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(Seven Days)   Here's a nice little article about how restaurants cope with your made up allergies, you fragile snowflakes   (7dvt.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, food allergies, Michael Werneke, Bill McKibben, allergies, religious intolerance, celiac disease, Fletcher Allen Health Care, gluten allergy  
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15188 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jan 2014 at 12:33 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



228 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-20 12:19:17 PM  
I really am allergic to shellfish, but mostly my interaction with restaurants is asking if there is shellfish in a dish, and ordering something else if there is.

The real problems are when I travel in Asia...there doesn't seem to be a word in most Asian languages for "shellfish". I actually have a little card that I carry, written in the native language, which explains the problem.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-20 12:23:40 PM  
Though Prohibition Pig stops short of providing a dedicated gluten-free menu, it tries to guide special-needs diners by indicating 'V' beside vegetarian items and 'G' beside gluten-free items on the menu.

I have seen similar markings on menus around here for years and years. Maybe not always gluten-free, which is a new fashion, but vegetarian and vegan.
 
2014-01-20 12:35:23 PM  
My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.
 
2014-01-20 12:36:04 PM  
Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.
 
2014-01-20 12:36:24 PM  
The "Portland, Ore" aspect of this article does not surprise me.

Can we have our own tag?
 
2014-01-20 12:38:05 PM  
Submitter is soooo witty, saying food allergies are fake.
 
2014-01-20 12:39:31 PM  
From the article in question:

distilleryimage10.ak.instagram.com
 
2014-01-20 12:40:09 PM  

Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.


thedish.restaurant.com

You poor poor bastard. I'm so sorry for you.
 
2014-01-20 12:40:50 PM  

ZAZ: gluten-free, which is a new fashion


i never really considered the desire to not spend a couple of days of my life writhing in agony on the floor to be a 'fashion'. perhaps you and i define fashion differently.
 
2014-01-20 12:42:35 PM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered off of the menu.


FTFY and the douches in TFA.
 
2014-01-20 12:43:12 PM  
Food allergies are the eraser on the end of God's pencil.
 
2014-01-20 12:43:22 PM  

Ivan the Tolerable: ZAZ: gluten-free, which is a new fashion

i never really considered the desire to not spend a couple of days of my life writhing in agony on the floor to be a 'fashion'. perhaps you and i define fashion differently.


I think they mean that gluten-free is the new trendy elimination diet, not that people with actual gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease are attempting to be fashionable.
 
2014-01-20 12:44:24 PM  
DRTA -- is the answer "they lie"?

Seriously, just about every restaurant I've visited has been very accommodating to various needs and/or allergies in the party.

I wouldn't trust my life to it, though.

You know who sucks?  Applebee's sucks.  Their vegetarian option is NOTHING.  And it's not as if they make up for it by offering great meat and fish.
 
2014-01-20 12:45:18 PM  
I'm getting to the point now that when I hear the word "gluten" I want to kill someone.
 
2014-01-20 12:46:25 PM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.


Why, you wouldn't order a BMW at a Ford dealership ,

They gave you a product list, don't like it go to another product supplier
 
2014-01-20 12:46:38 PM  
No one is allergic to gluten.  An allergy and the autoimmune response to gluten are two different things.

Also, unless diagnoses, I rescues to believe you have a gluten intolerance/celiac.
 
2014-01-20 12:46:47 PM  
My favorite part was where they mentioned it is unknown what is causing all these allergies and sensitivities to suddenly pop up. I have a theory. We've been making the world TOO safe of a place. The weakest herd members are no longer being culled, on a wholesale level. To paraphrase Jeff Goldblum: natural selection uh, finds a way.
 
2014-01-20 12:47:02 PM  
Doesn't Applebee's just suck, in general?

I've only been twice, and both times the food sucked, regardless of persuasion.
 
2014-01-20 12:47:14 PM  
refuse, not rescues.
 
2014-01-20 12:50:14 PM  
I only know one person who is on a gluten-free diet and he has cancer. Apparently it's supposed to help with his treatment.
 
2014-01-20 12:50:20 PM  

Buttknuckle: I'm getting to the point now that when I hear the word "gluten" I want to kill someone.


Even if I had the  world's worst *legitimate* (ha!) "gluten allergy", I'd be too ashamed to admit it to anyone.
 
2014-01-20 12:50:25 PM  

Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.


At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

The allergy card is played all too often today. I wonder how these kids survive trips to the grocery store sometimes. 'Little Tommy has a nut allergy' while mom walks right by a display of peanuts somebody is scooping out into a bag. 'Little Janie is allergic to wheat.' as mom walks by the bakery where wheat flour is in the air.

FFS! There are people with legitimate allergies that are marginalized because you think your precious snowflake might be allergic because you fed them something and it didn't sit well in their tummy. You think the kid is allergic to X product? Take them to the doctor and get the test done, otherwise let the other kids have their PB&J sandwiches and their wheat flour breads.

Not only that, but it'll stop the 'it doesn't agree with your kid's tummy' that parents think are allergies. I think the article used 'intolerance' in it. When you're lactose intolerant, it means you don't digest milk like many people can. Being in the vicinity of milk isn't deadly. Some people who think their kids have nut allergies? The kid's bodies just don't process nuts properly. There isn't a question the kid won't like it if they eat nuts, but they won't have an allergic (and life threatening) reaction to them.
 
2014-01-20 12:50:51 PM  

sprgrss: No one is allergic to gluten. An allergy and the autoimmune response to gluten are two different things.


There can be a histamine reaction to wheat, though, and it can often be misdiagnosed as gluten-intolerance.
 
2014-01-20 12:51:20 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-01-20 12:52:05 PM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.


You sound like a self-entitled "dream customer."
 
2014-01-20 12:53:24 PM  

Far Cough: DRTA -- is the answer "they lie"?

<snip>

You know who sucks?  Applebee's sucks.  Their vegetarian option is NOTHING.  And it's not as if they make up for it by offering great meat and fish.


Georgio - The owner and head chef at D1vwife's favorite restaurant - has been known to fill a mixing bowl full of steamed spinach and place it with great ceremony in front of anyone who dares to ask for a vegetarian dish in his restaurant.  I've seen him do it twice now and it is hilarious to watch.

/try the veal.
//no, seriously, try it.  It is awesome.
 
2014-01-20 12:53:42 PM  

Trillian Astra: sprgrss: No one is allergic to gluten. An allergy and the autoimmune response to gluten are two different things.

There can be a histamine reaction to wheat, though, and it can often be misdiagnosed as gluten-intolerance.


Completely different response in the body.  if your wheat allergy is misdiagnosed as gluten-intolerance (which can only be diagnosed by a biopsy of the small intestine) then you need to find a new doctor.
 
2014-01-20 12:54:08 PM  

sprgrss: No one is allergic to gluten.  An allergy and the autoimmune response to gluten are two different things.

Also, unless diagnoses, I rescues to believe you have a gluten intolerance/celiac.


Actually, no they are not. An allergy is your body's auto-immune system over responding to something.
 
2014-01-20 12:54:29 PM  
You're right, subby, I should just grow a pair and eat everything. I'll just go ahead and munch on these sunflower seeaaaaaaaaaaagggggggggghhhhhhhhhhh
 
2014-01-20 12:55:06 PM  

mr_a: I really am allergic to shellfish, but mostly my interaction with restaurants is asking if there is shellfish in a dish, and ordering something else if there is.

The real problems are when I travel in Asia...there doesn't seem to be a word in most Asian languages for "shellfish". I actually have a little card that I carry, written in the native language, which explains the problem.


I'm sure your situation is real, and a risky allergy is no laughing matter.

Having said that, I still choose to imagine your card to be like the poorly translated chinese tattoos on sorority girls.

It actually says "Picky American. Just nod and smile then serve standard dish."
 
2014-01-20 12:55:17 PM  
Eventually everyone will be allergic to everything.  It's a self-solving problem.
 
2014-01-20 12:55:20 PM  
I realize that Fark has always had a large contingent of delicate little snowflakes who's finely tuned digestive systems can barely tolerate Taco Bell or Mc Donald's But I'm very impressed by the number of "Food Allergies" that have already been expressed in this short thread.

You "allergy" and "intolereant need to stop eating out and ruin it for us normal people,r better yet open your own restaurant and deal exclusively with other pain in the customers such as yourself. You wouldn't last a week if your customers were as "intolerant" as yourselves.
 
2014-01-20 12:55:59 PM  

plcow: sprgrss: No one is allergic to gluten.  An allergy and the autoimmune response to gluten are two different things.

Also, unless diagnoses, I rescues to believe you have a gluten intolerance/celiac.

Actually, no they are not. An allergy is your body's auto-immune system over responding to something.


Completely different reaction.  With an allergy, your body releases histamine.  With gluten intolerance/celiac, your body attacks the vili in your small intestine.

Not even remotely the same.
 
2014-01-20 12:56:22 PM  
FTFA: "The number of people who have a food allergy is growing, but there is no clear answer as to why."

nyulocal.com

Everyone else is doing it?  Hell, statements like "the number of people who have a food allergy is growing," is partially responsible.  The number of people who claim to have a food allergy is growing.  That I'll believe.

Also FTFA: "I think some people come in with a food intolerance that they think is an allergy."

And guess what, ignorant people are also loud (I think of them as co-morbid disorders).  If you're insecure in your specialness, you're going to pitch a fit to prove how important it is (and how important you are).

Have a serious reaction?  Take it seriously.  You think you're allergic?  Experiment.  Quietly please.
 
2014-01-20 12:56:27 PM  

Skyd1v: Far Cough: DRTA -- is the answer "they lie"?

<snip>

You know who sucks?  Applebee's sucks.  Their vegetarian option is NOTHING.  And it's not as if they make up for it by offering great meat and fish.

Georgio - The owner and head chef at D1vwife's favorite restaurant - has been known to fill a mixing bowl full of steamed spinach and place it with great ceremony in front of anyone who dares to ask for a vegetarian dish in his restaurant.  I've seen him do it twice now and it is hilarious to watch.

/try the veal.
//no, seriously, try it.  It is awesome.


That's awesome! A bowl of freshly clipped Kentucky blue-grass would be even better.
 
2014-01-20 12:56:44 PM  

Buttknuckle: I'm getting to the point now that when I hear the word "gluten" I want to kill someone.


I'm amused when I go to Petsmart and see all the gluten-free dog foods.  Who knew?
 
2014-01-20 12:56:53 PM  

Buttknuckle: I'm getting to the point now that when I hear the word "gluten" I want to kill someone.


this.
 
2014-01-20 12:58:11 PM  

sprgrss: Completely different response in the body. if your wheat allergy is misdiagnosed as gluten-intolerance (which can only be diagnosed by a biopsy of the small intestine) then you need to find a new doctor.


Celiac requires the biopsy. But there's at least one person in my life who has non-Celiac gluten intolerance that was diagnosed via a combination of endoscopy, allergy testing, and ruling out other dietary issues. He just gets horrible stomach issues and shiats a lot when he eats gluten. Allergies can also manifest as stomach issues like diarrhea, vomiting, and cramps. So the only way to make sure it ISN'T an allergy instead of gluten-induced IBS is to get tested by an allergist.
 
2014-01-20 12:58:45 PM  

Cold_Sassy: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.

You sound like a self-entitled "dream customer."


No, I order from the menu. If I need something done differently, I fully expect to pay for it. If your menu says "No Substitutions", that's fine too. It may be a deal-breaker, but no hard feelings, I'll just go somewhere that I can get what I want.  I also tip well. I was raised on tips, so I understand why they're important.
 
2014-01-20 12:58:46 PM  
I once thought I was lactose intolerant ... but I switched to organic milk products and never had a problem since. The residual antibiotics in the dairy were enough to make the flora in my digestive tract revolt.

No actual food allergies here, despite having a metric crapload (larger than an imperial crapload for those who care about uniform standards of crapload measuring systems) of allergies to animal dander, molds, pollens, dust mites, etc. I am allergic to almost everything but food.
 
2014-01-20 12:59:26 PM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.


With that attitude, you are surely getting a little extra "something" in your food.
Bon apetit.
 
2014-01-20 01:00:50 PM  
"Lady at four is allergic to carrots, can you do some kale without the garnish?"
"I guess, but she had the consomme?!"
*shrug*
 
2014-01-20 01:00:50 PM  

Trillian Astra: sprgrss: Completely different response in the body. if your wheat allergy is misdiagnosed as gluten-intolerance (which can only be diagnosed by a biopsy of the small intestine) then you need to find a new doctor.

Celiac requires the biopsy. But there's at least one person in my life who has non-Celiac gluten intolerance that was diagnosed via a combination of endoscopy, allergy testing, and ruling out other dietary issues. He just gets horrible stomach issues and shiats a lot when he eats gluten. Allergies can also manifest as stomach issues like diarrhea, vomiting, and cramps. So the only way to make sure it ISN'T an allergy instead of gluten-induced IBS is to get tested by an allergist.


No, the way to check for gluten intolerance is to go to a gastrointerologist.

And again, there is no such thing as a gluten allergy.  Completely different reactions.
 
2014-01-20 01:01:08 PM  

Cold_Sassy: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.

You sound like a self-entitled "dream customer."


And someone who may receive tainted food.

/taint
 
2014-01-20 01:02:45 PM  
The precisely accurate terminology is confusing, but plenty of people have genuine adverse reactions to certain foods. The two women behind this blog had multiple sensitivities pop up well into adulthood:

http://survivingthefoodallergyapocalypse.wordpress.com/

They both cook very well and provide many useful recipes.
 
2014-01-20 01:03:14 PM  

PolyHatSnake: My favorite part was where they mentioned it is unknown what is causing all these allergies and sensitivities to suddenly pop up. I have a theory. We've been making the world TOO safe of a place. The weakest herd members are no longer being culled, on a wholesale level. To paraphrase Jeff Goldblum: natural selection uh, finds a way.



The short version:  Lack of exposure to pathogens (i.e. Polio) decreases the body's ability to build defenses, causing a person to be more susceptible to them.
I saw a show regarding the history of Polio; the increased number and magnitude of polio outbreaks in the US was tied directly to the increased sterilization of maternity wards.  Newborn's bodies were not building their defense systems.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poliomyelitis
(from the History section)
Before the 20th century, polio infections were rarely seen in infants before six months of age, most cases occurring in children six months to four years of age.[98] Poorer sanitation of the time resulted in a constant exposure to the virus, which enhanced a natural immunity within the population. In developed countries during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, improvements were made in community sanitation, including better sewage disposal and clean water supplies. These changes drastically increased the proportion of children and adults at risk of paralytic polio infection, by reducing childhood exposure and immunity to the disease.[98]
 
2014-01-20 01:04:28 PM  

Kanemano: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.

Why, you wouldn't order a BMW at a Ford dealership ,

They gave you a product list, don't like it go to another product supplier


However, sometimes you ask for something and have to check.  For instance, I bought a sandwich whole wheat bread at Panera once, didn't think anything of it, until my throat started to close up.  The outside of the bread looked fine.  When I opened the sandwich, I could see the bread was riddled with sunflower seeds.  I haven't had the allergy long, but now I ask whenever I think there's any chance a food might have it.  You'd be surprised how many do.  If the place I'm eating offers a salad that looks awesome, is the only healthy thing on the menu, but has sunflower seeds on it, should I A: leave and make my entire party leave, or B: ask the waiter if they can hold the sunflower seeds?
 
2014-01-20 01:04:30 PM  
Despite what the submitter asserts, I do have actual food allergies & intolerances, many of them dating back from when I was a child, some more recent, such as an intolerance to canola.

It can also be disappointing to go to a restaurant such as a Chinese buffet & not be able to partake of the Mongolian grill because there's no way to avoid cross contamination. I love lamb, but it would be grilled on the same surface that shellfish had been prepared just moments before. It's just not worth it to risk anaphylaxis.

Same reason I avoid Thai restaurants since it's pretty common for peanuts to be in quite a few of the menu items. And for the record, I've had a peanut allergy for over 45 years. Same with shellfish.
 
2014-01-20 01:05:24 PM  

sprgrss: No, the way to check for gluten intolerance is to go to a gastrointerologist.


Where did I say to not go to a gastrointerologist or that people are allergic to gluten? I just said ruling out wheat allergy should be done by an allergist who can do the actual allergy testing as well as an endoscopy to rule out Celiac.
 
2014-01-20 01:05:44 PM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdIXrF34Bz0

Bobby: I'd like an omelet, plain, and a chicken salad sandwich on wheat toast, no mayonnaise, no butter, no lettuce. And a cup of coffee.

Waitress: A #2, chicken salad sand. Hold the butter, the lettuce, the mayonnaise, and a cup of coffee. Anything else?

Bobby: Yeah, now all you have to do is hold the chicken, bring me the toast, give me a check for the chicken salad sandwich, and you haven't broken any rules.

Waitress: You want me to hold the chicken, huh?

Bobby: I want you to hold it between your knees.
 
2014-01-20 01:06:12 PM  
Fark: BE AN INDIVIDUAL! BUT FARK YOU IF YOU ARE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER PEOPLE!
 
2014-01-20 01:10:13 PM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Cold_Sassy: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.

You sound like a self-entitled "dream customer."

No, I order from the menu. If I need something done differently, I fully expect to pay for it. If your menu says "No Substitutions", that's fine too. It may be a deal-breaker, but no hard feelings, I'll just go somewhere that I can get what I want.  I also tip well. I was raised on tips, so I understand why they're important.


Thanks for clearing that up because apparently a lot of other people interpreted it that way.  Glad to hear you are not like that.
 
2014-01-20 01:10:58 PM  
Also, some of us "healthy eaters" have discovered that you can ask for gluten-free options to avoid refined flour.  While wheat and wheat gluten are, themselves, not bad things, refined flour comes to us straight from the pits of Hades.

So I order gluten-free all the time, not because of celiac, not because I'm a loon, but because I can ensure I avoid foods that process way too easily by my body.  Given the fact that I've dropped 60 pounds and have kept it off (it's all I had to lose - I'm skinny now), I'd say it was successful.
 
2014-01-20 01:11:51 PM  
memecrunch.com
 
2014-01-20 01:12:27 PM  

Cold_Sassy: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Cold_Sassy: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.

You sound like a self-entitled "dream customer."

No, I order from the menu. If I need something done differently, I fully expect to pay for it. If your menu says "No Substitutions", that's fine too. It may be a deal-breaker, but no hard feelings, I'll just go somewhere that I can get what I want.  I also tip well. I was raised on tips, so I understand why they're important.

Thanks for clearing that up because apparently a lot of other people interpreted it that way.  Glad to hear you are not like that.


No problem. I reread what I'd written, and it was a bit inflammatory, and gave the wrong impression. That's on me. :)
 
2014-01-20 01:12:33 PM  
As the parent of a child that has bizarre "allergies"....dairy, garlic, and tree nuts...I will place a good amount of blame on the doctors/allergists.  So here's how all this starts...a baby, in due course, is introduced to table food.  The baby has a reaction to the food.  In my kid's case, it was quick development of hives.

First, we try to narrow things down ourselves...dairy was an easy one to figure out.  No idea why she still is breaking out, especially when there are no obvious allergens present (seriously...garlic?  who the #^&* is allergic to garlic?)

So now what? I'm not a doctor...nor is the wife.  So we get an appointment with an allergist and after various investigations and some testing, the results show "off the charts" reaction for dairy, garlic, and tree nuts.   Physically, when exposed to these things, hives quickly develop, but once contact is removed, they subside quickly.  Once, she accidently drank a whole cup of milk and the hives covered her face and chest for about an hour...that was the worst we ever saw.

We get a prescription for an epipen and the instructions not to give her those foods (duh).  I have no idea whether exposure would ever lead to a serious health issue...the allergist hasn't ever downplayed the risk, presumably because he would have some liability.  So the designation of allergy persists.  We hate it, but we have nothing to go on to downplay it to a 'sensitivity'.

We manage it mostly by making everything from scratch; we take some basic precautions at restaurants with regard to what we order for her, but no demands of separate grease or anything that crazy.
 
2014-01-20 01:13:13 PM  
I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.
 
2014-01-20 01:13:14 PM  

Airius: I once thought I was lactose intolerant ... but I switched to organic milk products and never had a problem since. The residual antibiotics in the dairy were enough to make the flora in my digestive tract revolt.

No actual food allergies here, despite having a metric crapload (larger than an imperial crapload for those who care about uniform standards of crapload measuring systems) of allergies to animal dander, molds, pollens, dust mites, etc. I am allergic to almost everything but food.


I just realized that I get sick after drinking milk, poof, out of the blue it appeared.  But I think mine is related to milk products.  I get a little ill when I eat yogurt, I am inclined to try soy milk.
 
2014-01-20 01:13:15 PM  
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
of course not..... but maybe
 
2014-01-20 01:17:03 PM  
The clear answer is to ban food. All of it.
 
2014-01-20 01:19:42 PM  

reillan: Kanemano: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.

Why, you wouldn't order a BMW at a Ford dealership ,

They gave you a product list, don't like it go to another product supplier

However, sometimes you ask for something and have to check.  For instance, I bought a sandwich whole wheat bread at Panera once, didn't think anything of it, until my throat started to close up.  The outside of the bread looked fine.  When I opened the sandwich, I could see the bread was riddled with sunflower seeds.  I haven't had the allergy long, but now I ask whenever I think there's any chance a food might have it.  You'd be surprised how many do.  If the place I'm eating offers a salad that looks awesome, is the only healthy thing on the menu, but has sunflower seeds on it, should I A: leave and make my entire party leave, or B: ask the waiter if they can hold the sunflower seeds?


C: Eat the sunflower seeds, die, and ensure your weak genetics are eliminated from the available pool.

Jokes aside, that type of request in totally reasonable. It's a simple matter of not adding a topping, not a major alteration to a dish.
 
2014-01-20 01:21:07 PM  
i41.tinypic.com
 
2014-01-20 01:21:57 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdFMIk38Ms

This was the beginning of the down fall of our society.
 
2014-01-20 01:22:41 PM  

Pangea: mr_a: I really am allergic to shellfish, but mostly my interaction with restaurants is asking if there is shellfish in a dish, and ordering something else if there is.

The real problems are when I travel in Asia...there doesn't seem to be a word in most Asian languages for "shellfish". I actually have a little card that I carry, written in the native language, which explains the problem.

I'm sure your situation is real, and a risky allergy is no laughing matter.

Having said that, I still choose to imagine your card to be like the poorly translated chinese tattoos on sorority girls.

It actually says "Picky American. Just nod and smile then serve standard dish."


Or "This round-eye doesn't eat shrimp...but goat testicles, monkey brains and road kill are all just fine".
 
2014-01-20 01:23:59 PM  

inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

The allergy card is played all too often today. I wonder how these kids survive trips to the grocery store sometimes. 'Little Tommy has a nut allergy' while mom walks right by a display of peanuts somebody is scooping out into a bag. 'Little Janie is allergic to wheat.' as mom walks by the bakery where wheat flour is in the air.

FFS! There are people with legitimate allergies that are marginalized because you think your precious snowflake might be allergic because you fed them something and it didn't sit well in their tummy. You think the kid is allergic to X product? Take them to the doctor and get the test done, otherwise let the other kids have their PB&J sandwiches and their wheat flour breads.

Not only that, but it'll stop the 'it doesn't agree with your kid's tummy' that parents think are allergies. I think the article used 'intolerance' in it. When you're lactose intolerant, it means you don't digest milk like many people can. Being in the vicinity of milk isn't deadly. Some people who think their kids have nut allergies? The kid's bodies just don't process nuts properly. There isn't a question the kid won't like it if they eat nuts, but they won't have an allergic (and life threatening) reaction to them.


Not every allergic reaction is life threatening, and even light reactions can spontaneously increase and cause anaphylaxis.

I'm slightly allergic to certain nuts, peanuts being one of them, they cause my mouth and face to itch and cause slight constriction of my esophagus along with hours of gastrointestinal pain. Just because I haven't had a major reaction yet doesn't mean it can't happen in the future.

Also, people can develope allergies to things that didn't used to effect them at any time, that's what happened to me with the nuts. I used to love peanuts and then one day, bam!, allergic to peanuts.

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for
 
2014-01-20 01:25:07 PM  

inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

The allergy card is played all too often today. I wonder how these kids survive trips to the grocery store sometimes. 'Little Tommy has a nut allergy' while mom walks right by a display of peanuts somebody is scooping out into a bag. 'Little Janie is allergic to wheat.' as mom walks by the bakery where wheat flour is in the air.

FFS! There are people with legitimate allergies that are marginalized because you think your precious snowflake might be allergic because you fed them something and it didn't sit well in their tummy. You think the kid is allergic to X product? Take them to the doctor and get the test done, otherwise let the other kids have their PB&J sandwiches and their wheat flour breads.

Not only that, but it'll stop the 'it doesn't agree with your kid's tummy' that parents think are allergies. I think the article used 'intolerance' in it. When you're lactose intolerant, it means you don't digest milk like many people can. Being in the vicinity of milk isn't deadly. Some people who think their kids have nut allergies? The kid's bodies just don't process nuts properly. There isn't a question the kid won't like it if they eat nuts, but they won't have an allergic (and life threatening) reaction to them.


I would have to agree with you on this one. Its like the saying "when everything is racist, nothing is racist."

I'm not trying to detract from people who actually have allergies, nor am I not saying that they aren't life threatening or dangerous, but it almost seems fad-like to have one of these allergies or "intolerances." sometimes I just want to take a slice of bread and slap these people in their face with it.

I know people who claim that they have intolerance or allergic to gluten. While yes, they might be less congested if they don't eat gluten, but as they walk around and talk about how hard it is to be gluten intolerant/allergic it takes away from people who actually are allergic and or intolerant to gluten.
 
2014-01-20 01:26:34 PM  

WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.


I just tell people I don't like seafood. I don't feel bad about that, either. But just because I don't want to eat it, doesn't mean they can't. I recognize that if everybody else is having seafood, it's up to ME to come up with an alternative for myself. It's not up to the group to change their plans, on account of my dietary restrictions.
 
2014-01-20 01:26:39 PM  
"Hi, I'd like the grilled salmon salad, but make sure the croutons are gluten free and I'm allergic to peanuts and shellfish, so make sure my salmon is prepared in a different pan than other fish, and I only eat wild-caught, not farm raised salmon, can I substitute tomatoes--but only if they're completely organically grown--for the mushrooms, and I don't eat any dairy products, so make sure the salmon isn't grilled in butter, and can you bring bottled water instead of tap water and also..."

Later, in the kitchen...[Chef]: "Hurrrrrrrrkhkhkhkhkhkh, phlough!"
 
2014-01-20 01:28:08 PM  

PolyHatSnake: My favorite part was where they mentioned it is unknown what is causing all these allergies and sensitivities to suddenly pop up. I have a theory. We've been making the world TOO safe of a place. The weakest herd members are no longer being culled, on a wholesale level. To paraphrase Jeff Goldblum: natural selection uh, finds a way.


Already in my Photobucket:

<a href="http://smg.photobucket.com/user/CitizenjaQ/media/005.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v128/CitizenjaQ/005.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 005.jpg"/></a>
 
2014-01-20 01:29:06 PM  
ARGH.

img.photobucket.com

/allergic to preview
 
2014-01-20 01:30:23 PM  
Why not put up a big sign; "*Allergen Customized for only $20.00 Extra on your order!"

Right in the front, in 12" high letters.
 
2014-01-20 01:31:29 PM  
Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.
 
2014-01-20 01:31:47 PM  

glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

The allergy card is played all too often today. I wonder how these kids survive trips to the grocery store sometimes. 'Little Tommy has a nut allergy' while mom walks right by a display of peanuts somebody is scooping out into a bag. 'Little Janie is allergic to wheat.' as mom walks by the bakery where wheat flour is in the air.

FFS! There are people with legitimate allergies that are marginalized because you think your precious snowflake might be allergic because you fed them something and it didn't sit well in their tummy. You think the kid is allergic to X product? Take them to the doctor and get the test done, otherwise let the other kids have their PB&J sandwiches and their wheat flour breads.

Not only that, but it'll stop the 'it doesn't agree with your kid's tummy' that parents think are allergies. I think the article used 'intolerance' in it. When you're lactose intolerant, it means you don't digest milk like many people can. Being in the vicinity of milk isn't deadly. Some people who think their kids have nut allergies? The kid's bodies just don't process nuts properly. There isn't a question the kid won't like it if they eat nuts, but they won't have an allergic (and life threatening) reaction to them.

Not every allergic reaction is life threatening, and even light reactions can spontaneously increase and cause anaphylaxis.

I'm slightly allergic to certain nuts, peanuts being one of them, they cause my mouth and face to itch and cause slight constriction of my esophagus along with hours of gastrointestinal pain. Just because I haven't had a major reaction yet doesn't mean it can't happen in the future.

Also, people can develope allergies to things that didn't used to effect them at any time, that's what happened to me with the nuts. I used to love peanuts and then one day, bam!, allergic to peanuts.

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for


That being said, I did work in restaurants for over ten years. If it's something light and easily removable from the dish, by all means ask for it to be left off. But if you're allergic to onions, for the love of god don't order something like a creole dish where onions are one of the major components.

/Used to love it when people would say they're allergic to mayonnaise and then proceed to order ranch or bleu cheese dressing which are like 80% mayonnaise.
 
2014-01-20 01:32:39 PM  
Eh, we all know how this will end up being standardized:

Price(allergy-free whatever) = price(whatever) * (how much of a pain in the ass it is to change the dish)

People will  alwaysbe willing to cater to your delusions so long as you're willing to, y'know, pay more.

Them doing it for free is going to take exactly as long as it takes the industry as a whole to realize that it's not usually an actual medical problem and is just an affectation in the vast majority of cases.  Once that finally clicks at an institutional level, I feel a little sorry for the .01% of these people that actually have component allergies, because they're gonna be stuck paying the surcharges too.
 
2014-01-20 01:34:49 PM  

Trillian Astra: Submitter is soooo witty, saying food allergies are fake.


A lot are.

My ex has been tested several times over the past 15 years and does have a few allergies. She also has weekly allergy treatments, carries Allegra around all the time and takes then fairly often, and she carries an epi pen but has never had to use it. Mostly she avoids the item or dishes that contain it but sometimes she'll add a Benadryl or two and have a small experience with it anyway. She already knew she was allergic to some things before being tested because the reaction was immediate and obvious (pecans), some results surprised her because she hadn't had much if any exposure to the tem (horses is one), some were wrong (she's supposed to be allergic to peanuts but practically lives on Reese's cups & Snicker bars), and some started out strong and then faded with years of shots and experimental exposure, e.g., she used to have an intensely itching eye-watering sensitivity to cats but always liked them at a distance so she worked to overcome it and now she has her own chubby tom who spends half his evening in her lap.

And she believes that a lot of people's allergies are exaggerated ("they should try to get over it instead of just cave in") and some are just made up ("being allergic to peanuts seems like some kind of fad").
 
2014-01-20 01:36:04 PM  

glmorrs1: /Used to love it when people would say they're allergic to mayonnaise and then proceed to order ranch or bleu cheese dressing which are like 80% mayonnaise.


i don't think most people even know what mayonaise is.  (egg, lemon/vinegar, oil).  if you are allergic to mayonaise, than you allergic to something that is in almost everything.
 
2014-01-20 01:36:23 PM  

Kanemano: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Fark that. Here's the deal: I pay, and you serve me what I ordered.

Why, you wouldn't order a BMW at a Ford dealership ,

They gave you a product list, don't like it go to another product supplier


What?  Going to a restaurant isn't the same as having a personal chef who has to cook whatever you tell him too?
 
2014-01-20 01:36:27 PM  
We have dined with a couple where the lady makes so many modifications to the order that it doesn't at all resemble what's on the menu. Makes me want to scream and walk out.
 
2014-01-20 01:36:36 PM  
I am literally standing on line at a restaurant right now waiting for all hell to break loose...

I didn't ever want to be a cook. I have no formal cooking training. I kind of hate cooking. But by god...I'm great at it and everybody is going to be making moaning sounds around here in 10 minutes at how great this food is.

That being said, I take your allergies very seriously and am happy to sell you anything that you can eat.

That being said, I hate hearing about what kinds of foods adults dislike. Grow the fark up and manage your lives...I'm not your doctor or personal trainer or crystal medicine shaman or your Mom or your...
 
2014-01-20 01:37:11 PM  
I think it's all from the last couple generations who felt that they have to disinfect every single surface in the house. If you never are exposed to anything, how do you develop a tolerance to anything? Peanuts? When we were kids, every kid in the neighborhood practically Lived off of Peanut Butter. I never knew there was any Allergy to it till sometime in my 20's. Gluten? I don't even know what that is! When I was i a kid, you ate what was put on the table and that was that. If you turned up your nose at something, Tough, that's what everyone else is eating, are you Mr. Special or something? Some things I still won't eat today though. Mrs. Pauls fish sticks. I seem to remember I couldn't put enough ketchup on those SOB's! Spam, Mac & Cheese, cut up hot dogs in beans. Seems we ate on the Cheap a Lot when I was a kid. Dad liked Liver but the 1st and only time I ate that I thought I was gonna throw up right there at the table. Later in life my Mom said we didn't always eat cheap like that. Well how come I remember it so well?
 
2014-01-20 01:38:20 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: "Hi, I'd like the grilled salmon salad, but make sure the croutons are gluten free and I'm allergic to peanuts and shellfish, so make sure my salmon is prepared in a different pan than other fish, and I only eat wild-caught, not farm raised salmon, can I substitute tomatoes--but only if they're completely organically grown--for the mushrooms, and I don't eat any dairy products, so make sure the salmon isn't grilled in butter, and can you bring bottled water instead of tap water and also..."

Later, in the kitchen...[Chef]: "Hurrrrrrrrkhkhkhkhkhkh, phlough!"


I worked in foodservice for a decade, and I NEVER messed with a patron's food. No matter how pissed off they made me. There is no call for that sort of nonsense. That's not to be saying that it doesn't happen, just that I never did it...
 
2014-01-20 01:38:52 PM  
Not good enough for the average Mom with a fragile snowflake. She'd demand that the wait staff slap the dishes containing any traces of peanuts or whatever off the tables and demand the diners vacate the premises immediately, then demand that staff don HazMat suits and scrub every last square inch of everything before her Precious would step in through the front door.

Then she'll want a notarized document hand-written about how sorry they are for having such toxic items and will pledge their entire year's pay toward some idiotic allergy-survivor's group.

And if they don't comply 100%, she'll sue all their asses for being such insensitive bastards!!!!!!

/Nothing more asshole-ish than a Mother with an allergic child.
 
2014-01-20 01:40:51 PM  
I have a milk allergy - the whole hives thing, some GI distress.  I've had it since I was a baby.  Annoying on the "ice cream" level, and sometimes I'll have it and just put up with the effects, but almond milk and such work fine most of the time.

I also have an alcohol "allergy".  It's not actually an allergy - I'm missing the second enzyme that processes alcohol, so instead of getting drunk, I basically go straight into alcohol poisoning, even for extremely small amounts.  But saying, "I'm allergic to alcohol" is a lot easier and simpler to explain to people who insist I try this balsamic vinegar or that specialty wine.  "No, really, this shiat can kill me," is usually the only follow-up I need.

But I pretty much don't ever ask for specialty food prep at a restaurant; I may ask if a dish contains alcohol, but if there's even a little doubt, I'll just order something else..  About the limit is if there's a side-sauce that comes with something, and the sauce has alcohol (pretty common with fish dishes, usually white wine), I'll just tell them I don't need it (and save them from having to make it at all).  I have a friend I go to dinner with often who is constantly asking to switch this side with that dish or this other sauce, and he can never understand why it annoys the crap out of me.
 
2014-01-20 01:42:50 PM  

Airius: I once thought I was lactose intolerant ... but I switched to organic milk products and never had a problem since. The residual antibiotics in the dairy were enough to make the flora in my digestive tract revolt.

No actual food allergies here, despite having a metric crapload (larger than an imperial crapload for those who care about uniform standards of crapload measuring systems) of allergies to animal dander, molds, pollens, dust mites, etc. I am allergic to almost everything but food.


Eating organic solves quite a  few 'allergic' issues. The US has a very high rate of allergic and asthmatic people, also numerous food additives. Coincidence?
If you're in a restaurant just find something you can eat, go somewhere else or go home and cook your own food. Pretty simple.
 
2014-01-20 01:44:05 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.


That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"
 
2014-01-20 01:45:13 PM  

Lapdance: Some things I still won't eat today though. Mrs. Pauls fish sticks. I seem to remember I couldn't put enough ketchup on those SOB's!


Well that's your problem, right there...

newseawin.com
 
2014-01-20 01:47:41 PM  
If food is prepared a la minute, then it may be reasonable for certain parts of dishes to have ingredients removed. The dish will probably be unbalanced, but that is better than getting sick. Your biggest problem is going to be things that are prepped ahead of time that can't possibly be accommodated on the fly. Complicated and slow simmer sauces aren't going to be made on the spot, therefore it isn't reasonable and you should take the chefs/waiters word that it can't be changed.

If you go to a chain restaurant, say applebees, olive garden or chili's, the cooks have zero control really over the contents of the food. Everything that can be is prepared at a factory. The cooks are glorified technicians. They are given a formula and place it on a conveyer belt. They have no knowledge of what are in the sauces. The good news is that those dishes probably have very little in the way of the big allergens involved in the dish.

There is no way that the picture above reflects real allergies though. You can't tell me that a 50 seat restaurant has %80 allergic patrons. The majority of that is preferences. If they those %80 are true allergies then the owner is creating havoc for his kitchen. Total quality goes down when almost every order is different than menu.
 
2014-01-20 01:48:32 PM  
Counterpoint: there are no allergies.
 
2014-01-20 01:51:07 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: Despite what the submitter asserts, I do have actual food allergies & intolerances, many of them dating back from when I was a child, some more recent, such as an intolerance to canola.

It can also be disappointing to go to a restaurant such as a Chinese buffet & not be able to partake of the Mongolian grill because there's no way to avoid cross contamination. I love lamb, but it would be grilled on the same surface that shellfish had been prepared just moments before. It's just not worth it to risk anaphylaxis.

Same reason I avoid Thai restaurants since it's pretty common for peanuts to be in quite a few of the menu items. And for the record, I've had a peanut allergy for over 45 years. Same with shellfish.


What the people in this thread are trying to say is that you're obviously a genetic abomination and that you should have been thrown of a cliff at birth, like in ancient Sparta, or that you're faking it and that you should suck it up, princess!  How dare you survive past 2 years of age and inconvenience line cooks at the restaurant?
 
2014-01-20 01:53:44 PM  

WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.


Is that a euphemism for something?
 
2014-01-20 01:57:07 PM  
There also might be a peer-pressure aspect to the rising number of spurious intolerances.  I am lactose-tolerant, and gluten-tolerant too.  It's a little amazing, though, how people who are intolerant of those foods are always trying to convice me that I must be intolerant, too.
 
2014-01-20 01:58:29 PM  
The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate on individual plates, as opposed to going by reflex. That slows us down. That causes backlog. It upsets the natural timing, and the whole restaurant is then slowed down because of that. I get four special orders in a row, the next three tables are set back as well. And then there are the folks who imagine that we have a dozen fryers dedicated to each seafood dish, and tell a server that they have a specific allergy, but want a dish just without the offending item, and simply don't realize that the oil itself has already been used for said item. Which means that we have to communicate with said server, who then has to relay that to the customer, who then replaces their order. Educating the staff to run interference to make sure the patron knows that we can't make some accommodations is key, but it doesn't always happen. Waitstaff get busy, they get distracted, it happens, and when it does, it slows down the whole line, ups the stress level, and annoys the crap out of us, because three guys on a line can handle a few hundred folks easy enough, and the backlog created just gums up the works.

You have an allergy, then be aware. Yes, if you have a seafood allergy, you might want to avoid fried foods. You have a dairy allergy, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Asking for a vegetarian version of a special is not always an option. Pasta sans sauce is easy, substituting rice for pasta is easy enough, trying to order a marinara without garlic and onions means you're a dumbass, and your stupidity just cost me a few minutes I could have plated two entire tables in the time it takes to communicate with the waitstaff that there is NO way in Hells your request can be granted, even if you're trying to be polite and ask ahead if it is possible. On a busy night, I'm not going to make you a special putanesca without garlic and onions, and substitute black and green olives, but no anchovies, and fresh thyme instead of the fresh basil, and no salt but extra pepper. Possible on a slow night? Sure, but be aware of your surroundings, because your special request means that others are going to have their night slowed down a bit too.

You don't like mushrooms? Then don't order the burger that HAS mushrooms on it. Plain and simple. You don't like garlic? Then maybe keep the f*ck away from the Scampi. Don't like spinach? Then maybe the Florentine isn't for you. No bacon on a club sandwich? Easy. No bun for a burger? Simplicity. Be aware of what you're asking for, and insisting that the waitstaff "just see if they can..." when they tell you right off the bat that it's not possible is just bogging down everyone else's night.

I want my customers to be happy. I understand that folks have issues with allergies. I also realize that there are a ton of folks who don't have allergies and are just using the excuse to try to get a substitution without looking like a picky douche. I know that some folks are looking to be special with their very rare and sudden 'important dietary needs" too. It's a weird time, when you look to make yourself feel special by feigning a weakness. Not all folks are doing so. There are very much folks with dietary restrictions, but be aware that your restrictions don't translate to "getting whatever I ask for."
 
2014-01-20 02:00:12 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.


Gluten is one of the easiest foods to avoid in the restaurant scene these days.  I can't think of very many restaurants that I frequent that don't have multiple gluten free options.
 
2014-01-20 02:04:48 PM  

hubiestubert: The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate on individual ...


Well said.
I had a customer at the wine bar I used to run who would bring his wife in for pizza once in a blue moon. She had celiac.  He would stop by at 3 pm with a gluten-free pizza crust & let me know when they'd be coming in that night.  I'd knock a couple bucks off the price of his pizza.  Everybody was happy.
 
2014-01-20 02:05:24 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.

I just tell people I don't like seafood. I don't feel bad about that, either. But just because I don't want to eat it, doesn't mean they can't. I recognize that if everybody else is having seafood, it's up to ME to come up with an alternative for myself. It's not up to the group to change their plans, on account of my dietary restrictions.


Nowadays I do just say "I don't like seafood, so more for you, eh?" Haven't used the "allergic" line in years, but it seemed the most effective and polite way to shut down arguments that I should try this or that, or just haven't had it prepared properly, etc.
 
2014-01-20 02:05:28 PM  

pute kisses like a man: glmorrs1: /Used to love it when people would say they're allergic to mayonnaise and then proceed to order ranch or bleu cheese dressing which are like 80% mayonnaise.

i don't think most people even know what mayonaise is.  (egg, lemon/vinegar, oil).  if you are allergic to mayonaise, than you allergic to something that is in almost everything.


This is the phenomenon that results from people saying they're allergic to something when they just have an aversion to a taste or texture.

"Being grossed out" is not an allergic response. I'm allergic to smelling Spencer's terrible Monday morning shiats.
 
2014-01-20 02:05:51 PM  

glmorrs1: //Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for


The Fark?  Can't you buy one out of pocket?  It's not like you need to take a second mortgage for one?
 
2014-01-20 02:07:05 PM  

FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"


http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.
 
2014-01-20 02:10:05 PM  
"The number of people who have a food allergy is growing, but there is no clear answer as to why."

Because they are allowed to breed.
 
2014-01-20 02:10:41 PM  

Egoy3k: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

Gluten is one of the easiest foods to avoid in the restaurant scene these days.  I can't think of very many restaurants that I frequent that don't have multiple gluten free options.


I rarely think of gluten.  it's not in a lot of foods.  have an animal, some vegetables, and maybe some fruit somewhere.  you have satisfied 3 elemental groups: soul, earth, and air (since fruits are generally in trees and fall).  you might even get some water with your soul by eating fish (was going to make a joke, like sole).  then fire is all in the heat.

all 5 elemental groups can be covered without ever getting any gluten.

/ yes, i follow an elemental diet.  and yes, soul is very important.
 
2014-01-20 02:11:08 PM  
Like fast food places, you always order something without an item to make sure they cook it fresh. If you have an allergy and they went the scrape it off route they would be in big trouble. Holding a key item makes sure they have to cook up a new item for you and not give you one of the already made stock sitting under the warmer.
 
2014-01-20 02:11:12 PM  
Like most things - it's a matter of degrees.

Please leave the bacon bits off of my salad?   Shouldn't be a problem

Please make my pasta sauce without garlic?   Fark off and eat something else.
 
2014-01-20 02:11:36 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.


http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/
 
2014-01-20 02:13:51 PM  
static4.wikia.nocookie.net

Didn't read the thread
 
2014-01-20 02:14:24 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/


The "Wheat Belly" doctor is a crank and a fraud.
 
2014-01-20 02:14:51 PM  

wambu: "The number of people who have a food allergy is growing, but there is no clear answer as to why."

Because they are allowed to breed.


The simplicity and elegance of this observation is actually deceptively deep.

Maybe all the people with chronic allergies 40 years ago just died as children.
 
2014-01-20 02:16:21 PM  

WordyGrrl: Nowadays I do just say "I don't like seafood, so more for you, eh?" Haven't used the "allergic" line in years, but it seemed the most effective and polite way to shut down arguments that I should try this or that, or just haven't had it prepared properly, etc.


I would think the easy rebuttal is "Kind like lesbians just haven't got a proper dicking." I mean, you know what you like and no amount of trying something you don't is going to make you like it.
 
2014-01-20 02:18:36 PM  

pute kisses like a man: I rarely think of gluten.  it's not in a lot of foods.  have an animal, some vegetables, and maybe some fruit somewhere.  you have satisfied 3 elemental groups: soul, earth, and air (since fruits are generally in trees and fall).  you might even get some water with your soul by eating fish (was going to make a joke, like sole).  then fire is all in the heat.all 5 elemental groups can be covered without ever getting any gluten./ yes, i follow an elemental diet.  and yes, soul is very important.


0.tqn.com
 
2014-01-20 02:19:53 PM  

ReverendJynxed: Like fast food places, you always order something without an item to make sure they cook it fresh. If you have an allergy and they went the scrape it off route they would be in big trouble. Holding a key item makes sure they have to cook up a new item for you and not give you one of the already made stock sitting under the warmer.


You can easily tell what has been sitting around without doing this. If meat is dry, if veggies are soggy, if pasta isn't al dente then chances are they were made up earlier. And there probably is no way to tell just how long ago. Best to write the place off.
 
2014-01-20 02:20:04 PM  

lockers: If you go to a chain restaurant, say applebees, olive garden or chili's, the cooks have zero control really over the contents of the food. Everything that can be is prepared at a factory. The cooks are glorified technicians. They are given a formula and place it on a conveyer belt. They have no knowledge of what are in the sauces.


After 26 years in the food and beverage service industry, my sister took a job at an Applebees. She said she's never seen anything like it. The cooks don't cook, they heat. Almost everything is prepackaged, with no skills needed. As a bartender, she said it's the only place she's ever worked that instead of timed pours, they measure every ounce of liquor poured. Keeps them out of trouble with the ABC, I guess.
 
2014-01-20 02:20:54 PM  

baconbeard: Skyd1v: Far Cough: DRTA -- is the answer "they lie"?

<snip>

You know who sucks?  Applebee's sucks.  Their vegetarian option is NOTHING.  And it's not as if they make up for it by offering great meat and fish.

Georgio - The owner and head chef at D1vwife's favorite restaurant - has been known to fill a mixing bowl full of steamed spinach and place it with great ceremony in front of anyone who dares to ask for a vegetarian dish in his restaurant.  I've seen him do it twice now and it is hilarious to watch.

/try the veal.
//no, seriously, try it.  It is awesome.

That's awesome! A bowl of freshly clipped Kentucky blue-grass would be even better.


So Georgio is a dickbag then.  God forbid a group of friends or family enjoy his restaurant if one member of the group doesn't eat meat.  Put some actual seasoning on the spinach, fine, that's a dish.  No reason to be a humongous dickbag about it and serve something purposely flavorless to say fark you to a paying customer.  Some "chef".

By the way, by vegetarian option I didn't mean Applebee's necessarily needs to label things "HEY VEGGIE SECTION HERE".  I meant that even after trying, it's nearly impossible to order anything off their menu without meat.  This is not usually a big problem at other restaurants (pasta, egg dishes, cheese dishes, salads, pizza, etc.), both up and down the scale, though of course it doesn't get much further down.

Hell, even Cracker Barrel is more accommodating.
 
2014-01-20 02:21:18 PM  

ReverendJynxed: Like fast food places, you always order something without an item to make sure they cook it fresh. If you have an allergy and they went the scrape it off route they would be in big trouble. Holding a key item makes sure they have to cook up a new item for you and not give you one of the already made stock sitting under the warmer.


I have some really bad news for you about fast food.  Everything is 'made to order' well more correctly it is 'assembled to order'  your cheeseburger without pickles is no more fresh than one with pickles.
 
2014-01-20 02:26:19 PM  

Cyno01: pute kisses like a man: I rarely think of gluten.  it's not in a lot of foods.  have an animal, some vegetables, and maybe some fruit somewhere.  you have satisfied 3 elemental groups: soul, earth, and air (since fruits are generally in trees and fall).  you might even get some water with your soul by eating fish (was going to make a joke, like sole).  then fire is all in the heat.all 5 elemental groups can be covered without ever getting any gluten./ yes, i follow an elemental diet.  and yes, soul is very important.

[0.tqn.com image 300x200]


that picture is terrifying.

the elemental diet started as a joke.  and it still is a joke.  i was talking about pitre dish grown slabs of meat with a vegan friend, and she asked if i would give up eating dead animals if pitre dish meat tasted as good.

i said, while it would be very interesting... taste is not all that I look for.  i like to know that my food had a soul.

i made this comment as a joke, and we all laughed, though, with the wrong delivery, i see perfectly that it's an asshole thing to say to a sympathetic vegan.  however, my delivery was kind and goofy, not cruel and offhand.  so, it was a funny thing to say.  however, immediately thereafter, i started picturing the food groups of the 5 elements or the 5 kids from captain planet, and decided to create the fictional elemental diet... just in case i have to defend meat eating to vegans on the internet.

/ since, there are a million retarded diets, might as well add a new retarded diet to the mix.
 
2014-01-20 02:29:32 PM  
I had really interesting conversations with a member of my family who was born in 1903 about what healthcare was like in her childhood.

No one had allergies (not surprising, the concept of allergies wasn't introduced until 1906) but I would be shocked her stories of how many infants, children and adults just ... died. Sure there were flu epidemics and others, but I wonder how many were just written off as, "these things happen."

And she'd tell stories of the generation before, "My aunt so and so had 9 kids, though only 5 lived."

Sadly, I think the entities most capable to determine the actual vs. perceived increase and possible causes and cures are the same entities least likely to actively pursue it.
 
2014-01-20 02:34:57 PM  
I'm going to start being one of those people. I'm going to claim an allergy for foods I just dislike eating.

"I'm actually allergic to parsnips. Highly allergic. So you'll have to make the 'fall root veggie de-lite' without them in it. No, I don't want to try another item. I want that, without parsnips. Also, I'm allergic to cilantro at over a tablespoon per serving of guacamole, so remember that when making it for me."
 
2014-01-20 02:39:57 PM  
Allergic to tree nuts and peanuts.  Can't really set foot in a Thai restaurant.  Which is a shame, since my friend, who is Thai, has made me food before that doesn't involve nuts and they're fantastically delicious.  I wanted to eat at Pok Pok in Portland, but I'd rather not end up a choking mess in an ED and possibly intubated.  So I went to Screen Door instead and had Chicken and Waffles.
 
2014-01-20 02:40:51 PM  
FTA:  "The number of people who have a food allergy is growing, but there is no clear answer as to why."

The same reason why a whole lot of other diagnoses seem to be "growing." We're diagnosing it more. Also, we live in the era of WebMD and self-diagnosis, and we've created a nation of hypochondriacs.
 
2014-01-20 02:41:35 PM  
Wow. It must SUCK being most of you farkers. THe only thing I have problems with is raw vegetables and dairy products. But hey, If I want them bad enough, I'll endure the severe cramps, farts and shiats. There's not much I do not like. I can eat anything that tastes good to me with no problem. It's funny how I love things now that tasted like shiat years ago.
 
2014-01-20 02:44:24 PM  
White people problems. Seriously.

I'll try to find the article, but some polling place did a poll and found that the majority of people who have food allergies to things like gluten were predominantly upper middle class and rich folk. The moral of the story is that mother nature, fsm, god, or w/e your dirty may be, hates well to do white people.

Or people who make minimum wage or below can't afford to have allergies.
 
2014-01-20 02:45:03 PM  

pute kisses like a man: / since, there are a million retarded diets, might as well add a new retarded diet to the mix.


So is there some corollary to rule 34 associated with diets?

Because I think you pretty much just invented one that at least some people will swear by.
 
2014-01-20 02:46:29 PM  

Egoy3k: ReverendJynxed: Like fast food places, you always order something without an item to make sure they cook it fresh. If you have an allergy and they went the scrape it off route they would be in big trouble. Holding a key item makes sure they have to cook up a new item for you and not give you one of the already made stock sitting under the warmer.

I have some really bad news for you about fast food.  Everything is 'made to order' well more correctly it is 'assembled to order'  your cheeseburger without pickles is no more fresh than one with pickles.


I hate to tell you but a lot of places around here prepare common fast food items ahead of time for the lunch rush.
 
2014-01-20 02:47:17 PM  

FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

The "Wheat Belly" doctor is a crank and a fraud.


Say what you want but my boy was adversely affected by gluten. Stopped gluten. Got a different, much improved child.

All the medical professionals we saw pushed drugs as a solution. All poo-pooed diet change. Drugs didn't work. Diet change did.

Your results may vary.
 
2014-01-20 02:47:33 PM  

pute kisses like a man: all 5 elemental groups can be covered without ever getting any gluten.

/ yes, i follow an elemental diet.  and yes, soul is very important.


Jesus Christ. I'm in the wrong business. I should stop trying to be a productive member of society and start peddling horseshiat to idiots.
 
2014-01-20 02:48:07 PM  

supayoda: FTA:  "The number of people who have a food allergy is growing, but there is no clear answer as to why."

The same reason why a whole lot of other diagnoses seem to be "growing." We're diagnosing it more. Also, we live in the era of WebMD and self-diagnosis, and we've created a nation of hypochondriacs.


Exactly. Every obese person I know seems to have some kind of "thyroid problem" that their doctors mysteriously have been unable to diagnose.
 
2014-01-20 02:48:28 PM  

Far Cough: baconbeard: Skyd1v: Far Cough: DRTA -- is the answer "they lie"?

<snip>

You know who sucks?  Applebee's sucks.  Their vegetarian option is NOTHING.  And it's not as if they make up for it by offering great meat and fish.

Georgio - The owner and head chef at D1vwife's favorite restaurant - has been known to fill a mixing bowl full of steamed spinach and place it with great ceremony in front of anyone who dares to ask for a vegetarian dish in his restaurant.  I've seen him do it twice now and it is hilarious to watch.

/try the veal.
//no, seriously, try it.  It is awesome.

That's awesome! A bowl of freshly clipped Kentucky blue-grass would be even better.

So Georgio is a dickbag then. God forbid a group of friends or family enjoy his restaurant if one member of the group doesn't eat meat.  Put some actual seasoning on the spinach, fine, that's a dish.  No reason to be a humongous dickbag about it and serve something purposely flavorless to say fark you to a paying customer.  Some "chef".


Yes, yes he is.  He won't deny it or try to hide it either.  He's about as mean as you can imagine a 70 year old Sicilian man can get.

But his food ranges from "Really GD good" to "This is the best thing I have ever or shall ever eat in my life" so he's able to get away with his Soup Nazi tomfoolery.
 
2014-01-20 02:51:05 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

The "Wheat Belly" doctor is a crank and a fraud.

Say what you want but my boy was adversely affected by gluten. Stopped gluten. Got a different, much improved child.

All the medical professionals we saw pushed drugs as a solution. All poo-pooed diet change. Drugs didn't work. Diet change did.

Your results may vary.


Yeah, that's fine and dandy, and I'm glad you found a solution and that your kid is healthy now.

Your son had a problem.  The entire global wheat crop does not have a problem.
 
2014-01-20 02:51:22 PM  

PseudonymityFan: I had really interesting conversations with a member of my family who was born in 1903 about what healthcare was like in her childhood.

No one had allergies (not surprising, the concept of allergies wasn't introduced until 1906) but I would be shocked her stories of how many infants, children and adults just ... died. Sure there were flu epidemics and others, but I wonder how many were just written off as, "these things happen."

And she'd tell stories of the generation before, "My aunt so and so had 9 kids, though only 5 lived."

Sadly, I think the entities most capable to determine the actual vs. perceived increase and possible causes and cures are the same entities least likely to actively pursue it.


There aren't a whole lot of fatal food allergies. The decline in early childhood death is less about discovering allergy and avoidance and more about vaccination. The rate kids were dying from food allergy is going to be super low. Just like now, you don't figure out you have it until you eat something that contains it.
 
2014-01-20 02:51:23 PM  

office_despot: There also might be a peer-pressure aspect to the rising number of spurious intolerances.  I am lactose-tolerant, and gluten-tolerant too.  It's a little amazing, though, how people who are intolerant of those foods are always trying to convice me that I must be intolerant, too.


People want to believe that they represent the norm. If you go and demonstrate that they aren't, it tends to hurt their feelings. After all, why should you get to enjoy something that is denied to them? That's just not fair, you know?
 
2014-01-20 02:54:25 PM  

pedobearapproved: PseudonymityFan: I had really interesting conversations with a member of my family who was born in 1903 about what healthcare was like in her childhood.

No one had allergies (not surprising, the concept of allergies wasn't introduced until 1906) but I would be shocked her stories of how many infants, children and adults just ... died. Sure there were flu epidemics and others, but I wonder how many were just written off as, "these things happen."

And she'd tell stories of the generation before, "My aunt so and so had 9 kids, though only 5 lived."

Sadly, I think the entities most capable to determine the actual vs. perceived increase and possible causes and cures are the same entities least likely to actively pursue it.

There aren't a whole lot of fatal food allergies. The decline in early childhood death is less about discovering allergy and avoidance and more about vaccination. The rate kids were dying from food allergy is going to be super low. Just like now, you don't figure out you have it until you eat something that contains it.


Vaccinations?  Yeah, good luck with the autism!
 
2014-01-20 02:55:35 PM  
How about not going out to eat? If you've got to follow a specific diet, just stay home unless you're sure you can get something at the restaurant that you can eat.

I eat halal. I wouldn't go into a steakhouse and demand a halal steak, nor would I expect a BBQ place to cater to my non-pork diet.

If all else fails and you need to go to a restaurant, have the salad and STFU. Unless you're allergic to salad, then just have the water I guess.

Also, if you think you've got an allergy but won't go through the testing to know for sure you probably don't have an allergy and it's in your head.
 
2014-01-20 02:58:38 PM  

Trillian Astra: Ivan the Tolerable: ZAZ: gluten-free, which is a new fashion

i never really considered the desire to not spend a couple of days of my life writhing in agony on the floor to be a 'fashion'. perhaps you and i define fashion differently.

I think they mean that gluten-free is the new trendy elimination diet, not that people with actual gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease are attempting to be fashionable.


This. It is very, very fashionable to eat gluten free these days. This pisses me off to no end because every time I ask for gluten free I just know the waiter thinks I'm one of these douchebags. I'd eat pasta five times a day if I could, dammit!

/Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine
//gluten causes me serious unpleasantness
///so does a lot of things, unfortunately
 
2014-01-20 02:58:59 PM  

Buttknuckle: Vaccinations?  Yeah, good luck with the autism!


I only use anti-autisimal vaccines.

They're pretty exclusive so I'm not surprised you haven't heard of them.

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-01-20 03:02:04 PM  

Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

The "Wheat Belly" doctor is a crank and a fraud.

Say what you want but my boy was adversely affected by gluten. Stopped gluten. Got a different, much improved child.

All the medical professionals we saw pushed drugs as a solution. All poo-pooed diet change. Drugs didn't work. Diet change did.

Your results may vary.


You should have seen a gastrointerologist if you suspect gluten.  There are a myriad of syndromes and diseases that mimic celiac disease that are not celiac disease.  It very well may save your child's life.
 
2014-01-20 03:05:14 PM  

Jument: /Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine


You sound like my cousin's husband. My cousin can't cook worth a damn but I make everything from scratch at home for my fiance and I've offered to cook for them once, much to his pleasure. The fiance has gluten issues but only in this country. Back in his home country he can eat bread and pizza to his heart's content. But for some reason he can't digest gluten in the US. Still can't figure it out.
 
2014-01-20 03:05:31 PM  

FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

The "Wheat Belly" doctor is a crank and a fraud.

Say what you want but my boy was adversely affected by gluten. Stopped gluten. Got a different, much improved child.

All the medical professionals we saw pushed drugs as a solution. All poo-pooed diet change. Drugs didn't work. Diet change did.

Your results may vary.

Yeah, that's fine and dandy, and I'm glad you found a solution and that your kid is healthy now.

Your son had a problem.  The entire global wheat crop does not have a problem.


May be a sign of things to come. You don't know.
 
2014-01-20 03:13:08 PM  

pute kisses like a man: the elemental diet started as a joke. and it still is a joke.


Jebus don't scare us like that.
 
2014-01-20 03:14:48 PM  
I'm allergic to eggs.  Yes, really allergic.  I got food poisoning from some bad eggs, (really bad - lost about 40 pounds, had to go to the hospital, etc) and since then I have an immune response to eggs.  The treatment the doctor prescribed?   "Avoid eggs."  I used to love eating fried eggs for breakfast and egg nog during the holidays.  But now, I get sick, including, but not limited to, extreme gastrointestinal distress.  It ain't pretty.  And it ain't pretty for several days.  So many people think I'm making it up, and they are farking morons.

But when I go out to eat, I don't order anything special, I just avoid the dishes with eggs in them.  Sometimes if I'm not sure, I'll ask, (and the wait staff never know - they all have to check with the kitchen) and if there are eggs in it, usually a sauce, I'll just order something else.  I don't ask for dishes to be altered, I just don't order them if they have eggs.

It's really not that big of a deal.  Besides breakfast, I mainly have to avoid baked deserts.  It's funny when someone offers me some brownies or something, and I politely decline, and they keep pressing the issue as to why.  When I tell them I'm allergic to eggs, they think that life must be over for me. Then they keep asking, "Are you sure?  Just a little bite?"  No, goddammit, even though it smells good, that one bite will keep me camped out in the bathroom for a few days.  No, it's not really a temptation when I know the consequences.

So, yeah, it's really an allergy, and not that I'm a vegan, or on a diet, or because I think I'm special somehow.
 
2014-01-20 03:15:34 PM  

WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.


Or don't order seafood then?
 
2014-01-20 03:19:20 PM  

Trillian Astra: Jument: /Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine

You sound like my cousin's husband. My cousin can't cook worth a damn but I make everything from scratch at home for my fiance and I've offered to cook for them once, much to his pleasure. The fiance has gluten issues but only in this country. Back in his home country he can eat bread and pizza to his heart's content. But for some reason he can't digest gluten in the US. Still can't figure it out.


GMO wheat and chemicals used in processing.
 
2014-01-20 03:23:51 PM  

Jument: Trillian Astra: Ivan the Tolerable: ZAZ: gluten-free, which is a new fashion

i never really considered the desire to not spend a couple of days of my life writhing in agony on the floor to be a 'fashion'. perhaps you and i define fashion differently.

I think they mean that gluten-free is the new trendy elimination diet, not that people with actual gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease are attempting to be fashionable.

This. It is very, very fashionable to eat gluten free these days. This pisses me off to no end because every time I ask for gluten free I just know the waiter thinks I'm one of these douchebags. I'd eat pasta five times a day if I could, dammit!

/Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine
//gluten causes me serious unpleasantness
///so does a lot of things, unfortunately


Talk about looking a gift horse in the mouth!  You've got hundreds of restaurants who not only have HEARD of gluten intolerance but actually crafted menus specifically devoted to the issue; you've got supermarket shelves filled with gluten-free pastas and cakes and breads.  With your condition you NOW have a freedom you and thousands like you would have NEVER had up until the last 5 years.  Centuries of science and medicine and marketing have conspired at just the right time to make YOUR life easier.

And you're "pissed off to no end" because some pretenders are involved, who want to eat the same food but might not really need to.  Wow.  If I were you I would kiss them in the face for creating the fad that makes my life bearable and affordable.
 
2014-01-20 03:25:16 PM  

glmorrs1: Also, people can develope allergies to things that didn't used to effect them at any time, that's what happened to me with the nuts. I used to love peanuts and then one day, bam!, allergic to peanuts.


Yep. I had no problems with peanuts/peanut products or shellfish until I was around 16 years old and then, BLAM, I developed allergies to both. Suddenly, no more PB&Js or my grandma's wonderful Crab Louie. The latter was our go-to dinner after a trip to the coast. Before we headed home we'd stop at either Depoe Bay or Winchester Bay and purchase fresh crab meat from one of the stalls & pop it into the ice chest.
 
2014-01-20 03:31:43 PM  
Hmm, I'm not allergic to any foods.  Pollen yes, food no.

/maybe I should breed
//for the fate of humanity
 
2014-01-20 03:33:10 PM  

Pangea: pute kisses like a man: / since, there are a million retarded diets, might as well add a new retarded diet to the mix.

So is there some corollary to rule 34 associated with diets?

Because I think you pretty much just invented one that at least some people will swear by.


anything that either references religion, science, or antiquity (or all three, preferably with a really old, goofy science.  for example, we need to bring transmutation and metallurgy into any discussion of dietary decision making)

i was going with elements because I hadn't seen elements yet, and you could include the soul.  of course, you could reduce to 4 elements and say fire is the soul.  (as aristotle said, women are only men who did not have the fire in their soul necessary to push their genitalia out).  take some greek philosopher completely out of context, and you have all you need to create a real food diet cult.  make it ethical and it gets even better.  for example, Pythagoras (inventor of triangles) said that you will burn in hell if you put your left shoe on before your right.  and that's just common knowledge.  all the same, you must wash your left foot first, or there will be an entirely different type of hell to deal with (the washing feet part might be wrong, it's been over a decade since I read any pythagorus.  but, the right shoe thing is totally attributable to him.  however, i don't really know if burning in hell was properly translated.  probably should have been suffering in the afterlife.  i think hell was developed later, and burning was developed even later than that).

for some reason, people think eating like a caveman is a great idea.  other people think eating like poor religious pilgrims is a good idea. other people just run with ill developed science and think it's brilliant.

/ i just study myself.  some things make me feel better.  some things make me feel worse.  since I am healthy, i just try to avoid anything that makes me feel worse as a large part of my diet.
// however, for humor, i will provide any number of complex systems, false explanations, and irreverently quoted greek philosophers
 
2014-01-20 03:38:55 PM  

Egoy3k: ReverendJynxed: Like fast food places, you always order something without an item to make sure they cook it fresh. If you have an allergy and they went the scrape it off route they would be in big trouble. Holding a key item makes sure they have to cook up a new item for you and not give you one of the already made stock sitting under the warmer.

I have some really bad news for you about fast food.  Everything is 'made to order' well more correctly it is 'assembled to order'  your cheeseburger without pickles is no more fresh than one with pickles.


True story... The restaurants I worked in college (which included both sit down and fast food) used to pre-assemble burgers and other menu items without pickles or onions or ketchup and then store them under the warmer. If you ordered one, you likely got a burger that had been sitting there longer than some of the fully assembled ones. If it got close to time to take them off the warmer, and they hadn't sold, we'd slap on the missing ingredient to move them out. Long story short... You're not clever.

There's also the fact that, as Egoy3k points out, the burgers aren't made to order. They're assembled to order. Unless you come in during lunch or dinner rush, you're likely not going to get a burger hot off the grill. They make up 12 or more patties at a time and store them in a warming bin BY THEMSELVES. The condiments and fixings are stored. Sure, they pre-assemble a few to put in the warmer, but for the most part, if you have something special order, they've already got some patties in the warmer with nothing on them. They slap it on a bun with whatever you specified, and there you go.
 
2014-01-20 03:39:14 PM  

Far Cough: Jument: Trillian Astra: Ivan the Tolerable: ZAZ: gluten-free, which is a new fashion

i never really considered the desire to not spend a couple of days of my life writhing in agony on the floor to be a 'fashion'. perhaps you and i define fashion differently.

I think they mean that gluten-free is the new trendy elimination diet, not that people with actual gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease are attempting to be fashionable.

This. It is very, very fashionable to eat gluten free these days. This pisses me off to no end because every time I ask for gluten free I just know the waiter thinks I'm one of these douchebags. I'd eat pasta five times a day if I could, dammit!

/Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine
//gluten causes me serious unpleasantness
///so does a lot of things, unfortunately

Talk about looking a gift horse in the mouth!  You've got hundreds of restaurants who not only have HEARD of gluten intolerance but actually crafted menus specifically devoted to the issue; you've got supermarket shelves filled with gluten-free pastas and cakes and breads.  With your condition you NOW have a freedom you and thousands like you would have NEVER had up until the last 5 years.  Centuries of science and medicine and marketing have conspired at just the right time to make YOUR life easier.

And you're "pissed off to no end" because some pretenders are involved, who want to eat the same food but might not really need to.  Wow.  If I were you I would kiss them in the face for creating the fad that makes my life bearable and affordable.


Those are some excellent points but this is the internet so I'm obligated to complain. Mostly I'm just bitter/jealous that all of these people are running around crying about how evil gluten is when I want nothing more than to gorge on gluten-rich foods 24x7.
 
2014-01-20 03:41:45 PM  
Salt makes me cough.  Doctor told me I'm allergic to it, which is stupid.  I'm sensitive to it and I don't like it, but I'm not allergic.  Just gives me a dry smoker cough until I rinse my mouth out.  Kinda funny to watch.  Most restaurant food is way too salty for me.  /shrug
 
2014-01-20 03:43:03 PM  

Flab: Bathia_Mapes: Despite what the submitter asserts, I do have actual food allergies & intolerances, many of them dating back from when I was a child, some more recent, such as an intolerance to canola.

It can also be disappointing to go to a restaurant such as a Chinese buffet & not be able to partake of the Mongolian grill because there's no way to avoid cross contamination. I love lamb, but it would be grilled on the same surface that shellfish had been prepared just moments before. It's just not worth it to risk anaphylaxis.

Same reason I avoid Thai restaurants since it's pretty common for peanuts to be in quite a few of the menu items. And for the record, I've had a peanut allergy for over 45 years. Same with shellfish.

What the people in this thread are trying to say is that you're obviously a genetic abomination and that you should have been thrown of a cliff at birth, like in ancient Sparta, or that you're faking it and that you should suck it up, princess!  How dare you survive past 2 years of age and inconvenience line cooks at the restaurant?


Heh!

Didn't develop the allergies to peanuts & shellfish until I was around 16 years old. Still don't know why I developed allergies to them because I had no problems beforehand and ate them with zero reactions.

However, I don't make a big fuss at restaurants. I just order something that I know is safe for me to eat off the menu, and as I said before, I avoid certain types of restaurants since I know it will nigh onto impossible for cross contamination to occur. I most certainly don't go all snowflakey at restaurant staff & it makes me angry when I see someone doing that.
 
2014-01-20 03:49:02 PM  
I don't see the problem with asking about ingredients in food (because they're supposed to know what's in the food, right?). It doesn't indicate that you're a snowflake, fragile or otherwise.

Requesting a special, modified meal, OTOH, is a bit of douchebaggery. If it's as simple as "no cheese, please, on that _________", fine. But if it's "make it gluten-free and replace _______ with _____, " then just stay home and cook your own meals, for fark's sake.

It's nice of some restaurants to make an effort to accommodate people, but if it's a huge problem (and apparently it is a problem now), maybe they should just stop doing the "special orders."
 
2014-01-20 03:49:33 PM  

ReverendJynxed: Egoy3k: ReverendJynxed: Like fast food places, you always order something without an item to make sure they cook it fresh. If you have an allergy and they went the scrape it off route they would be in big trouble. Holding a key item makes sure they have to cook up a new item for you and not give you one of the already made stock sitting under the warmer.

I have some really bad news for you about fast food.  Everything is 'made to order' well more correctly it is 'assembled to order'  your cheeseburger without pickles is no more fresh than one with pickles.

I hate to tell you but a lot of places around here prepare common fast food items ahead of time for the lunch rush.


I can tell you right now that you're still not getting a fresh burger with no pickles. They make those ahead of time for lunch rush, too. That includes "plain" (meat and bun only) burgers, so if you try to throw them for a loop, they'll just add whatever you didn't leave off.

The good news about the lunch or dinner rush is that with so many people coming in they're guaranteed to have burgers coming off the grill quite frequently, so you're pretty much guaranteed to get something fresh no matter what you order. But thinking you're going to get something fresher because you ordered it special is just ignorance as to how kitchens work. Kitchens that do prepare items ahead of time will regularly leave some unassembled and under a warmer in anticipation of special orders.
 
2014-01-20 03:53:03 PM  
It's always amusing to me when someone thinks they'll "test" my allergy, by slipping some mustard into something I'm eating.

//yes, mustard.  The seeds of the plant just as much as the condiment make my throat swell up until breathing is a chore.  I'm reasonably sure that my body's response indicates something more serious than dislike or intolerance.
 
2014-01-20 03:59:54 PM  
There are certain requests that I think are reasonable. You can ask that bacon or a condiment be left off of a sandwich or that your salad come without croutons. You can ask for steamed veggies instead of [insert side item here]. Some restaurants prepare shellfish on a separate surface.

Then there's the person with an egg allergy asking for a specially-made Hollandaise or the person with the nut allergy asking for special pesto or the person with the garlic allergy asking for special marinara.

Rule of thumb... If it's part of the assembly of the dish, then it's reasonable to ask that it be left out. If it's a dish that has been at least partially prepared ahead of time (usually due to the time it takes to cook), and that ingredient was part of said preparation, then order something else.
 
2014-01-20 04:02:05 PM  

IronJelly: It's always amusing to me when someone thinks they'll "test" my allergy, by slipping some mustard into something I'm eating.

//yes, mustard.  The seeds of the plant just as much as the condiment make my throat swell up until breathing is a chore.  I'm reasonably sure that my body's response indicates something more serious than dislike or intolerance.


What kind of evil person would do that?  It's happened more than once?  The only time I could even conceive of that happening is if you were clearly delusional about it and VERY close family/friends were absolutely sure you were just wrong and it wouldn't harm you.  But some random joker "testing" you??  That sounds like attempted murder.
 
2014-01-20 04:09:36 PM  

Trillian Astra: sprgrss: Completely different response in the body. if your wheat allergy is misdiagnosed as gluten-intolerance (which can only be diagnosed by a biopsy of the small intestine) then you need to find a new doctor.

Celiac requires the biopsy. But there's at least one person in my life who has non-Celiac gluten intolerance that was diagnosed via a combination of endoscopy, allergy testing, and ruling out other dietary issues. He just gets horrible stomach issues and shiats a lot when he eats gluten. Allergies can also manifest as stomach issues like diarrhea, vomiting, and cramps. So the only way to make sure it ISN'T an allergy instead of gluten-induced IBS is to get tested by an allergist.


A friend of mine has the same diagnosis--non-Celiac gluten intolerance. When she first identified the allergen, there were some who thought she was being dramatic. So she ate a slice of bread and took before and after pictures of her belly. She's a dancer and horseback instructor (she has amazing abs), and those abs went from perfectly defined to the belly of a pregnancy in its third term in a matter of 30 minutes.

She's very careful not to make life difficult for anyone around her when she goes out. She brings her own food if she thinks there will be a problem and is very discreet about the way she handles things. I think if more people just dealt with it privately rather than announcing it publicly, it wouldn't be a "thing."
 
2014-01-20 04:12:14 PM  
Far Cough:
What kind of evil person would do that?  It's happened more than once?  The only time I could even conceive of that happening is if you were clearly delusional about it and VERY close family/friends were absolutely sure you were just wrong and it wouldn't harm you.  But some random joker "testing" you??  That sounds like attempted murder.

I've had so-called "friends" lie about eggs being in a dish they have prepared, because they thought my allergy was psychosomatic or that it wasn't really an allergy.  Some people are just dicks.
 
2014-01-20 04:18:50 PM  
I feel bad for the few people who are actually allergic to things, but no pity for the "I'm lactose intolerant/gluten blah blah" whiners who just want to be part of the "speshul" in crowd.

/I once farted after I had cheese on my chili, I MUST be lactose intolerant.
 
2014-01-20 04:20:35 PM  

lewismarktwo: Hmm, I'm not allergic to any foods.  Pollen yes, food no.

/maybe I should breed
//for the fate of humanity


I think you're on to something.  Neither my wife nor I have any food allergies and sure enough, none of my kids have any food allergies either.  Then again, my whole family will eat just about anything: meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, dairy, bread, you name it.

I remember when my kids were little, other parents of similar age children always wanted to commiserate how hard it was to get kids to eat veggies or fish or whatnot.  I could never relate.

I will say the down side of being able to eat anything is that you don't pay as much attention to what goes in your mouth as people who do have to be on a restricted diet.
 
2014-01-20 04:21:50 PM  

Donkey Hodie: I've had so-called "friends" lie about eggs being in a dish they have prepared, because they thought my allergy was psychosomatic or that it wasn't really an allergy. Some people are just dicks.


There is an amazing variety of meals I make that you wouldn't otherwise know had eggs in it. Mac & Cheese, Meatballs and anything with a browned crust. Eggs are a wonderful binder. Having said that, if someone told me they are allergic to eggs, I can make a bagillion other dishes that contain no eggs.
 
2014-01-20 04:39:23 PM  

listernine: [img.fark.net image 640x640]


Oh, I  like this ...
 
2014-01-20 04:45:36 PM  

hubiestubert: The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate on individual ...


Great post, Hubie. I had you favorited as "well spoken", I might change that to something food-related.

/ Nuclear Food Rocket Surgeon or something
 
2014-01-20 04:46:48 PM  
This is nothing new.  Thirty years ago (yikes!), when I was a burger flipper at McD's, we used to get customers who would ask for "low salt" fries.  You KNEW what they really wanted was fries straight out of the vat because they'd go and dump a handful of salt packets on those "low salt" fries.  They didn't even attempt to hide it.

The funny thing was, we were more than happy to drop in a batch of fries for someone who wanted theirs straight from the fryer.
 
2014-01-20 04:48:10 PM  
Gather round, and I'll tell you a tragic allergy tale.  It was in my early adulthood I discovered two severe, previously undiagnosed allergies.

I was at the bar, and had a beer... I laughed while taking a sip of beer, and got some down the wrong pipe.  Later I started getting wheezy, and needed quite a few blasts from my inhaler (I have asthma).  I assumed it was because of the fine mist of beer that didn't quite make it past my pharynx.  Shortly after, another night at the bar, more beer, only this time it all made it into my stomach.  45 minutes later, I can't breathe at all.  I'm fighting for every breath.  It took 35 blasts from the inhaler to open up my lungs again.  Naturally I went to the doctor, who got me an emergency appointment with the allergist.  The allergist can't fathom why beer would possibly do that, as I test negative for every food related.  I can eat wheat (I get a little acidy from too much, but nothing tums won't fix), and all other grains, fruit, nuts, cultured products... there's just nothing in beer I'm allergic to.  He confirms the symptoms are anaphalactic shock, gives me an epi-pen, and suggests I stay away from beer (Yeah right).  He also admits that allergy tests are mostly inaccurate unless its severe, in which case you usually know already.

Over a few years and a couple of trips to the emergency room (anaphalactic shock is a biatch) by an alcohol elimination diet I discover I can have the same reaction to hard cider, white wine, and worst of all, scotch (oddly enough, not Irish Whiskey or Bourbon).

Not drinking beer wasn't an option, so I always take an antihistamine before drinking, and I live on daily allergy meds (for hayfever in the spring and fall mostly), but it seems (unless some brilliant farker can figure it out) that I am destined to have a real allergy to some mystery component of those particular drinks.  Truly tragedy.
 
2014-01-20 04:49:42 PM  

pute kisses like a man: i was going with elements because I hadn't seen elements yet,


A few years ago, I thought of a way to make a pile of money by using bad/incorrectly cited science and telling people what they wanted to hear. I didn't do it, because I make reasonable money doing computer junk and don't need to sell dubious books or dubious nutritional supplements. This "elemental diet" thing has even more potential than the things I thought of. If you get yourself a marketroid and a professional artist to illustrate a brochure, you could end up on national talk shows and making far more money than us ordinary working stiffs.

I can eat almost anything, including Dave's Insanity Sauce, and not suffer any ill effects from it. (Eating pork chops has a 1/3 chance of making me recreate the campfire scene from "Blazing Saddles" from 4 to 16 hours later, but that's a minor problem easily avoided.) Since "fecal transplants" are the new thing in gastroenterology, I wonder if I could package my poop in guaranteed-not-to-dissolve-until-the-large-intestine pills and sell those pills to dyspeptic folks for $LOTS?
 
2014-01-20 04:52:46 PM  

foxy_canuck: Gather round, and I'll tell you a tragic allergy tale.  It was in my early adulthood I discovered two severe, previously undiagnosed allergies.

I was at the bar, and had a beer... I laughed while taking a sip of beer, and got some down the wrong pipe.  Later I started getting wheezy, and needed quite a few blasts from my inhaler (I have asthma).  I assumed it was because of the fine mist of beer that didn't quite make it past my pharynx.  Shortly after, another night at the bar, more beer, only this time it all made it into my stomach.  45 minutes later, I can't breathe at all.  I'm fighting for every breath.  It took 35 blasts from the inhaler to open up my lungs again.  Naturally I went to the doctor, who got me an emergency appointment with the allergist.  The allergist can't fathom why beer would possibly do that, as I test negative for every food related.  I can eat wheat (I get a little acidy from too much, but nothing tums won't fix), and all other grains, fruit, nuts, cultured products... there's just nothing in beer I'm allergic to.  He confirms the symptoms are anaphalactic shock, gives me an epi-pen, and suggests I stay away from beer (Yeah right).  He also admits that allergy tests are mostly inaccurate unless its severe, in which case you usually know already.

Over a few years and a couple of trips to the emergency room (anaphalactic shock is a biatch) by an alcohol elimination diet I discover I can have the same reaction to hard cider, white wine, and worst of all, scotch (oddly enough, not Irish Whiskey or Bourbon).

Not drinking beer wasn't an option, so I always take an antihistamine before drinking, and I live on daily allergy meds (for hayfever in the spring and fall mostly), but it seems (unless some brilliant farker can figure it out) that I am destined to have a real allergy to some mystery component of those particular drinks.  Truly tragedy.


Okay, I lol'ed.  I think you might be an alcoholic if you are risking your ability to breath so you can drink.

/I'll save you a seat.
 
2014-01-20 04:53:54 PM  

lewismarktwo: Hmm, I'm not allergic to any foods.  Pollen yes, food no.

/maybe I should breed
//for the fate of humanity


Ironically, one of my in-laws had no food allergies until after her pregnancy.

And no, she's not faking it; she developed allergies to about 80% of the food she used to love.  They're not life-threatening, but serious headache and stomachache inducing.
 
2014-01-20 04:54:29 PM  

foxy_canuck: Gather round, and I'll tell you a tragic allergy tale.  It was in my early adulthood I discovered two severe, previously undiagnosed allergies.

I was at the bar, and had a beer... I laughed while taking a sip of beer, and got some down the wrong pipe.  Later I started getting wheezy, and needed quite a few blasts from my inhaler (I have asthma).  I assumed it was because of the fine mist of beer that didn't quite make it past my pharynx.  Shortly after, another night at the bar, more beer, only this time it all made it into my stomach.  45 minutes later, I can't breathe at all.  I'm fighting for every breath.  It took 35 blasts from the inhaler to open up my lungs again.  Naturally I went to the doctor, who got me an emergency appointment with the allergist.  The allergist can't fathom why beer would possibly do that, as I test negative for every food related.  I can eat wheat (I get a little acidy from too much, but nothing tums won't fix), and all other grains, fruit, nuts, cultured products... there's just nothing in beer I'm allergic to.  He confirms the symptoms are anaphalactic shock, gives me an epi-pen, and suggests I stay away from beer (Yeah right).  He also admits that allergy tests are mostly inaccurate unless its severe, in which case you usually know already.

Over a few years and a couple of trips to the emergency room (anaphalactic shock is a biatch) by an alcohol elimination diet I discover I can have the same reaction to hard cider, white wine, and worst of all, scotch (oddly enough, not Irish Whiskey or Bourbon).

Not drinking beer wasn't an option, so I always take an antihistamine before drinking, and I live on daily allergy meds (for hayfever in the spring and fall mostly), but it seems (unless some brilliant farker can figure it out) that I am destined to have a real allergy to some mystery component of those particular drinks.  Truly tragedy.


Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it manifests as a headache that comes on with 10 minutes of consuming an alcoholic beverage (one of the 3 or 4 different varieties of 'wine headaches').

Some varieties of yeast produce large levels of histamines, if the fermentation temperature is within a certain band.  Use a different variety of yeast, or ferment at a different temperature, and minimal histamines.

I've never heard of full-on anaphalactic shock from it, so I may be totally wrong.
 
2014-01-20 05:01:02 PM  
IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...


I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.
 
2014-01-20 05:03:36 PM  
Skyd1v: a mixing bowl full of steamed spinach

I could go for that.
 
2014-01-20 05:11:25 PM  

foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.


Well there you go!

Could be the congeners in the scotch from the barrel aging, not the histamines at all.
 
2014-01-20 05:12:28 PM  
Buttknuckle:
Okay, I lol'ed.  I think you might be an alcoholic if you are risking your ability to breathe

You sound just like the ER doctor
 
2014-01-20 05:44:16 PM  

FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Bruce the Deuce: FrancoFile: Bruce the Deuce: Anybody ever consider that it's the gluten that has changed?

My boy has problems with it (among other things) and guess what? We don't go to restaurants.

The food is better at home, a lot of which is grown in the back yard.

That's like saying "Anybody ever considered that it's the nitrogen that has changed?"

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

Hope this link works.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/modern-whe at-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doct or-says/

The "Wheat Belly" doctor is a crank and a fraud.

Say what you want but my boy was adversely affected by gluten. Stopped gluten. Got a different, much improved child.

All the medical professionals we saw pushed drugs as a solution. All poo-pooed diet change. Drugs didn't work. Diet change did.

Your results may vary.

Yeah, that's fine and dandy, and I'm glad you found a solution and that your kid is healthy now.

Your son had a problem.  The entire global wheat crop does not have a problem.


Oh he's far from cured but diet change helped. Avoiding processed food has also helped.

The world does have a food problem. People have become too reliant on corporate food production and subsequently eat whatever is put in front of them without ever questioning what was done to it before they ate it.

What's in your food? I don't know what's in a lot of mine unfortunately.
 
2014-01-20 05:44:23 PM  

JoieD'Zen: Trillian Astra: Jument: /Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine

You sound like my cousin's husband. My cousin can't cook worth a damn but I make everything from scratch at home for my fiance and I've offered to cook for them once, much to his pleasure. The fiance has gluten issues but only in this country. Back in his home country he can eat bread and pizza to his heart's content. But for some reason he can't digest gluten in the US. Still can't figure it out.

GMO wheat and chemicals used in processing.


No commercially-grown US wheat is GMO. It's hybridized all to hell, but there's no direct genetic tampering like there is with corn and soybeans.

It very well could be something in the processing, or maybe the specific variety of wheat, or maybe something else in the recipe here that's different than his home.
 
2014-01-20 05:47:48 PM  

FrancoFile: foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.

Well there you go!

Could be the congeners in the scotch from the barrel aging, not the histamines at all.


Seems that would be worse with the bourbon (new barrels) than the scotch (used barrels, most often old bourbon barrels).
 
2014-01-20 05:51:10 PM  

hubiestubert: The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate on individual plates, as opposed to going by reflex. That slows us down. That causes backlog. It upsets the natural timing, and the whole restaurant is then slowed down because of that. I get four special orders in a row, the next three tables are set back as well. And then there are the folks who imagine that we have a dozen fryers dedicated to each seafood dish, and tell a server that they have a specific allergy, but want a dish just without the offending item, and simply don't realize that the oil itself has already been used for said item. Which means that we have to communicate with said server, who then has to relay that to the customer, who then replaces their order. Educating the staff to run interference to make sure the patron knows that we can't make some accommodations is key, but it doesn't always happen. Waitstaff get busy, they get distracted, it happens, and when it does, it slows down the whole line, ups the stress level, and annoys the crap out of us, because three guys on a line can handle a few hundred folks easy enough, and the backlog created just gums up the works.

You have an allergy, then be aware. Yes, if you have a seafood allergy, you might want to avoid fried foods. You have a dairy allergy, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Asking for a vegetarian version of a special is not always an option. Pasta sans sauce is easy, substituting rice for pasta is easy enough, trying to order a marinara without garlic and onions means you're a dumbass, and your stupidity just cost me a few minutes I could have plated two entire tables in the time it takes to communicate with the waitstaff that there is NO way in Hells your request can be granted, even if you're trying to be polite and ask ahead if it is possible. On a busy night, I'm not going to make you a special putanesca without garlic and onions, and substitute black and green olives, but no anchovies, and fresh thyme instead of the fresh basil, and no salt but extra pepper. Possible on a slow night? Sure, but be aware of your surroundings, because your special request means that others are going to have their night slowed down a bit too.

You don't like mushrooms? Then don't order the burger that HAS mushrooms on it. Plain and simple. You don't like garlic? Then maybe keep the f*ck away from the Scampi. Don't like spinach? Then maybe the Florentine isn't for you. No bacon on a club sandwich? Easy. No bun for a burger? Simplicity. Be aware of what you're asking for, and insisting that the waitstaff "just see if they can..." when they tell you right off the bat that it's not possible is just bogging down everyone else's night.

I want my customers to be happy. I understand that folks have issues with allergies. I also realize that there are a ton of folks who don't have allergies and are just using the excuse to try to get a substitution without looking like a picky douche. I know that some folks are looking to be special with their very rare and sudden 'important dietary needs" too. It's a weird time, when you look to make yourself feel special by feigning a weakness. Not all folks are doing so. There are very much folks with dietary restrictions, but be aware that your restrictions don't translate to "getting whatever I ask for."


I want to eat where you cook!
 
2014-01-20 05:52:41 PM  
I found out recently after an ER trip that Im allergic to a couple of the wierd non traditional oils companies have switched to in order to accomodate people allergic to the traditional oils (which I am not allergic to) .
 
2014-01-20 05:57:24 PM  

Ablejack: FrancoFile: foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.

Well there you go!

Could be the congeners in the scotch from the barrel aging, not the histamines at all.

Seems that would be worse with the bourbon (new barrels) than the scotch (used barrels, most often old bourbon barrels).


Yes and no.  Bourbon is in the barrel for a short time, scotch is in it for much longer.
 
2014-01-20 05:59:11 PM  

jdjoker: JoieD'Zen: Trillian Astra: Jument: /Crohn's Disease, missing some intestine

You sound like my cousin's husband. My cousin can't cook worth a damn but I make everything from scratch at home for my fiance and I've offered to cook for them once, much to his pleasure. The fiance has gluten issues but only in this country. Back in his home country he can eat bread and pizza to his heart's content. But for some reason he can't digest gluten in the US. Still can't figure it out.

GMO wheat and chemicals used in processing.

No commercially-grown US wheat is GMO. It's hybridized all to hell, but there's no direct genetic tampering like there is with corn and soybeans.

It very well could be something in the processing, or maybe the specific variety of wheat, or maybe something else in the recipe here that's different than his home.


You'd probably want to prove the problem is real first.  Buy or smuggle some flour from one location to the other.  Prepare a blind or double blind test of bread/whatever from both native and foreign flour.  Serve 1 to 2 days apart.

Or, even easier, before we blame it on the "GMO" boogeyman, purchase some GMO-free flour in the US and do the blind test now.

GMOphobia kind of pisses me off.  At least gluten does have noticeable affects on people; non-GMO foods are more expensive for no reason at all.
 
2014-01-20 06:05:01 PM  
The waiters and cooks put their peckers into the clam chowder, don't they?
 
2014-01-20 06:09:04 PM  

Far Cough: You'd probably want to prove the problem is real first. Buy or smuggle some flour from one location to the other. Prepare a blind or double blind test of bread/whatever from both native and foreign flour. Serve 1 to 2 days apart.


Whole lotta this.

A propos of the wine headache thing, I had customers who say "they put stuff in the wine they send here. When I was on vacation in Italy I had wine every night and never got a headache." I reply by saying "you didn't get a headache because you were on VA-CA-TION"
 
2014-01-20 06:09:32 PM  

BolshyGreatYarblocks: The waiters and cooks put their peckers into the clam chowder, don't they?


No that's not what chlamydia means.
 
2014-01-20 06:15:43 PM  

JerkStore: [memecrunch.com image 600x399]


allergies*
 
2014-01-20 06:36:36 PM  
It slows down the line, that being said I've never minded too much. Just be aware that if you call ahead and let the front of house know I have time to come up with a balanced version of the dish to suit your needs. If I get the ticket while I'm being slammed, your dish is just going to be missing the stuff you are allergic to.
 
2014-01-20 06:50:48 PM  
Due to thyroid cancer, every 6 months I have to have a scan that essentially requires me to eliminate iodeine from my diet for 2 to 3 weeks. No iodized salt, no dairy, no seafood. It REALLY sucks. You know what I do? I sit at home and cook my own food from scratch. I'm not going to go bother some chef with my crazy-ass requirements, especially when its impossible to verify, and I'm the one who gets farked if they screw it up.

Now the week after the scan/treatment? EAT AT ALL THE RESTARAUNTS!
 
2014-01-20 06:52:42 PM  
I see people all the farking time claim allergy to some food or other and when the food is served they will be clawing all over their partner's plate eating just what they were whining about because "it looks so good" or some such.  Then out comes the rationalization "well, I can eat a little of it sometimes."  Not with a real allergy you can't or would you want to.

I don't bother anymore to explain what allergy really is.  Or intolerance.  People who have make believe problems don't want to hear about it.  While I am certain there are lots of people with actual food allergies, I am also certain that many people who make this claim would do well to get an appointment with a psychiatrist.  My sympathies go out to food service people who must put up with this crap.
 
2014-01-20 07:40:25 PM  

ThreadSinger: hubiestubert: The industry is still trying to deal with this issue.

Shellfish and other allergies are nothing to joke about. Nut allergies either. There are items on my menu that are just verbotten for folks with these allergies, and I make no bones about there NOT being any way to make substitutions for these dishes. You can't get a eggless omelet. You can't get a gluten free pasta--at least not at the joint I'm at right now. No tomatoes? Easy. No onions? Don't get the marinara. Can't do nuts, then keep the f*ck away from the pesto. Consumers need to be aware just as much as the staff. No, I'm not going to be able to do a dairy free Alfredo, and you're a damn fool if you order it and think that it can be done. There are reasonable accommodations, and then there is just asinine. Vegan? Easy enough for options, but don't expect me to have tempeh to make a vegan bologonese. Not going to happen.

The article touches on the one of the biggest issues for restaurants: time. We have the ability to work around some things. I can use a sizzle platter to sear something so that it doesn't come in contact with the flat top that has been used for a number of other dishes. I use separate pans for shrimp and fish so that someone who IS allergic to shellfish or has a sensitivity for fish won't order a burger and then start to crottle up and die because there was shrimp proteins on their bun. It's fair easy to not put nuts on a salad, and leave off tomatoes or garlic. The issue is most of the time, in kitchens, folks are working from reflex. You order a salad, it's called off, and the garde manger has the thing 3/4s done before you can blink. That's how kitchens work. The hands know the job, and the mind is working out the timing so that everything can come up at the same time so food doesn't hang out in the window. Special orders take you out of that groove. We hate special orders, not because we hate humanity, but because it takes us out of our zone, and forces us to concentrate ...


I have him favorited and noted, "Great Food Service". I really like this guy in restaurant threads. He brings it on.
 
2014-01-20 08:06:34 PM  
I have an allergy to beer; drinking 20 or more beers in the evening will leave me feeling 75% or worse the next day.
 
2014-01-20 08:11:02 PM  

Ivan the Tolerable: ZAZ: gluten-free, which is a new fashion

i never really considered the desire to not spend a couple of days of my life writhing in agony on the floor to be a 'fashion'. perhaps you and i define fashion differently.


Gluten allergies are no joke, but there are millions of people who somehow got the idea that gluten is bad for you in general without an allergy. It's the biggest "diet" fad running right now, and it's particularly stupid.

/My cousin was having health problems for years before she found out she has Coeliac disease
//Now that she's gluten free she's living a much better life
 
2014-01-20 08:12:50 PM  
I get hives on my hands when I take NSAIDS.  Ibuprofen, naproxen, etc make my hands burst out in hives.  It's not as bad as it used to be, probably because I don't take them anywhere near as often.

/shrug
 
2014-01-20 08:18:30 PM  
I sometimes get sores on the insides of my mouth when I suck on hard candies too much.
 
2014-01-20 08:19:54 PM  
I have a terrible allergy to the stupid.  I know, there's lots of stupid here on fark.  In keeping with respecting people's allergies, could all of you that are or have come in contact with stupid please go somewhere else?  My progeny are afflicted with the same disorder.  THINK OF THE CHILDREN!
 
2014-01-20 08:22:55 PM  
 
2014-01-20 08:35:10 PM  
Well you have to consider that maybe, just maybe, our farked up food system is actually giving people these problems
 
2014-01-20 08:45:46 PM  

foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.


As weird as it may sound, some vintners use egg white to clean the rotten grape crap from the wine. Since 2012, they have to write it on the label in Canada, so it might be an egg allergy.

I don't know if brewers do the same, though.
 
2014-01-20 08:53:01 PM  
One time, I ate a bunch of raw almonds and my throat felt a little itchy.  Then I ate a whole bunch more until that stopped happening.
 
2014-01-20 08:56:20 PM  

PunGent: lewismarktwo: Hmm, I'm not allergic to any foods.  Pollen yes, food no.

/maybe I should breed
//for the fate of humanity

Ironically, one of my in-laws had no food allergies until after her pregnancy.

And no, she's not faking it; she developed allergies to about 80% of the food she used to love.  They're not life-threatening, but serious headache and stomachache inducing.


Well, that sucks.  Allergies are weird.  I say we divert some AIDS research money to study them.
 
2014-01-20 08:58:26 PM  

mr_a: I really am allergic to shellfish, but mostly my interaction with restaurants is asking if there is shellfish in a dish, and ordering something else if there is.

The real problems are when I travel in Asia...there doesn't seem to be a word in most Asian languages for "shellfish". I actually have a little card that I carry, written in the native language, which explains the problem.


I just avoid going to Long John Silver's.
 
2014-01-20 09:04:43 PM  

PolyHatSnake: My favorite part was where they mentioned it is unknown what is causing all these allergies and sensitivities to suddenly pop up. I have a theory. We've been making the world TOO safe of a place. The weakest herd members are no longer being culled, on a wholesale level. To paraphrase Jeff Goldblum: natural selection uh, finds a way.


Yeah...except science actually  does have a theory, and it's 'we can diagnose things now before you end up dead'. Rhetorical questions are a biatch.
 
2014-01-20 09:13:30 PM  
As the boyfriend of someone with true Celiacs, it's not pretty. It's not an allergy as stated above.

Having it leads to extremely painful cramping, and what's lovingly known as the "turbo fire craps"... it and it lasts a while after having it.

And whoever said it's not in much, is incorrect: It's even in Soy Sauce... which is soy beans and wheat.

But yes. The whole "I'm allergic to tomatoes" because you hate tomatoes? Just say no feckin' tomatoes and be an adult.
Or pick them off.

But people with legitimate autoimmune disorders do indeed need some special help.  Thankfully I live in Portland (hehe) so our selections are VAST!! I recommend Andina, Brooklyn House, and Hawthorne Fish House. Amazing food.
 
2014-01-20 09:41:28 PM  

Doc Batarang: I am literally standing on line at a restaurant right now waiting for all hell to break loose...

I didn't ever want to be a cook. I have no formal cooking training. I kind of hate cooking. But by god...I'm great at it and everybody is going to be making moaning sounds around here in 10 minutes at how great this food is.

That being said, I take your allergies very seriously and am happy to sell you anything that you can eat.

That being said, I hate hearing about what kinds of foods adults dislike. Grow the fark up and manage your lives...I'm not your doctor or personal trainer or crystal medicine shaman or your Mom or your...


This was exactly 8 hours and five minutes ago. You have probably 4 hours more to go on shift, proud warrior.

Please do enjoy Chef's shiatty cocaine,  and make mighty feats of batshiat weeds bullshiat. When all is said and done, down tools and clean up your farking disgusting station, asshole. Finally, enjoy a cold frosty and a waitress after work

We salute you.
 
2014-01-20 09:45:03 PM  
i422.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-20 10:09:14 PM  

airsupport: WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.

Is that a euphemism for something?


Yeah, it's an adult child stomping their fists and making things harder for actual allergic people.

It's not their culinary skills, it's your taste buds. Order something else and quit lying.
 
2014-01-20 10:30:24 PM  

lokidecat: As the boyfriend of someone with true Celiacs, it's not pretty. It's not an allergy as stated above.

Having it leads to extremely painful cramping, and what's lovingly known as the "turbo fire craps"... it and it lasts a while after having it.


I had an employee with for-reals Celiac's.  Having my intestines destroyed by dysentery, I could relate.   He was militant about what he ate.  On the rare occasion where something gluten snuck in, he'd be out for a few days.  Bastard was funny about it.  Skinny as a rail.  For lunch he'd have some kind of sandwich, but use lettuce as his bread.  Everyone would feel bad for him.  Then every time I'd take the team out for dinner, he'd order an expensive bottle of wine for the group and eat the shiat out of the most expensive steak on the menu.
 
2014-01-20 11:01:18 PM  

Flab: foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.

As weird as it may sound, some vintners use egg white to clean the rotten grape crap from the wine. Since 2012, they have to write it on the label in Canada, so it might be an egg allergy.

I don't know if brewers do the same, though.

Nah, I'm not allergic to eggs.  I thought it might be the clarifier for white wine (usually isinglass, from fish bladder), but I've tried a couple of white wines that either use chitosan (shellfish, not allergic to it) or nothing (vacuum the gas out and let it sit for 6 months before aging in the cask), and I still get the reaction.  When I brew my own beer the only clarifying agent I've ever added is irish moss, and I've had beers both with and without it that cause reactions.

I don't think scotch is the barrel aging, because I drink lots o' Irish whiskey, usually aged 12 or 18 years with no trouble, same with cask aged rum, tequila, bourbon and brandy... scotch is the only one.  Maybe it's the peat fire for that one, or maybe it was a reaction to something else that day.

I've heard some allergies can be relatively mild or benign until there is a cross reaction with more than one protein.  Something along the lines of something in a dairy product kind of putting your system in high gear, then a yeast allergy kicking it all into overdrive, but I don't know if the whole cross reaction thing has much evidence.  My allergist suggested it, but I don't have a lot of trust in them.  He basically told me a lot of an allergist's job involves logical guesswork.
 
2014-01-20 11:24:49 PM  

plcow: sprgrss: No one is allergic to gluten.  An allergy and the autoimmune response to gluten are two different things.

Also, unless diagnoses, I rescues to believe you have a gluten intolerance/celiac.

Actually, no they are not. An allergy is your body's auto-immune system over responding to something.


No, an allergy is your body's immune system over-responding to something.  It is NOT an auto-immune issue.
 
2014-01-20 11:26:21 PM  

foxy_canuck: Flab: foxy_canuck: IFrancoFile:

Histamines from yeast?

They've only figured this out in the last 15 years.  Mostly it ...

I've wondered about that, because the reaction isn't totally consistent, and some beers hit me more often and more severe than others (Rickards Red = hospital visit, fortunately it's a crappy beer).  White wine is virtually a guarantee of a bad reaction, usually with severe sinus pressure and hives to accompany the lack of breathing.  The yeast seems to be the only factor that can't be controlled to that degree.  I brew my own... I should do some research about that and do some small scale experimenting.  It wouldn't help me with commercial brews, but at least I'd know what to put in my kegs.  HA!  Can you imagine being a server at a bar and being asked about the yeast and temperature used in the beer!  The only thing that doesn't seem to fit is the scotch... I would think the distillation process would break down the histamines (the doc told me that cooking a couple of fruits I responded weakly to would make them easier to eat), or at least remove them.

As weird as it may sound, some vintners use egg white to clean the rotten grape crap from the wine. Since 2012, they have to write it on the label in Canada, so it might be an egg allergy.

I don't know if brewers do the same, though.
Nah, I'm not allergic to eggs.  I thought it might be the clarifier for white wine (usually isinglass, from fish bladder), but I've tried a couple of white wines that either use chitosan (shellfish, not allergic to it) or nothing (vacuum the gas out and let it sit for 6 months before aging in the cask), and I still get the reaction.  When I brew my own beer the only clarifying agent I've ever added is irish moss, and I've had beers both with and without it that cause reactions.

I don't think scotch is the barrel aging, because I drink lots o' Irish whiskey, usually aged 12 or 18 years with no trouble, same with cask aged rum, tequila, bourbon and brandy... scot ...


With histamines you also have to consider your total load.

If there's lots of pollen in the air, and you were at your neighbor's house with the 3 cats, and then had a couple of slices of bell pepper; only then do you get itchy and break out.  It's not that the peppers are particularly bad for you, it's just that the other stuff has already got your system close to the tipping point.
 
2014-01-21 01:08:56 AM  

The My Little Pony Killer: airsupport: WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.

Is that a euphemism for something?

Yeah, it's an adult child stomping their fists and making things harder for actual allergic people.

It's not their culinary skills, it's your taste buds. Order something else and quit lying.


Pretty damn much. I treat seafood allergies fair serious. If you're at someone's home, you say, "No, thank you." If you're at a restaurant, you say, "Can I please have petite filet, and a salad" or something other than seafood. If you're at a banquet, you order the beef or chicken option, or you avoid the raw bar entirely. It's not hard, it just takes piping up and ordering. Everyone at the table is getting the crab cakes, maybe you order the bruschetta instead. What kills me are the folks who claim that they're horribly allergic to onions, yet demand extra heapings of "your fantastic marinara that I love so much!" Just say, "I'm not a fan of raw onions, or grilled onions by their lonesome." It's not hard. I can accommodate for that too, but I'd rather hear, "I'd prefer no onions" than "I'm allergic" and then proceed to rave about the dish that you got last week that was chock full of shallots and scallions...
 
2014-01-21 03:24:10 AM  

glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for


Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...
 
2014-01-21 06:52:21 AM  
Just move into a bubble already, attention whores
 
2014-01-21 08:06:00 AM  

Donkey Hodie: I'm allergic to eggs.  Yes, really allergic.  I got food poisoning from some bad eggs, (really bad - lost about 40 pounds, had to go to the hospital, etc) and since then I have an immune response to eggs.  The treatment the doctor prescribed?   "Avoid eggs."  I used to love eating fried eggs for breakfast and egg nog during the holidays.  But now, I get sick, including, but not limited to, extreme gastrointestinal distress.  It ain't pretty.  And it ain't pretty for several days.  So many people think I'm making it up, and they are farking morons.

But when I go out to eat, I don't order anything special, I just avoid the dishes with eggs in them.  Sometimes if I'm not sure, I'll ask, (and the wait staff never know - they all have to check with the kitchen) and if there are eggs in it, usually a sauce, I'll just order something else.  I don't ask for dishes to be altered, I just don't order them if they have eggs.

It's really not that big of a deal.  Besides breakfast, I mainly have to avoid baked deserts.  It's funny when someone offers me some brownies or something, and I politely decline, and they keep pressing the issue as to why.  When I tell them I'm allergic to eggs, they think that life must be over for me. Then they keep asking, "Are you sure?  Just a little bite?"  No, goddammit, even though it smells good, that one bite will keep me camped out in the bathroom for a few days.  No, it's not really a temptation when I know the consequences.

So, yeah, it's really an allergy, and not that I'm a vegan, or on a diet, or because I think I'm special somehow.


Say what you want. All NAME hears is, "miracle diet!!!"
 
2014-01-21 09:03:08 AM  

Salmon: Doesn't Applebee's just suck, in general?

I've only been twice, and both times the food sucked, regardless of persuasion.


I don't really get this.
I've never been disappointed with Applebee's.  Isn't it just a "you get what you pay for" thing?  The food isn't life-changing, it's cheap.  I'd say it's like a McDonalds of sit-down restaurants, but that's unfair.  Are there any huge franchise chains you get significantly better food at for a similar price?

I admit, I'm one of those who gets the same thing 60% of the time, regardless of where I'm at.
(you guessed right, a burger:  cheddar+bacon+mushrooms+tomato+lettuce+pickles+beef = glory)
Never thought my burger wasn't worth the whopping $9.
 
2014-01-21 09:05:10 AM  
My pretend allergy to peanuts is the only way I can get peanut-free sundaes at Micky-D's.
Unlike the tobacco industry, a dead customer is a lot more problematic to them than a live disgruntled one.
 
2014-01-21 11:39:14 AM  

hubiestubert: The My Little Pony Killer: airsupport: WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.

Is that a euphemism for something?

Yeah, it's an adult child stomping their fists and making things harder for actual allergic people.

It's not their culinary skills, it's your taste buds. Order something else and quit lying.

Pretty damn much. I treat seafood allergies fair serious. If you're at someone's home, you say, "No, thank you." If you're at a restaurant, you say, "Can I please have petite filet, and a salad" or something other than seafood. If you're at a banquet, you order the beef or chicken option, or you avoid the raw bar entirely. It's not hard, it just takes piping up and ordering. Everyone at the table is getting the crab cakes, maybe you order the bruschetta instead. What kills me are the folks who claim that they're horribly allergic to onions, yet demand extra heapings of "your fantastic marinara that I love so much!" Just say, "I'm not a fan of raw onions, or grilled onions by their lonesome." It's not hard. I can accommodate for that too, but I'd rather hear, "I'd prefer no onions" than "I'm allergic" and then proceed to rave about the dish that you got last week that was chock full of shallots and scallions...


Interesting; I took Little Pony's response as douchetastic, but as you flesh it out it makes more sense.  My impression from the original poster was that he or she was just trying to be kind to someone who'd prepared a fish meal and would urge the poster to try it.  Rather than say "no I really don't like fish" only to be countered with "but it's really good you'll love it", they weasel out with "I'm allergic", which seems like a really harmless white lie and nothing to be called out for.

But I see your point too.
 
2014-01-21 12:33:05 PM  

aleister_greynight: glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for

Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...


I mean, do you want my registry number? Yeah, the epipen is only about $100, but you do have to have a prescription and that requires a doctors visit and allergen test which are considerably higher. And did you miss the part where I said I don't qualify for the company insurance yet?

And yes, I can acquire one for my jump bag, but again I need a prescription. Now, that I can get from our Medical Director, but he's really a hard ass about doing that for EMTs, even intermediates like myself. He says he's worried about us freelancing in our time off. (Lol, what time off?) but nurses and paramedics? They barely have to ask to get stuff.
 
2014-01-21 12:36:16 PM  

glmorrs1: aleister_greynight: glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for

Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...

I mean, do you want my registry number? Yeah, the epipen is only about $100, but you do have to have a prescription and that requires a doctors visit and allergen test which are considerably higher. And did you miss the part where I said I don't qualify for the company insurance yet?

And yes, I can acquire one for my jump bag, but again I need a prescription. Now, that I can get from our Medical Director, but he's really a hard ass about doing that for EMTs, even intermediates like myself. He says he's worried about us freelancing in our time off. (Lol, what time off?) but nurses and paramedics? They barely have to ask to get stuff.


That sounds nearly as ridiculous as needing a prescription for tobacco chewing gum.  Or codeine.  Or vitamin shots.  So much doesn't make sense regarding pharmaceuticals.
 
2014-01-21 12:37:19 PM  
People with made up food allergies worry me. My son has a genetic disorder (Galactosemia to be specific. Thoroughly medically tested. Had to actually some gene sequencing.) It nearly killed him at 1 week. Now he is on a very strict diet. (No milk. No tomatoes. No organ meat. No beans. etc.)

I'm worried that all these people with made-up allergies will desensitize food workers. When my wife and I come in and ask if the bread has milk in it, they will assume we're some nut jobs who think they are lactose intolerant and just tell us whatever. For my son it is real. That milk breaks down into a simple sugar (galactose) which poisons him slowly.
 
2014-01-21 12:40:21 PM  

gyorg: People with made up food allergies worry me. My son has a genetic disorder (Galactosemia to be specific. Thoroughly medically tested. Had to actually some gene sequencing.) It nearly killed him at 1 week. Now he is on a very strict diet. (No milk. No tomatoes. No organ meat. No beans. etc.)

I'm worried that all these people with made-up allergies will desensitize food workers. When my wife and I come in and ask if the bread has milk in it, they will assume we're some nut jobs who think they are lactose intolerant and just tell us whatever. For my son it is real. That milk breaks down into a simple sugar (galactose) which poisons him slowly.


So they'll make an effort to answer you, and may even have appropriate alternatives.  Whereas in the past they would have just been completely unprepared, looked at you funny, and/or just lied to you.  Please refer to my previous response to the guy who was upset that non-celiacs were ordering off the new gluten-free menus.  And all the best to your son!
 
2014-01-21 12:40:40 PM  

Far Cough: hubiestubert: The My Little Pony Killer: airsupport: WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.

Is that a euphemism for something?

Yeah, it's an adult child stomping their fists and making things harder for actual allergic people.

It's not their culinary skills, it's your taste buds. Order something else and quit lying.

Pretty damn much. I treat seafood allergies fair serious. If you're at someone's home, you say, "No, thank you." If you're at a restaurant, you say, "Can I please have petite filet, and a salad" or something other than seafood. If you're at a banquet, you order the beef or chicken option, or you avoid the raw bar entirely. It's not hard, it just takes piping up and ordering. Everyone at the table is getting the crab cakes, maybe you order the bruschetta instead. What kills me are the folks who claim that they're horribly allergic to onions, yet demand extra heapings of "your fantastic marinara that I love so much!" Just say, "I'm not a fan of raw onions, or grilled onions by their lonesome." It's not hard. I can accommodate for that too, but I'd rather hear, "I'd prefer no onions" than "I'm allergic" and then proceed to rave about the dish that you got last week that was chock full of shallots and scallions...

Interesting; I took Little Pony's response as douchetastic, but as you flesh it out it makes more sense.  My impression from the original poster was that he or she was just trying to be kind to someone who'd prepared a fish meal and would urge the poster to try it.  Rather than say "no I really don't like fish" only to be countered with "but it's really good you'll love it", they weasel out with "I'm allergic", which seems like a really harmless white lie and nothing to be called out for.

But I see your point too.


Sometimes, with vegetables and fruit allergens, cooking will actually denature the proteins that cause the allergic reactions. Like bananas, I have a friend who gets pretty bad allergic reactions to raw bananas but can eat bananas foster like its goin out of style.

Unfortunately, the allergens in other things, like peanuts and seeds, gets stronger and more concentrated when you cook them.
 
2014-01-21 12:42:57 PM  

glmorrs1: aleister_greynight: glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for

Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...

I mean, do you want my registry number? Yeah, the epipen is only about $100, but you do have to have a prescription and that requires a doctors visit and allergen test which are considerably higher. And did you miss the part where I said I don't qualify for the company insurance yet?

And yes, I can acquire one for my jump bag, but again I need a prescription. Now, that I can get from our Medical Director, but he's really a hard ass about doing that for EMTs, even intermediates like myself. He says he's worried about us freelancing in our time off. (Lol, what time off?) but nurses and paramedics? They barely have to ask to get stuff.


How does an EMT freelance? Does he write ECNALUBMA in electric tape on the hood of his econoline and yell "wooooowoooooowoooooo" out the driver's window while speeding?
 
2014-01-21 12:44:45 PM  

glmorrs1: Sometimes, with vegetables and fruit allergens, cooking will actually denature the proteins that cause the allergic reactions. Like bananas, I have a friend who gets pretty bad allergic reactions to raw bananas but can eat bananas foster like its goin out of style.


Interesting; I have an odd mini-allergy of sorts to bananas.  They make me cough a little.  I've never seen any documentation of this particular "allergy" but I haven't looked very hard, or been diagnosed.  Any connection to aspirin sensitivity?
 
2014-01-21 12:45:53 PM  

Far Cough: glmorrs1: aleister_greynight: glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for

Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...

I mean, do you want my registry number? Yeah, the epipen is only about $100, but you do have to have a prescription and that requires a doctors visit and allergen test which are considerably higher. And did you miss the part where I said I don't qualify for the company insurance yet?

And yes, I can acquire one for my jump bag, but again I need a prescription. Now, that I can get from our Medical Director, but he's really a hard ass about doing that for EMTs, even intermediates like myself. He says he's worried about us freelancing in our time off. (Lol, what time off?) but nurses and paramedics? They barely have to ask to get stuff.

That sounds nearly as ridiculous as needing a prescription for tobacco chewing gum.  Or codeine.  Or vitamin shots.  So much doesn't make sense regarding pharmaceuticals.


Epinephrine is a prescription drug.

I also need a prescription if I want to get my own oxygen tank (yes, medical grade oxygen is a prescription drug), IV caterers and administration sets, and lactated ringers. But in this sense, prescription really just means permission from the medical director to carry and administer.
 
2014-01-21 12:48:27 PM  

glmorrs1: Epinephrine is a prescription drug.

I also need a prescription if I want to get my own oxygen tank (yes, medical grade oxygen is a prescription drug), IV caterers and administration sets, and lactated ringers. But in this sense, prescription really just means permission from the medical director to carry and administer.


That's what I said, it doesn't make sense.
 
2014-01-21 12:50:18 PM  

Flab: glmorrs1: aleister_greynight: glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for

Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...

I mean, do you want my registry number? Yeah, the epipen is only about $100, but you do have to have a prescription and that requires a doctors visit and allergen test which are considerably higher. And did you miss the part where I said I don't qualify for the company insurance yet?

And yes, I can acquire one for my jump bag, but again I need a prescription. Now, that I can get from our Medical Director, but he's really a hard ass about doing that for EMTs, even intermediates like myself. He says he's worried about us freelancing in our time off. (Lol, what time off?) but nurses and paramedics? They barely have to ask to get stuff.

How does an EMT freelance? Does he write ECNALUBMA in electric tape on the hood of his econoline and yell "wooooowoooooowoooooo" out the driver's window while speeding?


Freelancing means providing treatment for payment outside of a registered and regulated service.
 
2014-01-21 12:54:28 PM  

Far Cough: glmorrs1: Epinephrine is a prescription drug.

I also need a prescription if I want to get my own oxygen tank (yes, medical grade oxygen is a prescription drug), IV caterers and administration sets, and lactated ringers. But in this sense, prescription really just means permission from the medical director to carry and administer.

That's what I said, it doesn't make sense.


It really does, giving epinepren to someone with high blood pressure can cause a myocardial infarction (heart attack) or a CVA (stroke).

And giving too much oxygen to a person with COPD could cause the hypoxic drive in their brain to slow their breathing to the point of causing respiratory arrest.
 
2014-01-21 12:55:10 PM  

Far Cough: glmorrs1: Sometimes, with vegetables and fruit allergens, cooking will actually denature the proteins that cause the allergic reactions. Like bananas, I have a friend who gets pretty bad allergic reactions to raw bananas but can eat bananas foster like its goin out of style.

Interesting; I have an odd mini-allergy of sorts to bananas.  They make me cough a little.  I've never seen any documentation of this particular "allergy" but I haven't looked very hard, or been diagnosed.  Any connection to aspirin sensitivity?


No idea actually.
 
2014-01-21 01:01:19 PM  

glmorrs1: Flab: glmorrs1: aleister_greynight: glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for

Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...

I mean, do you want my registry number? Yeah, the epipen is only about $100, but you do have to have a prescription and that requires a doctors visit and allergen test which are considerably higher. And did you miss the part where I said I don't qualify for the company insurance yet?

And yes, I can acquire one for my jump bag, but again I need a prescription. Now, that I can get from our Medical Director, but he's really a hard ass about doing that for EMTs, even intermediates like myself. He says he's worried about us freelancing in our time off. (Lol, what time off?) but nurses and paramedics? They barely have to ask to get stuff.

How does an EMT freelance? Does he write ECNALUBMA in electric tape on the hood of his econoline and yell "wooooowoooooowoooooo" out the driver's window while speeding?

Freelancing means providing treatment for payment outside of a registered and regulated service.


I made what is called a "joke".

I know very well that EMTs can provide their services without being within arm-length of an ambulance.

And I also know - from the flip side - why employers don't like it when their employees use company resources to freelance.
 
2014-01-21 01:03:43 PM  

Flab: glmorrs1: Flab: glmorrs1: aleister_greynight: glmorrs1: inglixthemad: Inquisitive Inquisitor: My avocado allergy can honestly kill me and I carry an epipen, so I'm pretty sure it's not made up.

I am a fragile snowflake though.

At least you have a real reaction. My cousin just got elected to the school board with three other parents. The newest initiative: You have to bring in medical documentation of an allergy.

Why? Things were getting out of farking hand. You won't believe how the 3 parents (who promptly whined) whose kids supposedly have food allergies reacted. 'Take our kids to the doctor? Verify that they have an actual allergy? Forsooth!'

/EMT, know what I'm talking about
//Don't have an epipen because my service has shiatty insurance that I'm still not yet eligible for

Although you make a valid point; I feel the need to play devil's advocate, and call shenanigans on you being an EMT.  I mean seriously, an EMT claiming not to have an epipen, is like an office worker claiming they don't take home staples or stationary.  I know they cost more like $100; I also know, from experience, that nurses can acquire them for personal use.  How much easier, for some who works with medical emergencies!  I believe severe allergic reactions, generally fall under that category...

I mean, do you want my registry number? Yeah, the epipen is only about $100, but you do have to have a prescription and that requires a doctors visit and allergen test which are considerably higher. And did you miss the part where I said I don't qualify for the company insurance yet?

And yes, I can acquire one for my jump bag, but again I need a prescription. Now, that I can get from our Medical Director, but he's really a hard ass about doing that for EMTs, even intermediates like myself. He says he's worried about us freelancing in our time off. (Lol, what time off?) but nurses and paramedics? They barely have to ask to get stuff.

How does an EMT freelance? Does he write ECNALUBMA in electric tape on the hood of his econoline and yell "wooooowoooooowoooooo" out the driver's window while speeding?

Freelancing means providing treatment for payment outside of a registered and regulated service.

I made what is called a "joke".

I know very well that EMTs can provide their services without being within arm-length of an ambulance.

And I also know - from the flip side - why employers don't like it when their employees use company resources to freelance.


Oh sorry. I'm working today so my sarcasm and joke meters are turne off at the moment.
 
2014-01-21 01:19:33 PM  

glmorrs1: Far Cough: glmorrs1: Epinephrine is a prescription drug.

I also need a prescription if I want to get my own oxygen tank (yes, medical grade oxygen is a prescription drug), IV caterers and administration sets, and lactated ringers. But in this sense, prescription really just means permission from the medical director to carry and administer.

That's what I said, it doesn't make sense.

It really does, giving epinepren to someone with high blood pressure can cause a myocardial infarction (heart attack) or a CVA (stroke).

And giving too much oxygen to a person with COPD could cause the hypoxic drive in their brain to slow their breathing to the point of causing respiratory arrest.


So can hitting them with a hammer, or punching them in the face, or overfeeding them, or poisoning them with bug killer, or giving them something you know they're allergic to, or driving them off a bridge, or shoving a kitchen knife in their chest, or taking a power tool to their body.

That a person with a known dangerous allergy could be restricted from easily acquiring a life saving device because he or she misplaced a prescription slip is NUTSO.

It really doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me.  The difference between over the counter and prescription medication seems, to this layman, as more a function of money and time than anything to do with safety.
 
2014-01-21 02:38:43 PM  

Far Cough: glmorrs1: Sometimes, with vegetables and fruit allergens, cooking will actually denature the proteins that cause the allergic reactions. Like bananas, I have a friend who gets pretty bad allergic reactions to raw bananas but can eat bananas foster like its goin out of style.

Interesting; I have an odd mini-allergy of sorts to bananas.  They make me cough a little.  I've never seen any documentation of this particular "allergy" but I haven't looked very hard, or been diagnosed.  Any connection to aspirin sensitivity?


I have the same thing with bananas.  Mine makes my throat itch and I get a mild cough.  That is the only allergy that I have to food, I think.
Also, I have no issue with aspirin.
 
2014-01-21 02:56:14 PM  

hubiestubert: The My Little Pony Killer: airsupport: WordyGrrl: I do not like seafood at all. Something about the smell, taste and texture of the meat just makes me gag, even the fancy stuff like salmon and lobster. Doesn't matter how it's prepared, what sauce you pour on it, or how well you try to hide it in a dish, I will hork it up. And that's not cool. Sometimes it's just easier to tell someone "I'm allergic to seafood" than to hurt their feelings regarding their culinary skills.

Is that a euphemism for something?

Yeah, it's an adult child stomping their fists and making things harder for actual allergic people.

It's not their culinary skills, it's your taste buds. Order something else and quit lying.

Pretty damn much. I treat seafood allergies fair serious. If you're at someone's home, you say, "No, thank you." If you're at a restaurant, you say, "Can I please have petite filet, and a salad" or something other than seafood. If you're at a banquet, you order the beef or chicken option, or you avoid the raw bar entirely. It's not hard, it just takes piping up and ordering. Everyone at the table is getting the crab cakes, maybe you order the bruschetta instead. What kills me are the folks who claim that they're horribly allergic to onions, yet demand extra heapings of "your fantastic marinara that I love so much!" Just say, "I'm not a fan of raw onions, or grilled onions by their lonesome." It's not hard. I can accommodate for that too, but I'd rather hear, "I'd prefer no onions" than "I'm allergic" and then proceed to rave about the dish that you got last week that was chock full of shallots and scallions...


I know what you're saying and agree completely. I do, however, have a bad reaction to raw onions vs cooked ones in that if I eat more than the smallest amount (say a teaspoonful) of raw onions I'm guaranteed to have a pounding headache within a half-hour. Cooked onions don't affect me at all.
 
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