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(SeattlePI)   If you're Target and you're trying to win back your customers' confidence, don't send out a spam email that reads like it was created by scammers   (seattlepi.com) divider line 66
    More: Obvious, Target, scams  
•       •       •

9116 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2014 at 10:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-17 01:27:28 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Sending it from a bizarre address like "[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]oifb[* image 7x13]com" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.


At an office I was assigned to for a while the IT dept did the old toss out a dozen or so thumb drives in the parking lot trick. I found one and brought it to them and told them nice try. It got a nice laugh but I was told to keep hush about it. Funny thing one of the senior partners that was complaining about lax IT security used one of them.
 
2014-01-17 01:35:42 PM  
I got one of those emails. Bought some hairdryers online for the GF, used a gift card. Hope the scammers enjoyed spending the whole eighty-one cents left on it.
 
2014-01-17 01:44:08 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: RickN99: Agreed.  Anyone, such as subby, who thinks this reads "like it was created by scammers" has never actually read an email created by scammers.  No typos, weird English, click-here links, claims of foreign riches, etc.

Years ago, I'd entertain myself by tormenting these guys by answering them back and leading them on. (In fact, if you search "nigerian scammer" and "lovecraft" you can probably find an archive of a fun conversation I had.) One of the things I tried was to offer my services to them to rewrite their scam letters to fix the grammar and misspellings and make them more believable. I never got anyone to take me up on that offer. This is too bad, because I'd love to be able to put "Nigerian scam letter editor" on my resume.



I've been told they make the emails deliberately unbelievable on purpose in order to self-select only the most gullible of idiots. They're trying to miss the gray area where the mark realizes only halfway through that it's a trap, after the Nigerians wasted hours upon hours setting up fake website accounts and such. If the mark is not completely, 100% convinced by the email, they'd rather the mark move on, as there's a million more down the pike. Human interaction is only required on their end when actually collecting money.

That's part of the reason "419 eater" and similar honeypot programs are so effective; it consumes the one most limited resource they have: time.
 
2014-01-17 01:57:36 PM  

underwhere: I like how everyones reaction was, "This might be spam, I'M GOING TO TELL THE WORLD THAT IT'S SPAM!!!"

When I got the email it took less than ten seconds to google it and find out it's legit.


It did read and look like spam, though. They really could have done a better job.  I also knew it wasn't spam, but when the initial reaction of most people, they didn't do a very good job with customers who are already leery of them.
 
2014-01-17 02:23:58 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
doctor[* image 7x13]mokimbo698[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]liamtoh[* image 7x13]com

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim


That HotMail account bounced doctor, can you reconfirm?  I have all of my ex-wife's info ready to go.
 
2014-01-17 02:38:55 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: (In fact, if you search "nigerian scammer" and "lovecraft" you can probably find an archive of a fun conversation I had.)


That is an all time classic. I'm glad to see it archived, since Geocities is no more.

Now where did I set that shining trapezohedron?
 
2014-01-17 02:45:04 PM  

born_yesterday: I'm in the same boat.  I've never ordered online from them, just B&M shopping.  How they got my information, if indeed they did, is troublesome.


I use a series of one-off email addresses so that I can backtrace spam to its original source.  The Target email came in through my Amazon address.
 
2014-01-17 03:08:49 PM  
How much do you want to bet that after the free year you have to  OPT-OUT from the Target service?  Otherwise you will be charged.
 
2014-01-17 03:16:27 PM  

strobis48z4: How much do you want to bet that after the free year you have to  OPT-OUT from the Target service?  Otherwise you will be charged.


I guarantee it.
 
2014-01-17 04:34:12 PM  

strobis48z4: How much do you want to bet that after the free year you have to  OPT-OUT from the Target service?  Otherwise you will be charged.


That's how 99% of all credit monitoring services make their money.
 
2014-01-17 04:56:33 PM  

IrateShadow: born_yesterday: I'm in the same boat.  I've never ordered online from them, just B&M shopping.  How they got my information, if indeed they did, is troublesome.

I use a series of one-off email addresses so that I can backtrace spam to its original source.  The Target email came in through my Amazon address.



Interesting. I know that I didn't shop at Target, either online or at a store anywhere near the time period in question, yet I got one of these emails too. I immediately thought it was spam, especially since it was sent to my personal email, not the one I use for retail/online purchases. And the only online store that has my personal address is Amazon since I started shopping with them so long ago, before security issues really became a problem. I was wondering how they got my personal email address and now I'm wondering if they're just blanketing the world with this email, why hasn't my online shopping email address gotten the email too?
 
2014-01-17 05:17:05 PM  

Snarfangel: Prank Call of Cthulhu: Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
doctor[* image 7x13]mokimbo698[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]liamtoh[* image 7x13]com

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim


I keep sending the information, but the email keeps bouncing back. I have tried three different credit cards so far. What am I doing wrong?


you forgot to include the routing number for your bank, if you do that it will work just fine
 
2014-01-17 05:21:57 PM  
I got one, on an obsolete email address that I haven't used in years (except as a spam bucket).
I've never bought anything from Target, either in-store or online.
My guess is that they bought, and leaked, ID lists from third parties.
These nimrods are really excelling themselves.
 
2014-01-17 08:25:50 PM  

groppet: Prank Call of Cthulhu: Sending it from a bizarre address like "[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]oifb[* image 7x13]com" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.

At an office I was assigned to for a while the IT dept did the old toss out a dozen or so thumb drives in the parking lot trick. I found one and brought it to them and told them nice try. It got a nice laugh but I was told to keep hush about it. Funny thing one of the senior partners that was complaining about lax IT security used one of them.


Take it home, plug it in a linux machine, remove the partition, and get a free USB stick.

Then fill it with weird porn and drop it back in the parking lot.
 
2014-01-18 12:40:16 AM  
Sounds like they took a page from Sony's book after the PSN hack.
 
2014-01-18 10:18:40 PM  

stonelotus: Interestingly enough, I got one of these emails as well.  The problem is that I rarely shop at Target (last visit was over a year ago), I always use cash, and I've never done business with them online or given them my email address.


This email was sent out through AMAZON.
I got only 1 of these and it went to the custom username I use for AMAZON shopping. (It has "amazon" in the username ).
That might explain why some of you got this without having given Target your email.
 
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