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(Philly.com)   New Jersey has been colluding with insurance companies to import coyotes in order to reduce the deer population. What a wily idea   ( philly.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Game Commission, deer population, David Swarter, Leo Deiter, Perry County, conspiracy, Western Pennsylvania  
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2846 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jan 2014 at 2:20 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-19 03:13:23 PM  

StrikitRich: Coyotes?  Are they trying to control miniature deer?

Deer will take out a dog, and coyotes aren't that big.


Link claiming coyotes kill up to 50% of fawns: http://www.gon.com/article.php?id=2749&cid=158

Most eastern states have experienced an explosion in deer populations in recent decades, which would certainly attract coyotes.
 
2014-01-19 03:14:09 PM  

Silentbob768768: simplicimus: Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]

Another vote for wolves. Not much danger to humans, deadly for deer.

Lots of livestock up here though


There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.
 
2014-01-19 03:22:10 PM  

simplicimus: Silentbob768768: simplicimus: Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]

Another vote for wolves. Not much danger to humans, deadly for deer.

Lots of livestock up here though

There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.


Yup, they look like this:

media.web.britannica.com

very effective against coyotes, wolves and mountain lions.
 
2014-01-19 03:31:08 PM  

rohar: simplicimus: There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.

Yup, they look like this:

[media.web.britannica.com image 550x427]

very effective against coyotes, wolves and mountain lions.


I have llamas which do a good job against coyotes (no sheep losses since getting them), but my books and the web say they cannot fight off cougars. Can't say about wolf packs, but since numerous sources caution against feral dog packs, I'd say wolves are problematical, too.
 
2014-01-19 03:31:51 PM  
I need glasses.

I read that as bringing in coyotes to reduce the derper population.
 
2014-01-19 03:32:57 PM  
Call Off Your Old Tired Ethics

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COYOTE
 
2014-01-19 03:34:01 PM  

rohar: simplicimus: Silentbob768768: simplicimus: Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]

Another vote for wolves. Not much danger to humans, deadly for deer.

Lots of livestock up here though

There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.

Yup, they look like this:

very effective against coyotes, wolves and mountain lions.


Donkeys are also quite effective at defending herds especially from mountain lions.
 
2014-01-19 03:34:34 PM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: Call Off Your Old Tired Ethics

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COYOTE


Okay...I LOL'd. :)
 
2014-01-19 03:35:09 PM  

Stone Meadow: my books and the web say they cannot fight off cougars.


Nothing can fight off cougars.  They are unstoppable, relentless killing machines and will not stop until you are coug'd.

i834.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-19 03:36:36 PM  

simplicimus: Silentbob768768: simplicimus: Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]

Another vote for wolves. Not much danger to humans, deadly for deer.

Lots of livestock up here though

There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.


I got to meet a Kangal at the Indianapolis Zoo once, during a lecture on how they help with the cheetah conservation effort.  Pretty cool dogs.
 
2014-01-19 03:36:48 PM  

Oldiron_79: rohar: simplicimus: Silentbob768768: simplicimus: Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]

Another vote for wolves. Not much danger to humans, deadly for deer.

Lots of livestock up here though

There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.

Yup, they look like this:

very effective against coyotes, wolves and mountain lions.

Donkeys are also quite effective at defending herds especially from mountain lions.


Elephants work too.
 
2014-01-19 03:40:16 PM  
Even better let a few of these loose in the area:
i.imgur.com
 
2014-01-19 03:41:21 PM  

StrikitRich: Coyotes?  Are they trying to control miniature deer?

Deer will take out a dog, and coyotes aren't that big.


As far as I know, coyotes can hunt as a pack, much like wolves, although it's not as common for them. Deer may be able to take out one or two, but three or four? I'm betting on the pack. I've mostly just seen this with wolves (documentaries) but they're fairly similar animals.

Also, FTFA:

Gambardello said he believes the importing is going on still. In October, local hunter Barry Zeldin, 74, went missing. A search of the Pine Barrens that Gambardello took part in yielded nothing.

"He could have been attacked by coyotes," Gambardello said.

SUUUURE. He couldn't possibly have injured himself or gotten lost (or both), or had a heart attack... It must have been those damn coyotes!

/It was the Jersey Devil
 
2014-01-19 03:46:54 PM  

Stone Meadow: rohar: simplicimus: There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.

Yup, they look like this:

[media.web.britannica.com image 550x427]

very effective against coyotes, wolves and mountain lions.

I have llamas which do a good job against coyotes (no sheep losses since getting them), but my books and the web say they cannot fight off cougars. Can't say about wolf packs, but since numerous sources caution against feral dog packs, I'd say wolves are problematical, too.


I've seen the aftermath of 2 mountain lion/llama interactions in the past 5 years near where I live (not mine).  No question, the llamas were a bit roughed up.  The mountain lions were dead.

Pretty sure the dairy goats didn't kill them, so my bet's on the llamas.

/yrmv
 
2014-01-19 03:48:14 PM  

ladyfortuna: StrikitRich: Coyotes?  Are they trying to control miniature deer?

Deer will take out a dog, and coyotes aren't that big.

As far as I know, coyotes can hunt as a pack, much like wolves, although it's not as common for them. Deer may be able to take out one or two, but three or four? I'm betting on the pack. I've mostly just seen this with wolves (documentaries) but they're fairly similar animals.

Also, FTFA:

Gambardello said he believes the importing is going on still. In October, local hunter Barry Zeldin, 74, went missing. A search of the Pine Barrens that Gambardello took part in yielded nothing.

"He could have been attacked by coyotes," Gambardello said.

SUUUURE. He couldn't possibly have injured himself or gotten lost (or both), or had a heart attack... It must have been those damn coyotes!

/It was the Jersey Devil


More likely he died of something and was scavenged by some form of canid. Canids prefer scavenging over hunting. Fewer calories expended to get calories.
 
2014-01-19 03:52:39 PM  

ladyfortuna: StrikitRich: Coyotes?  Are they trying to control miniature deer?

Deer will take out a dog, and coyotes aren't that big.

As far as I know, coyotes can hunt as a pack, much like wolves, although it's not as common for them. Deer may be able to take out one or two, but three or four? I'm betting on the pack. I've mostly just seen this with wolves (documentaries) but they're fairly similar animals.

Also, FTFA:

Gambardello said he believes the importing is going on still. In October, local hunter Barry Zeldin, 74, went missing. A search of the Pine Barrens that Gambardello took part in yielded nothing.

"He could have been attacked by coyotes," Gambardello said.

SUUUURE. He couldn't possibly have injured himself or gotten lost (or both), or had a heart attack... It must have been those damn coyotes!

/It was the Jersey Devil


Or Pauly Walnuts and Christafuh Moltisanti
 
2014-01-19 03:52:51 PM  
As someone who has seen this done before, also say goodbye to animals such as rabbits, free roaming cats, and dogs that run free on farms.  Also, say goodbye to a few cattle once the coyotes start reproducing and live in larger packs.  Next up...coyote season.
 
2014-01-19 03:55:31 PM  

rohar: I've seen the aftermath of 2 mountain lion/llama interactions in the past 5 years near where I live (not mine).  No question, the llamas were a bit roughed up.  The mountain lions were dead.

Pretty sure the dairy goats didn't kill them, so my bet's on the llamas.

/yrmv


I read it on the web, therefore it can't be wrong and your argument is a birdsnest... ;^)

J/k...that's actually pretty cool, as we have mountain lions here and I have had some concerns about Boots and Silver. That said, my copy of Birutta is pretty definitive on the topic, and my llamas are getting on in years, so I wouldn't want to put it to the test.
 
2014-01-19 03:57:43 PM  

Slappajo: As someone who has seen this done before, also say goodbye to animals such as rabbits, free roaming cats, and dogs that run free on farms.  Also, say goodbye to a few cattle once the coyotes start reproducing and live in larger packs.  Next up...coyote season.


In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 21 December. No tag. No bag limit.
 
2014-01-19 03:58:51 PM  

Stone Meadow: In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 231 December.


FTFM
 
2014-01-19 04:01:07 PM  

Stone Meadow: Slappajo: As someone who has seen this done before, also say goodbye to animals such as rabbits, free roaming cats, and dogs that run free on farms.  Also, say goodbye to a few cattle once the coyotes start reproducing and live in larger packs.  Next up...coyote season.

In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 21 December. No tag. No bag limit.


Was there ever a "reintroduction" effort?  The experience I was talking about was that they were all but absent in the area but it was decided to reintroduce them and restrictions were put on killing them.  Now it's pretty much shoot 'em if you see 'em.
 
2014-01-19 04:04:53 PM  

Brick-House: Next they'll be importing road runners to control the coyote population.


They'd be too slow, at least for Time Warner Cable customers.
 
2014-01-19 04:05:07 PM  

Slappajo: Stone Meadow: In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 21 December. No tag. No bag limit.

Was there ever a "reintroduction" effort?  The experience I was talking about was that they were all but absent in the area but it was decided to reintroduce them and restrictions were put on killing them.  Now it's pretty much shoot 'em if you see 'em.


No, but now you have me curious...was there a formal coyote reintroduction effort in Iowa?
 
2014-01-19 04:06:07 PM  
Kentucky...I lived there for 35 years.
 
2014-01-19 04:06:08 PM  
There are at least a few, and often more anti-predator hate propagandist dimbulbs in all the lower 48 states who are under the impression every state has a covert predator importation team with a secret budget and exceptions from ordinary wildlife and/or endangered species interstate transfer rules, dedicated to creating local populations of predators of kinds exotic to the local varieties, larger, and with the intention of them causing damage to livestock and danger to humans.

These people come in the same category as the Rainbows too Close to the Ground lady.  Unfortunately, they, and some politicians who listen to them, seem to think that their fantasies should be used to determine the local hunting regulations instead of actual scientists.
 
2014-01-19 04:06:32 PM  

Stone Meadow: rohar: I've seen the aftermath of 2 mountain lion/llama interactions in the past 5 years near where I live (not mine).  No question, the llamas were a bit roughed up.  The mountain lions were dead.

Pretty sure the dairy goats didn't kill them, so my bet's on the llamas.

/yrmv

I read it on the web, therefore it can't be wrong and your argument is a birdsnest... ;^)

J/k...that's actually pretty cool, as we have mountain lions here and I have had some concerns about Boots and Silver. That said, my copy of Birutta is pretty definitive on the topic, and my llamas are getting on in years, so I wouldn't want to put it to the test.


Not a subject I even want to think about, and I have no idea the success ratio, the plural of anecdote is not data.

We've got a couple of working dogs that sleep out with the livestock, but they're not much good for anything but noise.  That damned Llama though, has no sense of survival.  No matter how big a perceived threat is, she heads right for it.  Never thought she'd charge me in the skid steer.

Still, with the dogs and the llama, I've had to wake up in the middle of the night and plink a few coyotes in the past few years during kidding season.
 
2014-01-19 04:08:46 PM  

rohar: Stone Meadow: rohar: I've seen the aftermath of 2 mountain lion/llama interactions in the past 5 years near where I live (not mine).  No question, the llamas were a bit roughed up.  The mountain lions were dead.

Pretty sure the dairy goats didn't kill them, so my bet's on the llamas.

/yrmv

I read it on the web, therefore it can't be wrong and your argument is a birdsnest... ;^)

J/k...that's actually pretty cool, as we have mountain lions here and I have had some concerns about Boots and Silver. That said, my copy of Birutta is pretty definitive on the topic, and my llamas are getting on in years, so I wouldn't want to put it to the test.

Not a subject I even want to think about, and I have no idea the success ratio, the plural of anecdote is not data.

We've got a couple of working dogs that sleep out with the livestock, but they're not much good for anything but noise.  That damned Llama though, has no sense of survival.  No matter how big a perceived threat is, she heads right for it.  Never thought she'd charge me in the skid steer.

Still, with the dogs and the llama, I've had to wake up in the middle of the night and plink a few coyotes in the past few years during kidding season.


Blam! Lol JK!
 
2014-01-19 04:10:30 PM  

Stone Meadow: Slappajo: Stone Meadow: In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 21 December. No tag. No bag limit.

Was there ever a "reintroduction" effort?  The experience I was talking about was that they were all but absent in the area but it was decided to reintroduce them and restrictions were put on killing them.  Now it's pretty much shoot 'em if you see 'em.

No, but now you have me curious...was there a formal coyote reintroduction effort in Iowa?


If I remember correctly, there wasn't really one. With the switch of a lot of forest to agricultural use, decline in larger predators, and increase in food supply they pretty just migrated from the West. Apparently they were a lot less common in the eastern part of the US before the 1900s.
 
2014-01-19 04:11:18 PM  

redmid17: Stone Meadow: Slappajo: Stone Meadow: In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 21 December. No tag. No bag limit.

Was there ever a "reintroduction" effort?  The experience I was talking about was that they were all but absent in the area but it was decided to reintroduce them and restrictions were put on killing them.  Now it's pretty much shoot 'em if you see 'em.

No, but now you have me curious...was there a formal coyote reintroduction effort in Iowa?

If I remember correctly, there wasn't really one. With the switch of a lot of forest to agricultural use, decline in larger predators, and increase in food supply they pretty just migrated from the West. Apparently they were a lot less common in the eastern part of the US before the 1900s.


Old Times article on it:  http://www.nytimes.com/1981/03/03/science/coyotes-arrive-in-the-north e ast-after-an-evolutionary-trek-across-the.html
 
2014-01-19 04:13:19 PM  

SwiftFox: There are at least a few, and often more anti-predator hate propagandist dimbulbs in all the lower 48 states who are under the impression every state has a covert predator importation team with a secret budget and exceptions from ordinary wildlife and/or endangered species interstate transfer rules, dedicated to creating local populations of predators of kinds exotic to the local varieties, larger, and with the intention of them causing damage to livestock and danger to humans.

These people come in the same category as the Rainbows too Close to the Ground lady.  Unfortunately, they, and some politicians who listen to them, seem to think that their fantasies should be used to determine the local hunting regulations instead of actual scientists.


You would be partly correct.  However, you fail to mention that many people in rural areas also use hunting small game as a way to feed their families.  I'm sure those scientists and politicians are experienced in those areas as well and understand the impact of it.
 
2014-01-19 04:18:27 PM  

redmid17: redmid17: Stone Meadow: Slappajo: Stone Meadow: In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 21 December. No tag. No bag limit.

Was there ever a "reintroduction" effort?  The experience I was talking about was that they were all but absent in the area but it was decided to reintroduce them and restrictions were put on killing them.  Now it's pretty much shoot 'em if you see 'em.

No, but now you have me curious...was there a formal coyote reintroduction effort in Iowa?

If I remember correctly, there wasn't really one. With the switch of a lot of forest to agricultural use, decline in larger predators, and increase in food supply they pretty just migrated from the West. Apparently they were a lot less common in the eastern part of the US before the 1900s.

Old Times article on it:  http://www.nytimes.com/1981/03/03/science/coyotes-arrive-in-the-north e ast-after-an-evolutionary-trek-across-the.html


Looks like you might be correct.   http://www.richmondregister.com/lifestylescommunity/x1475588683/Coyot e s-in-our-midst
 
2014-01-19 04:19:50 PM  

simplicimus: Silentbob768768: simplicimus: Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]

Another vote for wolves. Not much danger to humans, deadly for deer.

Lots of livestock up here though

There are breeds of dogs that are quite effective at protecting livestock.


 upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-01-19 04:23:28 PM  

big pig peaches: Silentbob768768: There's mountain lions too but not very many it seems

NJ historically had cougars, grizzly bears, wolves, even jaguars I've heard. They were wiped out by man. The northeast was mostly forest once, and probably had every large predator present in North America.

With hunting less popular than ever it makes sense that anything that can adapt to suburban /urban areas will come back, and coyotes do quite well in other urban parts of the country. Personally, their howls would be a welcome sound.


I dont know that jags where anywhere near NJ unles you are talking like pre Native American times, but yeah cougars, gray wolves, and brown bears where once native to almost the entire continent before Europeans hunted them to extinction in the eastern US. There are still black bears and that about it.
 
2014-01-19 04:23:36 PM  

rohar: ArcadianRefugee: Also, Road Runner / Wile E Coyote trifecta in play?

Maybe they could just ship coyotes from Oregon to NJ and solve 2 problems?



Came here to say this.

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2014/01/18/Judge-allows-coyote-hunt-t o- go-forward-in-Oregon/UPI-47961390101548/
 
2014-01-19 04:33:48 PM  
New Jersey coyotes: man's best friend's cousin who knows somebody who can take care of this thing for you.
 
2014-01-19 04:37:17 PM  

redmid17: redmid17: Stone Meadow: Slappajo: Stone Meadow: In California "coyote season" starts at 12:01AM on January first and goes to midnight on 21 December. No tag. No bag limit.

Was there ever a "reintroduction" effort?  The experience I was talking about was that they were all but absent in the area but it was decided to reintroduce them and restrictions were put on killing them.  Now it's pretty much shoot 'em if you see 'em.

No, but now you have me curious...was there a formal coyote reintroduction effort in Iowa?

If I remember correctly, there wasn't really one. With the switch of a lot of forest to agricultural use, decline in larger predators, and increase in food supply they pretty just migrated from the West. Apparently they were a lot less common in the eastern part of the US before the 1900s.

Old Times article on it:  http://www.nytimes.com/1981/03/03/science/coyotes-arrive-in-the-north e ast-after-an-evolutionary-trek-across-the.html


So...long story short, coyotes had naturally migrated back into every eastern state by 30 years ago, but this yokel concludes it was collusion between the NJ State Gov't and insurance companies. Double-facepalm^∞... ;^)

/great article, btw...thanks!
 
2014-01-19 04:47:23 PM  

Slappajo: SwiftFox: There are at least a few, and often more anti-predator hate propagandist dimbulbs in all the lower 48 states who are under the impression every state has a covert predator importation team with a secret budget and exceptions from ordinary wildlife and/or endangered species interstate transfer rules, dedicated to creating local populations of predators of kinds exotic to the local varieties, larger, and with the intention of them causing damage to livestock and danger to humans.

These people come in the same category as the Rainbows too Close to the Ground lady.  Unfortunately, they, and some politicians who listen to them, seem to think that their fantasies should be used to determine the local hunting regulations instead of actual scientists.

You would be partly correct.  However, you fail to mention that many people in rural areas also use hunting small game as a way to feed their families.  I'm sure those scientists and politicians are experienced in those areas as well and understand the impact of it.


Yup, met a few of the kind of those who want to blame off the cyclical, inevitable, pretty much unaffected by predators boom-dieoff cycle of bunnies and so on on on predators too. They've tended to be the some folk'll never eat a skunk, but then again some folk'll type.
 
2014-01-19 04:51:28 PM  

SwiftFox: Slappajo: SwiftFox: There are at least a few, and often more anti-predator hate propagandist dimbulbs in all the lower 48 states who are under the impression every state has a covert predator importation team with a secret budget and exceptions from ordinary wildlife and/or endangered species interstate transfer rules, dedicated to creating local populations of predators of kinds exotic to the local varieties, larger, and with the intention of them causing damage to livestock and danger to humans.

These people come in the same category as the Rainbows too Close to the Ground lady.  Unfortunately, they, and some politicians who listen to them, seem to think that their fantasies should be used to determine the local hunting regulations instead of actual scientists.

You would be partly correct.  However, you fail to mention that many people in rural areas also use hunting small game as a way to feed their families.  I'm sure those scientists and politicians are experienced in those areas as well and understand the impact of it.

Yup, met a few of the kind of those who want to blame off the cyclical, inevitable, pretty much unaffected by predators boom-dieoff cycle of bunnies and so on on on predators too. They've tended to be the some folk'll never eat a skunk, but then again some folk'll type.


What...I've eaten skunk.  You haven't?
 
2014-01-19 05:01:19 PM  
There are about nine deer living in the brush half a mile from my house, and I am scared shirtless some SOB with a high powered rifle will try to take them out---in a residential area, where you can figure Murphy's Law will getcha every time.
 
2014-01-19 05:02:51 PM  

olddinosaur: There are about nine deer living in the brush half a mile from my house, and I am scared shirtless some SOB with a high powered rifle will try to take them out---in a residential area, where you can figure Murphy's Law will getcha every time.


It's more likely the deer will take you out.
 
2014-01-19 05:03:24 PM  
Sounds likethe morans who think Nebraska brought mountain lions in for deer.  Let's see, three states with proven populations have them.  No wonder Oobama was elected.  Pubic edumacation.
 
2014-01-19 05:09:05 PM  
Coyotes are killing and eating those nasty, annoying little yappy dogs?

I'm okay with this.
 
2014-01-19 05:17:03 PM  
Reading the article and the  comments on this article, I am literally astounded at the ignorance of some people who do not understand two things:

1--the population of predators will increase proportionally to the population of prey

2--the necessity of hunting to keep the population of prey (in this case, deer) from overwhelming rural areas.

As someone who has lived in rural areas most of my life, let me spell this out for those of you who don't understand the concept of hunting as it pertains to keeping a balance: if you do not hunt Bambi, Bambi will take the fark over because in some areas, there are not enough wolves and coyotes to prevent Bambi from breeding like Thumper. Bambi can do significant damage to crops in rural/farmland areas because Bambi is a farking vegetarian. We are not strict herbivores like Bambi, we are omnivores (or, if you prefer, om nom nom-ivores). Nature designed us this way for balance--so that in areas where Bambi doesn't have predators like the big bad wolf and Wile Coyote, he has a natural predator called Man. Man preys on Bambi so that plants and crops continue to grow so the remaining Bambis and Thumpers and men have food besides Bambi and Thumper to eat. And spaying/neutering Bambi isn't gonna cut it because then all those spayed/neutered Bambis are still gonna eat all the food and grain.

It's second-grade science. Emotion has nothing to farking do with it, nor does "ZOMG, GUN NUTS!" Get a farking grip.

*Disclaimer: nothing in the above is necessarily directed at any Farker. But holy shiat, those comments on the article just about gave me an aneurysm. So much stupid, all in one place.
 
2014-01-19 05:22:37 PM  

AngryDragon: ACME?


Follow the money. Someone has ties to an ACME supplier. Probably a wascally wabbit.
 
2014-01-19 05:30:18 PM  

Fano: AngryDragon: ACME?

Follow the money. Someone has ties to an ACME supplier. Probably a wascally wabbit.


Acme stuff don't work my money is on a despicable duck
 
2014-01-19 05:33:36 PM  

Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]


We also would have accepted "bears in far cry 3", "deathclaws in new vegas", or "walking around skyrim"..
 
2014-01-19 05:55:12 PM  
Neither the mountain lions nor the coyotes we've had around here have done jack to the deer population, the problem is the mountain lions are too sparse and too afraid to come into populated areas and the coyotes are too small to take down adult deer and would rather take yippy dogs out of peoples back yards. If they really want to drop the population allow 10 doe tags per hunter and allow for bow hunting in rural residential area where the deer are like overgrown rats.
 
2014-01-19 06:12:04 PM  
We use wolves, cougars and coyotes out here in Oregonland to keep the deer populations culled. The cattle ranchers don't like the wolves very much.
 
2014-01-19 06:22:37 PM  

Glitchwerks: Oldiron_79: If you want to reduce deer you probably want a bigger predator like wolves or cougars.

You want wolves, because wolves control coyotes too.

You don't want cougars, because cougars do not give a fark about anything.

[2.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com image 600x600]


I have to disagree.  Some of us REALLY want cougars.

s3.amazonaws.com
 
2014-01-19 06:30:36 PM  
Aigoo: ........ And spaying/neutering Bambi isn't gonna cut it because then all those spayed/neutered Bambis are still gonna eat all the food and grain.

Plus spay/neuter on deer is a fools errand. Wildlife biologists like me have found deer don't do well being captured and operated on. You can sometimes see over 70% fatalities due to the fragility of the animals. Plus the cost is horrendous, I usually ask the spay/neuter people if they'ed like to vote a tax levy in for the district to pay for the program and the silence is deafening.
 
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