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(The Kitchn)   Fark Food Thread: What makes a good soup? Is your go-to soup hearty or lighter fare? Have a tried-and-true recipe or do you just use whatever's handy? Help keep us warm now and all year long with your recipes   (thekitchn.com) divider line 214
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925 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jan 2014 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-16 06:37:03 PM  
Roasted Garlic and Onion Soup
2heads of garlic, roasted
6 onions, sliced
1 bottle of beer - some for you, some for the soup
2tsp thyme
Salt & pepper
Heavy cream

Roast your garlic in the oven.  When that is done, slice and sauté the onions in a little butter and olive oil, until soft and clear.  Deglaze your pan with what's left of the beer you're drinking. Add the roasted garlic, thyme, and 3 or 4 cups of heavy cream.   Reduce for a few minutes, and add salt and pepper to taste.  Open another beer, get a nice baguette, and strap on the feed bag
 
2014-01-16 06:38:46 PM  
Three of my favorite soups:

Pumpkin Curry Soup
(This one was given to me by a friend and it changes a little every time I make it but it's always good and I make it at least once every fall)

1 medium onion, chopped
1 big and one little can of pumpkin puree
1 box of swanson's broth
1 or 2 cans of coconut milk (depending on how much coconut flavor and fat you want)
1/2 cup??? of sour cream or plain yogurt (I actually have NO CLUE how much of that I add, but it is HUGELY important for the savory tang)
1/4 cup honey (this is very much to taste)
Curry powder, I like some of the Pakistani mixes I got from my roomie in college, thai curry paste works well for some heat, too, but it doesn't have as many complex flavors as Paki/Indian curries.
Garlic: lots, I use granulated when I don't have fresh or am lazy (most of the time)
Pumpkin pie spice, or your preferred mix of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg +/- cloves
2-3 tbspn of peanut butter.
I use soy for salting and lemon or lime juice if I need some last minute zip. Spiced rum or brandy is also occasionally an additive.

Pretty much saute the onion in a little oil, then add the pumpkin, coconut milk, and broth. The sour cream or yogurt you will need to temper a bit before trying to add them, or they will clump. Then start adding flavoring ingredients to taste.
Add honey last, as that's the hardest to get just so. The tang from the dairy and the savory spices with the garlic should be addictive when you taste it, otherwise it's not right. My biggest problem with this soup is knowing when to walk away and call it done.

Curry Fish Soup

(This is a new one I kind of made up this year, compiling a few recipes and whatever I thought might be good, like the thai chicken broth, which I found in the grocery store and felt I *had* to try and the veggies, which were leftover from my CSA.  It was an experiment I will be repeating)

Ingredients
2 pounds white fish (cod)
1 onion
4 cloves garlic
bok choy (or other leafy green)
3 sweet potatoes
sweet peppers (1-1.5 cups chopped)
1 box thai flavored chicken broth
2 bay leaves
carrots
1 can coconut milk and the cream of one can
1-2 tablespoons fish sauce

Method:

season fish with olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic, and thai red spice mix
bake at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes
soften onion and garlic
add bay leaves
add potatoes and carrots
simmer for 20 minutes
add peppers and bok choy
add coconut milk and cream
simmer for 10-15 minutes
add fish sauce
add baked fish, broken into small pieces


Delicata Creamy Squash Soup

(And this one was shamelessly stolen from AllRecipes but I love it and I use it as a base soup in the winter, adding kale, sweet corn, sausage, chicken or whatever to make the soup I want.  It's delicious alone or with anything in it and you can substitute butternut squash )

INGREDIENTS:
3 delicata squash, halved lengthwise and
seeded
1 onion, chopped
3 cups vegetable broth
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons butter
salt to taste
ground black pepper to taste
DIRECTIONS:
1.Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Place the squash, cut sides down, in a baking dish. Add 1/8 inch water in baking dish, cover with foil and bake 35-40 minutes or until tender. Cool.
2.In a large saucepan, melt butter. Add onion and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally until onion is softened but not brown.
3.Scrape the squash out of the flesh and add to onions. Add the stock and heavy cream. Cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, about 25 minutes.
4.Puree the soup in a blender or food processor. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve.
 
2014-01-16 06:46:57 PM  
So many recipes, so many ingredients and techniques.

Vegetable stock usually tastes like, well, a watery compost pile. Little flavor, no collagen for body. I usually buy dried shiatake mushrooms, grind them to a very fine powder and add to the pot. They thicken it and add some much-needed umami
 
2014-01-16 06:48:55 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Silly question: these threads pop up routinely; has anyone tried another Farker's recipe? Success? "OMGhowcouldyoueatthis?" Does anyone compile a book of "The Best of Fark Food Threads" recipes?


Great idea. I have a ton of these threads bookmarked in my favorites folder for recipes. :)
 
2014-01-16 06:53:30 PM  
I don't always make soup from scratch, but when I do, it's with kielbasa.  Seriously, even the smallest part of kielbasa noticeably improves a soup.  Also, I put in pearled barley.  It's not something you see everyday.  People be like, 'what dat?'  'Dat's barley, fool'.
 
2014-01-16 06:55:19 PM  
Exhaustion, dehydration and starvation. They turn a soup into something awesome.
 
2014-01-16 07:08:24 PM  
A great secret to hearty soup is roux.  And the great secret to roux is that you can make it easily in the microwave!  Roux comes in four primary colors, called "blond", "caramel", "brown" and "chocolate".  The lighter color thickens more, and the darker color is more flavorful.

You have to have a four cup Pyrex measuring bowl, a large metal spoon to stir the roux with, and a hot pad to pick up the bowl.

The proportion is 3/4 cup fats (liquified) or oils, to 1 cup of flour.  My favorite combination is 1 stick of butter (1/2 cup) and 1/4 cup bacon grease.  But you can use vegetable oil, olive oil, corn oil, canola, peanut, etc., as well as beef lard or chicken fat.

At first it should be a thick mix, but it thins over time.

Use great caution as it becomes extremely hot.

Cook on high for 3 minutes, watching constantly to insure it does not boil over, stirring if it tries to.
After this time, it should be blond in color, and with each additional minute it should darken to caramel then chocolate color.  It will continue to darken when stirring so take it out of the oven a few shades too light.

A great trick is to freeze the roux in the Pyrex container, then remove it and split it up, putting about a cubic inch each in plastic bags as single portions.  Then when you want to add roux to your sauce, soup, stew or other dish, just take out a cube and throw it in the pot.

Roux opens the door to magnificent sauces, four of the five French "master sauces", from which many other sauces are derived.

Béchamel Sauce also known as white sauce, is made with a roux of butter and flour cooked in milk.  It is used as the base for other sauces (such as Mornay sauce, which is Béchamel with cheese).

Sauce Espagnole, a fortified brown veal stock sauce, thickened with a brown roux.

Sauce Velouté (velvet), a light stock (one in which the bones used have not been previously roasted), such as chicken or fish stock, is thickened with a blond roux.

Sauce Tomate, it consists of salt belly of pork, onions, bay leaves, thyme, tomato purée or fresh tomatoes, blond roux, garlic, salt, sugar, and pepper.

Even with all these sauces, my favorite roux is chocolate roux, because it gives tremendous character to other dishes.  It is an essential part of Cajun cuisine, but works well in many American seafood, soups and stews, giving them delicious depth and richness.
 
2014-01-16 07:16:59 PM  
I would have to say that, generally,  good flavor makes a soup good.  That's my expert opinion.
 
2014-01-16 07:20:39 PM  

PolloDiablo: Gonz: IF you're making your own chicken stock, find an ethnic grocery in your area and buy feet. Throw a few in your stockpot, freeze the rest. I believe the traditional ratio was around two per carcass, but three will thicken up a full pot really well.

When you take the stock out of the fridge the next day, you'll notice a difference. Chicken Jell-o.

 I use pig's feet in my pozole for exactly the same reason, it gives the broth a really nice body that you just can't otherwise get.


Ye gods, no. Or, at least I don't. I raised those animals. I know where those feet have been. I don't care how much they've been washed.

I use leg quarters. If I want schmaltz I'll bake it out in a roasting pan first, then skin and pressure cook for an hour. I take the meat out, then pressure cook for another hour. There's your aspic, and no feet.

As for spices and flavors I use parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, pickling salt, white pepper, and lemon juice.
 
2014-01-16 07:26:34 PM  
Egg Drop Soup...

My gosh, I haven't dug out my ol' recipe book in entire geological ages, but I will tell y'all the secret to good egg drop soup.

It's cheap, easy, and lightweight, but it will stick to your ribs.

I generally use one to one and a half teaspoons of corn starch or potato starch per 3 eggs.

Mix it into the eggs, whup the hell out of them, then pour them into already simmering broth.

The starch will make the egg mixture shred as it's poured in, instead of forming flash-cooked eggylumps.

The stock or broth for egg drop soup can be just about any clear broth you like, although I'd draw the line at non-Japanese fish-based stock. That's just me.

If I put veggies in the broth such as carrots, they go in first, and are sliced thinly so they'll cook fast.

Garnishes such as chives or green onions go in last.

No more than a pinch of salt, and if you want it, white pepper.

If you have ethnic food shops in your town, or online access to Chinese grocery websites, potato starch is even better than corn starch as an add-in thickener for soup stock.
 
2014-01-16 07:28:25 PM  
Easiest, bestest chicken soup evar!

Take small chicken, put in big pot (take out little baggie of stored nasties inside of chicken first).
Take baby carrots, put some in (however the hell much you want, I use half a bag or so, no chop-chop just drop in)
Take celery, put some in (however the hell much you want, I use about half the bag, cut in 1 inch chunks, or 2 inch, or 3 inch or whatever, you lazy basterd)
Take onion, put some in (however the hell much you want, I use 2 big uns.  Peel them first, idiot, and chop em up to somewhere between 3mm and 2 inch chunks)
Cut up some potato and put it in pot(1 big tater is usually good enough)
Put in some herbs(whatever the hell types you like.  I use thyme, sage, and oregano.  Fresh, dried, these things matter not.)
Put in half a can of diced tomato(throw the other half in your neighbors mailbox, or whatever you do when you are drunk and have an extra half can of tomato, I wont judge you.)
Cover with water and cook(that means supply heat source, from under the damn pot)
45 minutes after boil started, take out chicken.--Use big tongs and slide it right in that chicken cavity and just yank it out.
Put chicken someplace else, like a bowl or something.
Let other stuff in pot keep simmering(that means very low boil)  no lid, smells good with no lid.
Once chicken has gone Lohan(from hot to not hot) pull meat from chicken.
Turn off hot stuff under pot of stuff.
Stick immersion blender in pot and immersion blend the shiat out of it.
Add salt, pepper, dash of hot sauce, or whatever you like to make flavor enhanced.
Add chicken back to pot.
TADA!  Soup!

Actually very good soup, taught to me by grandmother.  Nice and thick and hearty, not racist(white and dark meat).
Oh, and don't forget to drink beer while making soup.(not crap beer)
When I serve it, I put a little grated parmesan into it for extra salty goodness.
 
2014-01-16 07:33:36 PM  
My super simple clam chowder.  It's pretty darn good.  Easy too.

1 medium onion
2 stalks celery
2 tablespoons of butter
3 tablespoons of flour
1 container heavy cream (1 1/2 cups or so)
2 bay leaves
2-3 large potatoes
1 large can of clams (not the little cat food tin sized cans, the large can-of-kidney-beans size)
2 cups chicken stock

Cube the onion and the celery. Pieces should be about the size of your pinky fingernail.
Add the butter and sweat over medium heat until onions start to get clear.
Add the flour and whisk until everything is mixed evenly.
Cube the potatoes. Pieces should be about the size of your thumbnail.
Add the stock (two cups of water and 2 chicken bullion cubes would work), the heavy cream, the juice from the can of clams (reserve the clams for later), bay leaves, and potatoes.
Bring up to a simmer, just to where it wants to boil. But don't let it boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 20-30 minutes or until the potatoes are soft.
Add the clams, a dash of salt and pepper, simmer for 2 more minutes.
Done!
Optional garnish with fresh finely chopped parsley or chives, a little splash in the middle. Maybe another dash of pepper on top.
 
2014-01-16 07:35:44 PM  
Awesome tortilla soup and/or southwest chili:

Brown two pounds ground beef, as it becomes almost brown add chopped onions, garlic, and jalapeno. After about a minute pour two cans of corn (drained of juice), 3 cans of Ranch Style Beans (black label with white print), and two cans of beef broth plus cube of vegetable bouillon. Add at least one packet worth of ranch dressing seasoning. Simmer. Serve in bowl with cheese and tortilla chips.
 
2014-01-16 07:45:31 PM  

LlamaGirl: My French onion soup is pretty awesome. I caramelize a farkton of onions to make it, which is a pain in the butt. It sure is worth it in the end though.

/the secret is worchestershire sauce


Try making the onions in a huge batch in the slow cooker/crock pot!
http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-caramelize-onions-in-the-slow-cooker -c ooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-193413

Slice them up, and let the slow cooker do the work.
 
2014-01-16 07:52:15 PM  
Tomatoes ripened here just before Christmas, so I use a passatutto (rotary sieve) to seed, skin, and puree them.
Then I put the puree in a stainless pot with fresh herbs and bring to a rolling boil.
Put that stuff in hot, sterilized mason jars. You don't have to process them. The jars will seal and you'll have tomato base for every kind of soup. Just please, make sure your jars and lids are sterile. It would break my heart to hear you got the trots from bad tomatoes.
We like cannellinis in it, also braised vegetables. Kale is good, too.
S.O. and I are meatless now, but we used to put some good sausage in puree.
 
2014-01-16 08:03:37 PM  
Tinola. Fresh fish, onion, garlic tomato, ginger and chili peppers in a fish or veggie stock. You can also make it with chicken, or pork soup bones. Add a little chopped cabbage and a small potato for rhe latter two and use chicken stock instead of fish stock. Eat it over rice in a soup plate. (Don't eat the ginger or chilis: they're just there to add flavor to the stock.)
 
2014-01-16 08:15:26 PM  
I will use V8 sometimes to add something indefinable to Vegetable soups, Also is good in Tortilla soup.
 
2014-01-16 08:17:30 PM  

Sapper_Topo: SOUPS!!!! If there is one food I love its soups. I make so many I couldnt list all the recipes in this thread. But if you have a soup you like and dont know how to make hit me up I probably have a recipe handed down from my grandmother. Who BTW was IMHO the best soup maker in the history of soupdom!


--
hey, I love grandma-type recipes - any idea if Yukon Gold potatoes can be used in potato leek soup?
And does grandma have that recipe? :)
 
2014-01-16 08:19:53 PM  

nanim: Sapper_Topo: SOUPS!!!! If there is one food I love its soups. I make so many I couldnt list all the recipes in this thread. But if you have a soup you like and dont know how to make hit me up I probably have a recipe handed down from my grandmother. Who BTW was IMHO the best soup maker in the history of soupdom!

--
hey, I love grandma-type recipes - any idea if Yukon Gold potatoes can be used in potato leek soup?
And does grandma have that recipe? :)


Yukon Gold are a good choice for soup or stew. They don't get mealy and fall apart the way Russets do.  Color might be a little weird, though.
 
2014-01-16 08:20:58 PM  
I make a killer split pea soup.  I could tell you how, but then my farts would lose their potency.
 
2014-01-16 08:27:37 PM  

abhorrent1: ArcadianRefugee: Silly question: these threads pop up routinely; has anyone tried another Farker's recipe? Success? "OMGhowcouldyoueatthis?" Does anyone compile a book of "The Best of Fark Food Threads" recipes?

I have. It was last year and some kind of crock pot think. Can't remember exactly and unfortunately didn't save it. I do remember it was awesome though.

/wish I could remember and find it again


Dear God yes! Farkers are ridiculously talented in the kitchen  and there are quite a few pros on here.  I have a Word document that I copy and paste to regularly.  Hubiestubert's sick soup just got added.
 
2014-01-16 08:31:15 PM  
Mongo Madness: more of a stew than a soup. Soak a 250 gram package of mongo (mung) beans in water for 3 hours. Drain. Peel and cube a carrot and a medium potato. Chop a medium onion and 8 cloves of garlic. Chop a large tomato and (optional) a small red bell pepper. Slice up 6 or 7 hot peppers (jalapenos will do nicely.) Chop up a large handfull of greens of some sort. Cube a piece of pork shoulder about half the size of your fist.

Simmer the mongos and carrots for 30 minutes until tender. Drain and set aside. In a large skillet or sauteuse, put the pork in some water and cook until all the water evaporates. Add a couple tablespoons of oil and the onions and garlic. Cook until those are tender. Add the potato, tomato and peppers. Cook a few minutes. Add 4 tablespoons of soy sauce, one each pork and tamarind Knorr cube and two chicken Knorr cubes. Stir and cook until the Knor cubes have dissolved. Add lots of water, cover and simmer until potatoes are tender. Add the mongos and carrots. Simmer for 45 minutes. Add the greens. Turn off the heat and let it cool a bit. Add some salt and pepper to taste. Eat over rice.
 
2014-01-16 08:32:11 PM  
I stumbled on the recipe linked below and it's fantastic.

Chicken Tortilla soup
*One of the listed ingredients is a can of "Rotel Tomatoes And Green Chilies". That certainly works, but I like using the Habenero version. It' doesn't make the soup " blow your ears off hot ", but it does give a nice spice.
oh, I also use a cast iron pan to cook the chicken. Then use same pan to saute the veggies (fond = good).
 
2014-01-16 08:42:59 PM  
Cabbage soup: chop a cabbage, a large onion and some garlic. Cube a canned Danish ham, or slice up a Polish sausage. Peel and cube 2 potatoes. Simmer everything in lots of water with plenty of seasoning salt added, until veggies are tender. Add 2 or 3 tablespoons each of mustard and horseradish. Let cool then stir in a cup of sour cream at room temperature. Adjust seasonings and eat. This is very good in cold weather.
 
2014-01-16 08:43:35 PM  
BAKED POTATO SOUP

8 baking potatoes, baked
1 qt. chicken stock
2 cups sour cream
2 cups heavy cream
3 cups shredded cheese
10 slices of bacon cooked
1 bunch of green onions sliced

Wash and lightly oil potatoes, bake at 350 until tender. Set aside to cool.  Heat stock, cook bacon and let cool.  When potatoes have cooled cut in half and scoop out potato into bowl, lightly mash leaving small bits.  Chop bacon into bits. Add potatoes, bacon, sour cream, heavy cream to heated chicken stock, stir adding salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with green onions,  Lay on couch after eating, your not going to want to move for a while.
 
2014-01-16 08:44:47 PM  
OH and cheese throw in the damn cheese!
 
2014-01-16 08:50:09 PM  
Cooked elbow macaroni and baked beans. Voila: Elbow Farts!
 
2014-01-16 08:58:02 PM  
Make a beef stew with plenty of meat, potatoes, onions and celery. Go easy on the carrots and hold the tomatoes. Add a cup of red wine and 2 or 3 teaspoons each of sweet spices: cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg. Add lots of freshly-ground black pepper. The combo of beef, onions, pepper, wine and sweet spices is awesome! I made this for a potluck once, and everybody thought I was a gourmet and demanded the recipe, like I ever follow a recipe to make stew.
 
2014-01-16 09:06:38 PM  

vinniethepoo: Cabbage soup: chop a cabbage, a large onion and some garlic. Cube a canned Danish ham, or slice up a Polish sausage. Peel and cube 2 potatoes. Simmer everything in lots of water with plenty of seasoning salt added, until veggies are tender. Add 2 or 3 tablespoons each of mustard and horseradish. Let cool then stir in a cup of sour cream at room temperature. Adjust seasonings and eat. This is very good in cold weather.


I should have said, let it cool just enough that the sour cream doesn't curdle when you add it. The soup should still be quite warm when served.
 
2014-01-16 09:13:03 PM  
Just add water
i265.photobucket.com
Also great for hangovers
 
2014-01-16 09:16:04 PM  
My "go to" soup is  . . .  chili.

That's right. Chili is considered a damn soup.

Chop 1 large yellow onion and sautee until clear in bacon grease. Season with salt, black pepper and garlic powder to taste plus a heaping palm full of chili powder.
Add 1lb of ground 80/20 hamburger and brown the meat.
Add one 6oz. can of tomato paste and two to three 6oz. cans of water.
Add one can of Rotel tomatoes.
Simmer uncovered until thickened (reduced). Taste and add more chili powder and/or salt if needed at this time.
If you want, once thickened, add one or two cans of drained red kidney beans, a little water and re-heat. Don't eat it yet.
Let it cool and refrigerate it overnight, re-heat it the next day. Microwaving is OK, just cover it because the beans tend to explode. I usually just scoop mine out of the bowl with a Saltine instead of a spoon, it should be that thick.

There are a million ways to make chili; this is just a simple, basic recipe that works for me.
 
2014-01-16 09:34:07 PM  

Thorny4Pie: Honest Bender: First you're gonna need a stone.

Up until a few weeks ago, I would have had no clue what this meant.


Well clue me that fark in, because I'm lost.  Is it that stupid parable about government?
 
2014-01-16 09:36:33 PM  
Just made an huitlacoche/potato/jalapeno soup w/ oaxaca cheese croutons.  I extrapolated from this recipe.

http://recipes.idahopotato.com/idaho-potato-and-huitlacoche-soup-wit h- oaxaca-cheese-croutons/
 
2014-01-16 09:42:03 PM  

Lsherm: Thorny4Pie: Honest Bender: First you're gonna need a stone.

Up until a few weeks ago, I would have had no clue what this meant.

Well clue me that fark in, because I'm lost.  Is it that stupid parable about government?


Stone Soup
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-01-16 09:42:50 PM  

praxcelis: This is my kids' favorite soup of all.  In cold weather I make it two or three times a month.  It can be made in a slow cooker if you're not home during the day but it's better if you can baby it along and adjust the seasoning as you go.

Potato Leek Soup
  2 leeks
  1 medium  sweet onion
  1 large  russet potato -- peeled and diced
  3 large  white potato -- peeled and diced (Yukon Gold)
  1 stick  butter
  4 cups  chicken stock
salt -- to taste
white pepper -- to taste

Melt butter in stock pot
Trim and chop leeks and onions
Sweat leeks and onions in melted butter until translucent (10 minutes)
Add diced potatoes
Saute until potatoes are softened (about 5 minutes)
Add chicken stock
Simmer at least 2 hours, adjusting seasoning as necessary
Puree with immersion blender or food processor
Serve with fresh chives


I do something very similar and it's a huge hit at our place.
 
vpc
2014-01-16 09:59:34 PM  
I love soup. And crock pot FTW. Now I want boullabaisse (Nero Wolfe's recipe, with a few modifications).  What I did earlier this week will have to suffice:

Easy-peasy thai coconut soup
1 can unsweet coconut milk
1 can chicken broth
3 cups water
1 lb diced chicken bits
2 king oyster mushrooms sliced thin
1 head broccoli chopped up
1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated
2 stalks lemongrass, cleaned but not chopped
2 tbsp oil
salt and black pepper to taste
1/2 tsp chinese five-spice
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 c fresh cilantro chopped small

Heat oil, sautee ginger, lemongrass and chicken. When chicken is half-cooked, add all the rest of the ingredients except the cilantro and stir. When chicken completely cooked and broccoli soft, take out the lemongrass, add cilantro, then serve. Om nom nom. Makes lots.

Adjust seasonings and add other vegetables as you wish.
 
2014-01-16 10:10:39 PM  

Honest Bender: Lsherm: Thorny4Pie: Honest Bender: First you're gonna need a stone.

Up until a few weeks ago, I would have had no clue what this meant.

Well clue me that fark in, because I'm lost.  Is it that stupid parable about government?

Stone Soup


It does not surprise me that a tale about community cooperation could be used as the basis of a joke about socialism.
 
2014-01-16 10:54:43 PM  

FrancoFile: nanim: Sapper_Topo: SOUPS!!!! If there is one food I love its soups. I make so many I couldnt list all the recipes in this thread. But if you have a soup you like and dont know how to make hit me up I probably have a recipe handed down from my grandmother. Who BTW was IMHO the best soup maker in the history of soupdom!

--
hey, I love grandma-type recipes - any idea if Yukon Gold potatoes can be used in potato leek soup?
And does grandma have that recipe? :)

Yukon Gold are a good choice for soup or stew. They don't get mealy and fall apart the way Russets do.  Color might be a little weird, though.


I posted my potato leek recipe earlier. I use a combination of russet and Yukon gold for flavor and texture. The russet helps when pureed, gives the soup a more even texture. Actually, I do this with almost every potato dish, the combination is better than either alone.
 
2014-01-16 11:56:50 PM  
My Filipina mother-in-law once made an awesome soup with mung beans, onions, tinapa (a kind of smoked fish), yellow squash, coconut milk and tumeric. OK, the tinapa in it wasn't that great (not bad, either) but everything else was fantastic.
 
2014-01-17 12:15:33 AM  
Late to the thread (fell asleep actually) but here goes:
I enjoy all types of soup, and don't mind having it as a starter or meal, hearty or clear.
There's this concoction I enjoy when I've been exercising and/or dieting and want to have a power soup without feeling like I'm cutting myself short.
This one is extremely simple and on the clear side, with minimal additional flavoring and spices.

Get some pieces of meat, preferably on the bone. I personally use lamb to get a bit more flavor.
Bring water to boil.
Add salt until it stops tasting bland and starts tasting more like saltwater. You might want to rinse your mouth to clear your mouth so you don't over-salt the thing.
Once boiling, add either black pepper or ground red pepper to taste.
A touch of olive oil, maybe 1-2 table spoons.
Drop in the pieces of meat.
Cook until the meat softens.
Drop in the veggies of your choice.
The meat should be separating from the bones as the veggies are done.
Remove bones.
Enjoy.

My preference of veggies is potatoes, carrots, celery, green peas.
I usually like my veggies a bit crisp, so I don't over cook.
That said, I have, once or twice, added the peeled potatoes when I threw in the meat and let it dissolve from all the cooking to add thickness to the soup.

Simple, tasty and a meal in its own right.

Hope you like.
 
2014-01-17 02:16:18 AM  
Best soup ever:

2 Tbs. olive oul
1 head garlic, split into cloves, peeled, chopped  (less if you don't love garlic, but then why would you be making this then?)
4 cups (1 qt.) homemade or low-salt chicken broth
8 oz. fresh or frozen cheese tortellini
8 oz Italian Sausage, casing removed, sliced (I often use cooked Italian chicken sausage)
14 oz. canned diced tomatoes, with their liquid
10 oz. baby spinach, washed and stemmed
Grated parmigiano reggiano

Saute garlic until just fragrant (don't let it get brown or even really golden). Add broth, bring to boil. Add sausage, then tortellini (if sausage is raw, let it go a few minutes before tortellini goes in). Cook tortellini about half the time you would normally cook it (probably 5 minutes, but if fresh maybe just a minute or two). Add canned tomatoes and spinach. Simmer until spinach is wilted (a couple of minutes). Serve and grate cheese over it (a good amount).

It's garlicky, warming, lovely soup. It's a meal in itself, but a slice of crusty Italian bread is nice with it. Did I mention the garlic? It's wonderful and sweet...

(I'll also note that the next day it's still wonderful, but a lot of the broth gets absorbed so I usually add a bit more broth to leftovers in the Tupperware before it goes in the frig.)
 
2014-01-17 03:30:12 AM  
Late to the thread as usual, but my latest obsession is adding a few heads of roasted garlic to my soups.

I roast the heads by cutting off the top centimeter or so - exposing the cloves - then drizzling with extra virgin olive oil, sprinkling black pepper and garlic salt, and wrapping them up in foil with a bay leaf or two. Roast at 400 for 40 minutes.

When the garlic heads have cooled, squeeze the roasted garlic out like toothpaste onto a plate and mash it up and homogenize it well. The paste you get is like the concentrated essence of savory deliciousness.

Paste from 2 or 3 roasted heads dissolved into a pot of soup -- chicken, potato, whatever -- right before it's done really adds a savory richness and layer of complexity that brings a good soup to the next level.
 
2014-01-17 03:43:52 AM  

Old_Chief_Scott: My all time favorite is to get some smoked ham hocks and render them down for the stock. Once you get them simmering for several hours the meat (which there is a surprising amount of) will strip off easily. Add beans. Sometimes I do those 15 bean packages, then add a couple of onions to the pot about 30 minutes before serving.


Don't forget the savory! Lima beans with hamhocks seasoned with savory are great. So would any other beans be, cooked like this.
 
2014-01-17 06:29:16 AM  
Cream of mushroom and chicken noodle, both used as a dip for a PB&J sammich
 
2014-01-17 07:54:33 AM  

Honest Bender: First you're gonna need a stone.


OK, I'm stoned, now what.

Epicedion: maddman: they have recipes and it will make a piping hot soup in like 15 min.  But they are all neon colors and by nature, thin.  THey taste good but need something to keep me from thinking I my drinking my soup.

Why not just nuke a can of V8?


V8 and Ramen Noodles. Or as we called it in college, dinner.
 
2014-01-17 08:17:07 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Silly question: these threads pop up routinely; has anyone tried another Farker's recipe? Success? "OMGhowcouldyoueatthis?" Does anyone compile a book of "The Best of Fark Food Threads" recipes?


I absolutely have.  I made a clam chowder from a thread awhile back about regional and traditional growing-up dishes. (every time I need to find it I just use the search function, the poster said something about how they felt so bad for the recipes that were in the thread already that we were halfway to pity sex.  It makes an easy search term.)  It came out a little thin, but serviceable, and the flavor was absolutely there.  I can't wait to try it again with what I learned from the first iteration.  Absolutely tasty.
 
2014-01-17 09:01:53 AM  
www.steinerfoods.com

The "Better Than Bouillon" brand is my go-to for making soups and stews. Fantastic, easy, and I buy a few jars at a time because I use up the stuff so quickly.
 
kth
2014-01-17 09:28:18 AM  
We love soups. As noted above, the key is homemade stock.

We make:
Potato Leek (potatoes, leeks, butter, stock).
Carrot coriander (google williams sonoma carrot soup)
Corn Chowder (fresh (or fresh frozen) corn, poblanos, onions, potatoes, fish or chicken, cream).

Last weekend we made the mushroom soup from Modernist Cuisine at Home (we can't afford the actual cookbook). It was an expensive dinner, but cheaper than going out and made for a fun afternoon of cooking.  I made pork steaks and steamed artichokes with composed butter to go with it.

300g mushrooms
80g shallots
50g butter
400g water (boiling)
80g sherry
80g white wine
10g salt

Jus: saute shallots and mushrooms in butter, add the rest and cook at 15psi for 25 minutes. strain.

500g mushrooms
30g water (boiling)
5g salt
2.5g baking soda
10g garlic
Soup: put jus and all other ingredients in pressure cooker, cook at 15psi for 20 minutes.
 
2014-01-17 10:26:05 AM  
OK I have saved a ton of recipes from this thread!  This was an awesome idea!  We need to do this for other food types.

Llamagirl How much Worcestershire would you say is in a pot of your soup?

davebarnes: Does chili count as a soup?
Not in my world, Chili is a dish unto itself.  But I have hers it called soup in the North

Mandapants  Better than bullion is pretty awesome.
 
2014-01-17 10:47:06 AM  
The recipe for a great turkey soup starts at Thanksgiving. Brine the turkey, stuff with onions, garlic, celery, parsley. When turkey is done cooking, throw the veggies in a blender and add to drippings as the base for gravy. When all is done, take leftover carcass and gravy, freeze for later use.

When you're ready to make the soup, place carcass and leftover gravy in a crock pot, along with several containers of chicken broth or chicken stock. No need to add much in the way of extra seasonings (especially salt), as this will come out of the turkey carcass and gravy. A little red wine adds and interesting touch of flavor - just be careful not to overdo it. Add caramelized onions and garlic, then diced red potatoes, carrots, celery, peas, and optional veggies which can include okra, tomatoes, mushrooms, and green beans. slow cook for 6-8 hours. The meat comes off the bones without much effort. Serve with noodles or rice.
 
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