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(Huffington Post)   Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone. Please enter your phone number before reading the article   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 180
    More: Interesting, Radio Shack, Western New York, word processing  
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20859 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2014 at 4:45 AM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



180 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-17 09:07:15 AM  

guytoronto: Close, but no cigar. At best, 10/15.

Smart phone can NOT function as an AM radio. Streaming over the internet is NOT AM radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner.

Smart phone can NOT function as a CB radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a radar detector.

Smart phone can NOT function as a regular pair of decent speakers.


in fairness, the Realistic 15" speakers couldnt function as a decent pair of speakers.

And if delivering the user the same primary function isnt "functioning as" what is?   You are trying to split hairs and are on the wrong side of logic here.  A phone CAN tell you where the radar is, a phone CAN stream CB radio signals.  A phone is every BIT as good as a police scanner, for THOUSANDS of locations.

Not only CAN your phone do these things, in nearly every case, it does them better with more range and more flexibility.
 
2014-01-17 09:16:23 AM  

I sound fat: guytoronto: Close, but no cigar. At best, 10/15.

Smart phone can NOT function as an AM radio. Streaming over the internet is NOT AM radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner.

Smart phone can NOT function as a CB radio.

Smart phone can NOT function as a radar detector.

Smart phone can NOT function as a regular pair of decent speakers.

in fairness, the Realistic 15" speakers couldnt function as a decent pair of speakers.

And if delivering the user the same primary function isnt "functioning as" what is?   You are trying to split hairs and are on the wrong side of logic here.  A phone CAN tell you where the radar is, a phone CAN stream CB radio signals.  A phone is every BIT as good as a police scanner, for THOUSANDS of locations.

Not only CAN your phone do these things, in nearly every case, it does them better with more range and more flexibility.


Your phone is nothing without the internet. And your last sentence is patently false.
 
2014-01-17 09:16:57 AM  

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: downstairs: jaylectricity: 13 of 15 of the items. Which two are not in your pocket? My first guess is radar detector.

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

If you have a smartphone you can get AM radio, but it's over the internet.

1030 AM WBZ

Ok, I was being a bit pedantic.  You can't actually get a straight AM stream direct over a smartphone or PC.  Which I've always thought was weird.

Crap... bad wording.  By "stream" I mean an actual signal.

Why would you want to? The Internet signal is digital and thus clearer and better than an AM signal


Not all of us live in the city.
 
2014-01-17 09:17:54 AM  

SansNeural: I call fake.

No amateur's car is that clean.


Heh.

I cleaned it up for the picture.

Also note:  The car is in drive.  When I went to take the picture, with the shifter in park, it obscure the Yaesu FT-1900R 2 meter rig.  So I put my foot on the brake, and put it in drive to take the picture.
 
2014-01-17 09:18:20 AM  
If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight. You can't count on a cell phone in the case of an actual emergency or disaster. Ask those people who stayed behind when Katrina hit who were up to their attics in water with zero bars. Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.
 
2014-01-17 09:20:57 AM  
a400.idata.over-blog.com
 
2014-01-17 09:21:46 AM  

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


Tune-in Radio and I Heart Radio apps stream in AM radio stations.
 
2014-01-17 09:22:48 AM  

ransack.: If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight.


Define "area".  My power was out last night, no lights around, and one of the first things I did was check the co-op's website to see how widespread the outage was.  10 years ago, I would have made a phone call to find that out.

Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.

If you're using battery-powered radios, sure.
 
2014-01-17 09:23:10 AM  

Dimming: dittybopper: Dimming: I listen to my local police/fire chatter all the time.  Hell, i can choose to listen to Chicago's too, and I live in the DC area.  Your smartphone can function as a police/fire scanner

No, it can't, because you aren't directly receiving those frequencies.  And if the cell infrastructure goes down or is jammed up because of a widespread emergency, which is perhaps the need to listen to police/fire chatter is most acute, then you're shiat out of luck.   You can do it when things are working properly, but things don't always work properly in an emergency.

I made a point to write the OPs original statement:  "your smartphone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner." before replying.  I'm saying it can.  My lighter functions as a bottle opener, my computer functions as a nightlight for my son, and my girlfriend functions as my therapist.  They aren't exactly those things, but they get the job done.


Function =\= result

In function, a police/fire scanner(or CB) does the receiving directly.  With a smart phone, the function is on a receiver elsewhere.  The output of that function is then relayed over the internet and accessed by your phone.  Yes, you can get the output from your phone, but only because you rely on a network and and other equipment on the other end of the network.

The phone's "function" in the case of streaming media, is to access the internet.  That is all.  Without the network and the equipment on the other end, it's non-functional except to play back locally stored files.

/some of you people have some severe conceptual disabilities
 
2014-01-17 09:24:09 AM  
Sorry...

There is not a CB radio on your iPhone. Using your phone as a phone is actually not the same thing. At all.

I also doubt that your iPhone has an AM/FM radio.

It also doesn't play CDs.

As mentioned before, it also doesn't have a radar detector built in.

Nor does it have headphones built in.

And yeah, I know how to use a phone book. I'm not retarded, but apparently you are. What a stupid article. Interesting concept, executed by someone with about a 4th grade education.

And "streaming" an internet AM radio station is not having an "AM receiver" in your phone. Not even close.
 
2014-01-17 09:25:01 AM  

ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.


When Imus was still with them, my uncle would listen to WFAN 660AM in New York all the way to work in Bar Harbor, ME on a clear day.
 
2014-01-17 09:25:19 AM  

cameroncrazy1984: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

I have an app that allows me to stream WGR 550-AM in Buffalo directly to my phone. Plus I Heart Radio and other apps exist for this purpose.


That's not AM radio, that's an internet stream. Call TFA when you have an actual AM tuner in side of your phone.
 
2014-01-17 09:31:34 AM  

ransack.: If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight. You can't count on a cell phone in the case of an actual emergency or disaster. Ask those people who stayed behind when Katrina hit who were up to their attics in water with zero bars. Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.


Ham radio *DID* save lives.

For large swaths areas of the Gulf, ham radio took over for 911 service.  In many stricken areas, it was essentially the only way to communicate with the outside world.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/old-technology-still-needed/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IITBpLQmmiI
 
2014-01-17 09:34:53 AM  
I always thought a fuzzbuster was actually a radar jammer, not just detector.
 
2014-01-17 09:36:37 AM  

dittybopper: This was my first ham radio, bought it brand new back in late 1989 or early 1990 after I had passed my novice test, but before I actually got my license in the mail:

I still use it, it's in my car and I use it for communicating with people in Morse code while I'm driving:


Where do you keep your Aldiss lamp and semaphore flags?

j/k
 
2014-01-17 09:37:22 AM  

Mikey1969: Sorry...

There is not a CB radio on your iPhone. Using your phone as a phone is actually not the same thing. At all.

I also doubt that your iPhone has an AM/FM radio.

It also doesn't play CDs.

As mentioned before, it also doesn't have a radar detector built in.

Nor does it have headphones built in.

And yeah, I know how to use a phone book. I'm not retarded, but apparently you are. What a stupid article. Interesting concept, executed by someone with about a 4th grade education.

And "streaming" an internet AM radio station is not having an "AM receiver" in your phone. Not even close.


My Android phones (HTC One, HTC Vivid), many other Android phones, and all Windows phones have real FM radios built into them, as does the iPod but not the iPhone. You have to plug in headphones to use the cord as an antenna, though. But many smartphones do contain a real FM radio. In fact many of the radio stations in my area air PSAs about this and how the internet doesn't work in a real disaster but a real radio will always give you the latest updates on situations.
 
2014-01-17 09:42:47 AM  

ransack.: Mikey1969: Sorry...

There is not a CB radio on your iPhone. Using your phone as a phone is actually not the same thing. At all.

I also doubt that your iPhone has an AM/FM radio.

It also doesn't play CDs.

As mentioned before, it also doesn't have a radar detector built in.

Nor does it have headphones built in.

And yeah, I know how to use a phone book. I'm not retarded, but apparently you are. What a stupid article. Interesting concept, executed by someone with about a 4th grade education.

And "streaming" an internet AM radio station is not having an "AM receiver" in your phone. Not even close.

My Android phones (HTC One, HTC Vivid), many other Android phones, and all Windows phones have real FM radios built into them, as does the iPod but not the iPhone. You have to plug in headphones to use the cord as an antenna, though. But many smartphones do contain a real FM radio. In fact many of the radio stations in my area air PSAs about this and how the internet doesn't work in a real disaster but a real radio will always give you the latest updates on situations.


An FM radio is not an AM/FM tuner, which is my point. Yeah, I had a phone with an FM tuner, too, but that doesn't change the fact that the author has no idea what they are talking about.
 
2014-01-17 09:44:13 AM  

theMightyRegeya: ransack.: If there's no electricity on your area, your phone is a flashlight.

Define "area".  My power was out last night, no lights around, and one of the first things I did was check the co-op's website to see how widespread the outage was.  10 years ago, I would have made a phone call to find that out.

Ham radio or cb would have saved lives.

If you're using battery-powered radios, sure.


Almost all ham radios take 12 volts standard.  That means you can run them off of a car alternator, car battery, solar system, generators, or off of 110 volt mains with a power supply (something all hams usually do anyway).  We can use pretty much any available source of power.

One of the things I like to use is one of those 12 volt car jump-start thingies.  Convenient to use and carry, and will let you run a 10 or 15 watt VHF/UHF station for a while, or a handheld radio (plugged into an external antenna) at 5 watts for a *LONG* time.

For example, I've got VHF and upper HF communications in my car.  Running the car at idle, a full tank of gas will last for a *LONG* time, and it will power those radios at full power (55 watts in the case of the FT-1900R) with no sweat.  Even with the ignition off, I can power the radios off of the battery at reduced power for a long time.

Every ham I know that gives even a passing thought to emergency communications has alternative ways to power their radios.  Before any serious weather, I make sure all the handhelds are charged up, and all the rechargeable batteries (for both the radios and things like lanterns) are charged.

Heck, every year, hams do "Field Day", where they haul out their generators, go to some spot, throw up antennas, and operate for a weekend just as a kind of test for that sort of thing.
 
2014-01-17 09:50:10 AM  

omeganuepsilon: Dimming: dittybopper: Dimming: I listen to my local police/fire chatter all the time.  Hell, i can choose to listen to Chicago's too, and I live in the DC area.  Your smartphone can function as a police/fire scanner

No, it can't, because you aren't directly receiving those frequencies.  And if the cell infrastructure goes down or is jammed up because of a widespread emergency, which is perhaps the need to listen to police/fire chatter is most acute, then you're shiat out of luck.   You can do it when things are working properly, but things don't always work properly in an emergency.

I made a point to write the OPs original statement:  "your smartphone can NOT function as a police/fire scanner." before replying.  I'm saying it can.  My lighter functions as a bottle opener, my computer functions as a nightlight for my son, and my girlfriend functions as my therapist.  They aren't exactly those things, but they get the job done.

Function =\= result

In function, a police/fire scanner(or CB) does the receiving directly.  With a smart phone, the function is on a receiver elsewhere.  The output of that function is then relayed over the internet and accessed by your phone.  Yes, you can get the output from your phone, but only because you rely on a network and and other equipment on the other end of the network.

The phone's "function" in the case of streaming media, is to access the internet.  That is all.  Without the network and the equipment on the other end, it's non-functional except to play back locally stored files.

/some of you people have some severe conceptual disabilities


holy fark, man.....you really like your scanners. Next time, I will make sure to take a page out of your book of Smugness and Nitpicking to lend credence to whatever hard-on I have for the word "function", and to make sure that everyone reading is really impressed with my feigned wisdom of all-things scanner and network related issues.

Here's a fact:  I can turn on my phone right now and listen to local and remote police and fire scanner feeds. It functions, in lieu of whatever awesome list of equipment you have or need or want, (or jerk off to) as a scanner.  Go pick a fight elsewhere.
 
2014-01-17 09:50:14 AM  

jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording


Unless I'm missing the sarcasm, try SACD (Super Audio CD) or even DVD-A (which is not a video DVD) Both formats failed because consumers don't care about quality and they were marketed horribly wrong with a focus on surround sound which has never worked well for music (example: quadraphonic)
 
2014-01-17 09:52:09 AM  

machoprogrammer: [a400.idata.over-blog.com image 640x480]


I have a ham sandwich.
img.fark.net
 
2014-01-17 09:56:55 AM  

jso2897: dameron: log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014.

Nah.  Expectations of this kind of tech was everywhere.   Hell, there's a fark cliche about flying cars that exploits that.  None of the things that you mentioned would be out of the question in the 40s with the exception of computers.  They had analogs to cell phones (DIck Tracy's video watch), electric cars (which really aren't at all futuristic), flat screens (all screens were flat in 1940, they were projections, so it wouldn't seem at all odd), solar panels mimic plants, video games are computers so they fall into my caveat above, microwave ovens would be seen just as an advance on the current ovens of the day, florescent lights were being sold in the last 30s, etc.

The access to information is what would gall someone from 1940.  I see this all the time when I have my in-laws (in their 80s) over to my house for movie night.  After the movie (which is often from the 40s or 50s) we chat about the actors, directors and such.  If they recall a specific scene, song, or moment in another film I can usually find it within a couple of minutes and send it to my television.

Also they'd probably shiat themselves more at the idea of a black woman and a white woman getting married and opening a pot farm in Colorado.

And, depending upon where your theoretical 1st century dude lived, he might consider his 10th century accommodations a huge step back and wonder where all his public works went.

And wonder he would, since he would be unable to understand a word that anybody was saying.
A man from 1940, today, would have the benefit of speaking the language.


Unless 1CE guy spoke Latin. Which, although it drifted, was pretty much the same.
 
2014-01-17 09:59:15 AM  

buckler: dittybopper: This was my first ham radio, bought it brand new back in late 1989 or early 1990 after I had passed my novice test, but before I actually got my license in the mail:

I still use it, it's in my car and I use it for communicating with people in Morse code while I'm driving:

Where do you keep your Aldiss lamp and semaphore flags?

j/k


Actually, the Aldiss lamp brings up a neat thing about Morse:  It's medium independent.  It doesn't have to be sent over a radio or a telegraph wire.   I can send and receive it any number of ways:  Visually, with something like the Aldiss lamp (or even a flashlight, or laser pointer), typing or writing it out (-.-. --.-), or even blinking it.  I can send it aurally, as any number of sounds.  I can even whistle it like a bird.   I can send or receive it by tapping on skin, so even a person who has lost their sight and hearing can be communicated with.  I can bang it on a pipe if I'm trapped somewhere.

It's a very versatile method of communicating, and it doesn't require advanced technology to use.  And as long as you have some form of voluntary control over your body, you can use it to communicate and even control a computer.
 
2014-01-17 10:10:47 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11

The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.


You're welcome.

Granted, you're still not broadcasting to everyone in the area, but you have the PTT feature, and you can use it to talk to your friends across the pond.
 
2014-01-17 10:10:48 AM  
Don't know if this has been mentioned but pro sports are generally not streamed. At least, not by radio stations.
 
2014-01-17 10:11:54 AM  

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


You can with a streaming app.
 
2014-01-17 10:14:25 AM  

jmayson: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

You can with a streaming app.


A streaming app doesn't make your phone a radio any more than using the front camera to look at yourself makes it a mirror
 
2014-01-17 10:15:54 AM  

dittybopper: Ed Grubermann: Mobile CB, $49.95. Ad says "You'll never drive 'alone' again!" iPhone.

Yeah, this one doesn't quite work. But who uses CBs anymore? Maybe after the Zombie Apocalypse takes out the internet and the cell phone system...

Actually, people in areas where you don't have any cell service (like much of the Adirondacks in New York, for example) use radio services like CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS, and Ham radio to keep in touch while mobile.  Best part is:  They work without any infrastructure, so no matter what happens, as long as the batteries hold out, you can communicate.

Also, if you go ahead and listen, CBs are used.  I used to keep one or two around as "just in case" radios, because not everyone has a ham radio license, but I've replaced them with FRS/GMRS radios, which are much more common anyway, and you don't have to listen to idiots with annoying reverb on their signal yelling obscenities.

/What is the point of an echobox anyway?


It's like autotune for truckers.  They got used to the roger beeps and 1kw linears, and needed something new.
 
2014-01-17 10:18:25 AM  

supayoda: TuteTibiImperes: markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11

The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.

You're welcome.

Granted, you're still not broadcasting to everyone in the area, but you have the PTT feature, and you can use it to talk to your friends across the pond.


Meh.  I could do that with a hand-held ham radio years ago, using VoIP-connected Echolink repeaters.

Remember talking to a ham in South Korea one time that way, and a bunch in English speaking nations like the UK and Australia.

And, of course, if I want to just talk to them directly, radio to radio with nothing in between but the ionosphere, I can grab the mike on my HF rig instead.
 
2014-01-17 10:19:27 AM  

pedrop357: It's like autotune for truckers.  They got used to the roger beeps and 1kw linears, and needed something new.


No wonder they end up sounding like Cher with cob up her ass.
 
2014-01-17 10:20:24 AM  

smask: log_jammin: But imagine a guy from 1940 coming to 2014. cell phones, electric cars, flat screens, computers, solar panels, video games, microwave ovens, dishwashers, florescent lights, stereos, etc.. just imagine how jarring that would be.

My dad is born in 1940. If it's technological, he will only learn which buttons in what order he has to press to get what he wants. If he managed to press the wrong button or the right buttons in the wrong order, he will resort to press every button on the remote until it works. And then I have to sort it out. He's had a stroke 16 years ago so motor coordination in his hands is bad. When I tell him to make a quick tap on a button, he will mash it. He hates computers with a gusto and everything with a menu. Unfortunately manufacturers put processors into everything they make now.


Your dad probably learned that the proper way to write that sentence is "My dad was born in 1940."
 
2014-01-17 10:24:01 AM  

ransack.: jmayson: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

You can with a streaming app.

A streaming app doesn't make your phone a radio any more than using the front camera to look at yourself makes it a mirror


No, but the end result is the same. And if you want to get really nitty gritty your phone IS a radio but using 3G/4G/LTE/Wi-Fi frequencies instead.
 
2014-01-17 10:29:29 AM  

AngryTeacher: 619-239-KING


Last time I checked, it wasn't Mojo's anymore. Saw him at the airport in San Diego back in 92.
 
2014-01-17 10:31:06 AM  

mediaseth: jaylectricity: My phone doesn't play CDs

/CDs are the best recording medium in the history of recording

Unless I'm missing the sarcasm, try SACD (Super Audio CD) or even DVD-A (which is not a video DVD) Both formats failed because consumers don't care about quality and they were marketed horribly wrong with a focus on surround sound which has never worked well for music (example: quadraphonic)


That's part of why those formats failed (well, not completely, but they're definitely a niche and not mainstream). Also, SACD was as much about DRM as it was about audio quality. Even though it's possible to buy DSD-capable recorders from Korg and Sony, an SACD player will only play discs that have been digitally signed, and only the pressing plants have the signing keys. You can't make your own SACDs, period.

You can author your own DVD-A discs, though - they don't need to be signed. You could also put high-quality audio on a video DVD with just a still image, if you felt like it.
 
2014-01-17 11:12:55 AM  

Alphax: Reminds me of my days working for a certain office supply store in the late 90s, and having octogenarians come in to buy an adding machine.  They'd try one out, pressing the buttons firmly but slowly, and soon some number would come up twice because he held it down too long.  'Why did it do that?  This is no good to me.  Show me a different one.'  Uh, they all do that when you hold the button down.


They're right, you know.

Think about it: why would you ever want a number key or operation key on a calculator to repeat if you hold it down? When would you ever want to say "enter this number again and again until I pull up my finger", instead of just hitting the key the right number of times? When would you want to enter a digit lots of times, and even if you did, why would you want to enter it an unpredictable number of times (because holding down a key for a specific number of repetitions is a stunt, not a useful data-entry operation)?

If people put up with repeating keys on calculator apps, it's just because they've learned thats how keys work in apps. Key repeat on a dedicated calculator is a dead stupid idea.
 
2014-01-17 11:13:07 AM  

downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.


Also, I can't record VHS tapes on a smartphone either.
 
2014-01-17 11:27:17 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: markie_farkie: Radar detector is built into smartphones, too?

NSA SEEKRIT FEETURZ!!!!11

The CB would be a stretch as well.  I guess you could theoretically consider the Nextel style 'push to talk' features that became popular for a period to be similar enough, but I don't think any modern handsets do that, and it's still not the same as broadcasting to everyone in the area.


I'd take the position that CB's served a totally different use than anything a smartphone currently does.  CB's were an open broadcast, anyone on the same channel/ frequency could hear you and respond.  It was sort of like a radio chat room.

/10-4 good buddy, keep one eye on the prize and the other out for bears
 
2014-01-17 11:31:11 AM  

salsashark1: Yawn.

Wake me up when technology can replicate Polaroid ex-girlfriend porn.


Not that far away. I was in walmart (against my wishes) a couple of weeks ago, and saw a digital camera with a printer built in. Of course, you have to buy cartridges of the appropriate print stock.  I commented to my wife that, after all of the technological innovations of the past 20 years, we've gone back to apparently being so excited that a camera can instantly print our photos.

Then I realized it's only a matter of time until they build an Instagram app into that camera, so that it can print out, instantly, discolored and blurry images.
 
2014-01-17 11:39:38 AM  

Ed Grubermann: I had a pair of those Mach Two speakers. Damned good sound for a $300.00 pair of speakers. Sadly, I don't have room in my house for them, nor do I have anything to plug them into.


Those were some good speakers. A lot of people slag on Radio Shack stereo equipment, but some of it was quite good. Most of their stuff was made by Pioneer, Matsushiata (Technics), TEAC, etc. Some of it was made by CEC, which is an OEM for a lot of well-respected brands.
 
2014-01-17 11:41:06 AM  

ImpendingCynic: ransack.: Because AM radio still works from 100 miles away when all the cell towers around have been destroyed by a nuclear weapon?

AM can go a lot farther than that. Last time I was in Seattle, I was able to pick up KFI and KFWB from Los Angeles over the air. My dad once told me that when he was a kid in L.A. in the 50s, he used to be able to pick up AM radio from Chicago.


Beacuse of sciency-type stuff an AM station's effective range at night can be many, many times greater than it's daylight range.  So much greater that for a long time you could (barely) pick up WABC in New York from places like New Mexico.

50,000 wats can go a long way in the right conditions.
 
2014-01-17 11:46:55 AM  

HMS_Blinkin: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

Also, I can't record VHS tapes on a smartphone either.


But where would you play it?

I have a VHS of my wedding around somewhere, but I don't have a single device in the house that will play it. Whenever I find it, I'm going to send it off to one of those services that converts it to digital.

These days, I'd just copy the video from my phone to my media server, and I'd have it essentially forever.
 
2014-01-17 12:15:36 PM  
For all your nostalgia needs.

Old Radio Shack Catalogs and Ads
 
2014-01-17 12:24:38 PM  
i1282.photobucket.com Has not caught a virus or any malware in one hundred years and gets me to come in when dinner is ready.
Radio crap the store where you need two of something, like a switch, they will have one.
 
2014-01-17 01:12:49 PM  

ryan_n_waggoner: salsashark1: Yawn.

Wake me up when technology can replicate Polaroid ex-girlfriend porn.

Not that far away. I was in walmart (against my wishes) a couple of weeks ago, and saw a digital camera with a printer built in. Of course, you have to buy cartridges of the appropriate print stock.  I commented to my wife that, after all of the technological innovations of the past 20 years, we've gone back to apparently being so excited that a camera can instantly print our photos.

Then I realized it's only a matter of time until they build an Instagram app into that camera, so that it can print out, instantly, discolored and blurry images.


f.fastcompany.net

/obvious, really
 
2014-01-17 01:17:18 PM  

Ishkur: Yes. Your iphone can do all those things.

But it can't do any of them well.


^^ So much this.
 
2014-01-17 01:25:45 PM  
Can someone interpret this for me? I already wasted five minutes and got no where:
"Some people like to spend $3 on a cup of coffee. While that sounds like a gamble I probably wouldn't take, I'll always like to gamble -- especially as little as three bucks -- on what I might be able to dig up on Buffalo and Western New York, our collective past, and what it means for our future. "
 
2014-01-17 01:45:02 PM  

GibbyTheMole: Ed Grubermann: I had a pair of those Mach Two speakers. Damned good sound for a $300.00 pair of speakers. Sadly, I don't have room in my house for them, nor do I have anything to plug them into.

Those were some good speakers. A lot of people slag on Radio Shack stereo equipment, but some of it was quite good. Most of their stuff was made by Pioneer, Matsushiata (Technics), TEAC, etc. Some of it was made by CEC, which is an OEM for a lot of well-respected brands.


Some of their ham equipment was quite good also.

For example, the HTX-202 (and it's UHF twin, the HTX-404).  At a time when all the other manufacturers were touting wide receiver coverage, Radio Shack built essentially an Icom IC-02 handheld that was 2 meters only (144-148 MHz).  That meant they could make the receiver quite sensitive and still basically "intermod proof".  It was a quality piece of equipment, I carried one for years, also using it as a mobile rig (put out a solid 6 watts on 13.8 volts).  Never had a problem with intermod with it.


Another piece of equipment that they made well was their 5/8ths wave 2 meter magmount antenna.  I *STILL* have one on my car, and it still works great despite being something like 15 years old now.

Then again, they had crappy radios like the HTX-252 mobile radio.
 
2014-01-17 01:54:04 PM  
My 2 cents...

If you just take the smart phone by itself, it cannot perform all the tasks that indicated by the advertisement.   It requires additional hardware, not least of which is a big-assed cell phone tower in proximity.   The smart phone is not a complete system, whereas a radar detector  is a complete system.

Hooking up a space telescope to the Internet doesn't make everyones smart phone a space telescope just because they can view the results on a browser.

Having said that...the submitter says "Everything on this 1991 Radio Shack advertisement you can now do on your phone...".  Not 'Your phone is a radar detector'.   This seems functionally correct if you tweak the requirements from "Plays a CD" to "Plays music from a CD" or "Detects local police radar" to "Makes you aware of nearby police speed traps".
 
2014-01-17 02:12:46 PM  
I don't know about you but my phone has 15" woofers.
 
2014-01-17 02:13:24 PM  

jmayson: ransack.: jmayson: downstairs: Not to be picky, but I don't believe you can get AM radio directly on a smartphone.  No idea why, and I haven't tried in years... but when I did (on a PC) it was always FM only.

You can with a streaming app.

A streaming app doesn't make your phone a radio any more than using the front camera to look at yourself makes it a mirror

No, but the end result is the same. And if you want to get really nitty gritty your phone IS a radio but using 3G/4G/LTE/Wi-Fi frequencies instead.


You're missing the point that has been made earlier in this thread, which is without various apps and/or cell service, your phone alone cannot provide you with these services.

Conversely, these individual items like HAM, CB, AM radios will continue to work.

For example, during Katrina cell service was barely functional for several days. A cellphone with no data couldn't be used to hear emergency AM broadcasts or contact people for help.
 
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