If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Huffington Post)   Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone. Please enter your phone number before reading the article   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 180
    More: Interesting, Radio Shack, Western New York, word processing  
•       •       •

20846 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2014 at 4:45 AM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



180 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-16 11:54:47 PM
Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.
 
2014-01-16 11:58:25 PM
Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11
 
2014-01-16 11:59:57 PM
867-5309
 
2014-01-17 12:01:37 AM
13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ
 
2014-01-17 12:04:29 AM
Technology has advanced so fast since those days, sometimes too fast.
 
2014-01-17 12:05:28 AM

markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11


The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.
 
2014-01-17 12:05:42 AM
The 3-way speakers with sub-woofers?
 
2014-01-17 12:07:15 AM
My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording
 
2014-01-17 12:07:38 AM

jaylectricity: The 3-way speakers with sub-woofers?


dottedmusic.com
 
2014-01-17 12:12:36 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


I have an app that allows me to stream WGR 550-AM in Buffalo directly to my phone. Plus I Heart Radio and other apps exist for this purpose.
 
2014-01-17 12:16:11 AM

markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11


The radar detector requires an accessory.
 
2014-01-17 12:17:15 AM

jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ


Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.
 
2014-01-17 12:17:59 AM

downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.


Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.
 
2014-01-17 12:19:21 AM

downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.


Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal
 
2014-01-17 12:21:16 AM
Also to continue to be picky... no I don't believe there is or can be a radar detector app.
 
2014-01-17 12:22:48 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


I'm just being picky relative to what the article is saying.
 
2014-01-17 12:25:46 AM

jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording


Meh, 8-tracks are where it's at.

/you really want a beating from the vinylphiles, don't you?
 
2014-01-17 12:42:48 AM
Not on MY phone. But I did learn how to text. You can talk to people, live, and not have to actually speak to them. It's crazy.
 
2014-01-17 12:49:07 AM

downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.


Nothing weird about it. Your PC/Phone puts out too much EMF in the AM frequency for good reception.
 
2014-01-17 01:14:37 AM
Yeah, try typing 80 words per minute on that cell phone.
 
2014-01-17 01:41:39 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


AM radios usually use an antenna like this:
i.imgur.com
which would take up too much space in a phone. FM operates at a much higher frequency and can use smaller components.


downstairs: Also to continue to be picky... no I don't believe there is or can be a radar detector app.


You can get Twitter updates of speed trap locations which other users have spotted. That might be close enough.
 
2014-01-17 02:02:04 AM
if a guy born in 1 C.E time traveled to 1000 C.E. an walked inside the average home, he would be familiar with his surroundings. I can't imagine anything that would look out of place to him. for most of history this is true I think. some luxury items might become more common as time went on(like say, glass instead of wooden mugs),  and fashions changed over time, but the average house and the items in it would appear normal to the average person, for the most part anyway.

But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.
 
2014-01-17 02:45:49 AM

log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014.


Nah.  Expectations of this kind of tech was everywhere.   Hell, there's a fark cliche about flying cars that exploits that.  None of the things that you mentioned would be out of the question in the 40s with the exception of computers.  They had analogs to cell phones (DIck Tracy's video watch), electric cars (which really aren't at all futuristic), flat screens (all screens were flat in 1940, they were projections, so it wouldn't seem at all odd), solar panels mimic plants, video games are computers so they fall into my caveat above, microwave ovens would be seen just as an advance on the current ovens of the day, florescent lights were being sold in the last 30s, etc.

The access to information is what would gall someone from 1940.  I see this all the time when I have my in-laws (in their 80s) over to my house for movie night.  After the movie (which is often from the 40s or 50s) we chat about the actors, directors and such.  If they recall a specific scene, song, or moment in another film I can usually find it within a couple of minutes and send it to my television.

Also they'd probably shiat themselves more at the idea of a black woman and a white woman getting married and opening a pot farm in Colorado.

And, depending upon where your theoretical 1st century dude lived, he might consider his 10th century accommodations a huge step back and wonder where all his public works went.
 
2014-01-17 03:07:15 AM

dameron: Nah.  Expectations of this kind of tech was everywhere.   Hell, there's a fark cliche about flying cars that exploits that.  None of the things that you mentioned would be out of the question in the 40s with the exception of computers.  They had analogs to cell phones (DIck Tracy's video watch), electric cars (which really aren't at all futuristic), flat screens (all screens were flat in 1940, they were projections, so it wouldn't seem at all odd), solar panels mimic plants, video games are computers so they fall into my caveat above, microwave ovens would be seen just as an advance on the current ovens of the day, florescent lights were being sold in the last 30s, etc.


I'm not saying it would be magic to them or they wouldn't be able to relate to any of it. I'm saying it would be different. I'm saying an old mans house in 1940 isn't going to be much different than the house he grew up in 60 years earlier. but his grandson born in 1940 is going to live in a very different house in 2014. progress is accelerating.

dameron: The access to information is what would gall someone from 1940.  I see this all the time when I have my in-laws (in their 80s) over to my house for movie night.  After the movie (which is often from the 40s or 50s) we chat about the actors, directors and such.  If they recall a specific scene, song, or moment in another film I can usually find it within a couple of minutes and send it to my television.


when I'd go to the local VFW for a beer, I'd list to my dad and some other guy trying to remember the name of a movie, or an actor on tv. they'd argue back and forth for a bit, until I got bored with it. then I'd get my phone out and look it up on the internet, and blurt out the answer. I don't know why that amused me as much as it did.

on the same lines as that...when I was a kid I'd wonder about something. then try to remember to look it up the next time I was at the library. then hope the books I got actually told me what I was trying to find out, otherwise rinse and repeat. today I can find out what I want to know in seconds and I love it. but I'm still uncomfortable telling my son "google it" for some reason.
 
2014-01-17 04:13:36 AM
You can probably stream am radio.

Also I always thought vhs camcorders were the shiat. Something about them was insanely awesome.
 
2014-01-17 04:17:03 AM

hervatski: You can probably stream am radio.

Also I always thought vhs camcorders were the shiat. Something about them was insanely awesome.


because they looked like the cameras news crews used. they looked like a "real" camera.
 
2014-01-17 04:27:23 AM

log_jammin: hervatski: You can probably stream am radio.

Also I always thought vhs camcorders were the shiat. Something about them was insanely awesome.

because they looked like the cameras news crews used. they looked like a "real" camera.


YES. also you can go straight from the camcorder into the VCR without having to do anything else.
 
2014-01-17 04:54:25 AM
Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.
 
2014-01-17 04:59:04 AM

dameron: log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014.

Nah.  Expectations of this kind of tech was everywhere.   Hell, there's a fark cliche about flying cars that exploits that.  None of the things that you mentioned would be out of the question in the 40s with the exception of computers.  They had analogs to cell phones (DIck Tracy's video watch), electric cars (which really aren't at all futuristic), flat screens (all screens were flat in 1940, they were projections, so it wouldn't seem at all odd), solar panels mimic plants, video games are computers so they fall into my caveat above, microwave ovens would be seen just as an advance on the current ovens of the day, florescent lights were being sold in the last 30s, etc.

The access to information is what would gall someone from 1940.  I see this all the time when I have my in-laws (in their 80s) over to my house for movie night.  After the movie (which is often from the 40s or 50s) we chat about the actors, directors and such.  If they recall a specific scene, song, or moment in another film I can usually find it within a couple of minutes and send it to my television.

Also they'd probably shiat themselves more at the idea of a black woman and a white woman getting married and opening a pot farm in Colorado.

And, depending upon where your theoretical 1st century dude lived, he might consider his 10th century accommodations a huge step back and wonder where all his public works went.


And wonder he would, since he would be unable to understand a word that anybody was saying.
A man from 1940, today, would have the benefit of speaking the language.
 
2014-01-17 04:59:15 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?
 
2014-01-17 05:05:52 AM

jso2897: A man from 1940, today, would have the benefit of speaking the language.


fo shizzle
 
2014-01-17 05:07:33 AM

markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11


Also

Speakers with 15" subs?

CD and cassette players?

Dedicated alarm clock that you can leave in a place 24/7, don't have to wake up or unlock?  With a spare/old phone maybe.

I think subby is bad and should feel bad.
 
2014-01-17 05:09:19 AM
/regular woofer, my bad
 
2014-01-17 05:09:59 AM
But the experiences are irreplaceable....

mcgarnagle.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-01-17 05:10:38 AM

ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?


AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.
 
2014-01-17 05:11:27 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


I heart radio.
 
2014-01-17 05:15:59 AM
Yawn.

Wake me up when technology can replicate Polaroid ex-girlfriend porn.
 
2014-01-17 05:22:47 AM

TuteTibiImperes: markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11

The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.


And I am so glad I don't have to hear that shiat anymore -- *chirp* *loud conversation* -- repeat
 
2014-01-17 05:30:36 AM

jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording


It's warmer.
 
2014-01-17 05:35:56 AM

log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.


My dad is born in 1940. If it's technological, he will only learn which buttons in what order he has to press to get what he wants. If he managed to press the wrong button or the right buttons in the wrong order, he will resort to press every button on the remote until it works. And then I have to sort it out. He's had a stroke 16 years ago so motor coordination in his hands is bad. When I tell him to make a quick tap on a button, he will mash it. He hates computers with a gusto and everything with a menu. Unfortunately manufacturers put processors into everything they make now.
 
2014-01-17 05:38:40 AM
FTA- "when is the last time you heard the term "fuzzbuster" anyway?"

Last time I told her to shave.

/Happy Friday everyone!
 
SH
2014-01-17 05:43:48 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


iheartradio.com has some of the local AM stations where I live. It's not "directly" as you put it, but who cares?

I refuse to use it because it's owned by Clear Channel.
 
2014-01-17 05:45:10 AM

hervatski: YES. also you can go straight from the camcorder into the VCR without having to do anything else.


www.shockmansion.com
 
2014-01-17 05:46:29 AM
Wow.so many lawns to get off of in this thread.
 
2014-01-17 05:53:34 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


I get AM on my FM radio...http://www.abc.net.au/am/
 
2014-01-17 05:56:44 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


If you don't have an unlimited data plan, or you just don't want to use mobile data to stream, or you have a slower broadband connection and you don't want to deal with the signal drop out when you or someone else is downloading something. My first Android phone had an FM Tuner, which I miss sometimes; I know AM would be impractical in a smartphone.
 
2014-01-17 05:59:21 AM

smask: My dad is born in 1940. If it's technological, he will only learn which buttons in what order he has to press to get what he wants. If he managed to press the wrong button or the right buttons in the wrong order, he will resort to press every button on the remote until it works. And then I have to sort it out. He's had a stroke 16 years ago so motor coordination in his hands is bad. When I tell him to make a quick tap on a button, he will mash it. He hates computers with a gusto and everything with a menu. Unfortunately manufacturers put processors into everything they make now.


my dad was born in 47. he despises computers, and after using his dvd player for the first time(and the only time he's used it) he asked if he needed to rewind the dvd. his clamshell cell phone he uses for emergencies only.

but my grandparents born in the late 20s/early 30s had a computer since the 80s.
 
2014-01-17 06:08:37 AM
I had a pair of those Mach Two speakers. Damned good sound for a $300.00 pair of speakers. Sadly, I don't have room in my house for them, nor do I have anything to plug them into.

/"subwoofers"
//Idiot
 
2014-01-17 06:17:41 AM

smask: log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.

My dad is born in 1940. If it's technological, he will only learn which buttons in what order he has to press to get what he wants. If he managed to press the wrong button or the right buttons in the wrong order, he will resort to press every button on the remote until it works. And then I have to sort it out. He's had a stroke 16 years ago so motor coordination in his hands is bad. When I tell him to make a quick tap on a button, he will mash it. He hates computers with a gusto and everything with a menu. Unfortunately manufacturers put processors into everything they make now.


Reminds me of my days working for a certain office supply store in the late 90s, and having octogenarians come in to buy an adding machine.  They'd try one out, pressing the buttons firmly but slowly, and soon some number would come up twice because he held it down too long.  'Why did it do that?  This is no good to me.  Show me a different one.'  Uh, they all do that when you hold the button down.
 
2014-01-17 06:25:10 AM
Waze is a pretty decent app that comes close to radar capability- at least in major populated areas. It tips me off to police activity, stalled vehicles, and red light cameras.
 
2014-01-17 06:27:06 AM

log_jammin: if a guy born in 1 C.E time traveled to 1000 C.E. an walked inside the average home, he would be familiar with his surroundings. I can't imagine anything that would look out of place to him. for most of history this is true I think. some luxury items might become more common as time went on(like say, glass instead of wooden mugs),  and fashions changed over time, but the average house and the items in it would appear normal to the average person, for the most part anyway.

But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.


Not  just them, but someone like me who was born in '58.  All the things that have developed in my lifetime from going to the moon to cell phones to the internet.  It would be overwhelming if I went from a child of the early 60's and got slammed in the face of what is there now.  You'll see young man, you'll see some day!
 
2014-01-17 06:30:38 AM

Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.


Really?

All weather personal stereo, $11.88. I now use my iPhone with an Otter Box.

Sure, I have to use external speakers or headphones, but my iPhone does music (and video) very well.

AM/FM clock radio, $13.88. iPhone.

No radio, but streaming works well. I don't use my phone as an alarm clock because I have a bad habit of breaking alarm clocks.

In-Ear Stereo Phones, $7.88. Came with iPhone.

I'll give you this one. Apple's ear buds are garbage.

Microthin calculator, $4.88. Swipe up on iPhone.

Yeah, there's no app for that, is there?

Tandy 1000 TL/3, $1599. I actually owned a Tandy 1000, and I used it for games and word processing. I now do most of both of those things on my phone.

I play a lot of games on my iPhone, games that old Tandy 1000 couldn't play if God Himself ordered it to. As for typibg, well I can't type fast on my iPhone, but my younger co-workers are faster than hell on their iPhones, Androids and Windows phones.

VHS Camcorder, $799. iPhone.

Yeah, too bad the iPhone's camera can't quite match the glory of 320x240 interlaced video. Damned 5MP camera. Complete waste of money.

Mobile Cellular Telephone, $199. Obvs.

Do I even need to say anything?

Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...

20-Memory Speed-Dial phone, $29.95.

Again, do I need to comment?

Deluxe Portable CD Player, $159.95. 80 minutes of music, or 80 hours of music? iPhone.

See first point.

10-Channel Desktop Scanner, $99.55. I still have a scanner, but I have a scanner app, too. iPhone.

See CB comment above.

Easiest-to-Use Phone Answerer, $49.95. iPhone voicemail.

No comment needed, again.

Handheld Cassette Tape Recorder, $29.95. I use the Voice Memo app almost daily.

And again...

So, you were saying?
 
2014-01-17 06:42:22 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


But it doesn't have that "warm" sound like an actual AM broadcast therefore AM is much superior than digital :-P

I've had a couple of phones with FM radio receivers in, never really used the feature.
 
2014-01-17 06:42:26 AM

log_jammin: if a guy born in 1 C.E time traveled to 1000 C.E. an walked inside the average home, he would be familiar with his surroundings. I can't imagine anything that would look out of place to him. for most of history this is true I think. some luxury items might become more common as time went on(like say, glass instead of wooden mugs),  and fashions changed over time, but the average house and the items in it would appear normal to the average person, for the most part anyway.

But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.


from Bill Bryson's 'A Walk In The Woods':
'I remember reading once how some Stone Age Indians from the Brazilian rain forest with no knowledge or expectation of a world beyond the jungle were taken to S~ao Paulo or Rio, and when they saw what it contained-the buildings, the cars, the passing airplanes-and how thoroughly at variance it was with their own simple lives, they wet themselves, lavishly and in unison.  '
 
2014-01-17 06:44:57 AM

Ed Grubermann: Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.

Really?

All weather personal stereo, $11.88. I now use my iPhone with an Otter Box.

Sure, I have to use external speakers or headphones, but my iPhone does music (and video) very well.

AM/FM clock radio, $13.88. iPhone.

No radio, but streaming works well. I don't use my phone as an alarm clock because I have a bad habit of breaking alarm clocks.

In-Ear Stereo Phones, $7.88. Came with iPhone.

I'll give you this one. Apple's ear buds are garbage.

Microthin calculator, $4.88. Swipe up on iPhone.

Yeah, there's no app for that, is there?

Tandy 1000 TL/3, $1599. I actually owned a Tandy 1000, and I used it for games and word processing. I now do most of both of those things on my phone.

I play a lot of games on my iPhone, games that old Tandy 1000 couldn't play if God Himself ordered it to. As for typibg, well I can't type fast on my iPhone, but my younger co-workers are faster than hell on their iPhones, Androids and Windows phones.

VHS Camcorder, $799. iPhone.

Yeah, too bad the iPhone's camera can't quite match the glory of 320x240 interlaced video. Damned 5MP camera. Complete waste of money.

Mobile Cellular Telephone, $199. Obvs.

Do I even need to say anything?

Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...

20-Memory Speed-Dial phone, $29.95.

Again, do I need to comment?

Deluxe Portable CD Player, $159.95. 80 minutes of music, or 80 hours of music? iPhone.

See first point.

10-Channel Desktop Scanner, $99.55. I still have a scanner, but I have a scanner app, too. iPhone.

See CB comment above.

Easiest-to-Use Phone Answerer, $49.95. iPhone voicemail.

No comment needed, again.

Handheld Cassette Tape Recorder, $29.95. I use the Voice Memo app almost daily.

And again...

So, you were saying?

 
2014-01-17 06:47:30 AM

Ed Grubermann: Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.

Really?

All weather personal stereo, $11.88. I now use my iPhone with an Otter Box.

Sure, I have to use external speakers or headphones, but my iPhone does music (and video) very well.

AM/FM clock radio, $13.88. iPhone.

No radio, but streaming works well. I don't use my phone as an alarm clock because I have a bad habit of breaking alarm clocks.

In-Ear Stereo Phones, $7.88. Came with iPhone.

I'll give you this one. Apple's ear buds are garbage.

Microthin calculator, $4.88. Swipe up on iPhone.

Yeah, there's no app for that, is there?

Tandy 1000 TL/3, $1599. I actually owned a Tandy 1000, and I used it for games and word processing. I now do most of both of those things on my phone.

I play a lot of games on my iPhone, games that old Tandy 1000 couldn't play if God Himself ordered it to. As for typibg, well I can't type fast on my iPhone, but my younger co-workers are faster than hell on their iPhones, Androids and Windows phones.

VHS Camcorder, $799. iPhone.

Yeah, too bad the iPhone's camera can't quite match the glory of 320x240 interlaced video. Damned 5MP camera. Complete waste of money.

Mobile Cellular Telephone, $199. Obvs.

Do I even need to say anything?

Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...

20-Memory Speed-Dial phone, $29.95.

Again, do I need to comment?

Deluxe Portable CD Player, $159.95. 80 minutes of music, or 80 hours of music? iPhone.

See first point.

10-Channel Desktop Scanner, $99.55. I still have a scanner, but I have a scanner app, too. iPhone.

See CB comment above.

Easiest-to-Use Phone Answerer, $49.95. iPhone voicemail.

No comment needed, again.

Handheld Cassette Tape Recorder, $29.95. I use the Voice Memo app almost daily.

And again...

So, you were saying?


Ooops. Borrowed computer.
Seriously, great post. If you weren't already TF, I would have bought you a month.
 
2014-01-17 06:48:44 AM

downstairs: no I don't believe there is or can be a radar detector app.


Nope - but I use Waze, which (thanks to "the crowd") generally warns me when there is a police presence up ahead.  And construction, and accidents - better than a radar detector.
 
2014-01-17 06:48:52 AM

markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11


Use Waze, people report radar traps all the time.
 
2014-01-17 06:49:08 AM

Ed Grubermann: But who uses CBs anymore?


Same people that did before.  Truckers and people who want to listen to regional relevant news about the roads / road conditions / accidents / traffic etc.

True, the 'internet" provides some vague reports, but nothing like the detail you can get from listening to an eye witness who just drove by or is currently stuck there.

Similar for scanners.  Sure, many of them are now streamed, but hardly all of them.  And at that, there's delay and bandwidth issues. (unless the phone actually performs as a scanner, I wouldn't know)

Also, an Iphone playing music is not the same as an actual CD player, some people still have CD's and it will not play them natively.

The claim was that the smart phone would actually do all of these things, not perform some vaguely similar substitute.
 
2014-01-17 06:50:17 AM
"electronic gimzo type items" - apparently the spell-checker app was stretching the budget...

9 mentions of iPhone in place of smartphone says this is typical iTard filler...
 
2014-01-17 06:54:49 AM
That's "everything" in the "most things" sense of the word since there are things in the ad that a phone clearly cannot do.
 
2014-01-17 07:01:35 AM

markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11


Look up escort live radar in the app store.  it works.
 
2014-01-17 07:01:48 AM
Mobile Cellular Telephone, $199. Obvs.

Say Obvs, one more time.

/I won't be bargained with. I won't be reasoned with. I won't feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And i absolutely will not stop, ever, until you are dead.
 
2014-01-17 07:03:45 AM
To me the real surprise is that they were still selling (new!) 10mhz 286 desktops 2 years after the introduction of the 50mhz 486.
 
2014-01-17 07:05:01 AM
And there are apps for CB radio too, I have not tried them, but they are out there.

/ Obvs
 
2014-01-17 07:08:10 AM

Deathlok: To me the real surprise is that they were still selling (new!) 10mhz 286 desktops 2 years after the introduction of the 50mhz 486.


(looks closer)  I think that was a couple months after I got my first DOS machine, a 9.54 Mhz 8088 with amber monochrome CRT for about $999.
 
2014-01-17 07:10:13 AM
Yeah Im pretty sure the smart phone doesnt have a CB radio app, and well a phone doesnt really let you hear about traffic and wrecks and cops ahead from the oncoming traffic.

There are some apps that do gps traffic flow stuff like waze but using that and the cb in the truck at work the cb is quicker and more reliable about it there are only enough users of those apps to keep it on par with a cb at rush hour on the interstate, cb works on pretty much any highway big enough to have truck traffic at pretty much any time of the day or night.
 
2014-01-17 07:10:26 AM

I sound fat: And there are apps for CB radio too, I have not tried them, but they are out there.

/ Obvs


I have a police scanner app, though I've not used it much.
 
2014-01-17 07:14:45 AM
Found an old coffee table book for day in the life of a Californian from 1987. Other than fashion I really did not see much of a difference on daily life and now except that kids are not as outgoing and the electronic technology is different. One picture was of a business meeting and the table was clean. The attendees did not paper coffee cups, water bottles, laptops, only some prepared paperwork and Secretary taking notes on pad of paper.
 
2014-01-17 07:17:33 AM

Ed Grubermann: Really?


Your fallacy is comparing those technologies with the way they were 20 years ago ie: in the article. I wasn't.

I re-iterate: Your iphone can do a lot of things but it does none of them well. But that's okay, because convenience takes precedence over quality.
 
2014-01-17 07:20:22 AM
+1 for Waze
if more people used it it would be an ever better app.
 
2014-01-17 07:23:38 AM

micah1701: +1 for Waze
if more people used it it would be an ever better app.


If it didn't crash constantly on my HTC One, I would use it more.
 
2014-01-17 07:33:51 AM

Ed Grubermann: Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...


Actually, people in areas where you don't have any cell service (like much of the Adirondacks in New York, for example) use radio services like CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS, and Ham radio to keep in touch while mobile.  Best part is:  They work without any infrastructure, so no matter what happens, as long as the batteries hold out, you can communicate.

Also, if you go ahead and listen, CBs are used.  I used to keep one or two around as "just in case" radios, because not everyone has a ham radio license, but I've replaced them with FRS/GMRS radios, which are much more common anyway, and you don't have to listen to idiots with annoying reverb on their signal yelling obscenities.

/What is the point of an echobox anyway?
 
2014-01-17 07:36:12 AM
There is one major advantage to having 16 different gadgets to perform 16 different functions, as opposed to a single gadget to perform them all:

If the one gadget breaks, you can't do anything.  You have 0% functionality.   If one of the 16 gadgets break, however, you still have 94% functionality.

/Eggs.  Basket.
 
2014-01-17 07:38:51 AM

downstairs: Also to continue to be picky... no I don't believe there is or can be a radar detector app.


Plenty of apps warn you if a cop is ahead. Waze is one. Close enough.
 
2014-01-17 07:39:31 AM

fusillade762: jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording

Meh, 8-tracks are where it's at.

/you really want a beating from the vinylphiles, don't you?


People who like vinyl are idiots.
 
2014-01-17 07:41:50 AM
619-239-KING
 
2014-01-17 07:45:50 AM

ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.


WLS, I'm guessing.
 
2014-01-17 07:51:36 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Sometimes, I don't have a cell signal or internet service. You can almost always pick up an AM station
 
2014-01-17 07:56:22 AM

SlothB77: downstairs: Also to continue to be picky... no I don't believe there is or can be a radar detector app.

Plenty of apps warn you if a cop is ahead. Waze is one. Close enough.


Not really.

Those aren't updated in real time.  In other words, we don't have 100% instant tracking information on police cars, so we can't tell where they are, so any reported information is likely old by the time you get it, and you might be the first to get nailed anyway.

There is a way to get that information in pretty much real time, however.  Almost all police cars are now equipped with mobile data terminals that also report their position back to HQ on a regular basis.  This allows for better dispatching.  You could either break the encryption they use and report their positions on the web.

Failing that ability (because hey, you're not the NSA), you could set up a number of relatively simple automated radio direction finding stations that listen on that one frequency, or set of frequencies, and have them report back to a server with their own GPS position, a time-stamp, and bearing for each signal.  Server would take all the reports and combine them into position reports, and report those on the web.  You'd get a pretty good indication of where all the police are in pretty much real time.  The automated DF stations would be pretty cheap to make, maybe $300-$500 a piece, and the server could be some crappy old computer, because the math for calculating positions isn't particularly hard.
 
2014-01-17 08:01:00 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


Indirectly, however. I listen to WPPA AM 1360 from Pottsville, PA every day on my smart phone - in New Hampshire...bluetoothed into my car radio.
 
2014-01-17 08:01:44 AM

SansNeural: ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.

WLS, I'm guessing.


Medium wave AM radio signals (500 kHz - 1800 kHz) can travel long distances at night when the D-layer dissipates and no longer absorbs the skywave signal.  During the day, you just get the groundwave signal, which means less than 100 mile range from even a very powerful AM station.

At night, those signals can reflect off of the F-layer of the ionosphere and travel very long distances.  Theoretically, with a clear frequency, a good receiver and antenna, and the right conditions, you could hear an AM radio station on the other side of the World.
 
2014-01-17 08:01:50 AM
My phone can be a cb?
 
2014-01-17 08:02:05 AM

log_jammin: if a guy born in 1 C.E time traveled to 1000 C.E. an walked inside the average home, he would be familiar with his surroundings. I can't imagine anything that would look out of place to him. for most of history this is true I think. some luxury items might become more common as time went on(like say, glass instead of wooden mugs),  and fashions changed over time, but the average house and the items in it would appear normal to the average person, for the most part anyway.

But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.


Maybe a guy from 1840. 1940 might not have had much of that in a commercial form, but it was at least believable.
 
2014-01-17 08:10:57 AM
meh, I like old tech
someone around me will always have the latest and greatest NEW AND IMPROVED phone/computer thingie
I see them all the time
waiting in line for a fix at the apple or att&t store
 
2014-01-17 08:15:12 AM

natas6.0: meh, I like old tech
someone around me will always have the latest and greatest NEW AND IMPROVED phone/computer thingie
I see them all the time
waiting in line for a fix at the apple or att&t store


Reminds me of:

I'm drunk. 
And right now I'm so in love with you. 
And I don't want to think too much about what we should or shouldn't do. 
Lay my hands on Heaven and the sun and the moon and the stars. 
While the devil wants to fark me in the back of his car.
[Chorus:]
Nothing quite like the feel of something new. 
Maybe I'm all messed up. 
Maybe I'm all messed up. 
Maybe I'm all messed up in you. 
Maybe I'm all messed up. 
Maybe I'm all messed up. 
Maybe I'm all messed up. 
Maybe I'm all messed up in you. 
Maybe I'm all messed up. 
This is the only time I really feel alive. 
This is the only time I really feel alive. 
I swear.
I just found everything I need. 
The sweat in your eyes the blood in your veins are listening to me. 
Well I want to wrap it up and swim in it until I drown. 
My moral standing is lying down.
 
2014-01-17 08:17:59 AM
I worked at a radio shack in '95 or '96 and one day the store manager had me clean the back room. There were some boxes in a storage area/wall above the bathroom and in the bottom of the boxes there were a bunch of catalogs from the 70's and 80's... It was amazing to see how the technology changed from year to year and how expensive some things were when they first came out... They have all the catalogs online now... It's fun to page through a random year from time to time...

http://www.radioshackcatalogs.com/
 
2014-01-17 08:22:48 AM
Close, but no cigar. At best, 10/15.

Smart phone can NOT function as an AM radio. Streaming over the internet is NOT AM radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner.

Smart phone can NOT function as a CB radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a radar detector.

Smart phone can NOT function as a regular pair of decent speakers.
 
2014-01-17 08:29:58 AM

kim jong-un: log_jammin: if a guy born in 1 C.E time traveled to 1000 C.E. an walked inside the average home, he would be familiar with his surroundings. I can't imagine anything that would look out of place to him. for most of history this is true I think. some luxury items might become more common as time went on(like say, glass instead of wooden mugs),  and fashions changed over time, but the average house and the items in it would appear normal to the average person, for the most part anyway.

But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.

Maybe a guy from 1840. 1940 might not have had much of that in a commercial form, but it was at least believable.


I'm not saying it would be inbelievable. I'm just saying before pretty recently the pace at which life changed was much slower than it is today. Kids didn't have to explain new tech to grandparents and parents. They didn't have to because for the most part, it was still the same.
 
2014-01-17 08:32:54 AM

havana_joe: I worked at a radio shack in '95 or '96 and one day the store manager had me clean the back room. There were some boxes in a storage area/wall above the bathroom and in the bottom of the boxes there were a bunch of catalogs from the 70's and 80's... It was amazing to see how the technology changed from year to year and how expensive some things were when they first came out... They have all the catalogs online now... It's fun to page through a random year from time to time...

http://www.radioshackcatalogs.com/


This was my first ham radio, bought it brand new back in late 1989 or early 1990 after I had passed my novice test, but before I actually got my license in the mail:

i40.tinypic.com

I still use it, it's in my car and I use it for communicating with people in Morse code while I'm driving:

i41.tinypic.com

It's the radio farthest to the right in this picture, standing up on its side.

Last 3 contacts with that were with Ton, PA1CC in the Netherlands, Jack G8DX in the UK, and Wayne AB5ZA in Montana, all from upstate NY.

/Will your iPhone still work 24 years from now?
 
2014-01-17 08:34:55 AM

guytoronto: Close, but no cigar. At best, 10/15.

Smart phone can NOT function as an AM radio. Streaming over the internet is NOT AM radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner.

Smart phone can NOT function as a CB radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a radar detector.

Smart phone can NOT function as a regular pair of decent speakers.


I listen to my local police/fire chatter all the time.  Hell, i can choose to listen to Chicago's too, and I live in the DC area.  Your smartphone can function as a police/fire scanner.
 
2014-01-17 08:40:11 AM

log_jammin: I'm not saying it would be inbelievable. I'm just saying before pretty recently the pace at which life changed was much slower than it is today. Kids didn't have to explain new tech to grandparents and parents. They didn't have to because for the most part, it was still the same.


The big change happened not between 1940 and today, but between 1840 and 1940.

Prior to 1840, information could only travel as fast as it could be physically carried.  It would literally take days for information to go from, say, Philadelphia to Boston.   It would take months for information to go from North America to Europe, and vice-versa.

With the advent of the electric telegraph, all that changed.  You could get news from the other side of the globe in less than an hour.  You could send a message from Boston to Philadelphia and know it would be at its destination in just a few minutes.

Instead of taking an hour to send a message on a fast horse to 20 miles away, you could have the message there in seconds.

The real breakthrough in global communications didn't happen in the 20th Century, it happened in the 19th.  Everything since then has merely been an incremental improvement.
 
2014-01-17 08:41:11 AM

jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording


If I wasn't so goddamned easy for me to scratch them just by looking at them funny, I'd agree....
 
2014-01-17 08:51:32 AM

Dimming: I listen to my local police/fire chatter all the time.  Hell, i can choose to listen to Chicago's too, and I live in the DC area.  Your smartphone can function as a police/fire scanner


No, it can't, because you aren't directly receiving those frequencies.  And if the cell infrastructure goes down or is jammed up because of a widespread emergency, which is perhaps the need to listen to police/fire chatter is most acute, then you're shiat out of luck.   You can do it when things are working properly, but things don't always work properly in an emergency.
 
2014-01-17 08:53:34 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Because there are areas of the country where you can get am signals (especially at night) but might not have cell phone reception?
 
2014-01-17 08:53:55 AM

dittybopper: The big change happened not between 1940 and today, but between 1840 and 1940.


i didn't say it happened between 1940 and today. i just used that date to make a point.
 
2014-01-17 08:55:32 AM

ski9600: 867-5309


Jenny?
 
2014-01-17 08:56:34 AM

log_jammin: dittybopper: The big change happened not between 1940 and today, but between 1840 and 1940.

i didn't say it happened between 1940 and today. i just used that date to make a point.


My point was the the big change in communications happened in the 19th Century, not the 20th or 21st Century.  So the actual year is ear-elephant.
 
2014-01-17 08:57:15 AM

dittybopper: havana_joe: I worked at a radio shack in '95 or '96 and one day the store manager had me clean the back room. There were some boxes in a storage area/wall above the bathroom and in the bottom of the boxes there were a bunch of catalogs from the 70's and 80's... It was amazing to see how the technology changed from year to year and how expensive some things were when they first came out... They have all the catalogs online now... It's fun to page through a random year from time to time...

http://www.radioshackcatalogs.com/

This was my first ham radio, bought it brand new back in late 1989 or early 1990 after I had passed my novice test, but before I actually got my license in the mail:

[i40.tinypic.com image 600x775]

I still use it, it's in my car and I use it for communicating with people in Morse code while I'm driving:

[i41.tinypic.com image 640x480]

It's the radio farthest to the right in this picture, standing up on its side.

Last 3 contacts with that were with Ton, PA1CC in the Netherlands, Jack G8DX in the UK, and Wayne AB5ZA in Montana, all from upstate NY.

/Will your iPhone still work 24 years from now?


I call fake.

No amateur's car is that clean.
 
2014-01-17 09:05:07 AM

dittybopper: Dimming: I listen to my local police/fire chatter all the time.  Hell, i can choose to listen to Chicago's too, and I live in the DC area.  Your smartphone can function as a police/fire scanner

No, it can't, because you aren't directly receiving those frequencies.  And if the cell infrastructure goes down or is jammed up because of a widespread emergency, which is perhaps the need to listen to police/fire chatter is most acute, then you're shiat out of luck.   You can do it when things are working properly, but things don't always work properly in an emergency.


I made a point to write the OPs original statement:  "your smartphone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner." before replying.  I'm saying it can.  My lighter functions as a bottle opener, my computer functions as a nightlight for my son, and my girlfriend functions as my therapist.  They aren't exactly those things, but they get the job done.
 
2014-01-17 09:07:15 AM

guytoronto: Close, but no cigar. At best, 10/15.

Smart phone can NOT function as an AM radio. Streaming over the internet is NOT AM radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner.

Smart phone can NOT function as a CB radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a radar detector.

Smart phone can NOT function as a regular pair of decent speakers.


in fairness, the Realistic 15" speakers couldnt function as a decent pair of speakers.

And if delivering the user the same primary function isnt "functioning as" what is?   You are trying to split hairs and are on the wrong side of logic here.  A phone CAN tell you where the radar is, a phone CAN stream CB radio signals.  A phone is every BIT as good as a police scanner, for THOUSANDS of locations.

Not only CAN your phone do these things, in nearly every case, it does them better with more range and more flexibility.
 
2014-01-17 09:16:23 AM

I sound fat: guytoronto: Close, but no cigar. At best, 10/15.

Smart phone can NOT function as an AM radio. Streaming over the internet is NOT AM radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner.

Smart phone can NOT function as a CB radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a radar detector.

Smart phone can NOT function as a regular pair of decent speakers.

in fairness, the Realistic 15" speakers couldnt function as a decent pair of speakers.

And if delivering the user the same primary function isnt "functioning as" what is?   You are trying to split hairs and are on the wrong side of logic here.  A phone CAN tell you where the radar is, a phone CAN stream CB radio signals.  A phone is every BIT as good as a police scanner, for THOUSANDS of locations.

Not only CAN your phone do these things, in nearly every case, it does them better with more range and more flexibility.


Your phone is nothing without the internet. And your last sentence is patently false.
 
2014-01-17 09:16:57 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Not all of us live in the city.
 
2014-01-17 09:17:54 AM

SansNeural: I call fake.

No amateur's car is that clean.


Heh.

I cleaned it up for the picture.

Also note:  The car is in drive.  When I went to take the picture, with the shifter in park, it obscure the Yaesu FT-1900R 2 meter rig.  So I put my foot on the brake, and put it in drive to take the picture.
 
2014-01-17 09:18:20 AM
If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight. You can't count on a cell phone in the case of an actual emergency or disaster. Ask those people who stayed behind when Katrina hit who were up to their attics in water with zero bars. Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.
 
2014-01-17 09:20:57 AM
a400.idata.over-blog.com
 
2014-01-17 09:21:46 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


Tune-in Radio and I Heart Radio apps stream in AM radio stations.
 
2014-01-17 09:22:48 AM

ransack.: If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight.


Define "area".  My power was out last night, no lights around, and one of the first things I did was check the co-op's website to see how widespread the outage was.  10 years ago, I would have made a phone call to find that out.

Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.

If you're using battery-powered radios, sure.
 
2014-01-17 09:23:10 AM

Dimming: dittybopper: Dimming: I listen to my local police/fire chatter all the time.  Hell, i can choose to listen to Chicago's too, and I live in the DC area.  Your smartphone can function as a police/fire scanner

No, it can't, because you aren't directly receiving those frequencies.  And if the cell infrastructure goes down or is jammed up because of a widespread emergency, which is perhaps the need to listen to police/fire chatter is most acute, then you're shiat out of luck.   You can do it when things are working properly, but things don't always work properly in an emergency.

I made a point to write the OPs original statement:  "your smartphone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner." before replying.  I'm saying it can.  My lighter functions as a bottle opener, my computer functions as a nightlight for my son, and my girlfriend functions as my therapist.  They aren't exactly those things, but they get the job done.


Function =\= result

In function, a police/fire scanner(or CB) does the receiving directly.  With a smart phone, the function is on a receiver elsewhere.  The output of that function is then relayed over the internet and accessed by your phone.  Yes, you can get the output from your phone, but only because you rely on a network and and other equipment on the other end of the network.

The phone's "function" in the case of streaming media, is to access the internet.  That is all.  Without the network and the equipment on the other end, it's non-functional except to play back locally stored files.

/some of you people have some severe conceptual disabilities
 
2014-01-17 09:24:09 AM
Sorry...

There is not a CB radio on your iPhone. Using your phone as a phone is actually not the same thing. At all.

I also doubt that your iPhone has an AM/FM radio.

It also doesn't play CDs.

As mentioned before, it also doesn't have a radar detector built in.

Nor does it have headphones built in.

And yeah, I know how to use a phone book. I'm not retarded, but apparently you are. What a stupid article. Interesting concept, executed by someone with about a 4th grade education.

And "streaming" an internet AM radio station is not having an "AM receiver" in your phone. Not even close.
 
2014-01-17 09:25:01 AM

ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.


When Imus was still with them, my uncle would listen to WFAN 660AM in New York all the way to work in Bar Harbor, ME on a clear day.
 
2014-01-17 09:25:19 AM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

I have an app that allows me to stream WGR 550-AM in Buffalo directly to my phone. Plus I Heart Radio and other apps exist for this purpose.


That's not AM radio, that's an internet stream. Call TFA when you have an actual AM tuner in side of your phone.
 
2014-01-17 09:31:34 AM

ransack.: If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight. You can't count on a cell phone in the case of an actual emergency or disaster. Ask those people who stayed behind when Katrina hit who were up to their attics in water with zero bars. Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.


Ham radio *DID* save lives.

For large swaths areas of the Gulf, ham radio took over for 911 service.  In many stricken areas, it was essentially the only way to communicate with the outside world.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/old-technology-still-needed/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IITBpLQmmiI
 
2014-01-17 09:34:53 AM
I always thought a fuzzbuster was actually a radar jammer, not just detector.
 
2014-01-17 09:36:37 AM

dittybopper: This was my first ham radio, bought it brand new back in late 1989 or early 1990 after I had passed my novice test, but before I actually got my license in the mail:

I still use it, it's in my car and I use it for communicating with people in Morse code while I'm driving:


Where do you keep your Aldiss lamp and semaphore flags?

j/k
 
2014-01-17 09:37:22 AM

Mikey1969: Sorry...

There is not a CB radio on your iPhone. Using your phone as a phone is actually not the same thing. At all.

I also doubt that your iPhone has an AM/FM radio.

It also doesn't play CDs.

As mentioned before, it also doesn't have a radar detector built in.

Nor does it have headphones built in.

And yeah, I know how to use a phone book. I'm not retarded, but apparently you are. What a stupid article. Interesting concept, executed by someone with about a 4th grade education.

And "streaming" an internet AM radio station is not having an "AM receiver" in your phone. Not even close.


My Android phones (HTC One, HTC Vivid), many other Android phones, and all Windows phones have real FM radios built into them, as does the iPod but not the iPhone. You have to plug in headphones to use the cord as an antenna, though. But many smartphones do contain a real FM radio. In fact many of the radio stations in my area air PSAs about this and how the internet doesn't work in a real disaster but a real radio will always give you the latest updates on situations.
 
2014-01-17 09:42:47 AM

ransack.: Mikey1969: Sorry...

There is not a CB radio on your iPhone. Using your phone as a phone is actually not the same thing. At all.

I also doubt that your iPhone has an AM/FM radio.

It also doesn't play CDs.

As mentioned before, it also doesn't have a radar detector built in.

Nor does it have headphones built in.

And yeah, I know how to use a phone book. I'm not retarded, but apparently you are. What a stupid article. Interesting concept, executed by someone with about a 4th grade education.

And "streaming" an internet AM radio station is not having an "AM receiver" in your phone. Not even close.

My Android phones (HTC One, HTC Vivid), many other Android phones, and all Windows phones have real FM radios built into them, as does the iPod but not the iPhone. You have to plug in headphones to use the cord as an antenna, though. But many smartphones do contain a real FM radio. In fact many of the radio stations in my area air PSAs about this and how the internet doesn't work in a real disaster but a real radio will always give you the latest updates on situations.


An FM radio is not an AM/FM tuner, which is my point. Yeah, I had a phone with an FM tuner, too, but that doesn't change the fact that the author has no idea what they are talking about.
 
2014-01-17 09:44:13 AM

theMightyRegeya: ransack.: If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight.

Define "area".  My power was out last night, no lights around, and one of the first things I did was check the co-op's website to see how widespread the outage was.  10 years ago, I would have made a phone call to find that out.

Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.

If you're using battery-powered radios, sure.


Almost all ham radios take 12 volts standard.  That means you can run them off of a car alternator, car battery, solar system, generators, or off of 110 volt mains with a power supply (something all hams usually do anyway).  We can use pretty much any available source of power.

One of the things I like to use is one of those 12 volt car jump-start thingies.  Convenient to use and carry, and will let you run a 10 or 15 watt VHF/UHF station for a while, or a handheld radio (plugged into an external antenna) at 5 watts for a *LONG* time.

For example, I've got VHF and upper HF communications in my car.  Running the car at idle, a full tank of gas will last for a *LONG* time, and it will power those radios at full power (55 watts in the case of the FT-1900R) with no sweat.  Even with the ignition off, I can power the radios off of the battery at reduced power for a long time.

Every ham I know that gives even a passing thought to emergency communications has alternative ways to power their radios.  Before any serious weather, I make sure all the handhelds are charged up, and all the rechargeable batteries (for both the radios and things like lanterns) are charged.

Heck, every year, hams do "Field Day", where they haul out their generators, go to some spot, throw up antennas, and operate for a weekend just as a kind of test for that sort of thing.
 
2014-01-17 09:50:10 AM

omeganuepsilon: Dimming: dittybopper: Dimming: I listen to my local police/fire chatter all the time.  Hell, i can choose to listen to Chicago's too, and I live in the DC area.  Your smartphone can function as a police/fire scanner

No, it can't, because you aren't directly receiving those frequencies.  And if the cell infrastructure goes down or is jammed up because of a widespread emergency, which is perhaps the need to listen to police/fire chatter is most acute, then you're shiat out of luck.   You can do it when things are working properly, but things don't always work properly in an emergency.

I made a point to write the OPs original statement:  "your smartphone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner." before replying.  I'm saying it can.  My lighter functions as a bottle opener, my computer functions as a nightlight for my son, and my girlfriend functions as my therapist.  They aren't exactly those things, but they get the job done.

Function =\= result

In function, a police/fire scanner(or CB) does the receiving directly.  With a smart phone, the function is on a receiver elsewhere.  The output of that function is then relayed over the internet and accessed by your phone.  Yes, you can get the output from your phone, but only because you rely on a network and and other equipment on the other end of the network.

The phone's "function" in the case of streaming media, is to access the internet.  That is all.  Without the network and the equipment on the other end, it's non-functional except to play back locally stored files.

/some of you people have some severe conceptual disabilities


holy fark, man.....you really like your scanners. Next time, I will make sure to take a page out of your book of Smugness and Nitpicking to lend credence to whatever hard-on I have for the word "function", and to make sure that everyone reading is really impressed with my feigned wisdom of all-things scanner and network related issues.

Here's a fact:  I can turn on my phone right now and listen to local and remote police and fire scanner feeds. It functions, in lieu of whatever awesome list of equipment you have or need or want, (or jerk off to) as a scanner.  Go pick a fight elsewhere.
 
2014-01-17 09:50:14 AM

jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording


Unless I'm missing the sarcasm, try SACD (Super Audio CD) or even DVD-A (which is not a video DVD) Both formats failed because consumers don't care about quality and they were marketed horribly wrong with a focus on surround sound which has never worked well for music (example: quadraphonic)
 
2014-01-17 09:52:09 AM

machoprogrammer: [a400.idata.over-blog.com image 640x480]


I have a ham sandwich.
img.fark.net
 
2014-01-17 09:56:55 AM

jso2897: dameron: log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014.

Nah.  Expectations of this kind of tech was everywhere.   Hell, there's a fark cliche about flying cars that exploits that.  None of the things that you mentioned would be out of the question in the 40s with the exception of computers.  They had analogs to cell phones (DIck Tracy's video watch), electric cars (which really aren't at all futuristic), flat screens (all screens were flat in 1940, they were projections, so it wouldn't seem at all odd), solar panels mimic plants, video games are computers so they fall into my caveat above, microwave ovens would be seen just as an advance on the current ovens of the day, florescent lights were being sold in the last 30s, etc.

The access to information is what would gall someone from 1940.  I see this all the time when I have my in-laws (in their 80s) over to my house for movie night.  After the movie (which is often from the 40s or 50s) we chat about the actors, directors and such.  If they recall a specific scene, song, or moment in another film I can usually find it within a couple of minutes and send it to my television.

Also they'd probably shiat themselves more at the idea of a black woman and a white woman getting married and opening a pot farm in Colorado.

And, depending upon where your theoretical 1st century dude lived, he might consider his 10th century accommodations a huge step back and wonder where all his public works went.

And wonder he would, since he would be unable to understand a word that anybody was saying.
A man from 1940, today, would have the benefit of speaking the language.


Unless 1CE guy spoke Latin. Which, although it drifted, was pretty much the same.
 
2014-01-17 09:59:15 AM

buckler: dittybopper: This was my first ham radio, bought it brand new back in late 1989 or early 1990 after I had passed my novice test, but before I actually got my license in the mail:

I still use it, it's in my car and I use it for communicating with people in Morse code while I'm driving:

Where do you keep your Aldiss lamp and semaphore flags?

j/k


Actually, the Aldiss lamp brings up a neat thing about Morse:  It's medium independent.  It doesn't have to be sent over a radio or a telegraph wire.   I can send and receive it any number of ways:  Visually, with something like the Aldiss lamp (or even a flashlight, or laser pointer), typing or writing it out (-.-. --.-), or even blinking it.  I can send it aurally, as any number of sounds.  I can even whistle it like a bird.   I can send or receive it by tapping on skin, so even a person who has lost their sight and hearing can be communicated with.  I can bang it on a pipe if I'm trapped somewhere.

It's a very versatile method of communicating, and it doesn't require advanced technology to use.  And as long as you have some form of voluntary control over your body, you can use it to communicate and even control a computer.
 
2014-01-17 10:10:47 AM

TuteTibiImperes: markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11

The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.


You're welcome.

Granted, you're still not broadcasting to everyone in the area, but you have the PTT feature, and you can use it to talk to your friends across the pond.
 
2014-01-17 10:10:48 AM
Don't know if this has been mentioned but pro sports are generally not streamed. At least, not by radio stations.
 
2014-01-17 10:11:54 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


You can with a streaming app.
 
2014-01-17 10:14:25 AM

jmayson: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

You can with a streaming app.


A streaming app doesn't make your phone a radio any more than using the front camera to look at yourself makes it a mirror
 
2014-01-17 10:15:54 AM

dittybopper: Ed Grubermann: Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...

Actually, people in areas where you don't have any cell service (like much of the Adirondacks in New York, for example) use radio services like CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS, and Ham radio to keep in touch while mobile.  Best part is:  They work without any infrastructure, so no matter what happens, as long as the batteries hold out, you can communicate.

Also, if you go ahead and listen, CBs are used.  I used to keep one or two around as "just in case" radios, because not everyone has a ham radio license, but I've replaced them with FRS/GMRS radios, which are much more common anyway, and you don't have to listen to idiots with annoying reverb on their signal yelling obscenities.

/What is the point of an echobox anyway?


It's like autotune for truckers.  They got used to the roger beeps and 1kw linears, and needed something new.
 
2014-01-17 10:18:25 AM

supayoda: TuteTibiImperes: markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11

The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.

You're welcome.

Granted, you're still not broadcasting to everyone in the area, but you have the PTT feature, and you can use it to talk to your friends across the pond.


Meh.  I could do that with a hand-held ham radio years ago, using VoIP-connected Echolink repeaters.

Remember talking to a ham in South Korea one time that way, and a bunch in English speaking nations like the UK and Australia.

And, of course, if I want to just talk to them directly, radio to radio with nothing in between but the ionosphere, I can grab the mike on my HF rig instead.
 
2014-01-17 10:19:27 AM

pedrop357: It's like autotune for truckers.  They got used to the roger beeps and 1kw linears, and needed something new.


No wonder they end up sounding like Cher with cob up her ass.
 
2014-01-17 10:20:24 AM

smask: log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.

My dad is born in 1940. If it's technological, he will only learn which buttons in what order he has to press to get what he wants. If he managed to press the wrong button or the right buttons in the wrong order, he will resort to press every button on the remote until it works. And then I have to sort it out. He's had a stroke 16 years ago so motor coordination in his hands is bad. When I tell him to make a quick tap on a button, he will mash it. He hates computers with a gusto and everything with a menu. Unfortunately manufacturers put processors into everything they make now.


Your dad probably learned that the proper way to write that sentence is "My dad was born in 1940."
 
2014-01-17 10:24:01 AM

ransack.: jmayson: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

You can with a streaming app.

A streaming app doesn't make your phone a radio any more than using the front camera to look at yourself makes it a mirror


No, but the end result is the same. And if you want to get really nitty gritty your phone IS a radio but using 3G/4G/LTE/Wi-Fi frequencies instead.
 
2014-01-17 10:29:29 AM

AngryTeacher: 619-239-KING


Last time I checked, it wasn't Mojo's anymore. Saw him at the airport in San Diego back in 92.
 
2014-01-17 10:31:06 AM

mediaseth: jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording

Unless I'm missing the sarcasm, try SACD (Super Audio CD) or even DVD-A (which is not a video DVD) Both formats failed because consumers don't care about quality and they were marketed horribly wrong with a focus on surround sound which has never worked well for music (example: quadraphonic)


That's part of why those formats failed (well, not completely, but they're definitely a niche and not mainstream). Also, SACD was as much about DRM as it was about audio quality. Even though it's possible to buy DSD-capable recorders from Korg and Sony, an SACD player will only play discs that have been digitally signed, and only the pressing plants have the signing keys. You can't make your own SACDs, period.

You can author your own DVD-A discs, though - they don't need to be signed. You could also put high-quality audio on a video DVD with just a still image, if you felt like it.
 
2014-01-17 11:12:55 AM

Alphax: Reminds me of my days working for a certain office supply store in the late 90s, and having octogenarians come in to buy an adding machine.  They'd try one out, pressing the buttons firmly but slowly, and soon some number would come up twice because he held it down too long.  'Why did it do that?  This is no good to me.  Show me a different one.'  Uh, they all do that when you hold the button down.


They're right, you know.

Think about it: why would you ever want a number key or operation key on a calculator to repeat if you hold it down? When would you ever want to say "enter this number again and again until I pull up my finger", instead of just hitting the key the right number of times? When would you want to enter a digit lots of times, and even if you did, why would you want to enter it an unpredictable number of times (because holding down a key for a specific number of repetitions is a stunt, not a useful data-entry operation)?

If people put up with repeating keys on calculator apps, it's just because they've learned thats how keys work in apps. Key repeat on a dedicated calculator is a dead stupid idea.
 
2014-01-17 11:13:07 AM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


Also, I can't record VHS tapes on a smartphone either.
 
2014-01-17 11:27:17 AM

TuteTibiImperes: markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11

The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.


I'd take the position that CB's served a totally different use than anything a smartphone currently does.  CB's were an open broadcast, anyone on the same channel/ frequency could hear you and respond.  It was sort of like a radio chat room.

/10-4 good buddy, keep one eye on the prize and the other out for bears
 
2014-01-17 11:31:11 AM

salsashark1: Yawn.

Wake me up when technology can replicate Polaroid ex-girlfriend porn.


Not that far away. I was in walmart (against my wishes) a couple of weeks ago, and saw a digital camera with a printer built in. Of course, you have to buy cartridges of the appropriate print stock.  I commented to my wife that, after all of the technological innovations of the past 20 years, we've gone back to apparently being so excited that a camera can instantly print our photos.

Then I realized it's only a matter of time until they build an Instagram app into that camera, so that it can print out, instantly, discolored and blurry images.
 
2014-01-17 11:39:38 AM

Ed Grubermann: I had a pair of those Mach Two speakers. Damned good sound for a $300.00 pair of speakers. Sadly, I don't have room in my house for them, nor do I have anything to plug them into.


Those were some good speakers. A lot of people slag on Radio Shack stereo equipment, but some of it was quite good. Most of their stuff was made by Pioneer, Matsushiata (Technics), TEAC, etc. Some of it was made by CEC, which is an OEM for a lot of well-respected brands.
 
2014-01-17 11:41:06 AM

ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.


Beacuse of sciency-type stuff an AM station's effective range at night can be many, many times greater than it's daylight range.  So much greater that for a long time you could (barely) pick up WABC in New York from places like New Mexico.

50,000 wats can go a long way in the right conditions.
 
2014-01-17 11:46:55 AM

HMS_Blinkin: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

Also, I can't record VHS tapes on a smartphone either.


But where would you play it?

I have a VHS of my wedding around somewhere, but I don't have a single device in the house that will play it. Whenever I find it, I'm going to send it off to one of those services that converts it to digital.

These days, I'd just copy the video from my phone to my media server, and I'd have it essentially forever.
 
2014-01-17 12:15:36 PM
For all your nostalgia needs.

Old Radio Shack Catalogs and Ads
 
2014-01-17 12:24:38 PM
i1282.photobucket.com Has not caught a virus or any malware in one hundred years and gets me to come in when dinner is ready.
Radio crap the store where you need two of something, like a switch, they will have one.
 
2014-01-17 01:12:49 PM

ryan_n_waggoner: salsashark1: Yawn.

Wake me up when technology can replicate Polaroid ex-girlfriend porn.

Not that far away. I was in walmart (against my wishes) a couple of weeks ago, and saw a digital camera with a printer built in. Of course, you have to buy cartridges of the appropriate print stock.  I commented to my wife that, after all of the technological innovations of the past 20 years, we've gone back to apparently being so excited that a camera can instantly print our photos.

Then I realized it's only a matter of time until they build an Instagram app into that camera, so that it can print out, instantly, discolored and blurry images.


f.fastcompany.net

/obvious, really
 
2014-01-17 01:17:18 PM

Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.


^^ So much this.
 
2014-01-17 01:25:45 PM
Can someone interpret this for me? I already wasted five minutes and got no where:
"Some people like to spend $3 on a cup of coffee. While that sounds like a gamble I probably wouldn't take, I'll always like to gamble -- especially as little as three bucks -- on what I might be able to dig up on Buffalo and Western New York, our collective past, and what it means for our future. "
 
2014-01-17 01:45:02 PM

GibbyTheMole: Ed Grubermann: I had a pair of those Mach Two speakers. Damned good sound for a $300.00 pair of speakers. Sadly, I don't have room in my house for them, nor do I have anything to plug them into.

Those were some good speakers. A lot of people slag on Radio Shack stereo equipment, but some of it was quite good. Most of their stuff was made by Pioneer, Matsushiata (Technics), TEAC, etc. Some of it was made by CEC, which is an OEM for a lot of well-respected brands.


Some of their ham equipment was quite good also.

For example, the HTX-202 (and it's UHF twin, the HTX-404).  At a time when all the other manufacturers were touting wide receiver coverage, Radio Shack built essentially an Icom IC-02 handheld that was 2 meters only (144-148 MHz).  That meant they could make the receiver quite sensitive and still basically "intermod proof".  It was a quality piece of equipment, I carried one for years, also using it as a mobile rig (put out a solid 6 watts on 13.8 volts).  Never had a problem with intermod with it.


Another piece of equipment that they made well was their 5/8ths wave 2 meter magmount antenna.  I *STILL* have one on my car, and it still works great despite being something like 15 years old now.

Then again, they had crappy radios like the HTX-252 mobile radio.
 
2014-01-17 01:54:04 PM
My 2 cents...

If you just take the smart phone by itself, it cannot perform all the tasks that indicated by the advertisement.   It requires additional hardware, not least of which is a big-assed cell phone tower in proximity.   The smart phone is not a complete system, whereas a radar detector  is a complete system.

Hooking up a space telescope to the Internet doesn't make everyones smart phone a space telescope just because they can view the results on a browser.

Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".
 
2014-01-17 02:12:46 PM
I don't know about you but my phone has 15" woofers.
 
2014-01-17 02:13:24 PM

jmayson: ransack.: jmayson: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

You can with a streaming app.

A streaming app doesn't make your phone a radio any more than using the front camera to look at yourself makes it a mirror

No, but the end result is the same. And if you want to get really nitty gritty your phone IS a radio but using 3G/4G/LTE/Wi-Fi frequencies instead.


You're missing the point that has been made earlier in this thread, which is without various apps and/or cell service, your phone alone cannot provide you with these services.

Conversely, these individual items like HAM, CB, AM radios will continue to work.

For example, during Katrina cell service was barely functional for several days. A cellphone with no data couldn't be used to hear emergency AM broadcasts or contact people for help.
 
2014-01-17 02:18:21 PM

VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".


There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.
 
2014-01-17 02:20:15 PM

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


I use TuneIn Radio.  I prefer it to IHeartRadio since I can get actual Spanish music (as in from Spain, not Mexican music in Spanish).
 
2014-01-17 02:22:42 PM

Mikey1969: It also doesn't play CDs.


It doesn't record cassette or VCR/Beta either.
 
2014-01-17 02:27:19 PM
My Ma was born in 1945, and while computers were frustrating to her, she could use a cell phone like a pro.  She had me explain what all it could do, then listed the things she needed to use, and I wrote down simple instructions for each of those functions.  She kept those with her and referred to it as needed until she could do them without the cheat sheet.  Her bedroom TV had both a VCR and DVD built-in, and she read the instruction book, and could operate all the modes with ease.  Her philosophy was, "What a wonderful age we live in!"

Her mother went from riding in a horse and wagon when she was a child, to driving her own pick-up truck in her later years.  Then again, that's the Comanche side of my family, and grandma's mother and grandmother weren't too far removed from living in tipis.

So, yeah.  It is a wonderful age we live in, isn't it?  What can we do to make our kid's world wonderful?
 
2014-01-17 02:30:02 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".

There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.


I like the possibilities in something like this:
https://www.escortradar.com/passportmax/
 
2014-01-17 02:30:09 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".

There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.


If your requirement is for a device that immediately detect the presence of radar signals in your area then clearly a cell phone is deficient.  But not everyone has that as a requirement which is why the sale of radar detectors is declining in favour of applications such as Waze.   In some ways, the applications are actually more accurate in that they aren't triggered by false signals.  (I have two points on my drive home where I know the radar detector will be set off but there are no speed traps.)
 
2014-01-17 02:49:32 PM

log_jammin: because they looked like the cameras news crews used. they looked like a "real" camera.


CSB: I was playing a show at an amusement park about 10 years ago and this involved us having to march in from offstage while the show began. Well, after playing this same show with the same intro hundreds of times over the course of one summer you get a bit accustomed to routine, and you try to amuse yourself in any way possible - this usually involved a certain amount of clandestine screwing around that would not detract from the show. Usually this involved throwing things at each other or sticking a nude picture or some other nonsense in someone else's music folder to be found after a quick page turn. At other times, however, the antics became much more overt and obvious to the public attending the shows. On these occasions it became much more difficult to retain our composure and usually about 3 or 4 of us (out of a 10-person band) would be laughing so hard that playing would be briefly impossible.

All of this should be enough background to explain the significance what we saw one day in July of 2002. The show was going on as normal with the usual opening announcement and fanfare and we began to march up to the stage. Normally people kept clear of this spot, as it was a bit of an open area, unencumbered by tables or merchants or anything of the like; making it quite obvious that this area was to be used by the dancers and musicians for part of the show. Anyway, we came upon this area in front of the stage and one attendee decided to remain in this spot close to the performers (remaining within what I would consider the normal personal space you would expect during a close conversation) so as to record the show. This guy was wearing loose tattered jeans, a sweater (in July), had a full beard and a mostly toothless grin, a potbelly, an eyepatch, and he was sporting one of these 80's VHS recording cameras (which was already extremely outdated). I swear to God this guy looked just like a pirate! I didn't see him right away, as my position was on the other side of the front of the stage in this big open area, but I caught a glimpse of him as we were going up the stairs to this main stage to begin the main part of the show. I can't really say why, but at this point in the summer, having played the same show day after day (and dicking around to greater and greater extents), we just all completely lost our shiat and had the most prolonged fit of laughter I have ever experienced. What normally should have been 10 people performing a polka show was reduced to one drummer accompanying the incredulous laughter of 10 voices (including the drummer himself). I have not experienced anything of this magnitude in the years since. Nor can I explain why it happened to begin with. But ever since I saw this one crazy-looking pirate guy I have always had the urge to laugh whenever I saw one of these cameras in a pawn shop or wherever else they can be found.
 
2014-01-17 02:53:23 PM

VladTheEmailer: If you just take the smart phone by itself, it cannot perform all the tasks that indicated by the advertisement.   It requires additional hardware, not least of which is a big-assed cell phone tower in proximity.   The smart phone is not a complete system, whereas a radar detector  is a complete system.


Tell me more about how long that radar detector will work without an entire fossil fuel distribution industry to put gas in the tank to drive your engine to drive your alternator.

Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.
 
2014-01-17 02:54:40 PM

VladTheEmailer: If your requirement is for a device that immediately detect the presence of radar signals in your area then clearly a cell phone is deficient.  But not everyone has that as a requirement which is why the sale of radar detectors is declining in favour of applications such as Waze.   In some ways, the applications are actually more accurate in that they aren't triggered by false signals.  (I have two points on my drive home where I know the radar detector will be set off but there are no speed traps.)


Well, I've been driving the same route back and forth to work for about 12 years now.

After the first year or so, I knew every single place where the police set up their traps.  So in essence, I have an internal map of that information that's useful for me.

Plus, I think the reason radar detector sales are declining isn't so much because of apps like Waze, but more because of things like the use of LIDAR instead of traditional radar units.  By it's very nature, there is very, very little "leakage" from laser units that a detector that isn't in the car being directly measured can detect.

Even detectors that have sensors to pick up LIDAR are unlikely to give you a warning until it's too late.

Unless, of course, you jam the LIDAR, which is legal in all states except Virginia, unlike jamming radar, which is against federal law.

Radar detectors sales peaked in 2000-2001, and have fallen ever since, which is long before mobile apps like Waze became available.
 
2014-01-17 03:02:28 PM

jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.


Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database
 
2014-01-17 03:17:18 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: If your requirement is for a device that immediately detect the presence of radar signals in your area then clearly a cell phone is deficient.  But not everyone has that as a requirement which is why the sale of radar detectors is declining in favour of applications such as Waze.   In some ways, the applications are actually more accurate in that they aren't triggered by false signals.  (I have two points on my drive home where I know the radar detector will be set off but there are no speed traps.)

Well, I've been driving the same route back and forth to work for about 12 years now.

After the first year or so, I knew every single place where the police set up their traps.  So in essence, I have an internal map of that information that's useful for me.

Plus, I think the reason radar detector sales are declining isn't so much because of apps like Waze, but more because of things like the use of LIDAR instead of traditional radar units.  By it's very nature, there is very, very little "leakage" from laser units that a detector that isn't in the car being directly measured can detect.

Even detectors that have sensors to pick up LIDAR are unlikely to give you a warning until it's too late.

Unless, of course, you jam the LIDAR, which is legal in all states except Virginia, unlike jamming radar, which is against federal law.

Radar detectors sales peaked in 2000-2001, and have fallen ever since, which is long before mobile apps like Waze became available.


Accepting that any implication that mobile apps caused the decline sales of radar detectors was incorrect.

The gist is that radar detectors as they existed in 1991 have been or are in the process of being obsoleted by other technology which includes smart phones.   Waze can warn users of speed traps that standalone detectors cannot.   So the fact that smartphone do not have the requisite hardware to detect modern speed traps is irrelevant.  Neither do the detectors from 1991.   Smart phones just use a different method of detection.
 
2014-01-17 03:41:12 PM

dittybopper: SansNeural: ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.

WLS, I'm guessing.

Medium wave AM radio signals (500 kHz - 1800 kHz) can travel long distances at night when the D-layer dissipates and no longer absorbs the skywave signal.  During the day, you just get the groundwave signal, which means less than 100 mile range from even a very powerful AM station.

At night, those signals can reflect off of the F-layer of the ionosphere and travel very long distances.  Theoretically, with a clear frequency, a good receiver and antenna, and the right conditions, you could hear an AM radio station on the other side of the World.


Just a few months ago, I was able to listen to Cardinals baseball on KMOX all the way up into Minnesota. Signal started fading out in Owatonna on I-35. Linear distance was probably about 450-500 miles at that point. So it's possible to pull it in from that far away even with all of the ground clutter today.
 
2014-01-17 03:50:33 PM

dittybopper: VladTheEmailer: Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".

There is a major functional difference between a radar detector, though, and an app that reports nearby police speed traps.

A functional radar detector will always "go off" when it detects a signal above a certain threshhold.  That's an *IMMEDIATE* indication that there is a radar gun in the area.  You get notified at the speed of light.

For an app like Waze, though, it depends on others reporting the information.  Maybe no one with the app went by that area recently.  Maybe they did 10 minutes ago and no one was there, so nothing was reported, but a cop pulled into the speed trap area 5 minutes ago.  Maybe the opposite:  Waze reports a speed trap, which was valid 10 minutes ago, but the cop left for his lunch break 5 minutes ago.

The information, in other words, is likely to be stale by the time you receive it, unlike an indication from a radar detector, which is immediate, local intelligence.

Of course, there is no reason why you can't use both.


Using that same logic also makes Waze better, as it can predict where the cops will be long before you get close to them. In fact, with constant updating the likelihood is better that you will get an early warning over out of date information.
 
2014-01-17 04:00:19 PM
jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs
 /CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording

Agreed. I suppose the unwashed masses can be satisfied with lossy compressed MP3 sound, but some of us still prefer high fidelity audio.

Remember spending big bucks in college to get the highest S/N and channel separation ratios, and the lowest wow/flutter and harmonic distortion levels? Now people are spending their big bucks on phones with bigger screens and faster CPUs, but with crappy sound reproduction.

I'll take a WAV file over an MP3 any day.
 
2014-01-17 04:07:41 PM
BONUS REPLACEMENT: It's not an item for sale, but at the bottom of the ad, you're instructed to 'check your phone book for the Radio Shack Store nearest you.' Do you even know how to use a phone book?

Why yes, yes I do. You are an idiot.
 
2014-01-17 04:13:11 PM

Uchiha_Cycliste: Can someone interpret this for me? I already wasted five minutes and got no where:
"Some people like to spend $3 on a cup of coffee. While that sounds like a gamble I probably wouldn't take, I'll always like to gamble -- especially as little as three bucks -- on what I might be able to dig up on Buffalo and Western New York, our collective past, and what it means for our future. "


The author bought an old newspaper at a car boot sale.
 
2014-01-17 04:46:49 PM

Gordon Bennett: Uchiha_Cycliste: Can someone interpret this for me? I already wasted five minutes and got no where:
"Some people like to spend $3 on a cup of coffee. While that sounds like a gamble I probably wouldn't take, I'll always like to gamble -- especially as little as three bucks -- on what I might be able to dig up on Buffalo and Western New York, our collective past, and what it means for our future. "

The author bought an old newspaper at a car boot sale.


papers from garage sale. I'll be damned. thanks!

\why didn't he just say that?
 
2014-01-17 04:52:00 PM

jaylectricity: If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ


Except for when they block internet stream coverage of local sports, the bastards.

I still have a transistor pocket radio to listen to football/basketball for this reason (pretty much ball games and nothing else).

cameroncrazy1984: Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Because not all stations stream all content over the internet.

dittybopper: Also, if you go ahead and listen, CBs are used.


We have a CB in our car, and it's great.  Definitely the best for hearing road conditions (plus amusing general chit-chat) on highways in the middle of nowhere.

Meanwhile the first boombox I had contained a record player, single cassette deck, and... an all-band radio (listening only, not broadcasting).  I listened to shortwave on it all the time, to hear NHK from California.

Later I got rid of that (wish I still had it) for a boombox with dual cassette, but I had another all-band radio similar to the one in your ad for $199, again to listen to shortwave.

Even now when I go camping, I like to listen to shortwave.  Sit around the fire, have some beer, listen to some craaaaazy conspiracy theorists going on about HAARP/FEMA camps/chemtrails, listen to a little Radio Havana,  and of course again NHK.

Now I get the NHK podcast on my phone and can download TV from... places, though.  And I do love streaming radio apps on my phone.

But I will second you, actual radio is something else and we still need it.
 
2014-01-17 05:14:04 PM

Dimming: holy fark, man.....you really like your scanners.


No, ignorance just bothers me. It is as if you think your phone is made of magic.  Boggles the mind that you can't understand a simple explanation.

I will dumb it down for you some more, because I'm feeling charitable.

 A dog can eat steak that a human cooked, but he can't cook it himself.

The dog being your phone, and the human being the conglomeration that is the internet and other various hardware that actually perform the tasks.

Yes, your dog can shiat out anything it consumes, but what it consumes is rendered largely by other entities.  Without those entities he'd be scavenging, hunting, and starving, since most domesticated dogs are dependant on what human's produce.

ransack.: Your phone is nothing without the internet.


This.  Your phone, much like any PC, can access data on the internet.  That is not the same as having the native ability to function in many of the given ways from the article that are under discussion.

It is a technical issue.

I think people are getting defensive over their magical and powerful phones, feel threatened when they see people explaining things rather simply about how things actually work.
 
2014-01-17 05:31:26 PM

salsashark1: Yawn.

Wake me up when technology can replicate Polaroid ex-girlfriend porn.


http://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.polaroidapps.pogoap p
 
2014-01-17 05:40:50 PM

dittybopper: jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.

Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database


Oh, sure. We had so much more privacy when we broadcast our conversations over the CB.

Or maybe you meant old days, when we could talk in private over the party line -- except for the neighbors listening in. Or when we walked to the corner store and paid our cash to the shopkeeper. Nobody building up profiles of our travel or our purchase habits -- except, again, the shopkeeper, and all the folks hanging out in the store, and anybody they gossiped to.
 
2014-01-17 06:26:35 PM

Ivo Shandor: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

AM radios usually use an antenna like this:
[i.imgur.com image 250x105]
which would take up too much space in a phone. FM operates at a much higher frequency and can use smaller components.


downstairs: Also to continue to be picky... no I don't believe there is or can be a radar detector app.

You can get Twitter updates of speed trap locations which other users have spotted. That might be close enough.


Here is one..

http://www.trapster.com/
 
2014-01-17 06:30:40 PM

mediaseth: jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording

Unless I'm missing the sarcasm, try SACD (Super Audio CD) or even DVD-A (which is not a video DVD) Both formats failed because consumers don't care about quality and they were marketed horribly wrong with a focus on surround sound which has never worked well for music (example: quadraphonic)


Well shiat, you have the word "media" in your name, I HAVE to believe you!
 
2014-01-17 06:32:48 PM

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Because I don't have an unlimited data plan and baseball games are only broadcast on AM stations where I am. They are long and there are many of them, but I would love to be able to listen to a game on the train.

dittybopper: Ed Grubermann: Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...

Actually, people in areas where you don't have any cell service (like much of the Adirondacks in New York, for example) use radio services like CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS, and Ham radio to keep in touch while mobile.  Best part is:  They work without any infrastructure, so no matter what happens, as long as the batteries hold out, you can communicate.


Yup. I use my CB at least once per month when I go out off roading with friends. Cell phones don't work at all, so we either use CB (not everyone has one) or portable radios. I haven't bothered with ham yet though, I don't go far enough out in the boonies to justify that (yet.)
 
2014-01-17 10:13:57 PM

jfarkinB: dittybopper: jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.

Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database

Oh, sure. We had so much more privacy when we broadcast our conversations over the CB.

Or maybe you meant old days, when we could talk in private over the party line -- except for the neighbors listening in. Or when we walked to the corner store and paid our cash to the shopkeeper. Nobody building up profiles of our travel or our purchase habits -- except, again, the shopkeeper, and all the folks hanging out in the store, and anybody they gossiped to.


Actually, ironically, CBs (and other radios) are actually more secure than cell phones.

That's because there isn't a massive installed infrastructure the collects the information about your radio communications. Cell phones inherently leave a record of who called who when and for how long and approximately where that phone was.

There is no such infrastructure to monitor CB or other radio services. They are more vulnerable to casual eavesdropping, but you have to be within range (same with DFing).

Plus, if you are just receiving, there is no way anyone eavesdropping on you communications channel can tell where you are. You can't DF a signal that isn't sent. On the other hand, a cell phone periodically transmits to the local cell towers. That's how the system knows where to route your calls, and those records are retained and available to the government.
 
2014-01-17 11:02:01 PM

dittybopper: jfarkinB: dittybopper: jfarkinB: Everything on that page (except the solar calculator) is more or less directly dependent on a lot of contemporary infrastructure to keep running. The cellular system is part of that infrastructure now. If you want to save the $20/month that it costs to buy into that infrastructure, I guess I understand, but you're giving up an awful lot.

Except, of course, for your privacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_call_database

Oh, sure. We had so much more privacy when we broadcast our conversations over the CB.

Or maybe you meant old days, when we could talk in private over the party line -- except for the neighbors listening in. Or when we walked to the corner store and paid our cash to the shopkeeper. Nobody building up profiles of our travel or our purchase habits -- except, again, the shopkeeper, and all the folks hanging out in the store, and anybody they gossiped to.

Actually, ironically, CBs (and other radios) are actually more secure than cell phones.

That's because there isn't a massive installed infrastructure the collects the information about your radio communications. Cell phones inherently leave a record of who called who when and for how long and approximately where that phone was.

There is no such infrastructure to monitor CB or other radio services. They are more vulnerable to casual eavesdropping, but you have to be within range (same with DFing).

Plus, if you are just receiving, there is no way anyone eavesdropping on you communications channel can tell where you are. You can't DF a signal that isn't sent. On the other hand, a cell phone periodically transmits to the local cell towers. That's how the system knows where to route your calls, and those records are retained and available to the government.


This.

The content is not safe from other ears, but your Identity is more safe than anything average people could ever do on the internet.  Factor in the tendency for a CB user to be mobile and use it on the road, if you are doing something illegal, people in that area have to be monitoring at the time, and care enough to try and find out who you are.  The range on them is just small enough so that you're long gone by the time anyone can do anything about it.  Perfect for carrying on a conversation with, say, a trucker going in the same direction as you.

You'd have to be caught red handed, documented(ie video) or witnessed in person as saying X, to have anything at all stick.
 
2014-01-18 10:05:36 AM

omeganuepsilon: This.

The content is not safe from other ears, but your Identity is more safe than anything average people could ever do on the internet.  Factor in the tendency for a CB user to be mobile and use it on the road, if you are doing something illegal, people in that area have to be monitoring at the time, and care enough to try and find out who you are.  The range on them is just small enough so that you're long gone by the time anyone can do anything about it.  Perfect for carrying on a conversation with, say, a trucker going in the same direction as you.

You'd have to be caught red handed, documented(ie video) or witnessed in person as saying X, to have anything at all stick.


Well, with the proper equipment set up in range, and perhaps a mobile "sniffing" unit, I could still find you relatively easily.

The thing about it is that the infrastructure needed to do that just isn't there, nor will it probably ever be.

Also, I believe CB's will be immune to interception by drones:  The specifications put forth by the DHS for domestic drones include the ability to monitor and determine the bearing of signals between 30 MHz and 3 GHz (3,000 MHz).

CBs transmit and receive on 26 to 27 MHz, outside that range.  Also, ham radio HF transceivers also send and receive outside that range.  An "opened up" HF transceiver can transmit anywhere between 1.8 MHz to 30 MHz.

Also, you can use NVIS techniques in the lower-HF region to communicate out to 300 miles or so reliably, and because of the nature of NVIS signals, they are hard to DF if you are more than a few dozen miles from the transmitter.
 
2014-01-18 10:26:23 AM

dittybopper: omeganuepsilon: This.

The content is not safe from other ears, but your Identity is more safe than anything average people could ever do on the internet.  Factor in the tendency for a CB user to be mobile and use it on the road, if you are doing something illegal, people in that area have to be monitoring at the time, and care enough to try and find out who you are.  The range on them is just small enough so that you're long gone by the time anyone can do anything about it.  Perfect for carrying on a conversation with, say, a trucker going in the same direction as you.

You'd have to be caught red handed, documented(ie video) or witnessed in person as saying X, to have anything at all stick.

Well, with the proper equipment set up in range, and perhaps a mobile "sniffing" unit, I could still find you relatively easily.

The thing about it is that the infrastructure needed to do that just isn't there, nor will it probably ever be.

Also, I believe CB's will be immune to interception by drones:  The specifications put forth by the DHS for domestic drones include the ability to monitor and determine the bearing of signals between 30 MHz and 3 GHz (3,000 MHz).

CBs transmit and receive on 26 to 27 MHz, outside that range.  Also, ham radio HF transceivers also send and receive outside that range.  An "opened up" HF transceiver can transmit anywhere between 1.8 MHz to 30 MHz.

Also, you can use NVIS techniques in the lower-HF region to communicate out to 300 miles or so reliably, and because of the nature of NVIS signals, they are hard to DF if you are more than a few dozen miles from the transmitter.


I'll take your word for it, heh.  I just have a basic understanding of the concepts involved and sort of like science.(that some don't even have that is what disturbs me as I mentioned above).

You are right though, the structure for tracking radio communications just won't exist.  You'd need a fairly dense array of towers, much more dense than cell towers.  Maybe some local authorities could pull it off over a small region, but something on the level of tracking internet activity no matter where you're at?  No.

Just being mobile is the real key.  You can use a cheap laptop accessing varying publicly available wi-fi access points and be almost as untrackable, but you'd have to spend less time in a given area than even a radio user.  And at that, you're relying on the existance of those points.  Radio users are not hindered in such a way.

That is why CB's and such are so handy. They need nothing other than someone else listening.  They need no outside structure to function.

Interestingly, that's what pisses me off about "cloud" computing coming to be understood as something done on another computer elsewhere.  Remote usage, not a cloud at all.

/haven't used a CB in forever
//had some fun with an old base station a long time ago when a lot of people still had them in their daily drivers
///met some interesting people, heard even more interesting conversations from people I'd never want to meet

Some of the one sided one's were the best, some clearly unhinged person just telling a long and pointless story, much like Big Trouble in Little China's Kurt Russel.
 
2014-01-18 04:03:05 PM

Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.


It has a pretty good calculator, I hear.
 
2014-01-18 04:40:32 PM

untaken_name: Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.

It has a pretty good calculator, I hear.


I've got a slide rule that has more functions on it.
 
Displayed 180 of 180 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report