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(Boston.com)   A man was WHAT to death? Oh, shucked   (mobile.boston.com) divider line 72
    More: Scary, New Bedford, accidents  
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12563 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2014 at 6:23 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-17 07:49:26 PM
OK, lots of funny jokes but did you read to the end of the article?

"Since 2000, 22 workers have been crushed to death by machinery in Massachusetts, usually because of inadequate machine guards and other federally mandated safety measures, according to MassCOSH. "

Massachusetts isn't known as an industrial state and yet they've had 22 crushing deaths in the past 14 years?  That doesn't include falls, being struck or electrocution - each of which causes more deaths than crushing.  The examples cited all happened in manufacturing plants, not on construction sites where accidents occur more frequently (less controlled environment than manufacturing)  What the hell is going on over there?

I've worked with lots of heavy industry and other machinery-rich environments and I've seen accidents and I've heard of deaths, but rarely.  I know that OSHA and every state's version of OSHA is supposed to keep an eye on these things but most companies don't even worry about OSHA - their liability insurance carrier is much more vigilant and much more conversant in safety practices and safety equipment than any OSHA inspector can dream of being (it's that profit motive thing and trying to hang on to your premium dollars rather than give them to One-armed Louie).  Do manufacturers in Massachusetts not understand the concept of risk management?
 
2014-01-17 07:49:26 PM

JonnyBGoode: GGracie: Oh, shucked.  Boring.  I thought this was one of my kind of threads ;-)

Say goodnight, Gracie.


GOOD NIGHT GRACIE! :-) :-)
 
2014-01-17 08:03:23 PM
Damned deaf genie, IM sure the guy didnt want a 12 pianist either.
 
2014-01-17 08:04:46 PM

Oldiron_79: Damned deaf genie, IM sure the guy didnt want a 12 pianist either.


Typo, 12 inch
 
2014-01-17 08:04:56 PM

VladTheEmailer: SeedFreak: OMG, poor fellow. What a horrible way to die. I hope it was over quickly.

...could tell you're a chick.

Empathy on the internet for random individuals is so unmacho.


I'd rather watch Too Cute than Law and Order reruns.

Mr. Right: OK, lots of funny jokes but did you read to the end of the article?

"Since 2000, 22 workers have been crushed to death by machinery in Massachusetts, usually because of inadequate machine guards and other federally mandated safety measures, according to MassCOSH. "

Massachusetts isn't known as an industrial state and yet they've had 22 crushing deaths in the past 14 years?  That doesn't include falls, being struck or electrocution - each of which causes more deaths than crushing.  The examples cited all happened in manufacturing plants, not on construction sites where accidents occur more frequently (less controlled environment than manufacturing)  What the hell is going on over there?

I've worked with lots of heavy industry and other machinery-rich environments and I've seen accidents and I've heard of deaths, but rarely.  I know that OSHA and every state's version of OSHA is supposed to keep an eye on these things but most companies don't even worry about OSHA - their liability insurance carrier is much more vigilant and much more conversant in safety practices and safety equipment than any OSHA inspector can dream of being (it's that profit motive thing and trying to hang on to your premium dollars rather than give them to One-armed Louie).  Do manufacturers in Massachusetts not understand the concept of risk management?


A long time ago I temped and was assigned to the NYS Insurance Fund to manage and reorganize the dead records. I thought, "Oh cool, it's just old files that need to be moved to another floor." No. It was the file room of everyone who had been killed on the job in NY.

Don't let anyone you ever know or care about work for Blackman Plumbing. They had the largest set of files, stacks and stacks of them with some absolutely horrible deaths. After that, don't work in any parking garage, either. Horrors.
 
2014-01-17 08:26:48 PM
Mobile links should be an instaban.  That said, I used to live there, and worked right down the street from there.  Poor guy.
 
2014-01-17 08:33:09 PM

SeedFreak: VladTheEmailer: SeedFreak: OMG, poor fellow. What a horrible way to die. I hope it was over quickly.

...could tell you're a chick.

Empathy on the internet for random individuals is so unmacho.

I'd rather watch Too Cute than Law and Order reruns.
Mr. Right: OK, lots of funny jokes but did you read to the end of the article?

"Since 2000, 22 workers have been crushed to death by machinery in Massachusetts, usually because of inadequate machine guards and other federally mandated safety measures, according to MassCOSH. "

Massachusetts isn't known as an industrial state and yet they've had 22 crushing deaths in the past 14 years?  That doesn't include falls, being struck or electrocution - each of which causes more deaths than crushing.  The examples cited all happened in manufacturing plants, not on construction sites where accidents occur more frequently (less controlled environment than manufacturing)  What the hell is going on over there?

I've worked with lots of heavy industry and other machinery-rich environments and I've seen accidents and I've heard of deaths, but rarely.  I know that OSHA and every state's version of OSHA is supposed to keep an eye on these things but most companies don't even worry about OSHA - their liability insurance carrier is much more vigilant and much more conversant in safety practices and safety equipment than any OSHA inspector can dream of being (it's that profit motive thing and trying to hang on to your premium dollars rather than give them to One-armed Louie).  Do manufacturers in Massachusetts not understand the concept of risk management?

A long time ago I temped and was assigned to the NYS Insurance Fund to manage and reorganize the dead records. I thought, "Oh cool, it's just old files that need to be moved to another floor." No. It was the file room of everyone who had been killed on the job in NY.

Don't let anyone you ever know or care about work for Blackman Plumbing. They had the largest set of files, stacks and st ...


I am intruiged by the stories you may have.
 
2014-01-17 08:33:34 PM

SeedFreak: VladTheEmailer: SeedFreak: OMG, poor fellow. What a horrible way to die. I hope it was over quickly.

...could tell you're a chick.

Empathy on the internet for random individuals is so unmacho.

I'd rather watch Too Cute than Law and Order reruns.
Mr. Right: OK, lots of funny jokes but did you read to the end of the article?

"Since 2000, 22 workers have been crushed to death by machinery in Massachusetts, usually because of inadequate machine guards and other federally mandated safety measures, according to MassCOSH. "

Massachusetts isn't known as an industrial state and yet they've had 22 crushing deaths in the past 14 years?  That doesn't include falls, being struck or electrocution - each of which causes more deaths than crushing.  The examples cited all happened in manufacturing plants, not on construction sites where accidents occur more frequently (less controlled environment than manufacturing)  What the hell is going on over there?

I've worked with lots of heavy industry and other machinery-rich environments and I've seen accidents and I've heard of deaths, but rarely.  I know that OSHA and every state's version of OSHA is supposed to keep an eye on these things but most companies don't even worry about OSHA - their liability insurance carrier is much more vigilant and much more conversant in safety practices and safety equipment than any OSHA inspector can dream of being (it's that profit motive thing and trying to hang on to your premium dollars rather than give them to One-armed Louie).  Do manufacturers in Massachusetts not understand the concept of risk management?

A long time ago I temped and was assigned to the NYS Insurance Fund to manage and reorganize the dead records. I thought, "Oh cool, it's just old files that need to be moved to another floor." No. It was the file room of everyone who had been killed on the job in NY.

Don't let anyone you ever know or care about work for Blackman Plumbing. They had the largest set of files, stacks and stacks of them with some absolutely horrible deaths. After that, don't work in any parking garage, either. Horrors.


Ive witnessed a person dieing of crush injuries from being smashed between a forklift and a yellow OSHA safety pole(IRONY). Tried keeping the guy concious till the ambulance got there. with no success.

Ineed a drink now.
 
2014-01-17 08:40:59 PM

gerrychampoux: Isn't that what happened to Chuckles the Clown?


www.morethings.com

Chuckles the Clown Loved to mess around. That's why Chuckles is splattered on the ground. Thought I was his tool, he could treat me like a fool. But Homey showed him he ain't nobody's sucka and won't be ill treated by no low life two dollar minimum wage making stupid jackass like him. Y'ALL BETTER SING THIS DAMN SONG.
 
2014-01-17 08:44:54 PM

NutWrench: I assume they're talking about an oyster shucking machine and not a corn shucking machine.
Still, how does this manage to kill you?

/Shucks to be him.
//Ok, I'll go now.
///Sorry.


I'm not familiar with the machine in question, but that does not look like something I would call a turbine...
 
2014-01-17 09:02:36 PM
This is an industrial oyster shucker. (Sorry for the size, it's a big mother shucker.)

blogs.nicholas.duke.edu
 
2014-01-17 09:06:02 PM
Police said in an e-mail that it took the fire department nearly an hour to free Gerena after partially dismantling the machine.

File this under "Reason #342 Not to Be a Firefighter".

OSHA inspected the plant in 2011 and discovered several serious safety violations, including inadequate emergency training for employees dealing with hazardous waste and insufficient respiratory protection for some workers.

Umm, this is a seafood processing plant, no?  What kinds of hazardous waste are being generated there?  Ick.
 
2014-01-17 09:07:04 PM
In December 2011, another worker died in Taunton after his hand was stuck in an industrial hummus grinder.

Man, what a falafel way to go.
 
2014-01-17 09:47:29 PM

Mr. Right: OK, lots of funny jokes but did you read to the end of the article?

"Since 2000, 22 workers have been crushed to death by machinery in Massachusetts, usually because of inadequate machine guards and other federally mandated safety measures, according to MassCOSH. "

Massachusetts isn't known as an industrial state and yet they've had 22 crushing deaths in the past 14 years?  That doesn't include falls, being struck or electrocution - each of which causes more deaths than crushing.  The examples cited all happened in manufacturing plants, not on construction sites where accidents occur more frequently (less controlled environment than manufacturing)  What the hell is going on over there?

I've worked with lots of heavy industry and other machinery-rich environments and I've seen accidents and I've heard of deaths, but rarely.  I know that OSHA and every state's version of OSHA is supposed to keep an eye on these things but most companies don't even worry about OSHA - their liability insurance carrier is much more vigilant and much more conversant in safety practices and safety equipment than any OSHA inspector can dream of being (it's that profit motive thing and trying to hang on to your premium dollars rather than give them to One-armed Louie).  Do manufacturers in Massachusetts not understand the concept of risk management?


http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0011.pdf

22 over the course of 14 years is not a large number.
 
2014-01-17 09:54:31 PM
That's no way for a man to die.
 
2014-01-17 11:02:04 PM
An autopsy was planned.

"Death by massive crush injury" is likely the culprit.

And in re whoever asked about this: Do manufacturers in Massachusetts not understand the concept of risk management? Yeah, it's usually not the manufacturers or the equipment makers' fault. Almost invariably when they say "inadequate machine guards" what they mean is "the equipment is not 110% idiot proof and here's the proof: some idiot found a way to die in this equipment."

Example from personal experience: My best friend used to work on his dad's dairy ranch & they had a one-legged ranch hand. How, you ask did this happen? Well, it seems this fellow was waiting for some piece of rotating machinery or other to spin down and decided to help it by putting his foot on the cam shaft. Which was spinning at about 10,000 rpms. Which then wound his leg around it up to the knee.

Now, I suppose that was due to "inadequate machine guards" since the cam shaft could have been encased in a protective cover to prevent idiots from attempting to brake it with their feet--or it could have been due to an idiot who thought he could brake a spinning steel cam shaft with his foot. Most of us learn that early and don't need to be protected against spinning equipment by more than the usual safeguards.
 
2014-01-17 11:42:33 PM
http://stephenking.wikia.com/wiki/The_Mangler_(character)

Will "The Shucker" show up in Stephen King's next batch of short-stories?

Is SyFy already procuring the rights to "Shucknado"?
 
2014-01-18 12:32:12 AM
Did he at least get to go through the Pearly Gates?

/on a serious note, RIP to the guy. That is a terrible way to die.
 
2014-01-18 02:02:24 AM

brantgoose: Andy Warhol warned us that we would all get fifteen minutes in the future, but I pity the man the high price he paid for his shucking fame.

Shucking fame.

Yes I did.


I've never heard that one before... kudos.

/yes, I actually like puns
//harder than it seems
 
2014-01-18 06:23:48 AM
OUCHIE!
 
2014-01-18 07:36:50 AM

valkore: Police said in an e-mail that it took the fire department nearly an hour to free Gerena after partially dismantling the machine.

File this under "Reason #342 Not to Be a Firefighter".

OSHA inspected the plant in 2011 and discovered several serious safety violations, including inadequate emergency training for employees dealing with hazardous waste and insufficient respiratory protection for some workers.

Umm, this is a seafood processing plant, no?  What kinds of hazardous waste are being generated there?  Ick.


Concentrated fish guts probably counts as hazardous waste.
Cleaning supplies
Lubricating oils
 
2014-01-18 09:23:14 AM

valkore: Police said in an e-mail that it took the fire department nearly an hour to free Gerena after partially dismantling the machine.

File this under "Reason #342 Not to Be a Firefighter".

OSHA inspected the plant in 2011 and discovered several serious safety violations, including inadequate emergency training for employees dealing with hazardous waste and insufficient respiratory protection for some workers.

Umm, this is a seafood processing plant, no?  What kinds of hazardous waste are being generated there?  Ick.


Ammonia for the refrigeration?
 
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