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(Huffington Post)   Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone. Please enter your phone number before reading the article   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 180
    More: Interesting, Radio Shack, Western New York, word processing  
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20856 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2014 at 4:45 AM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-17 02:18:21 PM

VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".


There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.
 
2014-01-17 02:20:15 PM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


I use TuneIn Radio.  I prefer it to IHeartRadio since I can get actual Spanish music (as in from Spain, not Mexican music in Spanish).
 
2014-01-17 02:22:42 PM

Mikey1969: It also doesn't play CDs.


It doesn't record cassette or VCR/Beta either.
 
2014-01-17 02:27:19 PM
My Ma was born in 1945, and while computers were frustrating to her, she could use a cell phone like a pro.  She had me explain what all it could do, then listed the things she needed to use, and I wrote down simple instructions for each of those functions.  She kept those with her and referred to it as needed until she could do them without the cheat sheet.  Her bedroom TV had both a VCR and DVD built-in, and she read the instruction book, and could operate all the modes with ease.  Her philosophy was, "What a wonderful age we live in!"

Her mother went from riding in a horse and wagon when she was a child, to driving her own pick-up truck in her later years.  Then again, that's the Comanche side of my family, and grandma's mother and grandmother weren't too far removed from living in tipis.

So, yeah.  It is a wonderful age we live in, isn't it?  What can we do to make our kid's world wonderful?
 
2014-01-17 02:30:02 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".

There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.


I like the possibilities in something like this:
https://www.escortradar.com/passportmax/
 
2014-01-17 02:30:09 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".

There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.


If your requirement is for a device that immediately detect the presence of radar signals in your area then clearly a cell phone is deficient.  But not everyone has that as a requirement which is why the sale of radar detectors is declining in favour of applications such as Waze.   In some ways, the applications are actually more accurate in that they aren't triggered by false signals.  (I have two points on my drive home where I know the radar detector will be set off but there are no speed traps.)
 
2014-01-17 02:49:32 PM

log_jammin: because they looked like the cameras news crews used. they looked like a "real" camera.


CSB: I was playing a show at an amusement park about 10 years ago and this involved us having to march in from offstage while the show began. Well, after playing this same show with the same intro hundreds of times over the course of one summer you get a bit accustomed to routine, and you try to amuse yourself in any way possible - this usually involved a certain amount of clandestine screwing around that would not detract from the show. Usually this involved throwing things at each other or sticking a nude picture or some other nonsense in someone else's music folder to be found after a quick page turn. At other times, however, the antics became much more overt and obvious to the public attending the shows. On these occasions it became much more difficult to retain our composure and usually about 3 or 4 of us (out of a 10-person band) would be laughing so hard that playing would be briefly impossible.

All of this should be enough background to explain the significance what we saw one day in July of 2002. The show was going on as normal with the usual opening announcement and fanfare and we began to march up to the stage. Normally people kept clear of this spot, as it was a bit of an open area, unencumbered by tables or merchants or anything of the like; making it quite obvious that this area was to be used by the dancers and musicians for part of the show. Anyway, we came upon this area in front of the stage and one attendee decided to remain in this spot close to the performers (remaining within what I would consider the normal personal space you would expect during a close conversation) so as to record the show. This guy was wearing loose tattered jeans, a sweater (in July), had a full beard and a mostly toothless grin, a potbelly, an eyepatch, and he was sporting one of these 80's VHS recording cameras (which was already extremely outdated). I swear to God this guy looked just like a pirate! I didn't see him right away, as my position was on the other side of the front of the stage in this big open area, but I caught a glimpse of him as we were going up the stairs to this main stage to begin the main part of the show. I can't really say why, but at this point in the summer, having played the same show day after day (and dicking around to greater and greater extents), we just all completely lost our shiat and had the most prolonged fit of laughter I have ever experienced. What normally should have been 10 people performing a polka show was reduced to one drummer accompanying the incredulous laughter of 10 voices (including the drummer himself). I have not experienced anything of this magnitude in the years since. Nor can I explain why it happened to begin with. But ever since I saw this one crazy-looking pirate guy I have always had the urge to laugh whenever I saw one of these cameras in a pawn shop or wherever else they can be found.
 
2014-01-17 02:53:23 PM

VladTheEmailer: If you just take the smart phone by itself, it cannot perform all the tasks that indicated by the advertisement.   It requires additional hardware, not least of which is a big-assed cell phone tower in proximity.   The smart phone is not a complete system, whereas a radar detector  is a complete system.


Tell me more about how long that radar detector will work without an entire fossil fuel distribution industry to put gas in the tank to drive your engine to drive your alternator.

Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.
 
2014-01-17 02:54:40 PM

VladTheEmailer: If your requirement is for a device that immediately detect the presence of radar signals in your area then clearly a cell phone is deficient.  But not everyone has that as a requirement which is why the sale of radar detectors is declining in favour of applications such as Waze.   In some ways, the applications are actually more accurate in that they aren't triggered by false signals.  (I have two points on my drive home where I know the radar detector will be set off but there are no speed traps.)


Well, I've been driving the same route back and forth to work for about 12 years now.

After the first year or so, I knew every single place where the police set up their traps.  So in essence, I have an internal map of that information that's useful for me.

Plus, I think the reason radar detector sales are declining isn't so much because of apps like Waze, but more because of things like the use of LIDAR instead of traditional radar units.  By it's very nature, there is very, very little "leakage" from laser units that a detector that isn't in the car being directly measured can detect.

Even detectors that have sensors to pick up LIDAR are unlikely to give you a warning until it's too late.

Unless, of course, you jam the LIDAR, which is legal in all states except Virginia, unlike jamming radar, which is against federal law.

Radar detectors sales peaked in 2000-2001, and have fallen ever since, which is long before mobile apps like Waze became available.
 
2014-01-17 03:02:28 PM

jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.


Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database
 
2014-01-17 03:17:18 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: If your requirement is for a device that immediately detect the presence of radar signals in your area then clearly a cell phone is deficient.  But not everyone has that as a requirement which is why the sale of radar detectors is declining in favour of applications such as Waze.   In some ways, the applications are actually more accurate in that they aren't triggered by false signals.  (I have two points on my drive home where I know the radar detector will be set off but there are no speed traps.)

Well, I've been driving the same route back and forth to work for about 12 years now.

After the first year or so, I knew every single place where the police set up their traps.  So in essence, I have an internal map of that information that's useful for me.

Plus, I think the reason radar detector sales are declining isn't so much because of apps like Waze, but more because of things like the use of LIDAR instead of traditional radar units.  By it's very nature, there is very, very little "leakage" from laser units that a detector that isn't in the car being directly measured can detect.

Even detectors that have sensors to pick up LIDAR are unlikely to give you a warning until it's too late.

Unless, of course, you jam the LIDAR, which is legal in all states except Virginia, unlike jamming radar, which is against federal law.

Radar detectors sales peaked in 2000-2001, and have fallen ever since, which is long before mobile apps like Waze became available.


Accepting that any implication that mobile apps caused the decline sales of radar detectors was incorrect.

The gist is that radar detectors as they existed in 1991 have been or are in the process of being obsoleted by other technology which includes smart phones.   Waze can warn users of speed traps that standalone detectors cannot.   So the fact that smartphone do not have the requisite hardware to detect modern speed traps is irrelevant.  Neither do the detectors from 1991.   Smart phones just use a different method of detection.
 
2014-01-17 03:41:12 PM

dittybopper: SansNeural: ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.

WLS, I'm guessing.

Medium wave AM radio signals (500 kHz - 1800 kHz) can travel long distances at night when the D-layer dissipates and no longer absorbs the skywave signal.  During the day, you just get the groundwave signal, which means less than 100 mile range from even a very powerful AM station.

At night, those signals can reflect off of the F-layer of the ionosphere and travel very long distances.  Theoretically, with a clear frequency, a good receiver and antenna, and the right conditions, you could hear an AM radio station on the other side of the World.


Just a few months ago, I was able to listen to Cardinals baseball on KMOX all the way up into Minnesota. Signal started fading out in Owatonna on I-35. Linear distance was probably about 450-500 miles at that point. So it's possible to pull it in from that far away even with all of the ground clutter today.
 
2014-01-17 03:50:33 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".

There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.


Using that same logic also makes Waze better, as it can predict where the cops will be long before you get close to them. In fact, with constant updating the likelihood is better that you will get an early warning over out of date information.
 
2014-01-17 04:00:19 PM
jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs
 /CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording

Agreed. I suppose the unwashed masses can be satisfied with lossy compressed MP3 sound, but some of us still prefer high fidelity audio.

Remember spending big bucks in college to get the highest S/N and channel separation ratios, and the lowest wow/flutter and harmonic distortion levels? Now people are spending their big bucks on phones with bigger screens and faster CPUs, but with crappy sound reproduction.

I'll take a WAV file over an MP3 any day.
 
2014-01-17 04:07:41 PM
BONUS REPLACEMENT: It's not an item for sale, but at the bottom of the ad, you're instructed to 'check your phone book for the Radio Shack Store nearest you.' Do you even know how to use a phone book?

Why yes, yes I do. You are an idiot.
 
2014-01-17 04:13:11 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: Can someone interpret this for me? I already wasted five minutes and got no where:
"Some people like to spend $3 on a cup of coffee. While that sounds like a gamble I probably wouldn't take, I'll always like to gamble -- especially as little as three bucks -- on what I might be able to dig up on Buffalo and Western New York, our collective past, and what it means for our future. "


The author bought an old newspaper at a car boot sale.
 
2014-01-17 04:46:49 PM

Gordon Bennett: Uchiha_Cycliste: Can someone interpret this for me? I already wasted five minutes and got no where:
"Some people like to spend $3 on a cup of coffee. While that sounds like a gamble I probably wouldn't take, I'll always like to gamble -- especially as little as three bucks -- on what I might be able to dig up on Buffalo and Western New York, our collective past, and what it means for our future. "

The author bought an old newspaper at a car boot sale.


papers from garage sale. I'll be damned. thanks!

\why didn't he just say that?
 
2014-01-17 04:52:00 PM

jaylectricity: If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ


Except for when they block internet stream coverage of local sports, the bastards.

I still have a transistor pocket radio to listen to football/basketball for this reason (pretty much ball games and nothing else).

cameroncrazy1984: Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Because not all stations stream all content over the internet.

dittybopper: Also, if you go ahead and listen, CBs are used.


We have a CB in our car, and it's great.  Definitely the best for hearing road conditions (plus amusing general chit-chat) on highways in the middle of nowhere.

Meanwhile the first boombox I had contained a record player, single cassette deck, and... an all-band radio (listening only, not broadcasting).  I listened to shortwave on it all the time, to hear NHK from California.

Later I got rid of that (wish I still had it) for a boombox with dual cassette, but I had another all-band radio similar to the one in your ad for $199, again to listen to shortwave.

Even now when I go camping, I like to listen to shortwave.  Sit around the fire, have some beer, listen to some craaaaazy conspiracy theorists going on about HAARP/FEMA camps/chemtrails, listen to a little Radio Havana,  and of course again NHK.

Now I get the NHK podcast on my phone and can download TV from... places, though.  And I do love streaming radio apps on my phone.

But I will second you, actual radio is something else and we still need it.
 
2014-01-17 05:14:04 PM

Dimming: holy fark, man.....you really like your scanners.


No, ignorance just bothers me. It is as if you think your phone is made of magic.  Boggles the mind that you can't understand a simple explanation.

I will dumb it down for you some more, because I'm feeling charitable.

 A dog can eat steak that a human cooked, but he can't cook it himself.

The dog being your phone, and the human being the conglomeration that is the internet and other various hardware that actually perform the tasks.

Yes, your dog can shiat out anything it consumes, but what it consumes is rendered largely by other entities.  Without those entities he'd be scavenging, hunting, and starving, since most domesticated dogs are dependant on what human's produce.

ransack.: Your phone is nothing without the internet.


This.  Your phone, much like any PC, can access data on the internet.  That is not the same as having the native ability to function in many of the given ways from the article that are under discussion.

It is a technical issue.

I think people are getting defensive over their magical and powerful phones, feel threatened when they see people explaining things rather simply about how things actually work.
 
2014-01-17 05:31:26 PM

salsashark1: Yawn.

Wake me up when technology can replicate Polaroid ex-girlfriend porn.


http://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.polaroidapps.pogoap p
 
2014-01-17 05:40:50 PM

dittybopper: jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.

Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database


Oh, sure. We had so much more privacy when we broadcast our conversations over the CB.

Or maybe you meant old days, when we could talk in private over the party line -- except for the neighbors listening in. Or when we walked to the corner store and paid our cash to the shopkeeper. Nobody building up profiles of our travel or our purchase habits -- except, again, the shopkeeper, and all the folks hanging out in the store, and anybody they gossiped to.
 
2014-01-17 06:26:35 PM

Ivo Shandor: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

AM radios usually use an antenna like this:
[i.imgur.com image 250x105]
which would take up too much space in a phone. FM operates at a much higher frequency and can use smaller components.


downstairs: Also to continue to be picky... no I don't believe there is or can be a radar detector app.

You can get Twitter updates of speed trap locations which other users have spotted. That might be close enough.


Here is one..

http://www.trapster.com/
 
2014-01-17 06:30:40 PM

mediaseth: jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording

Unless I'm missing the sarcasm, try SACD (Super Audio CD) or even DVD-A (which is not a video DVD) Both formats failed because consumers don't care about quality and they were marketed horribly wrong with a focus on surround sound which has never worked well for music (example: quadraphonic)


Well shiat, you have the word "media" in your name, I HAVE to believe you!
 
2014-01-17 06:32:48 PM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Because I don't have an unlimited data plan and baseball games are only broadcast on AM stations where I am. They are long and there are many of them, but I would love to be able to listen to a game on the train.

dittybopper: Ed Grubermann: Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...

Actually, people in areas where you don't have any cell service (like much of the Adirondacks in New York, for example) use radio services like CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS, and Ham radio to keep in touch while mobile.  Best part is:  They work without any infrastructure, so no matter what happens, as long as the batteries hold out, you can communicate.


Yup. I use my CB at least once per month when I go out off roading with friends. Cell phones don't work at all, so we either use CB (not everyone has one) or portable radios. I haven't bothered with ham yet though, I don't go far enough out in the boonies to justify that (yet.)
 
2014-01-17 10:13:57 PM

jfarkinB: dittybopper: jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.

Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database

Oh, sure. We had so much more privacy when we broadcast our conversations over the CB.

Or maybe you meant old days, when we could talk in private over the party line -- except for the neighbors listening in. Or when we walked to the corner store and paid our cash to the shopkeeper. Nobody building up profiles of our travel or our purchase habits -- except, again, the shopkeeper, and all the folks hanging out in the store, and anybody they gossiped to.


Actually, ironically, CBs (and other radios) are actually more secure than cell phones.

That's because there isn't a massive installed infrastructure the collects the information about your radio communications. Cell phones inherently leave a record of who called who when and for how long and approximately where that phone was.

There is no such infrastructure to monitor CB or other radio services. They are more vulnerable to casual eavesdropping, but you have to be within range (same with DFing).

Plus, if you are just receiving, there is no way anyone eavesdropping on you communications channel can tell where you are. You can't DF a signal that isn't sent. On the other hand, a cell phone periodically transmits to the local cell towers. That's how the system knows where to route your calls, and those records are retained and available to the government.
 
2014-01-17 11:02:01 PM

dittybopper: jfarkinB: dittybopper: jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.

Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database

Oh, sure. We had so much more privacy when we broadcast our conversations over the CB.

Or maybe you meant old days, when we could talk in private over the party line -- except for the neighbors listening in. Or when we walked to the corner store and paid our cash to the shopkeeper. Nobody building up profiles of our travel or our purchase habits -- except, again, the shopkeeper, and all the folks hanging out in the store, and anybody they gossiped to.

Actually, ironically, CBs (and other radios) are actually more secure than cell phones.

That's because there isn't a massive installed infrastructure the collects the information about your radio communications. Cell phones inherently leave a record of who called who when and for how long and approximately where that phone was.

There is no such infrastructure to monitor CB or other radio services. They are more vulnerable to casual eavesdropping, but you have to be within range (same with DFing).

Plus, if you are just receiving, there is no way anyone eavesdropping on you communications channel can tell where you are. You can't DF a signal that isn't sent. On the other hand, a cell phone periodically transmits to the local cell towers. That's how the system knows where to route your calls, and those records are retained and available to the government.


This.

The content is not safe from other ears, but your Identity is more safe than anything average people could ever do on the internet.  Factor in the tendency for a CB user to be mobile and use it on the road, if you are doing something illegal, people in that area have to be monitoring at the time, and care enough to try and find out who you are.  The range on them is just small enough so that you're long gone by the time anyone can do anything about it.  Perfect for carrying on a conversation with, say, a trucker going in the same direction as you.

You'd have to be caught red handed, documented(ie video) or witnessed in person as saying X, to have anything at all stick.
 
2014-01-18 10:05:36 AM

omeganuepsilon: This.

The content is not safe from other ears, but your Identity is more safe than anything average people could ever do on the internet.  Factor in the tendency for a CB user to be mobile and use it on the road, if you are doing something illegal, people in that area have to be monitoring at the time, and care enough to try and find out who you are.  The range on them is just small enough so that you're long gone by the time anyone can do anything about it.  Perfect for carrying on a conversation with, say, a trucker going in the same direction as you.

You'd have to be caught red handed, documented(ie video) or witnessed in person as saying X, to have anything at all stick.


Well, with the proper equipment set up in range, and perhaps a mobile "sniffing" unit, I could still find you relatively easily.

The thing about it is that the infrastructure needed to do that just isn't there, nor will it probably ever be.

Also, I believe CB's will be immune to interception by drones:  The specifications put forth by the DHS for domestic drones include the ability to monitor and determine the bearing of signals between 30 MHz and 3 GHz (3,000 MHz).

CBs transmit and receive on 26 to 27 MHz, outside that range.  Also, ham radio HF transceivers also send and receive outside that range.  An "opened up" HF transceiver can transmit anywhere between 1.8 MHz to 30 MHz.

Also, you can use NVIS techniques in the lower-HF region to communicate out to 300 miles or so reliably, and because of the nature of NVIS signals, they are hard to DF if you are more than a few dozen miles from the transmitter.
 
2014-01-18 10:26:23 AM

dittybopper: omeganuepsilon: This.

The content is not safe from other ears, but your Identity is more safe than anything average people could ever do on the internet.  Factor in the tendency for a CB user to be mobile and use it on the road, if you are doing something illegal, people in that area have to be monitoring at the time, and care enough to try and find out who you are.  The range on them is just small enough so that you're long gone by the time anyone can do anything about it.  Perfect for carrying on a conversation with, say, a trucker going in the same direction as you.

You'd have to be caught red handed, documented(ie video) or witnessed in person as saying X, to have anything at all stick.

Well, with the proper equipment set up in range, and perhaps a mobile "sniffing" unit, I could still find you relatively easily.

The thing about it is that the infrastructure needed to do that just isn't there, nor will it probably ever be.

Also, I believe CB's will be immune to interception by drones:  The specifications put forth by the DHS for domestic drones include the ability to monitor and determine the bearing of signals between 30 MHz and 3 GHz (3,000 MHz).

CBs transmit and receive on 26 to 27 MHz, outside that range.  Also, ham radio HF transceivers also send and receive outside that range.  An "opened up" HF transceiver can transmit anywhere between 1.8 MHz to 30 MHz.

Also, you can use NVIS techniques in the lower-HF region to communicate out to 300 miles or so reliably, and because of the nature of NVIS signals, they are hard to DF if you are more than a few dozen miles from the transmitter.


I'll take your word for it, heh.  I just have a basic understanding of the concepts involved and sort of like science.(that some don't even have that is what disturbs me as I mentioned above).

You are right though, the structure for tracking radio communications just won't exist.  You'd need a fairly dense array of towers, much more dense than cell towers.  Maybe some local authorities could pull it off over a small region, but something on the level of tracking internet activity no matter where you're at?  No.

Just being mobile is the real key.  You can use a cheap laptop accessing varying publicly available wi-fi access points and be almost as untrackable, but you'd have to spend less time in a given area than even a radio user.  And at that, you're relying on the existance of those points.  Radio users are not hindered in such a way.

That is why CB's and such are so handy. They need nothing other than someone else listening.  They need no outside structure to function.

Interestingly, that's what pisses me off about "cloud" computing coming to be understood as something done on another computer elsewhere.  Remote usage, not a cloud at all.

/haven't used a CB in forever
//had some fun with an old base station a long time ago when a lot of people still had them in their daily drivers
///met some interesting people, heard even more interesting conversations from people I'd never want to meet

Some of the one sided one's were the best, some clearly unhinged person just telling a long and pointless story, much like Big Trouble in Little China's Kurt Russel.
 
2014-01-18 04:03:05 PM

Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.


It has a pretty good calculator, I hear.
 
2014-01-18 04:40:32 PM

untaken_name: Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.

It has a pretty good calculator, I hear.


I've got a slide rule that has more functions on it.
 
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