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(WTKR)   Man sorting through old box in grandparents' house finds never before seen pics of the Challenger disaster, blasting subby right back to his fourth-grade classroom. Where were you older Farkers that day? (with the pics)   (wtkr.com ) divider line
    More: Sad, Challenger, space shuttles, Challenger disasters, Bill Rendle, Christa McAuliffe, grandparents, Michael Hindes  
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13182 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jan 2014 at 8:36 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-18 09:06:46 AM  
Second grade, in lunch. We returned to the classroom where we watched replays...
 
2014-01-18 09:06:52 AM  
Second grade. Like most school kids around the country, we were being shown the launch live because of the teacher on board. I don't remember the teachers'reactions all that clearly, but I remember it wasn't a good time.
 
2014-01-18 09:07:08 AM  
Watched it live in my 2nd grade classroom...I really thought this was going to be the "where were you when" moment of my generation, then 9/11 happened...
 
2014-01-18 09:08:04 AM  

Fabric_Man: Remember how they had kindergartners from around the country watching the launch on live TV? 'Cause I sure as shiat remember.


pretty sure i was in one of those classes.  or it was first grade.  yup.
 
2014-01-18 09:08:30 AM  
I was delivering mail on a rural route, at box 273.  You can deliver mail the remainder of the day in tears, but it is more difficult.
 
2014-01-18 09:08:46 AM  
Walking into AP Biology, 9th grade, McCallum High School, Austin, Texas.
 
2014-01-18 09:09:03 AM  
My first wedding anniversary with my first husband had been two days earlier. He'd driven to work and I had the launch on the tee and vee.

I called him after it happened.

"The Challenger blew up."

"Oh yeah? And?" he says, sure I'm telling a joke because as it turned out, he was a mean stupid a&&hole

"This isn't a joke. If anybody there has a television, go turn it on."

I don't remember much else about that day.
 
2014-01-18 09:09:06 AM  
Freshman year at boarding school, I was from Florida but one idiot kid from NYC became obsessed by it, tape-recorded the NPR broadcasts and played them back over and over. The next year he was my roommate, bought a 45 single of "Tequila" by the Champs and played it over and over. Idiot.
 
2014-01-18 09:11:35 AM  
I missed it because I had late classes that day at college. Found out when I turned ob the TV before I left for campus.  Never saw a major university campus that quiet.


Oh, and:

OnlyM3: 7 dead.... 0 held accountable.

NASA repeated the trick of knowingly killing 7 when they returned Columbia.


Go fark yourself.
 
2014-01-18 09:11:57 AM  
7th grade parochial school. Only other time class was stopped to watch TV was when Reagan was shot. I remember there was a debate in class to whether or not the astronauts and teachers were heroes or not, that anyone would jump at the chance to fly in a spaceship and they were not risking their lives to save somoene else.
 
2014-01-18 09:13:14 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: I was in 4th grade. My principal came into the classroom, pulled the teacher aside, and then almost immediately the teacher gasped and burst into tears. Throughout the day all of the adults looked sad beyond words. Not of them told us, though. Not one. The principal decided that a noteworthy historical event wasn't worth losing two class periods in the afternoon.

I came home and my dad was watching the coverage. I was stunned beyond words. The sad thing is, because I know what actually happened and why, with the additional knowledge that they didn't die until they hit the water, I'm still stunned. It was my first encounter with the casual, callous nature of government. but not my last.


Wait. You take the fact that faculty at an elementary school weren't immediately prepared to deal with the biggest national tragedy since the Kennedy assassination as evidence of the callous nature of government? What the actual fark, man?
 
2014-01-18 09:13:47 AM  
Sixth grade. Between classes or right around lunch, another kid came up to me in the hall and said, "Did you know there are dead people floating in space?"

Not cool.
 
2014-01-18 09:13:53 AM  
Where was I? A place that I don't like revisiting, but I get dragged back to every time I come across something like this. It's right next to 9/11 Place, and a bit down the street from "she's been in an accident. I'm heading to the hospital now".

Fark.
 
2014-01-18 09:14:28 AM  
I was in my cube at Singer-Link Flight Simulation Division working on the next shuttle flght when the word came out to go to the media room. It was very quiet in the room while the NASA feed was on. As a kid, I lived next door to one of the Apollo 1 astronauts and it seemed a little too familiar.
 
2014-01-18 09:16:16 AM  

drgloryboy: 7th grade parochial school. Only other time class was stopped to watch TV was when Reagan was shot. I remember there was a debate in class to whether or not the astronauts and teachers were heroes or not, that anyone would jump at the chance to fly in a spaceship and they were not risking their lives to save somoene else.


What a weird time for a debate like that, especially from a child's perspective safely on the ground.
 
2014-01-18 09:17:37 AM  

EZ1923: Adolf Oliver Nipples: I was in 4th grade. My principal came into the classroom, pulled the teacher aside, and then almost immediately the teacher gasped and burst into tears. Throughout the day all of the adults looked sad beyond words. Not of them told us, though. Not one. The principal decided that a noteworthy historical event wasn't worth losing two class periods in the afternoon.

I came home and my dad was watching the coverage. I was stunned beyond words. The sad thing is, because I know what actually happened and why, with the additional knowledge that they didn't die until they hit the water, I'm still stunned. It was my first encounter with the casual, callous nature of government. but not my last.

Wait. You take the fact that faculty at an elementary school weren't immediately prepared to deal with the biggest national tragedy since the Kennedy assassination as evidence of the callous nature of government? What the actual fark, man?


No, I was referring to the fact that they launched with the knowledge that the shuttle had a substantial possibility of blowing up.

Paragraph breaks mean different thoughts.
 
2014-01-18 09:18:14 AM  
Thanks, Subby. Maybe you'd like to give me a nice papercut and squeeze some lemon into it.

Not CSB:

So, fifth grade, teacher had a TV set up in the room so we could all watch along for the liftoff. Don't remember exactly, but the teacher either knew or had met McAuliffe, and was very excited. We were all told how important this mission would be, and how it showed anyone could become an astronaut.

The kicker was after liftoff when the actual explosion took place, the teacher was over at her desk and didn't immediately see what happened. We (being dumbass fifth graders) didn't know what happened, and started chattering and shouting at each other.

I still remember how pale our teacher looked, as she turned off the TV and told us to wait there in a broken voice. She left, and a it later, our assistant principal came to our class with a substitute for the rest of the day.

I'd experienced death before from grandparents and pets, but it was the first time to actually see a tragedy and know that those people were dead from it. Godspeed to Challenger and Columbia.
 
2014-01-18 09:18:37 AM  
I would have been 5, in kindergarten.  I have no memories of that day, though of course I've since watched the news as it happened.
 
2014-01-18 09:19:13 AM  
I don't remember where I was when it happened, though I'm sure I was in school.  My strongest memories are all of the drawings and the letter my friend and I wrote to NASA for the launch of Discovery afterward.

NASA sent us both a hand-written note and an absolute TON of stuff back.
 
2014-01-18 09:19:33 AM  
I was 14 and had stayed home from school that day...in an otherwise very busy home, I found myself all alone watching tv.
Watched the entire thing unfold live sitting in my Dads rocker.

Very sad and very lonely day I will never forget.
 
2014-01-18 09:19:33 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: I was in 4th grade. My principal came into the classroom, pulled the teacher aside, and then almost immediately the teacher gasped and burst into tears. Throughout the day all of the adults looked sad beyond words. Not of them told us, though. Not one. The principal decided that a noteworthy historical event wasn't worth losing two class periods in the afternoon.

I came home and my dad was watching the coverage. I was stunned beyond words. The sad thing is, because I know what actually happened and why, with the additional knowledge that they didn't die until they hit the water, I'm still stunned. It was my first encounter with the casual, callous nature of government. but not my last.


I was working in an office, listening to the radio, and hoping they survived by splashing down into water.  Much later, Lewis Grizzard wrote an editorial for the Atlanta Journal, and actually used a profanity that got printed in full about the revelation that the astronauts survived the blast.  And then when the Columbia disaster came along years later, I felt the exact same way Lewis felt.  Sons of biatches knew, dammit.
 
2014-01-18 09:21:15 AM  

Bedstead Polisher: I was about 7 years old, and I remember knowing that a teacher was on board. Being so young, I have to ask the older Farkers, was it pretty standard for people to make a point to watch shuttle launches? I don't remember ever watching shuttle launches after that (probably for good reason). But it seems like a lot of people were looking forward to this launch. Was it because this one had a civilian or was it pretty standard to get this excited about a launch?


The Shuttle was amazing because it took off and landed sort of like an airplane. Before the Shuttle, astronauts had to splashdown in the ocean and be picked up.

I remember the first Shuttle landing. We cried with pride at the advances scientists had made over the old days. A space vehicle that could take off and land with such ease...

I remember watching the Moonwalk. Dad had bought a color tv because it was such an occasion. The moon landing was televised in black and white!

Many people watched the Challenger take-off because of the teacher on board. She was the first non-professional astronaut. She was one of us, just plain folks, going on a fantastic adventure. I recall lots of schools having assemblies so kids could watch the First Teacher in Space.

I recall watching most of the Apollo launches, but only those two shuttles...the very first landing and the Challenger.
 
2014-01-18 09:21:44 AM  
I was working nights and sleeping in days covering a paramedic shift at the local Volunteer Fire Department. My driver woke me up to tell me that it had happened and spent most of the morning watching the coverage.

As for Columbia, I was driving cross country and was at the Iowa 80 truckstop for breakfast and heard it on the TV they had going there.
 
2014-01-18 09:23:01 AM  
9th grade library, they herded us in there to watch what must have been one of the replays.

Chemguy: I was living in Chile, and something caught my eye as I walked past the newsstand.  I stopped, bought a paper and learned of it that way.  I still have that paper.


Wow, what a way to find out. I still have the Columbia paper.
 
2014-01-18 09:24:12 AM  
10th grade watching it live in class. We all just sat there stunned
 
x23
2014-01-18 09:24:16 AM  
i was in 3rd grade.

before school i was arguing with my mom forever because she refused to let me bring this new Transformers triple-charger i got. when she wasn't looking i snuck it into my backpack anyway.

i was playing with it at school before the bell rang. was still playing with it few minutes into the school day they made the announcement on the PA.

the triple changer would transform between a robot / train / and this...

static.seibertron.com
 
2014-01-18 09:25:30 AM  
I was passing through the student union while attending college at University Of Michigan-Flint. I paused to watch the launch... everybody was stunned
 
2014-01-18 09:25:31 AM  
A friend of mine ran into our classroom crying after having gone to the bathroom. We were in a "trailer" classroom since our school was a little overcrowded.

We all walked outside and looked up at the sky to the east and knew something was wrong by the trail.

/10th grade social studies
// Oviedo Florida
 
2014-01-18 09:27:30 AM  
Was at work, heard about it on the radio. What I remember most of that day is my foreman saying something to the effect of "serves them right". He was a bit of a jerk.
 
2014-01-18 09:30:13 AM  
A little older than you, subs. I was in 7th grade and was getting my braces adjusted.  I heard about it on the radio when Mom was bringing me back from the orthodontist.
 
2014-01-18 09:30:34 AM  

Bedstead Polisher: I was about 7 years old, and I remember knowing that a teacher was on board. Being so young, I have to ask the older Farkers, was it pretty standard for people to make a point to watch shuttle launches? I don't remember ever watching shuttle launches after that (probably for good reason). But it seems like a lot of people were looking forward to this launch. Was it because this one had a civilian or was it pretty standard to get this excited about a launch?



By then, no it was not. In fact the "teacher in space" angle was a publicity stunt to try and rekindle interest in the program because they were starting to get common.
 
2014-01-18 09:30:52 AM  

jfarkinB: Where was I? A place that I don't like revisiting, but I get dragged back to every time I come across something like this. It's right next to 9/11 Place, and a bit down the street from "she's been in an accident. I'm heading to the hospital now".

Fark.


Internet hug.
 
2014-01-18 09:33:29 AM  
College in Texas. But as sad as it is, I have no memories of the event. Don't know how I found out or where exactly I was. I was too distracted by my college years I suppose.
 
2014-01-18 09:34:47 AM  
We had off from school, and my tv show was interrupted
 
2014-01-18 09:37:08 AM  
Just a kid in a classroom, I think about 5th grade. One of my earliest memories.
 
2014-01-18 09:38:45 AM  
Heard someone say at work that the Challenger blew up and thought they were talking about my car.
 
2014-01-18 09:39:21 AM  

x23: i was in 3rd grade.

before school i was arguing with my mom forever because she refused to let me bring this new Transformers triple-charger i got. when she wasn't looking i snuck it into my backpack anyway.

i was playing with it at school before the bell rang. was still playing with it few minutes into the school day they made the announcement on the PA.

the triple changer would transform between a robot / train / and this...


I had that triple changer :-)
 
2014-01-18 09:40:06 AM  

Limeyluv: Bedstead Polisher: I was about 7 years old, and I remember knowing that a teacher was on board. Being so young, I have to ask the older Farkers, was it pretty standard for people to make a point to watch shuttle launches? I don't remember ever watching shuttle launches after that (probably for good reason). But it seems like a lot of people were looking forward to this launch. Was it because this one had a civilian or was it pretty standard to get this excited about a launch?

The Shuttle was amazing because it took off and landed sort of like an airplane. Before the Shuttle, astronauts had to splashdown in the ocean and be picked up.

I remember the first Shuttle landing. We cried with pride at the advances scientists had made over the old days. A space vehicle that could take off and land with such ease...

I remember watching the Moonwalk. Dad had bought a color tv because it was such an occasion. The moon landing was televised in black and white!

Many people watched the Challenger take-off because of the teacher on board. She was the first non-professional astronaut. She was one of us, just plain folks, going on a fantastic adventure. I recall lots of schools having assemblies so kids could watch the First Teacher in Space.

I recall watching most of the Apollo launches, but only those two shuttles...the very first landing and the Challenger.


Thanks. These days there are so few "new" things, and the internet has made it so that everything has been done already. Makes you feel kind of jaded. Probably the last "historic moment" that people got excited about was Obama's inauguration, at least that I can think of.
 
2014-01-18 09:40:37 AM  
I was in 7th grade algebra class when....no wait, that is where I was when we heard Kennedy was shot. THAT is the one I will always remember. The day Challenger blew up was just another day at work.
Went home at noon and watched the replays of the explosion all through lunch. Sad day.
 
2014-01-18 09:41:37 AM  
I was in high school, junior year, when I heard what had happened.  Spent most of the day stunned.
 
2014-01-18 09:43:29 AM  
Watched it live with my 3rd grade class. I do not remember the explosion all I can recall is my teachers uncontrolled sobbing. None of us kids knew what to do. I have only felt that level of true helplessness on one other occasion, that of watching my father telling His father it was OK to let go...

 I would wish that feeling on no one.

    I would later learn that she had been in the running to be a Teacher in space. After that I was never sure if they were tears of grief or relief.
 
2014-01-18 09:44:11 AM  
I was about a year old, so I don't remember.

I remember what I was doing when I heard about Columbia, but that was barely a year after 9/11, so I don't think it will get to "where were you" status among national tragedies.
 
2014-01-18 09:45:53 AM  
Grade 6... watching live at school for science class....
 
2014-01-18 09:47:10 AM  
Sophomore in college.  Walked into the student lounge and saw the tv just after the fireball and all I saw were the 'horns' of the boosters.  I thought, "that doesn't look right"
 
2014-01-18 09:48:39 AM  
I was in 5th grade. My class wasn't watching but another class was. One of the other teachers came in to our room and told my teacher what had happened loud enough for the kids in the front to hear and when it got back to me in the back of the class, being a huge NASA fanboy and 10 year old "expert" on these things, I told the kid in the next seat that he'd heard wrong and that the challenger blowing up was impossible.

I also remember that one of the 5th grade teachers had had a dream the night before that it had blown up and everyone thought it was creepy and pre-cognitive, though in fairness in 5th grade you don't know anything about probability.

Also remember very vividly all the horrid jokes we told:

What does NASA stand for? Need Another Seven Astronauts

Where was Christa McAuliffe's last vacation? All over Florida?

What was Christa McAuliffe's last words to her husband? "You feed the dog, I'll feed the fish"

/A paychiatrist would say that Gallows Humor is an appropriate coping mechanism for tragedy

//I just think 10 year old boys are insensitive little jerks

///at least I was a jerk in the 80s and was allowed to mature into a functional adult. In 2014, my 10 year old self would be sent to sensitivity training and receive death threats after being outed and shamed on Gawker or jezebel for making cracks like that.
 
2014-01-18 09:48:45 AM  

Fabric_Man: Remember how they had kindergartners from around the country watching the launch on live TV? 'Cause I sure as shiat remember.


I was in kindergarten at the time; I don't remember anything of it or my parents saying anything.  Then again, my dad told me I once witnessed a plane crash at an air show some time around that age and I don't remember that either.
 
2014-01-18 09:48:46 AM  

dajoro: 11th grade Oceanography class. They wheeled in a tv and we watched the coverage right after it happened.

For 9/11, getting ready for work and just out of shower, Howard Stern on radio with TV on mute. Drying off and see TV is covering some skyscraper that has smoke coming out of it. I turn the tv up and they're talking about a plane hitting and as they say this I watch the second plane hit.

For Red Wedding, was in tub and crapped self. Had to then take shower - shower of tears. :(


Don't read books, huh?
 
2014-01-18 09:49:46 AM  
Senior year of college, majoring in aerospace engineering, coming back from class.  One of my suitemates yelled out the window that the shuttle had exploded.  Ran up and watched for a while, then had to go to another class.  Spent the afternoon in a lecture hall with a few aero majors and our propulsion professor watching the replays and trying to figure out what happened.

Later, my landlord was Judy Resnick's cousin.
 
2014-01-18 09:51:18 AM  
Where was I that day? Updating my 'What do I want to be when I grow up?" list.


1. Cowboy
2. Astronaut
3. Football Player
4. Porn star

Actually I was 8 years old, in the 3rd grade, and quite sad when it happened... I really did want to be an astronaut, even won the science fair that year with my Solar System project...
 
2014-01-18 09:51:52 AM  
On the West Coast, I was just getting out of bed. Heard the news on the clock-radio.

As has been said, the shuttle launches had become so routine for the general public that this launch wasn't broadcast live by the networks.

CSB
I got a job at NASA the following year, so I was there when flights resumed. Job not Shuttle related, but I did get a pass to watch the landing of the shuttle at Edwards.

/CSB
 
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