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(WTKR)   Man sorting through old box in grandparents' house finds never before seen pics of the Challenger disaster, blasting subby right back to his fourth-grade classroom. Where were you older Farkers that day? (with the pics)   (wtkr.com) divider line 309
    More: Sad, Challenger, space shuttles, Challenger disasters, Bill Rendle, Christa McAuliffe, grandparents, Michael Hindes  
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13096 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jan 2014 at 8:36 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-18 09:53:25 AM  

painless42: I was in 5th grade. My class wasn't watching but another class was. One of the other teachers came in to our room and told my teacher what had happened loud enough for the kids in the front to hear and when it got back to me in the back of the class, being a huge NASA fanboy and 10 year old "expert" on these things, I told the kid in the next seat that he'd heard wrong and that the challenger blowing up was impossible.


Strictly speaking, you were right. The Challenger didn't explode. It was torn apart by excessive loads.
 
2014-01-18 09:54:54 AM  

painless42: I was in 5th grade. My class wasn't watching but another class was. One of the other teachers came in to our room and told my teacher what had happened loud enough for the kids in the front to hear and when it got back to me in the back of the class, being a huge NASA fanboy and 10 year old "expert" on these things, I told the kid in the next seat that he'd heard wrong and that the challenger blowing up was impossible.

I also remember that one of the 5th grade teachers had had a dream the night before that it had blown up and everyone thought it was creepy and pre-cognitive, though in fairness in 5th grade you don't know anything about probability.

Also remember very vividly all the horrid jokes we told:

What does NASA stand for? Need Another Seven Astronauts

Where was Christa McAuliffe's last vacation? All over Florida?

What was Christa McAuliffe's last words to her husband? "You feed the dog, I'll feed the fish"

/A paychiatrist would say that Gallows Humor is an appropriate coping mechanism for tragedy

//I just think 10 year old boys are insensitive little jerks

///at least I was a jerk in the 80s and was allowed to mature into a functional adult. In 2014, my 10 year old self would be sent to sensitivity training and receive death threats after being outed and shamed on Gawker or jezebel for making cracks like that.


How did they find out Christa McAuliffe had dandruff?

They found her head and shoulders all over the beach.
 
2014-01-18 09:55:01 AM  
I didn't know a thing about it, was in grade 5, walked home for lunch, and the crossing guard mentioned something.  Saw it on tv when I got home.  As a kid you just don't realize the enormity of what had happened, but the space program which was the way of the future, has never been the same.
 
2014-01-18 09:55:42 AM  
I was at work and a guy said to me "did you hear the shuttle blew up"? I thought he was going to tell me some sick joke. The he was "no really". We listened to the news on the radio. When I got home that day I turned on the news to see the video. A was almost in tears.
 
2014-01-18 09:55:43 AM  
I was in bed.  I had worked the night before closing the pizza place, didn't get home until 4:30 or some similar ungodly hour.  I was having a dream about the shuttle and it blew up in my dream.  Then my roommate shook me awake and said "Dan, the shuttle just blew up."

"No, it didn't.  That was just a dream."

"Whaa..?  No, Dan, the shuttle, it really blew up."

"What?  No way.  Are you sure?"

/let it not be said that I'm totally coherent when shaken from a sound sleep.
//still one of those moments in my life when I wonder about senses beyond the traditional 5 or 6 humans are attributed with.
 
2014-01-18 09:57:17 AM  
West coast, got up early to go to school to watch the launch of the shuttle, my school district had won a spot to send some seeds or some stupid thing up with the teacher. Went home about an hour after the explosion, the teachers couldn't handle it.
 
2014-01-18 09:58:18 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: painless42: I was in 5th grade. My class wasn't watching but another class was. One of the other teachers came in to our room and told my teacher what had happened loud enough for the kids in the front to hear and when it got back to me in the back of the class, being a huge NASA fanboy and 10 year old "expert" on these things, I told the kid in the next seat that he'd heard wrong and that the challenger blowing up was impossible.

Strictly speaking, you were right. The Challenger didn't explode. It was torn apart by excessive loads.


Strictly speaking, I didnt "sleep" her

Baby....? Where you going.... Don't leave me.... Please don't take the Firefly BluRays!
 
2014-01-18 09:59:37 AM  
At working, listening to the radio.  Was the only one in the office at the time....my boss thought I was joking when he arrived back.  Because I would joke about something like that.....
Really felt bad for the kids watching it in school...can't imagine trying to process that as a child.
 
2014-01-18 09:59:51 AM  

rhiannon: Was at work, heard about it on the radio. What I remember most of that day is my foreman saying something to the effect of "serves them right". He was a bit of a jerk.


Lolwut? Yeah those damn astronauts, doing science and crap. Screw them.
 
2014-01-18 10:00:11 AM  
Standing on the roof at work in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. About 150 miles away, but you could see it launch and the explosion.

Cheering and yelling (we were all engineers) immediately went to total silence.

Nothing much got done that day.
 
2014-01-18 10:00:11 AM  
I was on my way to American History class as a junior in high school.
 
2014-01-18 10:00:36 AM  

painless42: Adolf Oliver Nipples: painless42: I was in 5th grade. My class wasn't watching but another class was. One of the other teachers came in to our room and told my teacher what had happened loud enough for the kids in the front to hear and when it got back to me in the back of the class, being a huge NASA fanboy and 10 year old "expert" on these things, I told the kid in the next seat that he'd heard wrong and that the challenger blowing up was impossible.

Strictly speaking, you were right. The Challenger didn't explode. It was torn apart by excessive loads.

Strictly speaking, I didnt "sleep" her

Baby....? Where you going.... Don't leave me.... Please don't take the Firefly BluRays!


Doh! That didn't format right I guess putting text in carrots doesn't work. Eh fark it, it wasn't that good of a joke anyway.
 
2014-01-18 10:02:38 AM  
On the East/West runway at TIA, freezin' our butts off
I got to watch it thru a Pentax survey transit
Cried, I did

2 years later

Driving along 581 (N. Tampa) had to stop and pull over...
To see the next one liftin' off
Cheered I did!
 
2014-01-18 10:04:17 AM  
I saw it happen live... that is to say, not on tv.

I was a 5th grader in Florida. We used to go outside to the PE field to watch shuttle launches. From 100 mile away they usually looked like a tiny sun rising through the air. That day we saw those crazy contrails. The teachers hustled back inside, they wheeled a tv into the classroom, and we learned the awful truth about what we'd just witnessed.

Later a reporter came by and asked our class to write essays about what we'd seen. Mine got printed in the newspaper. CSB
 
2014-01-18 10:04:18 AM  
Senior year in HS, was the only day of HS I stayed home sick. Turned on the TV specifically to watch the launch. I didn't move from the sofa all day.

After reading some of the reactions other people posted, about stores being ghost towns and businesses shutting down etc made me realize something. If this happened today, how little anyone would care. The general public knows so little about and seems to be so ambivalent regarding our space program efforts. I guess it's the result of the newness of the space program wearing off or perhaps it just isn't emphasized in schools like it was when I was young.

Would love to see the public fall in love with space again. It's a worthwhile endeavor.
 
2014-01-18 10:04:22 AM  
6th grade.  We were changing classes and everyone was running into a series of classrooms on one hall that had been showing the launch. A lot of students stayed there a while even though we were supposed to be somewhere else. I remember thinking "how could that happen?"  Learning moment, a big learning moment.
 
2014-01-18 10:05:49 AM  
I was in 6th grade and like many students in FL that day the teachers took us out to watch. Shuttle launches were common and the only reason we were let out to see this one was because of mcauliffe.

/they had a sign up contest to be the first teacher in space. My mom signed up. Glad she didnt win.
 
2014-01-18 10:07:08 AM  
Yeah, I don't remember 'cause I'm an older Farker.
And fark you subby.
 
2014-01-18 10:09:57 AM  
Just outside Cape Canaveral with a shoulder-launched SAM...why do you ask?
 
2014-01-18 10:11:57 AM  
never before seen pics of the Challenger disaster

inigomontoya.jpg
 
2014-01-18 10:13:25 AM  

unyon: MmmmBacon: I was sitting in Computer Science class, senior year of High School. When the announcement came of the disaster, and the teacher asked if we knew anything about this particular mission, I was the only student in class that knew a teacher was among the crew.

I had just finished my grade 12 English exam and was heading home for lunch when I heard it in the car.

/Grad '86 represent


I was in gov't/econ class. The vice principal rolled in a tv cart while she cried.
 
2014-01-18 10:13:43 AM  
Shuttle launches had become frequent enough that they didn't wheel the tv carts into our classrooms to watch anymore. Someone came in and whispered something to my teacher and she brought int he tv and tuned it to CNN so we could see the news on what happened.

/go with throttle up
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-18 10:14:28 AM  
16 months after the explosion rapid disassembly I got a job in the McNair Building, named for a Challenger crew member who wasn't a teacher or a pilot.  But I didn't become an astronaut or an astronomer after all. And nobody called the building by its proper name.
 
2014-01-18 10:15:36 AM  
I was in preschool at the time, but I remember being at home with my Mom playing with toys (not the triple changer, even though I had one) that day. We were watching it live. When it happened, my Mom got emotional, but I didn't understand what happened. Can't believe I remember that!
 
2014-01-18 10:16:06 AM  
I was working as a jerk-of-all-trades at a restaurant/bar & package goods store while drinking my way thru college. I was putting away the mop bucket and assorted crap & walked past one of the TV's in the bar just as the launch was counting down. (we had satellite TV and Joyce the bartender liked to watch the news) The electricians were finishing up on rewiring the breaker boxes after the places little "dances with code enforcement" episode.

I stopped to watch the launch expecting nothing more surprising than maybe another last minute abort...Yeah, we all know how that turned out.
 
2014-01-18 10:17:01 AM  
I was home watching the launch on TV before I went to my afternoon shift at work. I've been fascinated with space travel since I was a kid. I used to write to NASA and request pictures of the astronauts back in the 60's. Having watched numerous launches prior, I knew something was farked up.  Years later, I had to had to have an emergency appendectomy. The morning after the surgery I awoke to the doctor coming into the room to check on my progress. After looking me over he says, "By the way, the space shuttle (Columbia) blew up this morning".
 
2014-01-18 10:17:12 AM  
On my way to elementary school with my mother.  The launch and disaster were all over the news in Hawaii, as Onizuka was a native Hawaiian and that was a pretty big deal for us.
 
2014-01-18 10:19:47 AM  
I was home that day.  I wasn't watching the launch...but, my sister was.  I'd given up watching live launches since EVERY. SINGLE. TIME. I'd tried to watch one, the launch was scrubbed for one reason or another.  I didn't think there was much point in setting myself up for disappointment.

When it happened, my sister ran to my room and said something along the lines of "the space shuttle just blew up!"  I don't think I said a single word.  I just stared back at her with a quizzical dog look.  My little kid mind couldn't process what she was saying.  It didn't make sense.  Space shuttles don't blow up.

My sister finally physically pushed me to the TV and I watched the replays.  I felt sick.

For the rest of the day, until my dad came home, I sat in the living room with my sister and mom watching all the coverage.  Silently.  For hours, nobody talked.  I don't think any of us wanted to.
 
2014-01-18 10:19:58 AM  
I was at work, an engineering office where we did space and military work.  Someone got a phone call, someone else got out a radio, We rode the news misinformation roller coaster all day long.  Someone saw parachutes, no they didn't, there may be survivors, no there aren't.  A quiet carpool going home where I finally got to see news footage and I was sick about it for days.

Growing up in the 60's I always wanted to be an astronaut, I built model spacecraft instead of the model cars my friends were all into.

BTW, the BBC docudrama about Feinman and the Challenger investigation is very much worth catching.
 
2014-01-18 10:20:01 AM  
I was in third grade at Kirkmere Elementary. We'd just come in from recess. The principal came on for the afternoon. He usually started with "Good morning/afternoon," depending on the time of day. He said "It is NOT a good afternoon," and told us what happened.
I went home and we watched Peter Jennings all night.
 
2014-01-18 10:21:57 AM  
I was at my parent's house. I had a day off work that day and went to the gym that I belonged to near their house to work out. I stopped mom and dad's to shower and visit with them for a bit. I was in the shower when the news broke. I remember mom banging on the door and I said "I'm in the shower. What do you need?" and she said "The space shuttle just blew up"
 
2014-01-18 10:23:15 AM  
Senior year at college, found out after lunch on the East Coast, some three to four hours. It was brought up in casual conversation and it took the other people five minutes to convince me that they weren't making a sick joke.

In retrospect, even though I ate alone, I find it remarkable that I was in a crowded cafeteria for a lunchtime and still had no clue.
 
2014-01-18 10:23:59 AM  
...71 CMU at Langley AFB, VA.  We had the radio on, and they broke into the report a couple minutes after the explosion, so what we heard first was a report about debris falling, smoke trails, etc. - and for some reason, a bunch of us jumped to the conclusion that Air Force One had crashed/been shot down.  I called home, and my wife was already crying.  We headed to Ammo Control, which had the only TV in the bomb dump (no cable, just three channels) and spent the next hour or two with about a hundred people crammed in there watching what we already knew was a recovery operation.  The one thing that has always stayed with me is how quiet it was - not a sound over four different radio nets, and ammo guys are not known for being quiet and reserved, but there was absolute silence until our OIC came in and told us flying was cancelled for the rest of the day.
 
2014-01-18 10:24:25 AM  
I was 4 days old. It's all a little hazy at this point.
 
2014-01-18 10:24:45 AM  
I was in fourth grade and out sick from school, and was at my Grammy's apartment for the day.  The Shuttle launched just as my Spaghetti-O's were ready, so I watched it for 45-60 seconds or so before going into the kitchen to grab my bowl.  I came back to a very odd cloud on the TV.

Don't remember watching much TV until Mom came to pick me up and wanted to watch the coverage for a few minutes.

\random not-so-CSB: My best friend was in third grade in Keene, NH, and McAuliffe had come to visit her school before it happened.  Needless to say, this topic is strictly off-limits to her
\\slightly better CSB: My cousin got into the program McAuliffe was in either right before or right after the accident, and still runs a NASA club at her middle school
\\\got pics of her in the full spacesuit at Space Camp and everything
 
2014-01-18 10:25:02 AM  
DontMakeMeComeBackThere
>>> OnlyM3: 7 dead.... 0 held accountable.

>>> NASA repeated the trick of knowingly killing 7 when they returned Columbia.

Go fark yourself.

Knee-jerk hatred to the thought of accountability. Guess how we know you're an obama voter.
 
2014-01-18 10:25:04 AM  
I was home sick that day and watched the launch since i was a big fan of all things space as a kid.
 
2014-01-18 10:28:30 AM  
I was either in 2nd or 3rd grade, and we were all shoved into the auditorium to watch the lift-off (what with the teacher on board and everything).  I remember someone yelling out, "Is that supposed to happen?"
 
2014-01-18 10:28:52 AM  
Two horrible facts about the Challenger disaster

1) They were killed by shiatty management
2) They were probably alive until they hit the ground

http://www.amazon.com/Riding-Rockets-Outrageous-Shuttle-Astronaut/dp /0 743276833/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1390058878&sr=8-1&keywords=riding+roc kets
 
2014-01-18 10:29:22 AM  
Perfect memory of that sad tragic day.

I was on Fark.

Some people were saying it was the Muslims; some said it was sabotage by the Jews; some said it was aliens and the moon landings were a hoax anyway, and others said it looks photoshopped.

/Drew came on and wrote that everyone will be banned for creating so many newsflashes.
//one of the mods then said 'you'll get over it'.
 
2014-01-18 10:32:12 AM  
I was sitting in Mrs. Parnell's second-grade class. The Challenger accident is my first vivid memory of a public event. Like so many classrooms around the country, we had it live on a television at the front of the room.

I remember my teacher, normally a very animated, boisterous woman with a strong Brooklynese accent, just crumpling into the chair at her desk at the front of the room. She didn't go into hysterics or anything, but seeing her so sad really struck a chord with me.

I remember her saying something to the effect of: "Children, you may not really understand this now, but for the rest of your life, you will always remember where you were when this happened."

She was right.
 
2014-01-18 10:32:15 AM  
I was a sophomore in high school, watching the whole thing happen live because back in those days a space shuttle launch was still a big deal, and we watched them in class.
 
2014-01-18 10:33:43 AM  

Brawndo: I was in 8th grade, having lunch. My social studies teacher came up to us and told us that the shuttle had exploded. We thought he was joking with us.

When the principal got on the PA system to tell everyone the news, afterwards, you could hear a pin drop in the school.


What kind of farked up Social Studies teacher did you have to make you think that it was a joke?
 
2014-01-18 10:34:20 AM  
I wasn't even a seed in my father's balls. But in honesty, I read these posts and realize that the Challenger had an impact on people in the same way that 9/11 did for me. The memory is forever in my brain. I love history, and it's always astonishing to learn of the events and connections that burn themselves into the collective psyche. I never knew that this launch was so important, but thank you all for your input. I've seen the footage, but now am able to apply the emotions. This has been a lesson for me.
 
2014-01-18 10:34:43 AM  
I was flying over Macho Grande.


/and don't call me Shirley.
 
2014-01-18 10:36:07 AM  

GungFu: Perfect memory of that sad tragic day.

I was on Fark.

Some people were saying it was the Muslims; some said it was sabotage by the Jews; some said it was aliens and the moon landings were a hoax anyway, and others said it looks photoshopped.

/Drew came on and wrote that everyone will be banned for creating so many newsflashes.
//one of the mods then said 'you'll get over it'.


Yeah, that 1986 Fark kinda sucked because of the dial-up and all... And Drew still being in junior high school kinda meant it was all a bit amateur at the time. He had to do it on CompuServe, and the fact that hardly anybody was online at the time meant it was pretty dull.
 
2014-01-18 10:38:25 AM  
I was at the Jensen Beach campus of Florida Institute of Technology on the way to pick up a package at facilities. As my buddy and I passed the photo lab we saw all of the photo majors outside waiting for the launch.

The photo director commented "all these photo majors and not a single one has a camera." One of his students replied "it's just another shuttle launch."

Being so far away it wasn't readily apparent what went wrong. We saw the white plume get a lot bigger, the SRBs continue going up, and didn't think utter disaster until we saw smoke trails of large objects going down.

A few hours later they announced our beloved campus was closing. Banner fn day.
 
2014-01-18 10:39:12 AM  
I was at work at an engineering/design company, watching the launch on an old 12" B&W TV......never forget the feeling when the pieces started spiraling.  Numb....realizing what had just happened, but not truly believing it could.

Reality check, which was repeated on 9/11.  Live TV's a biatch.
 
2014-01-18 10:44:55 AM  
I heard Pepsi was the sponsor of that launch because they got not get 7up.....to soon to joke.
 
2014-01-18 10:44:58 AM  

Orion5k: I wasn't even a seed in my father's balls. But in honesty, I read these posts and realize that the Challenger had an impact on people in the same way that 9/11 did for me. The memory is forever in my brain. I love history, and it's always astonishing to learn of the events and connections that burn themselves into the collective psyche. I never knew that this launch was so important, but thank you all for your input. I've seen the footage, but now am able to apply the emotions. This has been a lesson for me.


It was huge. The teacher in space aspect was major. It was all over over the news beforehand and I remember it being integrated into the science ciriulum. NASA had tied it all in to a bunch of educational materials they'd produced..... I'm sure Joe Biden would have called it a Big Effing Deal

Plus it had been a long time since the US had had a major tragedy, so much like 9/11 it was seared in your brain if you were of a certain age. If you were a child of he 80s you were living in Ronald Regan's Morning in America/American Exceptionalism age. No war, good economy, Cold War thawing, NASA saying that they'd be soon doing a launch a month and we'd have a fleet of dozens of shuttles. Obvious as an adult you can look back and appreciate that it wasn't all rainbows and roses, but overall if you were a kid in that era you were luckier than most. shiat, American automakers were actually beginning to make semi-decent cars again....

/my childhood consited of the Atari 2600, NES and SNES.....
//and the good transformers when they actually had some metal in them
/
 
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