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(Seven Days)   Here's a nice little article about how restaurants cope with your made up allergies, you fragile snowflakes   (7dvt.com) divider line 228
    More: Interesting, food allergies, Michael Werneke, Bill McKibben, allergies, religious intolerance, celiac disease, Fletcher Allen Health Care, gluten allergy  
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15173 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jan 2014 at 12:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



228 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-20 03:59:54 PM  
There are certain requests that I think are reasonable. You can ask that bacon or a condiment be left off of a sandwich or that your salad come without croutons. You can ask for steamed veggies instead of [insert side item here]. Some restaurants prepare shellfish on a separate surface.

Then there's the person with an egg allergy asking for a specially-made Hollandaise or the person with the nut allergy asking for special pesto or the person with the garlic allergy asking for special marinara.

Rule of thumb... If it's part of the assembly of the dish, then it's reasonable to ask that it be left out. If it's a dish that has been at least partially prepared ahead of time (usually due to the time it takes to cook), and that ingredient was part of said preparation, then order something else.
 
2014-01-20 04:02:05 PM  

IronJelly: It's always amusing to me when someone thinks they'll "test" my allergy, by slipping some mustard into something I'm eating.

//yes, mustard.  The seeds of the plant just as much as the condiment make my throat swell up until breathing is a chore.  I'm reasonably sure that my body's response indicates something more serious than dislike or intolerance.


What kind of evil person would do that?  It's happened more than once?  The only time I could even conceive of that happening is if you were clearly delusional about it and VERY close family/friends were absolutely sure you were just wrong and it wouldn't harm you.  But some random joker "testing" you??  That sounds like attempted murder.
 
2014-01-20 04:09:36 PM  

Trillian Astra: sprgrss: Completely different response in the body. if your wheat allergy is misdiagnosed as gluten-intolerance (which can only be diagnosed by a biopsy of the small intestine) then you need to find a new doctor.

Celiac requires the biopsy. But there's at least one person in my life who has non-Celiac gluten intolerance that was diagnosed via a combination of endoscopy, allergy testing, and ruling out other dietary issues. He just gets horrible stomach issues and shiats a lot when he eats gluten. Allergies can also manifest as stomach issues like diarrhea, vomiting, and cramps. So the only way to make sure it ISN'T an allergy instead of gluten-induced IBS is to get tested by an allergist.


A friend of mine has the same diagnosis--non-Celiac gluten intolerance. When she first identified the allergen, there were some who thought she was being dramatic. So she ate a slice of bread and took before and after pictures of her belly. She's a dancer and horseback instructor (she has amazing abs), and those abs went from perfectly defined to the belly of a pregnancy in its third term in a matter of 30 minutes.

She's very careful not to make life difficult for anyone around her when she goes out. She brings her own food if she thinks there will be a problem and is very discreet about the way she handles things. I think if more people just dealt with it privately rather than announcing it publicly, it wouldn't be a "thing."
 
2014-01-20 04:12:14 PM  
Far Cough:
What kind of evil person would do that?  It's happened more than once?  The only time I could even conceive of that happening is if you were clearly delusional about it and VERY close family/friends were absolutely sure you were just wrong and it wouldn't harm you.  But some random joker "testing" you??  That sounds like attempted murder.

I've had so-called "friends" lie about eggs being in a dish they have prepared, because they thought my allergy was psychosomatic or that it wasn't really an allergy.  Some people are just dicks.
 
2014-01-20 04:18:50 PM  
I feel bad for the few people who are actually allergic to things, but no pity for the "I'm lactose intolerant/gluten blah blah" whiners who just want to be part of the "speshul" in crowd.

/I once farted after I had cheese on my chili, I MUST be lactose intolerant.
 
2014-01-20 04:20:35 PM  

lewismarktwo: Hmm, I'm not allergic to any foods.  Pollen yes, food no.

/maybe I should breed
//for the fate of humanity


I think you're on to something.  Neither my wife nor I have any food allergies and sure enough, none of my kids have any food allergies either.  Then again, my whole family will eat just about anything: meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, dairy, bread, you name it.

I remember when my kids were little, other parents of similar age children always wanted to commiserate how hard it was to get kids to eat veggies or fish or whatnot.  I could never relate.

I will say the down side of being able to eat anything is that you don't pay as much attention to what goes in your mouth as people who do have to be on a restricted diet.
 
2014-01-20 04:21:50 PM  

Donkey Hodie: I've had so-called "friends" lie about eggs being in a dish they have prepared, because they thought my allergy was psychosomatic or that it wasn't really an allergy. Some people are just dicks.


There is an amazing variety of meals I make that you wouldn't otherwise know had eggs in it. Mac & Cheese, Meatballs and anything with a browned crust. Eggs are a wonderful binder. Having said that, if someone told me they are allergic to eggs, I can make a bagillion other dishes that contain no eggs.
 
2014-01-20 04:39:23 PM  

listernine: [img.fark.net image 640x640]


Oh, I  like this ...
 
2014-01-20 04:45:36 PM  

hubiestubert: The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate on individual ...


Great post, Hubie. I had you favorited as "well spoken", I might change that to something food-related.

/ Nuclear Food Rocket Surgeon or something
 
2014-01-20 04:46:48 PM  
This is nothing new.  Thirty years ago (yikes!), when I was a burger flipper at McD's, we used to get customers who would ask for "low salt" fries.  You KNEW what they really wanted was fries straight out of the vat because they'd go and dump a handful of salt packets on those "low salt" fries.  They didn't even attempt to hide it.

The funny thing was, we were more than happy to drop in a batch of fries for someone who wanted theirs straight from the fryer.
 
2014-01-20 04:48:10 PM  
Gather round, and I'll tell you a tragic allergy tale.  It was in my early adulthood I discovered two severe, previously undiagnosed allergies.

I was at the bar, and had a beer... I laughed while taking a sip of beer, and got some down the wrong pipe.  Later I started getting wheezy, and needed quite a few blasts from my inhaler (I have asthma).  I assumed it was because of the fine mist of beer that didn't quite make it past my pharynx.  Shortly after, another night at the bar, more beer, only this time it all made it into my stomach.  45 minutes later, I can't breathe at all.  I'm fighting for every breath.  It took 35 blasts from the inhaler to open up my lungs again.  Naturally I went to the doctor, who got me an emergency appointment with the allergist.  The allergist can't fathom why beer would possibly do that, as I test negative for every food related.  I can eat wheat (I get a little acidy from too much, but nothing tums won't fix), and all other grains, fruit, nuts, cultured products... there's just nothing in beer I'm allergic to.  He confirms the symptoms are anaphalactic shock, gives me an epi-pen, and suggests I stay away from beer (Yeah right).  He also admits that allergy tests are mostly inaccurate unless its severe, in which case you usually know already.

Over a few years and a couple of trips to the emergency room (anaphalactic shock is a biatch) by an alcohol elimination diet I discover I can have the same reaction to hard cider, white wine, and worst of all, scotch (oddly enough, not Irish Whiskey or Bourbon).

Not drinking beer wasn't an option, so I always take an antihistamine before drinking, and I live on daily allergy meds (for hayfever in the spring and fall mostly), but it seems (unless some brilliant farker can figure it out) that I am destined to have a real allergy to some mystery component of those particular drinks.  Truly tragedy.
 
2014-01-20 04:49:42 PM  

pute kisses like a man: i was going with elements because I hadn't seen elements yet,


A few years ago, I thought of a way to make a pile of money by using bad/incorrectly cited science and telling people what they wanted to hear. I didn't do it, because I make reasonable money doing computer junk and don't need to sell dubious books or dubious nutritional supplements. This "elemental diet" thing has even more potential than the things I thought of. If you get yourself a marketroid and a professional artist to illustrate a brochure, you could end up on national talk shows and making far more money than us ordinary working stiffs.

I can eat almost anything, including Dave's Insanity Sauce, and not suffer any ill effects from it. (Eating pork chops has a 1/3 chance of making me recreate the campfire scene from "Blazing Saddles" from 4 to 16 hours later, but that's a minor problem easily avoided.) Since "fecal transplants" are the new thing in gastroenterology, I wonder if I could package my poop in guaranteed-not-to-dissolve-until-the-large-intestine pills and sell those pills to dyspeptic folks for $LOTS?
 
2014-01-20 04:52:46 PM  

foxy_canuck: Gather round, and I'll tell you a tragic allergy tale.  It was in my early adulthood I discovered two severe, previously undiagnosed allergies.

I was at the bar, and had a beer... I laughed while taking a sip of beer, and got some down the wrong pipe.  Later I started getting wheezy, and needed quite a few blasts from my inhaler (I have asthma).  I assumed it was because of the fine mist of beer that didn't quite make it past my pharynx.  Shortly after, another night at the bar, more beer, only this time it all made it into my stomach.  45 minutes later, I can't breathe at all.  I'm fighting for every breath.  It took 35 blasts from the inhaler to open up my lungs again.  Naturally I went to the doctor, who got me an emergency appointment with the allergist.  The allergist can't fathom why beer would possibly do that, as I test negative for every food related.  I can eat wheat (I get a little acidy from too much, but nothing tums won't fix), and all other grains, fruit, nuts, cultured products... there's just nothing in beer I'm allergic to.  He confirms the symptoms are anaphalactic shock, gives me an epi-pen, and suggests I stay away from beer (Yeah right).  He also admits that allergy tests are mostly inaccurate unless its severe, in which case you usually know already.

Over a few years and a couple of trips to the emergency room (anaphalactic shock is a biatch) by an alcohol elimination diet I discover I can have the same reaction to hard cider, white wine, and worst of all, scotch (oddly enough, not Irish Whiskey or Bourbon).

Not drinking beer wasn't an option, so I always take an antihistamine before drinking, and I live on daily allergy meds (for hayfever in the spring and fall mostly), but it seems (unless some brilliant farker can figure it out) that I am destined to have a real allergy to some mystery component of those particular drinks.  Truly tragedy.


Okay, I lol'ed.  I think you might be an alcoholic if you are risking your ability to breath so you can drink.

/I'll save you a seat.
 
2014-01-20 04:53:54 PM  

lewismarktwo: Hmm, I'm not allergic to any foods.  Pollen yes, food no.

/maybe I should breed
//for the fate of humanity


Ironically, one of my in-laws had no food allergies until after her pregnancy.

And no, she's not faking it; she developed allergies to about 80% of the food she used to love.  They're not life-threatening, but serious headache and stomachache inducing.
 
2014-01-20 04:54:29 PM  

foxy_canuck: Gather round, and I'll tell you a tragic allergy tale.  It was in my early adulthood I discovered two severe, previously undiagnosed allergies.

I was at the bar, and had a beer... I laughed while taking a sip of beer, and got some down the wrong pipe.  Later I started getting wheezy, and needed quite a few blasts from my inhaler (I have asthma).  I assumed it was because of the fine mist of beer that didn't quite make it past my pharynx.  Shortly after, another night at the bar, more beer, only this time it all made it into my stomach.  45 minutes later, I can't breathe at all.  I'm fighting for every breath.  It took 35 blasts from the inhaler to open up my lungs again.  Naturally I went to the doctor, who got me an emergency appointment with the allergist.  The allergist can't fathom why beer would possibly do that, as I test negative for every food related.  I can eat wheat (I get a little acidy from too much, but nothing tums won't fix), and all other grains, fruit, nuts, cultured products... there's just nothing in beer I'm allergic to.  He confirms the symptoms are anaphalactic shock, gives me an epi-pen, and suggests I stay away from beer (Yeah right).  He also admits that allergy tests are mostly inaccurate unless its severe, in which case you usually know already.

Over a few years and a couple of trips to the emergency room (anaphalactic shock is a biatch) by an alcohol elimination diet I discover I can have the same reaction to hard cider, white wine, and worst of all, scotch (oddly enough, not Irish Whiskey or Bourbon).

Not drinking beer wasn't an option, so I always take an antihistamine before drinking, and I live on daily allergy meds (for hayfever in the spring and fall mostly), but it seems (unless some brilliant farker can figure it out) that I am destined to have a real allergy to some mystery component of those particular drinks.  Truly tragedy.


Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it manifests as a headache that comes on with 10 minutes of consuming an alcoholic beverage (one of the 3 or 4 different varieties of 'wine headaches').

Some varieties of yeast produce large levels of histamines, if the fermentation temperature is within a certain band.  Use a different variety of yeast, or ferment at a different temperature, and minimal histamines.

I've never heard of full-on anaphalactic shock from it, so I may be totally wrong.
 
2014-01-20 05:01:02 PM  
IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...


I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.
 
2014-01-20 05:03:36 PM  
Skyd1v: a mixing bowl full of steamed spinach

I could go for that.
 
2014-01-20 05:11:25 PM  

foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.


Well there you go!

Could be the congeners in the scotch from the barrel aging, not the histamines at all.
 
2014-01-20 05:12:28 PM  
Buttknuckle:
Okay, I lol'ed.  I think you might be an alcoholic if you are risking your ability to breathe

You sound just like the ER doctor
 
2014-01-20 05:44:16 PM  

FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

The "Wheat Belly" doctor is a crank and a fraud.

Say what you want but my boy was adversely affected by gluten. Stopped gluten. Got a different, much improved child.

All the medical professionals we saw pushed drugs as a solution. All poo-pooed diet change. Drugs didn't work. Diet change did.

Your results may vary.

Yeah, that's fine and dandy, and I'm glad you found a solution and that your kid is healthy now.

Your son had a problem.  The entire global wheat crop does not have a problem.


Oh he's far from cured but diet change helped. Avoiding processed food has also helped.

The world does have a food problem. People have become too reliant on corporate food production and subsequently eat whatever is put in front of them without ever questioning what was done to it before they ate it.

What's in your food? I don't know what's in a lot of mine unfortunately.
 
2014-01-20 05:44:23 PM  

JoieD'Zen: Trillian Astra: Jument: /Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine

You sound like my cousin's husband. My cousin can't cook worth a damn but I make everything from scratch at home for my fiance and I've offered to cook for them once, much to his pleasure. The fiance has gluten issues but only in this country. Back in his home country he can eat bread and pizza to his heart's content. But for some reason he can't digest gluten in the US. Still can't figure it out.

GMO wheat and chemicals used in processing.


No commercially-grown US wheat is GMO. It's hybridized all to hell, but there's no direct genetic tampering like there is with corn and soybeans.

It very well could be something in the processing, or maybe the specific variety of wheat, or maybe something else in the recipe here that's different than his home.
 
2014-01-20 05:47:48 PM  

FrancoFile: foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.

Well there you go!

Could be the congeners in the scotch from the barrel aging, not the histamines at all.


Seems that would be worse with the bourbon (new barrels) than the scotch (used barrels, most often old bourbon barrels).
 
2014-01-20 05:51:10 PM  

hubiestubert: The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate on individual plates, as opposed to going by reflex. That slows us down. That causes backlog. It upsets the natural timing, and the whole restaurant is then slowed down because of that. I get four special orders in a row, the next three tables are set back as well. And then there are the folks who imagine that we have a dozen fryers dedicated to each seafood dish, and tell a server that they have a specific allergy, but want a dish just without the offending item, and simply don't realize that the oil itself has already been used for said item. Which means that we have to communicate with said server, who then has to relay that to the customer, who then replaces their order. Educating the staff to run interference to make sure the patron knows that we can't make some accommodations is key, but it doesn't always happen. Waitstaff get busy, they get distracted, it happens, and when it does, it slows down the whole line, ups the stress level, and annoys the crap out of us, because three guys on a line can handle a few hundred folks easy enough, and the backlog created just gums up the works.

You have an allergy, then be aware. Yes, if you have a seafood allergy, you might want to avoid fried foods. You have a dairy allergy, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Asking for a vegetarian version of a special is not always an option. Pasta sans sauce is easy, substituting rice for pasta is easy enough, trying to order a marinara without garlic and onions means you're a dumbass, and your stupidity just cost me a few minutes I could have plated two entire tables in the time it takes to communicate with the waitstaff that there is NO way in Hells your request can be granted, even if you're trying to be polite and ask ahead if it is possible. On a busy night, I'm not going to make you a special putanesca without garlic and onions, and substitute black and green olives, but no anchovies, and fresh thyme instead of the fresh basil, and no salt but extra pepper. Possible on a slow night? Sure, but be aware of your surroundings, because your special request means that others are going to have their night slowed down a bit too.

You don't like mushrooms? Then don't order the burger that HAS mushrooms on it. Plain and simple. You don't like garlic? Then maybe keep the f*ck away from the Scampi. Don't like spinach? Then maybe the Florentine isn't for you. No bacon on a club sandwich? Easy. No bun for a burger? Simplicity. Be aware of what you're asking for, and insisting that the waitstaff "just see if they can..." when they tell you right off the bat that it's not possible is just bogging down everyone else's night.

I want my customers to be happy. I understand that folks have issues with allergies. I also realize that there are a ton of folks who don't have allergies and are just using the excuse to try to get a substitution without looking like a picky douche. I know that some folks are looking to be special with their very rare and sudden 'important dietary needs" too. It's a weird time, when you look to make yourself feel special by feigning a weakness. Not all folks are doing so. There are very much folks with dietary restrictions, but be aware that your restrictions don't translate to "getting whatever I ask for."


I want to eat where you cook!
 
2014-01-20 05:52:41 PM  
I found out recently after an ER trip that Im allergic to a couple of the wierd non traditional oils companies have switched to in order to accomodate people allergic to the traditional oils (which I am not allergic to) .
 
2014-01-20 05:57:24 PM  

Ablejack: FrancoFile: foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.

Well there you go!

Could be the congeners in the scotch from the barrel aging, not the histamines at all.

Seems that would be worse with the bourbon (new barrels) than the scotch (used barrels, most often old bourbon barrels).


Yes and no.  Bourbon is in the barrel for a short time, scotch is in it for much longer.
 
2014-01-20 05:59:11 PM  

jdjoker: JoieD'Zen: Trillian Astra: Jument: /Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine

You sound like my cousin's husband. My cousin can't cook worth a damn but I make everything from scratch at home for my fiance and I've offered to cook for them once, much to his pleasure. The fiance has gluten issues but only in this country. Back in his home country he can eat bread and pizza to his heart's content. But for some reason he can't digest gluten in the US. Still can't figure it out.

GMO wheat and chemicals used in processing.

No commercially-grown US wheat is GMO. It's hybridized all to hell, but there's no direct genetic tampering like there is with corn and soybeans.

It very well could be something in the processing, or maybe the specific variety of wheat, or maybe something else in the recipe here that's different than his home.


You'd probably want to prove the problem is real first.  Buy or smuggle some flour from one location to the other.  Prepare a blind or double blind test of bread/whatever from both native and foreign flour.  Serve 1 to 2 days apart.

Or, even easier, before we blame it on the "GMO" boogeyman, purchase some GMO-free flour in the US and do the blind test now.

GMOphobia kind of pisses me off.  At least gluten does have noticeable affects on people; non-GMO foods are more expensive for no reason at all.
 
2014-01-20 06:05:01 PM  
The waiters and cooks put their peckers into the clam chowder, don't they?
 
2014-01-20 06:09:04 PM  

Far Cough: You'd probably want to prove the problem is real first. Buy or smuggle some flour from one location to the other. Prepare a blind or double blind test of bread/whatever from both native and foreign flour. Serve 1 to 2 days apart.


Whole lotta this.

A propos of the wine headache thing, I had customers who say "they put stuff in the wine they send here. When I was on vacation in Italy I had wine every night and never got a headache." I reply by saying "you didn't get a headache because you were on VA-CA-TION"
 
2014-01-20 06:09:32 PM  

BolshyGreatYarblocks: The waiters and cooks put their peckers into the clam chowder, don't they?


No that's not what chlamydia means.
 
2014-01-20 06:15:43 PM  

JerkStore: [memecrunch.com image 600x399]


allergies*
 
2014-01-20 06:36:36 PM  
It slows down the line, that being said I've never minded too much. Just be aware that if you call ahead and let the front of house know I have time to come up with a balanced version of the dish to suit your needs. If I get the ticket while I'm being slammed, your dish is just going to be missing the stuff you are allergic to.
 
2014-01-20 06:50:48 PM  
Due to thyroid cancer, every 6 months I have to have a scan that essentially requires me to eliminate iodeine from my diet for 2 to 3 weeks. No iodized salt, no dairy, no seafood. It REALLY sucks. You know what I do? I sit at home and cook my own food from scratch. I'm not going to go bother some chef with my crazy-ass requirements, especially when its impossible to verify, and I'm the one who gets farked if they screw it up.

Now the week after the scan/treatment? EAT AT ALL THE RESTARAUNTS!
 
2014-01-20 06:52:42 PM  
I see people all the farking time claim allergy to some food or other and when the food is served they will be clawing all over their partner's plate eating just what they were whining about because "it looks so good" or some such.  Then out comes the rationalization "well, I can eat a little of it sometimes."  Not with a real allergy you can't or would you want to.

I don't bother anymore to explain what allergy really is.  Or intolerance.  People who have make believe problems don't want to hear about it.  While I am certain there are lots of people with actual food allergies, I am also certain that many people who make this claim would do well to get an appointment with a psychiatrist.  My sympathies go out to food service people who must put up with this crap.
 
2014-01-20 07:40:25 PM  

ThreadSinger: hubiestubert: The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate ...


I have him favorited and noted, "Great Food Service". I really like this guy in restaurant threads. He brings it on.
 
2014-01-20 08:06:34 PM  
I have an allergy to beer; drinking 20 or more beers in the evening will leave me feeling 75% or worse the next day.
 
2014-01-20 08:11:02 PM  

Ivan the Tolerable: ZAZ: gluten-free, which is a new fashion

i never really considered the desire to not spend a couple of days of my life writhing in agony on the floor to be a 'fashion'. perhaps you and i define fashion differently.


Gluten allergies are no joke, but there are millions of people who somehow got the idea that gluten is bad for you in general without an allergy. It's the biggest "diet" fad running right now, and it's particularly stupid.

/My cousin was having health problems for years before she found out she has Coeliac disease
//Now that she's gluten free she's living a much better life
 
2014-01-20 08:12:50 PM  
I get hives on my hands when I take NSAIDS.  Ibuprofen, naproxen, etc make my hands burst out in hives.  It's not as bad as it used to be, probably because I don't take them anywhere near as often.

/shrug
 
2014-01-20 08:18:30 PM  
I sometimes get sores on the insides of my mouth when I suck on hard candies too much.
 
2014-01-20 08:19:54 PM  
I have a terrible allergy to the stupid.  I know, there's lots of stupid here on fark.  In keeping with respecting people's allergies, could all of you that are or have come in contact with stupid please go somewhere else?  My progeny are afflicted with the same disorder.  THINK OF THE CHILDREN!
 
2014-01-20 08:22:55 PM  
 
2014-01-20 08:35:10 PM  
Well you have to consider that maybe, just maybe, our farked up food system is actually giving people these problems
 
2014-01-20 08:45:46 PM  

foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.


As weird as it may sound, some vintners use egg white to clean the rotten grape crap from the wine. Since 2012, they have to write it on the label in Canada, so it might be an egg allergy.

I don't know if brewers do the same, though.
 
2014-01-20 08:53:01 PM  
One time, I ate a bunch of raw almonds and my throat felt a little itchy.  Then I ate a whole bunch more until that stopped happening.
 
2014-01-20 08:56:20 PM  

PunGent: lewismarktwo: Hmm, I'm not allergic to any foods.  Pollen yes, food no.

/maybe I should breed
//for the fate of humanity

Ironically, one of my in-laws had no food allergies until after her pregnancy.

And no, she's not faking it; she developed allergies to about 80% of the food she used to love.  They're not life-threatening, but serious headache and stomachache inducing.


Well, that sucks.  Allergies are weird.  I say we divert some AIDS research money to study them.
 
2014-01-20 08:58:26 PM  

mr_a: I really am allergic to shellfish, but mostly my interaction with restaurants is asking if there is shellfish in a dish, and ordering something else if there is.

The real problems are when I travel in Asia...there doesn't seem to be a word in most Asian languages for "shellfish". I actually have a little card that I carry, written in the native language, which explains the problem.


I just avoid going to Long John Silver's.
 
2014-01-20 09:04:43 PM  

PolyHatSnake: My favorite part was where they mentioned it is unknown what is causing all these allergies and sensitivities to suddenly pop up. I have a theory. We've been making the world TOO safe of a place. The weakest herd members are no longer being culled, on a wholesale level. To paraphrase Jeff Goldblum: natural selection uh, finds a way.


Yeah...except science actually  does have a theory, and it's 'we can diagnose things now before you end up dead'. Rhetorical questions are a biatch.
 
2014-01-20 09:13:30 PM  
As the boyfriend of someone with true Celiacs, it's not pretty. It's not an allergy as stated above.

Having it leads to extremely painful cramping, and what's lovingly known as the "turbo fire craps"... it and it lasts a while after having it.

And whoever said it's not in much, is incorrect: It's even in Soy Sauce... which is soy beans and wheat.

But yes. The whole "I'm allergic to tomatoes" because you hate tomatoes? Just say no feckin' tomatoes and be an adult.
Or pick them off.

But people with legitimate autoimmune disorders do indeed need some special help.  Thankfully I live in Portland (hehe) so our selections are VAST!! I recommend Andina, Brooklyn House, and Hawthorne Fish House. Amazing food.
 
2014-01-20 09:41:28 PM  

Doc Batarang: I am literally standing on line at a restaurant right now waiting for all hell to break loose...

I didn't ever want to be a cook. I have no formal cooking training. I kind of hate cooking. But by god...I'm great at it and everybody is going to be making moaning sounds around here in 10 minutes at how great this food is.

That being said, I take your allergies very seriously and am happy to sell you anything that you can eat.

That being said, I hate hearing about what kinds of foods adults dislike. Grow the fark up and manage your lives...I'm not your doctor or personal trainer or crystal medicine shaman or your Mom or your...


This was exactly 8 hours and five minutes ago. You have probably 4 hours more to go on shift, proud warrior.

Please do enjoy Chef's shiatty cocaine,  and make mighty feats of batshiat weeds bullshiat. When all is said and done, down tools and clean up your farking disgusting station, asshole. Finally, enjoy a cold frosty and a waitress after work

We salute you.
 
2014-01-20 09:45:03 PM  
i422.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-20 10:09:14 PM  

airsupport: WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.

Is that a euphemism for something?


Yeah, it's an adult child stomping their fists and making things harder for actual allergic people.

It's not their culinary skills, it's your taste buds. Order something else and quit lying.
 
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