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(Philly.com)   New Jersey has been colluding with insurance companies to import coyotes in order to reduce the deer population. What a wily idea   (philly.com) divider line 116
    More: Unlikely, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Game Commission, deer population, David Swarter, Leo Deiter, Perry County, conspiracy, Western Pennsylvania  
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2797 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jan 2014 at 2:20 PM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-19 06:39:01 PM

boinkingbill: Coyotes are killing and eating those nasty, annoying little yappy dogs?

I'm okay with this.


This was in my old building a few years ago.

i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-19 06:54:22 PM

JeffreyScott: s3.amazonaws.com


Coyotes are Jersey's younger but uglier versions of cougars right?
 
2014-01-19 07:01:51 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Why not just expand hunting season?


Cuz the anti-hunting people in this state would probably freak.  We've got the highest bear density in the country (yeah, google it) yet half the cars here have bumper stickers with "Ban the bear hunt" on them.
 
2014-01-19 07:09:15 PM
"It's the biggest high you can ever get in your life,"

Meh. As a hunter myself, I must say your life must suck in terms of life experience if taking a 4 point buck was the big IT for you.

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy hunting, but I hunt to eat due to my heritage. What's the thrill of killing a deer? I do that quite regularly. Now BOW-hunting bear or taking a cougar out with a KNIFE, I could understand, but it's a fugging deer. There's no damned thrill to that anymore than setting a high record in Pac Man. It's not sporting to the deer at all unless you plan on hand-wrestling the damned thing by the horns.
 
2014-01-19 07:12:18 PM

Terrible Old Man: "It's the biggest high you can ever get in your life,"

Meh. As a hunter myself, I must say your life must suck in terms of life experience if taking a 4 point buck was the big IT for you.

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy hunting, but I hunt to eat due to my heritage. What's the thrill of killing a deer? I do that quite regularly. Now BOW-hunting bear or taking a cougar out with a KNIFE, I could understand, but it's a fugging deer. There's no damned thrill to that anymore than setting a high record in Pac Man. It's not sporting to the deer at all unless you plan on hand-wrestling the damned thing by the horns.


I mean also take into account he was 15 and spending time with his dad when it happened. That's prime real estate in the "pink colored glasses" market.
 
2014-01-19 07:51:18 PM
Years ago I was walking in Tucson and got to a light and had to wait for the green.  Suddenly next to me there is a dog walking up and stopping for the green as well even though there was little traffic.  The light changes and I start walking across with the dog and suddenly realize that is no dog, that is a coyote.  I continued to watch him as I let him get ahead and saw him stop at the next intersection to get the green even though no one was standing there waiting.
 
2014-01-19 08:25:00 PM
A coyote will breed with and/or eat your dog, depending.
 
2014-01-19 08:41:58 PM

interstellar_tedium: Years ago I was walking in Tucson and got to a light and had to wait for the green.  Suddenly next to me there is a dog walking up and stopping for the green as well even though there was little traffic.  The light changes and I start walking across with the dog and suddenly realize that is no dog, that is a coyote.  I continued to watch him as I let him get ahead and saw him stop at the next intersection to get the green even though no one was standing there waiting.


There have been numerous sightings/videos of coyotes in the LA area doing the same thing. Not wonder wolves and cougars are damned near extinct while coyotes flourish.
 
2014-01-19 09:09:50 PM
There go all of NJ's feral kitties...

/and small yappy dogs
 
2014-01-20 12:01:17 AM
Love to see it happen.
 
2014-01-20 01:26:17 AM
OK, I guess no one noticed this flaw in the hunters' reasoning.

They say government and insurance companies are colluding in importing coyotes to knock down the deer population.

Then they say they are combating this by hunting down the coyotes.  However, they are tricky little bastards and it's hard to for hunters to find them and kill them.

Fine.

Then how, if coyotes are so farking hard to hunt and kill, does the government and insurance companies manage to find them, catch them alive and bring them in alive to the state in question?
 
2014-01-20 01:52:39 AM

Aulus: OK, I guess no one noticed this flaw in the hunters' reasoning.

They say government and insurance companies are colluding in importing coyotes to knock down the deer population.

Then they say they are combating this by hunting down the coyotes.  However, they are tricky little bastards and it's hard to for hunters to find them and kill them.

Fine.

Then how, if coyotes are so farking hard to hunt and kill, does the government and insurance companies manage to find them, catch them alive and bring them in alive to the state in question?


A cunning man would probably realize that those organizations could look to some type of breeding system in which dogs or a similar animal were bred for sale. Only a cunning man would see that though.

/this story is apocryphal bs
 
2014-01-20 02:16:57 AM

rohar: simplicimus: Silentbob768768: simplicimus: Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]

Another vote for wolves. Not much danger to humans, deadly for deer.

Lots of livestock up here though

There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.

Yup, they look like this:



very effective against coyotes, wolves and mountain lions.


My family raised goats for many years, and we had a llama as a livestock guardian. I actually got to see it run down and kill a coyote. (Warning, some might find this story graphic). I was hunting, and a small brown streak entered the field, followed closely by a big white streak. They were both just booking it, and the llama, Oscar, caught up about 30 yards in front of my stand, and suddenly I had ringside seats to a SLAUGHTER!
I had expected the stomping, with the llama being a larger, heavier animal, what I didn't expect was the move where he bit the coyote by the scruff, held it, stomped a rear hoof THROUGH the stomach, and then pulled at the neck to disembowl. When he finally left, I took a closer look, and it wasn't a stomped, trampled coyote out there, it was coyote pieces strewn about as if the 'yote had swallowed a grenade. After seeing coyote predations on our goat flock, when I saw the absolute mayhem wreaked on coyotes by that llama, I seriously wanted to buy it a beer and get it a female.
A few years later I was attacked by a neighbor's llama, and that still ranks as the scariest moment of my life. I knew what that creature was capable of.

/one small scar, from the barbed-wire fence it knocked me into
//csb
 
2014-01-20 02:48:10 AM

interstellar_tedium: Years ago I was walking in Tucson and got to a light and had to wait for the green.  Suddenly next to me there is a dog walking up and stopping for the green as well even though there was little traffic.  The light changes and I start walking across with the dog and suddenly realize that is no dog, that is a coyote.  I continued to watch him as I let him get ahead and saw him stop at the next intersection to get the green even though no one was standing there waiting.


Urban coyotes must be more acclimated to people. I lived on a farm for two years, they own ~450 acres and there's tons more empty/forested land besides that in the area, and have never seen one here. I've heard them on occasion, and I've definitely seen signs (tracks, spoor, remains of smaller animals), but never put my eyes on them. Never even seen one run across the road in front of my car or anything like that.
 
2014-01-20 03:12:47 AM

ladyfortuna: interstellar_tedium: Years ago I was walking in Tucson and got to a light and had to wait for the green.  Suddenly next to me there is a dog walking up and stopping for the green as well even though there was little traffic.  The light changes and I start walking across with the dog and suddenly realize that is no dog, that is a coyote.  I continued to watch him as I let him get ahead and saw him stop at the next intersection to get the green even though no one was standing there waiting.

Urban coyotes must be more acclimated to people. I lived on a farm for two years, they own ~450 acres and there's tons more empty/forested land besides that in the area, and have never seen one here. I've heard them on occasion, and I've definitely seen signs (tracks, spoor, remains of smaller animals), but never put my eyes on them. Never even seen one run across the road in front of my car or anything like that.


I ran into a pack of 3 or 4 when hiking through the Cuyahoga Valley National Park on an infrequently used trail. I crested a hill and they were standing just on the other side, maybe 20' from me. As soon as they took notice of me they took off for the bushes which is why I'm not 100% sure if it was 3 or 4 animals. They were probably 30-40lbs each which means they weren't taking down any adult deer except maybe a sick doe (the whitetails grow big around here as long as there's food and it's been years since we had enough of a winter to keep their population down, though this one might do it). The mountain lion we had in the park was another case entirely, it was a young male but still big enough that someone saw it carry a deer over a 6' fence. I really wish we had some wolves around, big enough to kill the adults but not as dangerous as the lion to people.
 
2014-01-20 03:34:54 AM

ladyfortuna: interstellar_tedium: Years ago I was walking in Tucson and got to a light and had to wait for the green.  Suddenly next to me there is a dog walking up and stopping for the green as well even though there was little traffic.  The light changes and I start walking across with the dog and suddenly realize that is no dog, that is a coyote.  I continued to watch him as I let him get ahead and saw him stop at the next intersection to get the green even though no one was standing there waiting.

Urban coyotes must be more acclimated to people. I lived on a farm for two years, they own ~450 acres and there's tons more empty/forested land besides that in the area, and have never seen one here. I've heard them on occasion, and I've definitely seen signs (tracks, spoor, remains of smaller animals), but never put my eyes on them. Never even seen one run across the road in front of my car or anything like that.


Urban coyotes are definitely more acclimated to people. I've been within about 70 ft of a pair of coyote in Lincoln Park in downtown Chicago. One was sitting in the middle of a fairly busy street after midnight. The other one was looking for food. They sat around long enough for me to get several blurry shots of them (shiatty camera phone) over a few minutes. I've also seen more than a few coyotes in my parents' suburban neighborhood as well as my old neighbor's Bernese Mountain Dog chasing a coyote away from his outside food dish. That was actually kind of funny. I'm not sure I've ever seen a coyote when I was out in the boonies or hunting on my family's farm. Kind of funny thinking that I've been close enough to hit a coyote with a baseball far more often in the city than I have when I actually had a gun in my hand.
 
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