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(Pro Football Talk)   On Sunday there will be more television viewers watching the AFC and NFC football championship games than anything ever broadcast, well except for the World Cup   (profootballtalk.nbcsports.com) divider line 27
    More: Interesting, NFC, AFC, World Cup, competitive gaming, NFL, playoffs, watching, Garden State Parkway  
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594 clicks; posted to Sports » on 18 Jan 2014 at 5:58 PM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-18 04:43:46 PM
You mean soccer, subby?
 
2014-01-18 05:55:31 PM
Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.
 
2014-01-18 06:05:36 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.


The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.
 
2014-01-18 06:34:03 PM
The valuable and coveted "Third World Nations" demographic.
 
2014-01-18 06:52:39 PM

Slow To Return: The valuable and coveted "Third World Nations" demographic.


The Lions didn't make it this year
 
2014-01-18 07:01:25 PM

UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.


As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.
 
2014-01-18 07:12:48 PM
Yeah but it only matters here where God pays attention
 
2014-01-18 07:14:56 PM

iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.


Yeah, I tend to think that the level of play won't be impacted all the much even if 1/2 the mothers take their kids out of peewee football. Every team will still draw from the same pool of players.
 
2014-01-18 07:39:10 PM

"On Sunday there will be more television viewers watching the AFC and NFC football championship games than anything ever broadcast, well except for the World Cup"


What? The Super Bowl draws more viewers than any other football game. MASH had 105.9 million viewers. I doubt the combined Sunday football viewership will beat the MASH audience.

 
2014-01-18 07:55:43 PM

UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.


Potential scenario but rule adjustments will continue to keep the masses entertained. As long as touchdowns are being scored, there will be butts in the seats.
 
2014-01-18 08:15:34 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.


Add to the fact even Germany has football(not soccer) teams playing now.


And the ratings FIFA uses to arrive at those figures have been shown to be skewed in their favor. They assume everyone who watches their countries team watches every single other game played and they count 8-10 people per TV in undeveloped countries are watching. That just doesn't happen, hell even I watch a little of the USA if they make the world cup but I don't give a shiat about the rest just like most tune out when their team is out of it.

NFL ratings are more accurate.
 
2014-01-18 08:26:03 PM
Needs more hype.

Elite Quarterbacks.
 
2014-01-18 08:37:06 PM

iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.


My neighbors have been drilling baseball into their son for years. And I mean drilling. They sign him up for two leagues every year, dictate what he can and can't do (throwing the ball up and hitting it will get him in trouble. Something about ruining coordination), make him go to the batting cages twice a week and a bunch of other stuff. They believe he is going to play in the MLB, become a millionaire and then take care of them.

He told me he hates baseball now. Says they took all the fun out of it and fun was why he played. His parents are in for a big surprise. He said when he graduates high school this year he's going to some Fireman Academy so he can be what he wants to be, a Fireman.
 
2014-01-18 08:41:24 PM

nyseattitude: iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.

My neighbors have been drilling baseball into their son for years. And I mean drilling. They sign him up for two leagues every year, dictate what he can and can't do (throwing the ball up and hitting it will get him in trouble. Something about ruining coordination), make him go to the batting cages twice a week and a bunch of other stuff. They believe he is going to play in the MLB, become a millionaire and then take care of them.

He told me he hates baseball now. Says they took all the fun out of it and fun was why he played. His parents are in for a big surprise. He said when he graduates high school this year he's going to some Fireman Academy so he can be what he wants to be, a Fireman.


Great for him. Seriously. Those parents deserve the shock they are about to get handed.
 
2014-01-18 08:49:58 PM

nyseattitude: iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.

My neighbors have been drilling baseball into their son for years. And I mean drilling. They sign him up for two leagues every year, dictate what he can and can't do (throwing the ball up and hitting it will get him in trouble. Something about ruining coordination), make him go to the batting cages twice a week and a bunch of other stuff. They believe he is going to play in the MLB, become a millionaire and then take care of them.

He told me he hates baseball now. Says they took all the fun out of it and fun was why he played. His parents are in for a big surprise. He said when he graduates high school this year he's going to some Fireman Academy so he can be what he wants to be, a Fireman.


And football will survive for the opposite reasons. Even though it helps to play peewee football, there are bunches of guys that never put on pads until high school.

For lots of kids, baseball has become a crazy year round and super expensive sport to play.
 
2014-01-18 08:52:47 PM

nyseattitude: iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.

My neighbors have been drilling baseball into their son for years. And I mean drilling. They sign him up for two leagues every year, dictate what he can and can't do (throwing the ball up and hitting it will get him in trouble. Something about ruining coordination), make him go to the batting cages twice a week and a bunch of other stuff. They believe he is going to play in the MLB, become a millionaire and then take care of them.

He told me he hates baseball now. Says they took all the fun out of it and fun was why he played. His parents are in for a big surprise. He said when he graduates high school this year he's going to some Fireman Academy so he can be what he wants to be, a Fireman.


If he's good enough he should play anyway, only on his own terms. Most people hate, or at least dislike, some part of their job. He may as well make millions if he can. But maybe that's just me.
 
2014-01-18 09:10:42 PM
I am looking more forward to this Sunday than the Super Bowl.
 
2014-01-18 09:12:54 PM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: nyseattitude: iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.

My neighbors have been drilling baseball into their son for years. And I mean drilling. They sign him up for two leagues every year, dictate what he can and can't do (throwing the ball up and hitting it will get him in trouble. Something about ruining coordination), make him go to the batting cages twice a week and a bunch of other stuff. They believe he is going to play in the MLB, become a millionaire and then take care of them.

He told me he hates baseball now. Says they took all the fun out of it and fun was why he played. His parents are in for a big surprise. He said when he graduates high school this year he's going to some Fireman Academy so he can be what he wants to be, a Fireman.

If he's good enough he should play anyway, only on his own terms. Most people hate, or at least dislike, some part of their job. He may as well make millions if he can. But maybe that's just me.


I wouldn't wish Marinovich Syndrome on anyone.
 
2014-01-18 09:18:22 PM

wiseolddude: I am looking more forward to this Sunday than the Super Bowl.


Which is usually the case. You have two weeks' worth of hypehypehypehypehypehypehypehypehype after tomorrow that totally ruin the experience.

These guys are playing to get into the Big One. The effort's a lot more evident. Two games instead of one, with the disparate fan base, makes for a more compelling story and a longer time to drink.
 
2014-01-18 10:11:37 PM

UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: nyseattitude: iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.

My neighbors have been drilling baseball into their son for years. And I mean drilling. They sign him up for two leagues every year, dictate what he can and can't do (throwing the ball up and hitting it will get him in trouble. Something about ruining coordination), make him go to the batting cages twice a week and a bunch of other stuff. They believe he is going to play in the MLB, become a millionaire and then take care of them.

He told me he hates baseball now. Says they took all the fun out of it and fun was why he played. His parents are in for a big surprise. He said when he graduates high school this year he's going to some Fireman Academy so he can be what he wants to be, a Fireman.

If he's good enough he should play anyway, only on his own terms. Most people hate, or at least dislike, some part of their job. He may as well make millions if he can. But maybe that's just me.

I wouldn't wish Marinovich Syndrome on anyone.


I'm pretty sure his anger and frustration at his father is assuaged by his bank account and the knowledge that whatever he does with the rest of his life it will be something he wants to do, rather than something he has to do. Unless, of course, he blew his bankroll, in which case I can only say bad on him.

I'd trade a lifetime of being Todd Marinovich, failed football player with a sizable bankroll, for my life of hardscrabble any time.
 
2014-01-18 11:40:01 PM
Don't most people watch the superbowl for the ads?
 
2014-01-19 12:36:21 AM

skinink: "On Sunday there will be more television viewers watching the AFC and NFC football championship games than anything ever broadcast, well except for the World Cup"
What? The Super Bowl draws more viewers than any other football game. MASH had 105.9 million viewers. I doubt the combined Sunday football viewership will beat the MASH audience.


Every Super Bowl since XLIV has beat MASH.
 
2014-01-19 12:50:50 AM

Adolf Oliver Nipples: nyseattitude: iron_city_ap: UNC_Samurai: Adolf Oliver Nipples: Everybody talks about football dying. I don't see how it will, not so long as they offer so much money and generate so much interest. There will always be someone to play.

The long-term problem for the sport is convincing parents it's safe for their child to play. That could potentially make the talent pool shallower down the road. For now, the sport is just fine.

As long as athletic kids from underprivileged areas have an opportunity to become multi-millionares, any sport will be fine.

My neighbors have been drilling baseball into their son for years. And I mean drilling. They sign him up for two leagues every year, dictate what he can and can't do (throwing the ball up and hitting it will get him in trouble. Something about ruining coordination), make him go to the batting cages twice a week and a bunch of other stuff. They believe he is going to play in the MLB, become a millionaire and then take care of them.

He told me he hates baseball now. Says they took all the fun out of it and fun was why he played. His parents are in for a big surprise. He said when he graduates high school this year he's going to some Fireman Academy so he can be what he wants to be, a Fireman.

If he's good enough he should play anyway, only on his own terms. Most people hate, or at least dislike, some part of their job. He may as well make millions if he can. But maybe that's just me.


Play on his own terms = ringer on the Fireman's rec league softball team.
 
2014-01-19 01:17:23 AM
Adolf Oliver Nipples:

I'd trade a lifetime of being Todd Marinovich, failed football player with a sizable bankroll, for my life of hardscrabble any time.

Marinovich is a junkie that has been in and out of jail multiple times.  He's flat broke and is pretty much unemployable.   He is an "artist" now, selling paintings on the internet.

You go be Todd Marinovich.  I'll push my kids to the fire academy.
 
2014-01-19 04:01:39 AM

Rent Party: You go be Todd Marinovich.  I'll push my kids to the fire academy.


This doubly relevant given baseball salaries at anything lower than the Majors for anyone that wasn't a top-round pick. Once you get into the third round or so of the baseball pro draft, signing bonuses drop down to a couple hundred grand. The average minor league salary is $1100 a month (call it 10K a year for easy math). Unless the guy being talked about is lucky enough to make the bigs, he'll make more in 10 years as a fireman (avg 45K/year) than 10 years as a ballplayer: 450K as a fireman vs. 300K as a ballplayer.

If the guy's good enough to be drafted in the first couple of rounds (and he'll know before he graduates high school since it's in June), he stands to rake in a big signing bonus and will probably make the major leagues simply on basic economics. If not, though... he's better off being a fireman.
 
2014-01-19 08:26:43 AM

JayCab: Rent Party: You go be Todd Marinovich.  I'll push my kids to the fire academy.

This doubly relevant given baseball salaries at anything lower than the Majors for anyone that wasn't a top-round pick. Once you get into the third round or so of the baseball pro draft, signing bonuses drop down to a couple hundred grand. The average minor league salary is $1100 a month (call it 10K a year for easy math). Unless the guy being talked about is lucky enough to make the bigs, he'll make more in 10 years as a fireman (avg 45K/year) than 10 years as a ballplayer: 450K as a fireman vs. 300K as a ballplayer.

If the guy's good enough to be drafted in the first couple of rounds (and he'll know before he graduates high school since it's in June), he stands to rake in a big signing bonus and will probably make the major leagues simply on basic economics. If not, though... he's better off being a fireman.


If your fireman only makes $45K a year, I would suggest he go find somewhere else to live that pays him what he is worth.

That might be a starting fireman's wage some places, but they make a shiat-ton more than that.
 
2014-01-19 10:00:54 AM

JayCab: The average minor league salary is $1100 a month (call it 10K a year for easy math). Unless the guy being talked about is lucky enough to make the bigs, he'll make more in 10 years as a fireman (avg 45K/year) than 10 years as a ballplayer: 450K as a fireman vs. 300K as a ballplayer.


Yep. Here is a real-life example. "After six years of playing professional baseball, the last two with [a minor league team], Darrick Hale today announced his retirement following his acceptance to the Los Angeles Police Department Academy." When the salary cap for your entire team is $90,000, it's impossible for a player to make a living.

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