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(SeattlePI)   If you're Target and you're trying to win back your customers' confidence, don't send out a spam email that reads like it was created by scammers   (seattlepi.com) divider line 66
    More: Obvious, Target, scams  
•       •       •

9110 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2014 at 10:30 AM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



66 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-17 08:56:31 AM  
If you are target and want to continue to do business, consider cash only and no questions asked.
 
2014-01-17 09:00:46 AM  
Yes, but reading that article was difficult because it was hard to tell when it started and stopped due to the random fonts they used interspersed with the ads.
 
2014-01-17 09:11:47 AM  

stpauler: Yes, but reading that article was difficult because it was hard to tell when it started and stopped due to the random fonts they used interspersed with the ads.


You see ads? Are you a time traveler from 1997? All of us in the 21st century use Adblock. You should look into it.
 
2014-01-17 09:21:03 AM  
www.gannett-cdn.com
filesforfree.info
 
2014-01-17 09:33:41 AM  

Walker: stpauler: Yes, but reading that article was difficult because it was hard to tell when it started and stopped due to the random fonts they used interspersed with the ads.

You see ads? Are you a time traveler from 1997? All of us in the 21st century use Adblock. You should look into it.


Not only ads but on I'm on IE thanks to low-tech job. Behold the ugliness:

img.fark.net
 
2014-01-17 10:33:37 AM  
People are looking for ways to find fault with Target right now because it's a hot ticket new item with general discontent.  It's angsty clickbait.  They should just hole up for a bit.
 
2014-01-17 10:36:24 AM  

Walker: stpauler: Yes, but reading that article was difficult because it was hard to tell when it started and stopped due to the random fonts they used interspersed with the ads.

You see ads? Are you a time traveler from 1997? All of us in the 21st century use Adblock. You should look into it.


Still doesn't mean that the article isn't laid out like a 3rd grader with a meth problem was late for an assignment.
 
2014-01-17 10:38:14 AM  

stpauler: Walker: stpauler: Yes, but reading that article was difficult because it was hard to tell when it started and stopped due to the random fonts they used interspersed with the ads.

You see ads? Are you a time traveler from 1997? All of us in the 21st century use Adblock. You should look into it.

Not only ads but on I'm on IE thanks to low-tech job. Behold the ugliness:

[img.fark.net image 850x680]


Quit your job. Start fresh somewhere new. That ain't living, man.
 
2014-01-17 10:39:28 AM  
I like how everyones reaction was, "This might be spam, I'M GOING TO TELL THE WORLD THAT IT'S SPAM!!!"

When I got the email it took less than ten seconds to google it and find out it's legit.
 
2014-01-17 10:39:52 AM  
Jesus, it's not that hard to figure out, people...

1. Check out Target's website. Not from a link in the email, but by manually navigating to it.
2. Look for a link about the data breach. If it's not on the main page, then it's under the 'Customer Support' tab.
3, Click there.

And this is standard practice for companies involved in data breaches. Haven't shopped at Target for awhile? Just take the free credit monitoring and STFU, you'd be biatching if they WEREN'T doing anything also, I'm sure. Some people want to complain about every corporate entity they can, whether it's warranted or not.
 
2014-01-17 10:41:50 AM  
Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
do­ctor­*mo­kimbo­698[nospam-﹫-backwards]l­iam­toh­*com

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim
 
2014-01-17 10:42:56 AM  
All so, you farking douche bags, don't send out a letter explaining how you goofed, giving away 1 year free credit monitoring, and then in that letter lecture me on how to safeguard my information. Look you Target putzes I'm not the one that had a data breach, I'm not the one who has to make things right, and I'm not the one you should be lecturing. Getting that information from Target makes me want to hunt the CEO and CTO of Target down and breach their data, from behind.
 
2014-01-17 10:43:22 AM  
I got one of those e-mails, and it did indeed raise enough alerts to make me leery.
 
2014-01-17 10:45:50 AM  
I think the irony here is that Target, nominally in an effort to save face (though, more accurately, to save profits), has offered to pay for a year of credit monitoring/identity theft protection. They are doing so through Experian, who, it was revealed only 3 months ago, was selling consumer data to an identity theft service.
 
2014-01-17 10:46:23 AM  
Ah, the wonders of outsourced marketing and IT.
 
2014-01-17 10:49:32 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
doctor[* image 7x13]mokimbo698[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]liamtoh[* image 7x13]com

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim


Perfect! I get one of these at least once a week, They're hilarious!

+1
 
2014-01-17 10:52:12 AM  
An article sourced entirely from tweets. Journalism at its finest.
 
2014-01-17 10:52:39 AM  
I got the "free 1 year monitoring" email, and I'm not signing up for it because it will be a pain in the butt come on that will be hard sell at the end of the year. Also you will have to give the monitoring service all your info so they can monitor you. Had a service a few years ago but I let it expire because it required constant attention as they try daily to sell you more stuff.
 
2014-01-17 10:52:58 AM  

vudukungfu: If you are target and want to continue to do business, consider cash only and no questions asked.



I use barter for all of my major purchase, though the last time I spent a cow, I was was shortchanged a chicken.

/Protip: a dozen eggs and a slab of bacon make a fine tip.
 
2014-01-17 10:56:09 AM  
Target is probably the safest place to use your card now -- I predict they will find that other retailers have been compromised.
 
2014-01-17 10:58:02 AM  
Sending it from a bizarre address like "[nospam-﹫-backwards]oifb*co­m" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.
 
2014-01-17 11:01:48 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Sending it from a bizarre address like "[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]oifb[* image 7x13]com" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.



Ha, the joke's on you, that guy got all sorts of email space as a result.
 
2014-01-17 11:04:54 AM  
Years ago, M&T Bank sent out a promotional email entitled "Keeping Your Personal Information Safe From M&T Bank".

I laughed it off, but apparently they got a flurry of "frightened old lady" calls wondering why they needed to protect themselves from their bank. An apology email went out hours later.

Commas matter.
 
2014-01-17 11:05:26 AM  
I'm still angry they won't honor my preorder I made for a videogame back in November.  At the time, the preorder cost was $30 less ($19.99, compared to the current preorder price of $49.99).  But I had used my credit card in store a few times in December, so I felt it should cancel my card just in case (had 2 family members have similar problems with their credit cards in the past)  Target later cancels my order, because the card has been canceled, and when I try to explain the situation to them, they act like there is nothing they can do.  All I want is to be able to preorder the item again and have them honor the price I was willing to pay for in November.
 
2014-01-17 11:07:06 AM  
I got this email too, when I went to the link it asked for my SSN.  That, with the bfi0 bit in the email address made me overly cautious and I figured I would wait a bit and not suffer 'first responder remorse', that feeling you get when you buy the first generation model of something the day it is released and find out it's a giant POS, reviews be damned.

So now that it's real...  Has anyone used credit monitoring?  What does it entail?  Is there a hard sell attached to this?
 
2014-01-17 11:09:04 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Sending it from a bizarre address like "[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]oifb[* image 7x13]com" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email. Although anybody dumb enough to click on a link sent to them in an email deserves everything they get.

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK," I thought to myself "LULZ, nice try." Pop up the full set of mail headers and look at the raw email. The link points to someplace called account-updates.com. Does not seem legit.

Do a little WHOISing and googling on the senders domain and account-updates.com and find them all associated with a company called Phish Guru that companies can contract with to test their users and see how phishing-aware they are. So three minutes after receiving the email I forward it to our head IT guy and say, "LOL, try harder next time," and ask him if I can get a copy of the eventual report to see how good my colleagues are. I immediately get an "OH shiat, don't tell anyone we're doing this" phone call, because he doesn't want me to spoil the test by blabbing to my colleagues that they're doing it. In the end, it turns out my company is pretty good, fewer than 20% of the people clicked on the email, although one person clicked the link a total of 25 times. Tard.


You survived an encounter with your IT guy?  Clearly his name is not Simon Travaglia.
 
2014-01-17 11:09:13 AM  
Funny part is, for small transactions, I can swipe my Target Credit card, not even show it to the cashier, show no ID and be on my way.  I like that!  Having my personal info stolen, not so much.
 
2014-01-17 11:15:14 AM  
Got the email also - what bugs me is that I have no idea how they got my email address.  I never do the loyalty card thing, have never done any of their gift registries, etc.  I've never gotten an email from them previously.  This is an address that I'm very careful with to keep it as spam-free as possible.  So I'm not sure how they got this address unless they are not only collecting information on their customers, but actively going out and purchasing info on their customers from other sources.

That or my credit card company gave them the address - which seems like a really stupid thing to do.
 
2014-01-17 11:17:58 AM  
Prank Call of Cthulhu:

CSB: Months ago, I got a weird-looking email to my work account that claimed to be from "IT HELP DESK" indicating that I was about to run out of email disk quota and providing a link for me to click on to increase my quota. Given that my company's helpdesk isn't called "IT HELP DESK,"

At my work, the GIS people DO send out bogus emails with names similar to the help desk ones (we have a metric shiaton of email addresses for GIS, depending on what you want to do) from made up email addresses to check out whose dumb enough to click links in an email from people/businesses they don't know.  Now we do deal with some outside vendors and folks depending on our positions, so they slip in some obvious stuff, misspellings, perhaps the improper use of your work email in the letter.  Ours is last­n­a­me­_first­n­am­e­_­midd­leintial[nospam-﹫-backwards]krow­e­we­re­hw­*c­om  like many places, but they'll drop the initial or something.  It's not OTT obvious, but pretty obvious it's something you should question.  They 'caught' for lack of a better word 45 out of 150 people who clicked the link.

And they even have a special email account, posted all over the place, where we can forward suspicious emails and they will check them out and let us know if they're ok or not.  It's not like we have to work at determining that.

*shrug*
 
2014-01-17 11:20:51 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
doctor[* image 7x13]mokimbo698[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]liamtoh[* image 7x13]com

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim



I keep sending the information, but the email keeps bouncing back. I have tried three different credit cards so far. What am I doing wrong?
 
2014-01-17 11:22:00 AM  

Lamberts Ho Man: Got the email also - what bugs me is that I have no idea how they got my email address.


It's Target. They've got a forensics lab that rivals most police departments' and they're so good at data mining they can figure out when your teen daughter gets pregnant. They're like the NSA, only they use their powers to sell you housewares and low-grade electronics.
 
2014-01-17 11:24:28 AM  

Snarfangel: I keep sending the information, but the email keeps bouncing back. I have tried three different credit cards so far. What am I doing wrong?


I'm not sure. I can take a look at it for you. Shoot it to me at Pra­nk­-C­a­l­l-of-Cth­ul­hu[nospam-﹫-backwards]k­r­af­a­rtl­u*co­m and we'll see if we can figure it out.

/C'est ne pas une trap.
 
2014-01-17 11:28:50 AM  
Target customers & card holders = SUCKERS!
 
2014-01-17 11:30:20 AM  

Lamberts Ho Man: Got the email also - what bugs me is that I have no idea how they got my email address.  I never do the loyalty card thing, have never done any of their gift registries, etc.  I've never gotten an email from them previously.  This is an address that I'm very careful with to keep it as spam-free as possible.  So I'm not sure how they got this address unless they are not only collecting information on their customers, but actively going out and purchasing info on their customers from other sources.

That or my credit card company gave them the address - which seems like a really stupid thing to do.


I'm in the same boat.  I've never ordered online from them, just B&M shopping.  How they got my information, if indeed they did, is troublesome.
 
2014-01-17 11:31:02 AM  

Snarfangel: Prank Call of Cthulhu: Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value:

I am DR. MOKIMBO IBRAHIM, wishing to you of the health and happiness. I am writing to you on behalf of the TARGGET CORPORATION, who recently have suffered tragedy of stealing of credit card numbers and thefting of customers information. I am asking for you help in restoring the trust in TARGGET CORPORATION. To regain of the confidence of its customers TARGGET CORPORATION is wanting to send every good customer USD$10,000 as show of good faith. As a renowned good customer yourself, I am prepared to release to you that full sum. In order to transfer to your account can you be please providing to me:

1) Bank name
2) Account number
3) Your full name
4) Mother's name of maiden
5) Date of birthing also and of place
6) Your SSN

Also for verifying you as customer, we need one major credit card number with expiry date and 3-digit verification code.

You can send these to me at
doctor[* image 7x13]mokimbo698[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]liamtoh[* image 7x13]com

Thanking you for your time and compliments of the season to you.

Dr. Mokimbo Ibrahim


I keep sending the information, but the email keeps bouncing back. I have tried three different credit cards so far. What am I doing wrong?


Relate your information to one of our officials at the Central Bank of Nigeria. They will be contacting you soon with the proper way of dispersing your funds.

damontucker.files.wordpress.com
 P.S. Don't  forget to have your bank account number handy when you are contacted.
 
2014-01-17 11:31:23 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Sending it from a bizarre address like "[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]oifb[* image 7x13]com" was a pretty dumb move, but there's nothing particularly scammy about the actual email.


Agreed.  Anyone, such as subby, who thinks this reads "like it was created by scammers" has never actually read an email created by scammers.  No typos, weird English, click-here links, claims of foreign riches, etc.
 
2014-01-17 11:32:13 AM  

DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: Target customers & card holders = SUCKERS!


Let me guess, you only buy cash only from locally run mom and pop apothecaries and craft stores, organic food from the farmer just outside of town, all collected on your bicycle because you're too hipster and superior to everyone to use a common everyday big box store?

That's it, isn't it.  I knew that was it.
 
2014-01-17 11:36:34 AM  
Used my debit card at Walgreens the other day.  I was thinking, I should just go to an ATM
an get some money, this is dumb.

Target was just honest enough to tell us about their problem.  I have no such faith that will
continue.
 
2014-01-17 11:40:27 AM  

RickN99: Agreed.  Anyone, such as subby, who thinks this reads "like it was created by scammers" has never actually read an email created by scammers.  No typos, weird English, click-here links, claims of foreign riches, etc.


Years ago, I'd entertain myself by tormenting these guys by answering them back and leading them on. (In fact, if you search "nigerian scammer" and "lovecraft" you can probably find an archive of a fun conversation I had.) One of the things I tried was to offer my services to them to rewrite their scam letters to fix the grammar and misspellings and make them more believable. I never got anyone to take me up on that offer. This is too bad, because I'd love to be able to put "Nigerian scam letter editor" on my resume.
 
2014-01-17 11:45:01 AM  
I hate that Target calls me a guest
 
2014-01-17 11:47:30 AM  
As some one that shopped at Target during the data breach, I don't fault Target for the data breach.  It could happen to any company that accepts credit and debit cards, but Target sure is handling it poorly especially with initially lying about PIN Data not being stolen.  If I had received that e-mail, I probably would have gone straight to Target's website to see if it was legitimate.  My credit union was proactive and sent me a new card without me even requesting one, and luckily there had been non unauthorized charges to my account.
 
2014-01-17 11:48:43 AM  
www.chrisbeetles.com
 
2014-01-17 11:54:51 AM  

Zeb Hesselgresser: Used my debit card at Walgreens the other day.  I was thinking, I should just go to an ATM
an get some money, this is dumb.

Target was just honest enough to tell us about their problem.  I have no such faith that will
continue.


Once in a while I think of using my debit card for purchases, then something like Target happens and I renew my pledge to use it solely as an ATM card.
 
2014-01-17 12:03:04 PM  
"Satan's Bunny Slippers
DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: Target customers & card holders = SUCKERS!

Let me guess, you only buy cash only from locally run mom and pop apothecaries and craft stores, organic food from the farmer just outside of town, all collected on your bicycle because you're too hipster and superior to everyone to use a common everyday big box store?

That's it, isn't it. I knew that was it"

No, I dumpster dive exclusively, while I'm not shooting hipsters. Thanks for the complement though.
 
2014-01-17 12:15:02 PM  
I just got a fake dunning letter, for an electricity company that doesn't serve my area, that I have never used, in my corporate mailbox, so I'm getting a kick out of these replies. The sender and link were laughably wrong.
 
2014-01-17 12:17:46 PM  

DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: "Satan's Bunny Slippers
DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: Target customers & card holders = SUCKERS!

Let me guess, you only buy cash only from locally run mom and pop apothecaries and craft stores, organic food from the farmer just outside of town, all collected on your bicycle because you're too hipster and superior to everyone to use a common everyday big box store?

That's it, isn't it. I knew that was it"

No, I dumpster dive exclusively, while I'm not shooting hipsters. Thanks for the complement though.


dammit man, that's hardcore!

:)
 
2014-01-17 12:32:56 PM  
I still have no idea why they ask if I want all of my purchase on one card.  Is it really that f'in common or hard to do after the fact that you need to ask every single customer that question?

It reeks of something made up by a exec overlord because his mom had a problem with it somewhere.
 
kth
2014-01-17 12:49:04 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Seems legit:

Dear Customer of Value...



So the first time I saw one of these scams, it was an email that was sent to my office.  Nigerian prince needing to get his deceased parents' money out of the country or some such. Apparently they sent them to all of the people in my office, because at the next meeting of the estate planning/probate department (of which I was an associate), the managing partner brought it up as possible new business. I laughed and laughed.

He also was the one who invariably opened the attachments with the viruses.

He had no excuse, he was born in 1962.

ahh, memories of practicing law.
 
2014-01-17 01:06:28 PM  
Interestingly enough, I got one of these emails as well.  The problem is that I rarely shop at Target (last visit was over a year ago), I always use cash, and I've never done business with them online or given them my email address.
 
2014-01-17 01:15:43 PM  
I like how the email had tips on how I can protect my identity. Hey assholes, I don't need the tips--you do. The only thing I did to risk identity theft was to give my info to you.
 
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