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(WTKR)   Man sorting through old box in grandparents' house finds never before seen pics of the Challenger disaster, blasting subby right back to his fourth-grade classroom. Where were you older Farkers that day? (with the pics)   (wtkr.com ) divider line
    More: Sad, Challenger, space shuttles, Challenger disasters, Bill Rendle, Christa McAuliffe, grandparents, Michael Hindes  
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13166 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jan 2014 at 8:36 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-01-18 10:04:18 AM  
5 votes:
Senior year in HS, was the only day of HS I stayed home sick. Turned on the TV specifically to watch the launch. I didn't move from the sofa all day.

After reading some of the reactions other people posted, about stores being ghost towns and businesses shutting down etc made me realize something. If this happened today, how little anyone would care. The general public knows so little about and seems to be so ambivalent regarding our space program efforts. I guess it's the result of the newness of the space program wearing off or perhaps it just isn't emphasized in schools like it was when I was young.

Would love to see the public fall in love with space again. It's a worthwhile endeavor.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-18 08:27:31 AM  
5 votes:
I was playing piano in the living room while my family huddled at the other end of the house with the TV. So I missed it live but saw the replays about as often as I got to see the Tacoma Narrows Bridge video in a series of science and engineering classes.

If you remember Challenger, you also remember a time when you could not watch any video in the history of video with a mouse click. You had to wait for replays on TV. You had to wait for the projector to be rolled into class and the teacher to order the film. You had to have a blank tape ready and hit record at the right time (not valid with Macrovision-protected video inputs).
2014-01-18 10:55:12 AM  
3 votes:
I was about 19, walking through the student union at the community college, on my way to meet a friend. Paused to watch the launch on the NASA feed they had up. Then HOLY shiat DID THAT JUST HAPPEN? My dad worked for NASA, so I called him at work. We were both crying.

For him it was especially bad, since he had known the crew of Apollo 1, and the only reason he wasn't at the Cape when they died was that I'd been born nine days earlier. He dedicated his entire life to the US space program, so he took those tragedies very personally.

That was a rough day. I took it pretty hard when Columbia went down too. My dad raised me to be a true believer in the space program, and to this day I tear up just thinking about the fact that we went to the moon. People take it for granted these days (except the crazy deniers), but god damn it, we PUT A MAN ON THE FREAKIN' MOON. How can anybody not appreciate the magnitude of that achievement?

/I'll just be over here, sniffling and muttering to myself
2014-01-18 10:45:35 AM  
2 votes:

Orion5k: I wasn't even a seed in my father's balls. But in honesty, I read these posts and realize that the Challenger had an impact on people in the same way that 9/11 did for me. The memory is forever in my brain. I love history, and it's always astonishing to learn of the events and connections that burn themselves into the collective psyche. I never knew that this launch was so important, but thank you all for your input. I've seen the footage, but now am able to apply the emotions. This has been a lesson for me.


I don't really think I'd compare the two.  Prior to Challenger we'd had the Apollo I fire.  Nobody didn't know that space travel was risky.  9/11 stunned the world and forever changed the geopolitical paradigm.  Challenger was simply a tragedy in exploration.
2014-01-18 10:44:58 AM  
2 votes:

Orion5k: I wasn't even a seed in my father's balls. But in honesty, I read these posts and realize that the Challenger had an impact on people in the same way that 9/11 did for me. The memory is forever in my brain. I love history, and it's always astonishing to learn of the events and connections that burn themselves into the collective psyche. I never knew that this launch was so important, but thank you all for your input. I've seen the footage, but now am able to apply the emotions. This has been a lesson for me.


It was huge. The teacher in space aspect was major. It was all over over the news beforehand and I remember it being integrated into the science ciriulum. NASA had tied it all in to a bunch of educational materials they'd produced..... I'm sure Joe Biden would have called it a Big Effing Deal

Plus it had been a long time since the US had had a major tragedy, so much like 9/11 it was seared in your brain if you were of a certain age. If you were a child of he 80s you were living in Ronald Regan's Morning in America/American Exceptionalism age. No war, good economy, Cold War thawing, NASA saying that they'd be soon doing a launch a month and we'd have a fleet of dozens of shuttles. Obvious as an adult you can look back and appreciate that it wasn't all rainbows and roses, but overall if you were a kid in that era you were luckier than most. shiat, American automakers were actually beginning to make semi-decent cars again....

/my childhood consited of the Atari 2600, NES and SNES.....
//and the good transformers when they actually had some metal in them
/
2014-01-18 10:34:20 AM  
2 votes:
I wasn't even a seed in my father's balls. But in honesty, I read these posts and realize that the Challenger had an impact on people in the same way that 9/11 did for me. The memory is forever in my brain. I love history, and it's always astonishing to learn of the events and connections that burn themselves into the collective psyche. I never knew that this launch was so important, but thank you all for your input. I've seen the footage, but now am able to apply the emotions. This has been a lesson for me.
2014-01-18 09:30:52 AM  
2 votes:

jfarkinB: Where was I? A place that I don't like revisiting, but I get dragged back to every time I come across something like this. It's right next to 9/11 Place, and a bit down the street from "she's been in an accident. I'm heading to the hospital now".

Fark.


Internet hug.
2014-01-18 09:13:53 AM  
2 votes:
Where was I? A place that I don't like revisiting, but I get dragged back to every time I come across something like this. It's right next to 9/11 Place, and a bit down the street from "she's been in an accident. I'm heading to the hospital now".

Fark.
2014-01-18 09:11:35 AM  
2 votes:
I missed it because I had late classes that day at college. Found out when I turned ob the TV before I left for campus.  Never saw a major university campus that quiet.


Oh, and:

OnlyM3: 7 dead.... 0 held accountable.

NASA repeated the trick of knowingly killing 7 when they returned Columbia.


Go fark yourself.
2014-01-18 09:03:15 AM  
2 votes:

Unobtanium: That's right. I was listening to the radio. They covered up until it cleared the pad, then had to break back in when everyone realized something had gone wrong. We were reminded that day, as we were 17 years later, that manned space flight is still something of an R&D program


I still find it astonishing.  25-30 years ago manned space flight was in its infancy and the nation was captivated every time a launch occurred.  There was so much promise.  Now, the US doesn't even have a manned spaceflight program and no one even knows when missions launch.

Sad.
2014-01-18 08:20:36 AM  
2 votes:
I was a teenager, watching it live, unprepared for it to get sickening.

I remember what seemed like a rather long time when I was thinking "ummm....this...seems very wrong...." but the commentators weren't really saying much.

Later I would watch the events of 9/11 unfold live on tv from beginning to end, and despite the obvious differences I'm left with this sense of a farked-up set of bookends.
2014-01-18 09:39:48 PM  
1 vote:
I can hardly believe I just found this while cleaning house today.  I drew it in Kindergarten.  Refer to my TL;DR CSB post above for context.

I redacted personal info, hence the black bars.  The notes along the righthand side were written by my Mom.

The orbiter isn't visible because I needed a place to write "SPACE SHUTTLE".  The flames coming from the ET are supposed to be the main engines.  The poorly-drawn and chunky SRBs aren't lit because it's supposed to be on the ground.  And I was five.

The paper is covered by a sheet of adhesive-back plastic that wasn't archive quality.

www.lovenotedigital.com
2014-01-18 09:17:45 PM  
1 vote:
Hubby and I were home because school had been called off. It was -29F at the house and the wind was blowing about 40 mph. We were watching the sliding glass doors bend in and trying to keep the wood stove red hot. NC mountains.
I was in the back of the house and heard him yell "Look at this!"
Got to the TV in time to see the debris spiraling down.
Remember thinking, why the heck did they launch on such a farking cold day?
FWIW, I remember Kennedy being shot, and MacArthur being fired. And I didn't like Ike.
2014-01-18 07:52:45 PM  
1 vote:
I worked for Ma Bell, we had a live lead to the lift off.

The explosion.

My reaction: Holy fark, they're dead.

My co-workers: fark you, you sick bastid, What is wrong with you?

History bears me out. I no longer work with soulless troglodytes.

/Don't vote for this, just remember that peopled died; people will always die when the government goes with the lowest bidder...

//RIP Chaffee, White and Grissom
2014-01-18 02:04:21 PM  
1 vote:
I was in Kindergarten.  We watched it live on CNN.  Shuttle launches were always a big deal in my town because Thiokol, where the SRBs are made, reloaded, tested, and refined is so close that we see the sky glow during night time booster tests and pretty much half of the population worked there.

I knew a lot more than most five year olds when it came to the Space Shuttle because rockets are fascinating and I had access to science magazines and my Grandpa shared plenty of what he knew with me.  I knew how long the SRBs stayed attached, I knew how long the External Tank stayed attached, I knew what was in the ET, I knew what MECO was, and I knew what Max Q was.

I remember seeing fire coming out of the side of one SRB and thinking "They don't do that." just before all hell broke loose.

Years later I was talking Challenger with some Thiokol engineers who were guests at my school.  Roger Boisjoly (pronounced Bo-zho-lay)was with them (though by that time he had long since resigned from Thiokol).  I had absolutely no clue how important he was at the time.  Face-to-face with me was the man who tried in vain to get the launch scrubbed because he didn't trust the o-rings in such cold weather.


Oh what the heck.  I'll copypasta what I wrote at slashdot after Roger Boisjoly passed away:

When I was in 4th Grade, I had the good fortune to meet Boisjoly and a couple of other engineers from Thiokol. It wasn't like meeting a national celebrity or anything because I grew up in Brigham City, Utah, which is close enough to Thiokol that you can see the smoke plumes from booster tests rise up over the western mountains.

At my school, a group of fellow students and I had the opportunity to hold a demo model o-ring just like the ones used to join the booster segments. These demo units were just the ones that didn't pass muster for actual use. The group and I held one o-ring spread out in a full circle and nearly covered the entire floor of the classroom. They're huge and didn't feel like the household o-rings I was used to. I could definitely see something like that getting stiff or brittle at low temperatures. My memory is hazy, but I'd almost compare it to a Neoprene type feel.

I mentioned Challenger and how I learned about the o-rings (my grandpa, who also got me started in Electronics, told me about it). The engineers seemed surprised that a ten year old kid would know, let alone care, about that kind of thing.

Among the other visual aids the engineers brought, there was a piece of spongy SRB fuel with a couple of ingredients missing so as to make it inert. It was Boisjoly who calmed me down after I was angry with myself for breaking the piece in half while checking the flexibility of the material to see just how sponge-like it was.

For years after that, while still living in Brigham City, I got to see booster segments passing through town (can't take the freeway) on the way to Thiokol (now ATK) on the back of massive semi trailers with police escorts and utility workers leading the pack with tall poles on the front of their work trucks to make sure the lines over the roads would physically clear the booster and then holding the wires out of the way if there wasn't enough clearance. I always thought back to holding that o-ring and how truly massive it was.
I only ever saw one booster test and that was back in 2003. The dead-silence for the first few seconds (speed of sound, you know?) is eerie. After that, even from over a mile away, the noise hits you like a freight train. Those o-rings are charged with holding back a truly ridiculous amount of force.
2014-01-18 12:54:18 PM  
1 vote:
I was only two when it happened, so I don't remember.  But my mother was at work and she walked in on her coworkers sitting frozen around the TV. She asked what was on TV and no-one replied.

I see these pictures and my throat just seizes up.  What happened to those people, those kids that were in her class watching this when it happened, and what it did to the space program... It's just, I mean my heart just aches for all the implications of this.

But honestly? If I had to pick a way to go? It would be slipping the surly bonds of Earth to touch the face of god.
2014-01-18 11:35:06 AM  
1 vote:
I read this on or through a story on Fark once.


"At what point did we forget that the Space Shuttle was, essentially, a program that strapped human beings to an explosion and tried to stab through the sky with fire and math?"
2014-01-18 10:51:05 AM  
1 vote:
localtvwtkr.files.wordpress.com

Wow.  Just wow.
2014-01-18 10:32:12 AM  
1 vote:
I was sitting in Mrs. Parnell's second-grade class. The Challenger accident is my first vivid memory of a public event. Like so many classrooms around the country, we had it live on a television at the front of the room.

I remember my teacher, normally a very animated, boisterous woman with a strong Brooklynese accent, just crumpling into the chair at her desk at the front of the room. She didn't go into hysterics or anything, but seeing her so sad really struck a chord with me.

I remember her saying something to the effect of: "Children, you may not really understand this now, but for the rest of your life, you will always remember where you were when this happened."

She was right.
2014-01-18 10:28:52 AM  
1 vote:
Two horrible facts about the Challenger disaster

1) They were killed by shiatty management
2) They were probably alive until they hit the ground

http://www.amazon.com/Riding-Rockets-Outrageous-Shuttle-Astronaut/dp /0 743276833/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1390058878&sr=8-1&keywords=riding+roc kets
2014-01-18 10:19:58 AM  
1 vote:
I was at work, an engineering office where we did space and military work.  Someone got a phone call, someone else got out a radio, We rode the news misinformation roller coaster all day long.  Someone saw parachutes, no they didn't, there may be survivors, no there aren't.  A quiet carpool going home where I finally got to see news footage and I was sick about it for days.

Growing up in the 60's I always wanted to be an astronaut, I built model spacecraft instead of the model cars my friends were all into.

BTW, the BBC docudrama about Feinman and the Challenger investigation is very much worth catching.
2014-01-18 10:07:08 AM  
1 vote:
Yeah, I don't remember 'cause I'm an older Farker.
And fark you subby.
2014-01-18 09:43:29 AM  
1 vote:
Watched it live with my 3rd grade class. I do not remember the explosion all I can recall is my teachers uncontrolled sobbing. None of us kids knew what to do. I have only felt that level of true helplessness on one other occasion, that of watching my father telling His father it was OK to let go...

 I would wish that feeling on no one.

    I would later learn that she had been in the running to be a Teacher in space. After that I was never sure if they were tears of grief or relief.
2014-01-18 09:14:28 AM  
1 vote:
I was in my cube at Singer-Link Flight Simulation Division working on the next shuttle flght when the word came out to go to the media room. It was very quiet in the room while the NASA feed was on. As a kid, I lived next door to one of the Apollo 1 astronauts and it seemed a little too familiar.
vpc [TotalFark]
2014-01-18 09:06:25 AM  
1 vote:

Fabric_Man: Remember how they had kindergartners from around the country watching the launch on live TV? 'Cause I sure as shiat remember.


Me too except I was in first grade.
2014-01-18 09:04:51 AM  
1 vote:
I'm not old, dammit!!! F*CK YOU!!

...

and I don't remember. I have a vague memory of watching it in the school library but I think it was a recording of it. Not live. In retrospect that's kind of weird isn't it? Huh.
2014-01-18 08:49:52 AM  
1 vote:
I don't remember
2014-01-18 08:45:48 AM  
1 vote:
Sophomore year, geometry class.  We were watching it live on TV.

Say what you want about Reagan, but he delivered his "surly bonds of earth" speech masterfully afterwards.
2014-01-18 08:43:32 AM  
1 vote:
Brave people died that day.

CFB Summerside PEI.
2014-01-18 08:41:51 AM  
1 vote:
Remember how they had kindergartners from around the country watching the launch on live TV? 'Cause I sure as shiat remember.
2014-01-18 08:26:17 AM  
1 vote:
What really brought it home for me was when I got home from school that afternoon, and saw the announcement on MTV that they were immediately retiring the hourly "Moonman" intro. That may seem kinda weird, but it brought home the enormity of the event, that this quite literally changed things forever. Our space program during my lifetime (born in 68) had been mostly a model of efficiency and safety, especially the Shuttle program. That was over, and our country and in some ways the world hasn't been the same since.
2014-01-18 08:15:09 AM  
1 vote:
Was working plainclothes security for Macy's and wandered over to Electronics to watch the launch (it was a slow day). When the few of us there realized what we had just witnessed, it was like we all went numb. Within a few hours, nearly the entire store was empty, except for the employees. A very sad day.
2014-01-18 08:12:12 AM  
1 vote:
I was late for school (sophomore year), at my best friend Gina's house, watching the launch while putting on our makeup. I don't even remember if we ever made it to school that day.
2014-01-18 07:57:27 AM  
1 vote:

MmmmBacon: I was sitting in Computer Science class, senior year of High School. When the announcement came of the disaster, and the teacher asked if we knew anything about this particular mission, I was the only student in class that knew a teacher was among the crew.


I had just finished my grade 12 English exam and was heading home for lunch when I heard it in the car.

/Grad '86 represent
2014-01-18 07:38:07 AM  
1 vote:
I was sitting in Computer Science class, senior year of High School. When the announcement came of the disaster, and the teacher asked if we knew anything about this particular mission, I was the only student in class that knew a teacher was among the crew.

My CS class was full of morons.
2014-01-18 07:02:43 AM  
1 vote:
I was at work.  Passing by the breakroom where a television was on 24/7 (manufacturing plant).
I was the only one there to see.  Broke my heart.
 
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