what power source pushed it in there?


My take was that the unfinished station ("abandoned even before it was opened") was along an unfinished line or section of track, which was in effect a siding.  I know most abandoned stations are along lines which are in use (the most famous here in the States is City Hall in Manhattan, which is on the turn-around loop for the line) because those can be seen and documented, but stations on line that were never opened or completed are generally less well known (there are stations at either end of the Ben Franklin Bridge here in Philadelphia; I have spent years looking for information on theme and have never seen more than three or four pictures of the interiors).
 
2014-01-20 10:45:42 PM  
The "east wind" in the original story was World War I.
 
2014-01-20 11:13:48 PM  
The entire season is a wank fest.  Oh Shelock your so smart!  Oh we need Sherlock! 

Look back at season 1.  A lot of the fun was that the cops hated him and everyone thought he was a creep.  Now he's  super hero that can do no wrong and all the tension is gone.  It's just Cumbepatch getting wanked by the rest of the cast.  I've seen all three episodes and they are all the same. 

Hand waving Reichenbach Falls is the smallest problem with the 3rd series.  The entire series is like a commercial or demo of the show.  The writers trot out every character just so we can see how clever the first two series were.  Then gut them all leaving them sycophants hanging on Sherlock's every word. We don't need to be told Sherlock is smart we know that.  Everyone knows that.  The character is 100 years old and has been used in every possible media since then.

They could have just made something up to explain away Reichenbach  or even left a plausible out in that plot.  The real sin here is that a great set of characters have been just destroyed.
 
2014-01-20 11:16:47 PM  

styckx: The first two seasons worth giving a watch?


Loved season 1, hadn't seen anything like it before. Loved the idea of getting three movie-length shows a week apart from each other. Hated having to wait for season 2.

Season 2 ep 1 blew my mind. Some of the finest writing/plotting we've had on TV in a long time. Caveat Emptor, that's IMHO, I know some guys who found it weak, but I think they timed Irene Adler's appearance in the ongoing stories correctly -- the Jeremy Brett series brought Adler in early, which was a mistake. If you have a compelling character who is inherently mysterious, you benefit from bringing in a love interest later for the purposes of character development.

Season 2 ep 2 and 3 were good but... Ep 2 was pretty much a standalone, which has its good points and bad. Ep 3 was also fun, but it suffered by virtue of the fact that it was cliff-hangerish, and then you have to wait 2 years to figure out what comes next.

Season 3 ep 1 is where the show started to fall apart for me. Too much melodrama between Watson and Sherlock, not enough of a proper villain. Not enough sleuthing in general. I watched it a second time thinking "We waited two years for this?"

Season 3 ep 2 was initially another let-down, but it improves on a second viewing. One of the major problems with the show at this point, though, is made manifest in the flashbacks we get to Sherlock and Watson going out on cases. We only get glimpses of them, and I can't help but wondering "Hey, we might have liked to have actually seen those cases!" One of the drawbacks of only doing three episodes a year, I suppose.

Season 3 ep 3... Started great, then the villain disappears, then he comes back, then there's this big ending, and it's like Season 2 ep 3 all over again, lots of jeopardy, and then hoo! Big twist! Basically, a cynical point of view on the show is that nothing that happened in it really mattered, because there was no consequence.

So, yeah, tl/dr and csb combined, the show hit its zenith in Scandal in Belgravia, and has been on the downslope ever since. Hopefully it'll right its ship.

Again, though, just my opinion.
 
2014-01-20 11:47:11 PM  

aendeuryu: in the flashbacks we get to Sherlock and Watson going out on cases. We only get glimpses of them, and I can't help but wondering "Hey, we might have liked to have actually seen those cases!" One of the drawbacks of only doing three episodes a year, I suppose.


Read about them on Dr. John H. Watson's blog (contains spoilers)
 
2014-01-21 12:08:26 AM  

postnobills: Did it bother anyone else that the the Underground carriage they find in the tunnel is clearly from a 1972 tube stock train when they enter it, but the interior is a D stock subsurface train - the correct type for the District line? Also, individual carriages of D stock can't really be uncoupled outside of a maintenance depot - it requires heavy machinery. The idea that one could simply detach from a train in service is laughable. Having said that, they clearly had only the single carriage by itself when filming, so somebody went to a great deal of effort.


You didn't by chance leave your bobble hat lying around somewhere, did you?
 
2014-01-21 12:18:00 AM  
Bartitsu is not fictional, you idiot.

/former bartitsu instructor
 
2014-01-21 12:22:48 AM  

nuqneh: I also appreciated the nods to the fans and all the crazy fanfics, like the crazy Riechenbach Fall theories featuring different relationships.


Gatiss said in an interview (it's a podcast available on Empire magazine website via soundcloud but don't listen unless you've watched all three because spoilers) that they chose the Sherlock/Moriarty almost kiss because they thought that was the one ship that fans wouldn't have thought of.

/And tumblr burst into gales of laughter
//Sheriarty: for heartwarming tales of rape and abuse
///We're left to wonder why Anderson is shipping Sherlolly in his headcannons
 
2014-01-21 12:31:57 AM  

aendeuryu: Season 3 ep 2 was initially another let-down, but it improves on a second viewing. One of the major problems with the show at this point, though, is made manifest in the flashbacks we get to Sherlock and Watson going out on cases. We only get glimpses of them, and I can't help but wondering "Hey, we might have liked to have actually seen those cases!" One of the drawbacks of only doing three episodes a year, I suppose.


You're just pissed we didn't get to see the elephant in the room.  Or the headless nun!
 
2014-01-21 12:59:31 AM  

Son of Thunder: Bartitsu is not fictional, you idiot.

/former bartitsu instructor




Sherlock practices "Baritsu", not bartitsu.
 
2014-01-21 01:15:13 AM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Son of Thunder: Bartitsu is not fictional, you idiot.

/former bartitsu instructor

Sherlock practices "Baritsu", not bartitsu.


Because Doyle either misheard it or saw a misspelling when bartitsu was exhibited in London.  (Or he deliberately misspelled it so as to not be sued.)  Fascinating story, really.
 
2014-01-21 01:42:29 AM  

aendeuryu: styckx: The first two seasons worth giving a watch?

Loved season 1, hadn't seen anything like it before. Loved the idea of getting three movie-length shows a week apart from each other. Hated having to wait for season 2.

Season 2 ep 1 blew my mind. Some of the finest writing/plotting we've had on TV in a long time. Caveat Emptor, that's IMHO, I know some guys who found it weak, but I think they timed Irene Adler's appearance in the ongoing stories correctly -- the Jeremy Brett series brought Adler in early, which was a mistake. If you have a compelling character who is inherently mysterious, you benefit from bringing in a love interest later for the purposes of character development.

Season 2 ep 2 and 3 were good but... Ep 2 was pretty much a standalone, which has its good points and bad. Ep 3 was also fun, but it suffered by virtue of the fact that it was cliff-hangerish, and then you have to wait 2 years to figure out what comes next.

Season 3 ep 1 is where the show started to fall apart for me. Too much melodrama between Watson and Sherlock, not enough of a proper villain. Not enough sleuthing in general. I watched it a second time thinking "We waited two years for this?"

Season 3 ep 2 was initially another let-down, but it improves on a second viewing. One of the major problems with the show at this point, though, is made manifest in the flashbacks we get to Sherlock and Watson going out on cases. We only get glimpses of them, and I can't help but wondering "Hey, we might have liked to have actually seen those cases!" One of the drawbacks of only doing three episodes a year, I suppose.

Season 3 ep 3... Started great, then the villain disappears, then he comes back, then there's this big ending, and it's like Season 2 ep 3 all over again, lots of jeopardy, and then hoo! Big twist! Basically, a cynical point of view on the show is that nothing that happened in it really mattered, because there was no consequence.

So, yeah, tl/dr and csb combined, the show h ...


I disagree on S3.  I enjoyed the second episode because it was earned.  You had spent two seasons with Sherlock and Watson and so you were more invested in the characters.  I understand the criticism that people have that it didn't actually deal with a case, but at that point, the show had earned a character episode, and we got to see how the Sherlock/Watson characters interact without a cloud of another case hanging over their heads.  Not to mention, the second episode was absolutely necessary to set up Episode 3.

Episode 3 I would rank at or near the top of Sherlock.  It's as good, in some ways better, than Scandal in Belgravia.  You had some of the best acting of the series from Martin Freeman, you got payoffs from the 1st and 2nd episodes, you got one of the few mind palace sequences that actually really worked, and you had the best villain of the series.  Lars Mikkelsen takes that episode, puts it on his back, and carries it across the finish line.  This was a villain that you could believe was a complete bastard, without all the "crazy" from Moriarty.  And you had a conclusion, that when you thought about it, was completely in character for Sherlock.
 
2014-01-21 02:06:41 AM  

DemonEater: One the article missed:

Holmes specifically describes a situation as "nebulous".

Nebulous is a radio comedy starring Sherlock writer/Mycroft portrayer Mark Gatiss.


I also suspect that maybe the plane we saw at the very end of the last episode might have been GERTI (Golf Echo Romeo Tango India)
 
2014-01-21 02:52:24 AM  

KradDrol: This was a villain that you could believe was a complete bastard, without all the "crazy" from Moriarty. And you had a conclusion, that when you thought about it, was completely in character for Sherlock.


Sherlock did what he had to do: he set out to get the Blackmailer's files and destroy them.  Finding out they were all in his memory made it easy to destroy them (which is why you always keep hard copies).

And I think we'll find out how "crazy" Moriarty was next season.
 
2014-01-21 09:44:45 AM  
Guess the show's become just too darn clever for me.  Enjoyed the first two seasons, but the third season premier left me saying "Wtf?"

/tried to imagine the Basil Rathbone 'Sherlock' being an absolute dick to the Nigel Bruce 'Watson'
 
2014-01-21 11:38:26 AM  
Careful about spoilers for episodes 2 & 3 of Series 3 people.  This thread was created just for episode 1
 
2014-01-21 12:40:45 PM  

JosephFinn: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Son of Thunder: Bartitsu is not fictional, you idiot.

/former bartitsu instructor

Sherlock practices "Baritsu", not bartitsu.

Because Doyle either misheard it or saw a misspelling when bartitsu was exhibited in London.  (Or he deliberately misspelled it so as to not be sued.)  Fascinating story, really.


Or Doyle just made it up.
 
2014-01-21 12:57:57 PM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: DemonEater: One the article missed:

Holmes specifically describes a situation as "nebulous".

Nebulous is a radio comedy starring Sherlock writer/Mycroft portrayer Mark Gatiss.

I also suspect that maybe the plane we saw at the very end of the last episode might have been GERTI (Golf Echo Romeo Tango India)


Nah, the plane we saw was way too posh to be GERTI. GERTI's supposed to be held together by string, duct tape, and the fervent prayers of its crew.
 
2014-01-21 01:25:34 PM  

eeyore102: Uchiha_Cycliste: DemonEater: One the article missed:

Holmes specifically describes a situation as "nebulous".

Nebulous is a radio comedy starring Sherlock writer/Mycroft portrayer Mark Gatiss.

I also suspect that maybe the plane we saw at the very end of the last episode might have been GERTI (Golf Echo Romeo Tango India)

Nah, the plane we saw was way too posh to be GERTI. GERTI's supposed to be held together by string, duct tape, and the fervent prayers of its crew.


Well, it *was* carrying Mycroft, right? So they touched up the paint.
 
2014-01-21 10:54:14 PM  

mcreadyblue: JosephFinn: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Son of Thunder: Bartitsu is not fictional, you idiot.

/former bartitsu instructor

Sherlock practices "Baritsu", not bartitsu.

Because Doyle either misheard it or saw a misspelling when bartitsu was exhibited in London.  (Or he deliberately misspelled it so as to not be sued.)  Fascinating story, really.

Or Doyle just made it up.


Read the article I linked.  He didn't.
 
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  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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