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(SeattlePI)   If you're Target and you're trying to win back your customers' confidence, don't send out a spam email that reads like it was created by scammers   (seattlepi.com) divider line 9
    More: Obvious, Target, scams  
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9110 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2014 at 10:30 AM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-01-17 10:41:50 AM
9 votes:
Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
d­octor*mokimb­o­6­98[nospam-﹫-backwards]liam­toh­*co­m

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim
2014-01-17 10:58:02 AM
5 votes:
Sending it from a bizarre address like "[nospam-﹫-backwards]oifb­*c­o­m" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.
2014-01-17 08:25:50 PM
1 votes:

groppet: Prank Call of Cthulhu: Sending it from a bizarre address like "[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]oifb[* image 7x13]com" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.

At an office I was assigned to for a while the IT dept did the old toss out a dozen or so thumb drives in the parking lot trick. I found one and brought it to them and told them nice try. It got a nice laugh but I was told to keep hush about it. Funny thing one of the senior partners that was complaining about lax IT security used one of them.


Take it home, plug it in a linux machine, remove the partition, and get a free USB stick.

Then fill it with weird porn and drop it back in the parking lot.
2014-01-17 02:23:58 PM
1 votes:

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
doctor[* image 7x13]mokimbo698[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]liamtoh[* image 7x13]com

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim


That HotMail account bounced doctor, can you reconfirm?  I have all of my ex-wife's info ready to go.
2014-01-17 11:32:13 AM
1 votes:

DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: Target customers & card holders = SUCKERS!


Let me guess, you only buy cash only from locally run mom and pop apothecaries and craft stores, organic food from the farmer just outside of town, all collected on your bicycle because you're too hipster and superior to everyone to use a common everyday big box store?

That's it, isn't it.  I knew that was it.
2014-01-17 11:09:04 AM
1 votes:

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Sending it from a bizarre address like "[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]oifb[* image 7x13]com" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.


You survived an encounter with your IT guy?  Clearly his name is not Simon Travaglia.
2014-01-17 10:45:50 AM
1 votes:
I think the irony here is that Target, nominally in an effort to save face (though, more accurately, to save profits), has offered to pay for a year of credit monitoring/identity theft protection. They are doing so through Experian, who, it was revealed only 3 months ago, was selling consumer data to an identity theft service.
2014-01-17 09:33:41 AM
1 votes:

Walker: stpauler: Yes, but reading that article was difficult because it was hard to tell when it started and stopped due to the random fonts they used interspersed with the ads.

You see ads? Are you a time traveler from 1997? All of us in the 21st century use Adblock. You should look into it.


Not only ads but on I'm on IE thanks to low-tech job. Behold the ugliness:

img.fark.net
2014-01-17 09:11:47 AM
1 votes:

stpauler: Yes, but reading that article was difficult because it was hard to tell when it started and stopped due to the random fonts they used interspersed with the ads.


You see ads? Are you a time traveler from 1997? All of us in the 21st century use Adblock. You should look into it.
 
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