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(The Kitchn)   Fark Food Thread: What makes a good soup? Is your go-to soup hearty or lighter fare? Have a tried-and-true recipe or do you just use whatever's handy? Help keep us warm now and all year long with your recipes   (thekitchn.com) divider line 214
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935 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jan 2014 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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DGS [TotalFark]
2014-01-16 03:25:46 PM  

brap: The thing I like about soups is that aside from learning how to make a good stock, it allows for a lot of improvisation and that's how I like to kook.

This wild pony can not be caged.


Live ponies in the stock is not necessarily the best bit of improvising..
 
2014-01-16 03:26:25 PM  

flucto: maddman: I love our vitamix! but I like it better when I am blending soup that I made on a stovetop to thicken rather than straight up vitamix soup. It is good just not hearty enough for me.

I've never even tried to actually cook the soup in mine. But I couldn't make carrot ginger soup, or a dozen others, without it. I love that thing.


they have recipes and it will make a piping hot soup in like 15 min.  But they are all neon colors and by nature, thin.  THey taste good but need something to keep me from thinking I my drinking my soup.
 
2014-01-16 03:27:40 PM  

DGS: maddman: flucto: With our without a Vitamix?

I love our vitamix!  but I like it better when I am blending soup that I made on a stovetop to thicken rather than straight up vitamix soup.  It is good just not hearty enough for me.

Honestly, this is the first time I've ever heard someone talk about a vitamix.. it's nice to know someone that has it likes it. It seemed interesting but the utter dearth of feedback on it in the areas of teh intarwebs I frequent made me question if it was worth a damn.


If you have the cash you will not be sorry.  Costco normally has a deal if you are a member.
 
2014-01-16 03:30:09 PM  

LlamaGirl: My French onion soup is pretty awesome. I caramelize a farkton of onions to make it, which is a pain in the butt. It sure is worth it in the end though.

/the secret is worchestershire sauce


I make a great one too, but just off posts on this site, I think soze may do it best.
 
2014-01-16 03:30:50 PM  

Donnchadha: Purelilac: One rotisserie chicken carcass
half an onion
hacked up carrot
Any leftover or wilting veggies you have around.
Salt, pepper, garlic, rosemary, parsley, poultry seasoning, half a bay leaf

Simmer for an hour. Strain.

Throw in chicken, veggies, noodles or whatever and eat it.

Haven't eaten much soup this joke of a winter.

Half an onion? Half a bay leaf?

The hell is wrong with you?


I'm not making a gallon of soup, FFS. It's like 2 bowls.
 
2014-01-16 03:31:16 PM  

maddman: they have recipes and it will make a piping hot soup in like 15 min.  But they are all neon colors and by nature, thin.  THey taste good but need something to keep me from thinking I my drinking my soup.


Why not just nuke a can of V8?
 
2014-01-16 03:32:37 PM  
Ever since I first made mulligatawny soup I've always slightly sauteed the initial spices first for a minute or two. Really brings out a good toasty undertone. I even do this for chili or my pasta fagioli too.
 
2014-01-16 03:32:42 PM  

what_now: No man, just take the carcass of a chicken. No need to buy new chicken.


If the carcass of your chicken has feet, then I agree. Otherwise, go buy feet.

Find a Jewish grandmother or a Mexican abuela. Ask them about feet.
 
2014-01-16 03:34:22 PM  

maddman: OOOOH will you share your recipe? I suck at french onion....


I uhm, don't really have one? I kinda just make it.

Beef stock, onions, worchestershire, hot sauce, black pepper, au jus... pretty much all to taste! heh
 
2014-01-16 03:37:01 PM  

DGS: Honestly, this is the first time I've ever heard someone talk about a vitamix.. it's nice to know someone that has it likes it. It seemed interesting but the utter dearth of feedback on it in the areas of teh intarwebs I frequent made me question if it was worth a damn.


They're pretty awesome. Technically they can cook things because the blades spin so fast that friction heats whatever is inside the jar. I never use it that way though. If I'm making a mushroom soup the shrooms and onions etc all get sauteed first. The output of the blender is super smooth so I reserve a bit so that I can have a mix of textures.

Costco is a good place to get one. It's one of the very last things I'd give up in my kitchen, and I have a LOT of stuff.
 
2014-01-16 03:39:10 PM  
Any soup that comes from America's Test Kitchen recipe book.
 
2014-01-16 03:42:13 PM  
Hoppin John, and Bouillabaisse are my favorite two soups.
One is very easy, and one is damned hard to get right as I like it special.

But the one thing that is important when you make a very good soup, is that you make a lot.
You can spend all day making it perfect, and it can take a lot of work, but you can freeze quarts of it for later.

Cold winter's day you check the freezer and you find you can choose from chowder, bisque, chicken, beef, etc etc, and plan the whole day around it. Bake a fresh bread, to go with it, and it will be as if you slaved all day, but didn't.
 
2014-01-16 03:42:14 PM  
Since it's winter, cream-based soups are preferred.  Here are some of my favorites:

Corn and Poblano Chowder

1 large poblano pepper, cut in 1/2 lengthwise
20 oz. creamed corn
1 1/2 cups regular or low-fat milk
1/4 tsp. salt
1/8 to 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1 1/2 to 2 cups chicken broth or stock
half of an 8 oz. package of cream cheese, softened
Garnishes:  thinly sliced jalapeno strips, coarse ground black pepper

Broil poblano halves, skin side up, on an aluminum foil-lined baking sheet 6 inches from heat, 5-6 minutes or until pepper looks blistered.  Fold foil over pepper to seal and let stand for 10 minutes.  Peel pepper, and remove and discard seeds.  Coarsely chop pepper and set aside.

Bring creamed corn and next 4 ingredients to a boil in a 3 qt. saucepan over medium high heat, stirring mixture constantly.  Reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes.

Stir 1 1/2 cups chicken broth/stock into mixture.  Whisk in softened cream cheese and chopped poblano pepper;  cook, whisking often, 5 minutes or until cream cheese melts and mixture is thoroughly heated.  Whisk in additional chicken broth/stock, if necessary, to reach desired consistency, then garnish, if desired.


Creamy Cheddar Cheese Soup

6 oz. apple smoked bacon, diced
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup onion, chopped
1/4 cup celery, chopped
1/4 cup flour
12 oz. of beer, pale ale
1 quart chicken stock
8 oz. Maytag white cheddar cheese, grated
salt and pepper
Garnish:  chopped parsley, 1/2 cup small diced toasted croutons

Brown the bacon in the soup pot, remove some of the excess grease.  Add the butter, onions, and celery to the pot with the bacon and cook for 5 minutes over medium heat.  Dust the flour over the vegetables and bacon, and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes.  Stir in the beer, then the stock.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes.  Add the cheese and season to taste with the salt and pepper.  Ladle into bowls and garnish with the parsley and croutons.


Creamy Vidalia Onion Soup

4 Vidalia onions, thinly sliced
3 Tbsp. butter
1 Tbsp. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
2 cups chicken broth/stock
1 cup milk
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
3 egg yolks, beaten
1 1/2 tsp. paprika
ground black pepper to taste
1/4 Tbsp. hot pepper sauce
2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

In a saucepan, melt butter over medium heat.  Add onions, and saute until golden brown, about 10 minutes.

Stir in flour and salt, mix thoroughly.  Gradually add chicken broth/stock, stirring constantly.  Cover and simmer over low heat for about 10 minutes.

When onions are very tender, stir in milk and cream.  Heat through.  Remove 1/2 cup of soup, and to that add the egg yolks.  Slowly stir egg yolk mixture into soup in pan.  Heat through, but do not allow soup to boil.  Stir in paprika, black pepper, and hot sauce.  When serving, garnish with chopped parsley.

I have more recipes that are great, but I'm now thoroughly sick of typing, so this is whatchya get.  :)
 
2014-01-16 03:43:31 PM  

vudukungfu: Hoppin John, and Bouillabaisse are my favorite two soups.
One is very easy, and one is damned hard to get right as I like it special.

But the one thing that is important when you make a very good soup, is that you make a lot.
You can spend all day making it perfect, and it can take a lot of work, but you can freeze quarts of it for later.

Cold winter's day you check the freezer and you find you can choose from chowder, bisque, chicken, beef, etc etc, and plan the whole day around it. Bake a fresh bread, to go with it, and it will be as if you slaved all day, but didn't.


Whoa whoa whoa. Hoppin John isn't a soup.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-01-16 03:44:16 PM  

MIAppologia: Since it's winter, cream-based soups are preferred.  Here are some of my favorites:

Corn and Poblano Chowder

1 large poblano pepper, cut in 1/2 lengthwise
20 oz. creamed corn
1 1/2 cups regular or low-fat milk
1/4 tsp. salt
1/8 to 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp. ground cumin
1 1/2 to 2 cups chicken broth or stock
half of an 8 oz. package of cream cheese, softened
Garnishes:  thinly sliced jalapeno strips, coarse ground black pepper

Broil poblano halves, skin side up, on an aluminum foil-lined baking sheet 6 inches from heat, 5-6 minutes or until pepper looks blistered.  Fold foil over pepper to seal and let stand for 10 minutes.  Peel pepper, and remove and discard seeds.  Coarsely chop pepper and set aside.

Bring creamed corn and next 4 ingredients to a boil in a 3 qt. saucepan over medium high heat, stirring mixture constantly.  Reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes.

Stir 1 1/2 cups chicken broth/stock into mixture.  Whisk in softened cream cheese and chopped poblano pepper;  cook, whisking often, 5 minutes or until cream cheese melts and mixture is thoroughly heated.  Whisk in additional chicken broth/stock, if necessary, to reach desired consistency, then garnish, if desired.


Creamy Cheddar Cheese Soup

6 oz. apple smoked bacon, diced
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup onion, chopped
1/4 cup celery, chopped
1/4 cup flour
12 oz. of beer, pale ale
1 quart chicken stock
8 oz. Maytag white cheddar cheese, grated
salt and pepper
Garnish:  chopped parsley, 1/2 cup small diced toasted croutons

Brown the bacon in the soup pot, remove some of the excess grease.  Add the butter, onions, and celery to the pot with the bacon and cook for 5 minutes over medium heat.  Dust the flour over the vegetables and bacon, and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes.  Stir in the beer, then the stock.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes.  Add the cheese and season to taste with the salt and pepper.  Ladle into bowls and garnish with the parsley and croutons.


Creamy Vidalia Onion Soup

4 Vidalia onions, thinly sliced
3 Tbsp. butter
1 Tbsp. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
2 cups chicken broth/stock
1 cup milk
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
3 egg yolks, beaten
1 1/2 tsp. paprika
ground black pepper to taste
1/4 Tbsp. hot pepper sauce
2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

In a saucepan, melt butter over medium heat.  Add onions, and saute until golden brown, about 10 minutes.

Stir in flour and salt, mix thoroughly.  Gradually add chicken broth/stock, stirring constantly.  Cover and simmer over low heat for about 10 minutes.

When onions are very tender, stir in milk and cream.  Heat through.  Remove 1/2 cup of soup, and to that add the egg yolks.  Slowly stir egg yolk mixture into soup in pan.  Heat through, but do not allow soup to boil.  Stir in paprika, black pepper, and hot sauce.  When serving, garnish with chopped parsley.

I have more recipes that are great, but I'm now thoroughly sick of typing, so this is whatchya get.  :)


Score!
 
2014-01-16 03:46:00 PM  

professorkowalski: Good soup is a oxymoron.


i.imgur.com

Clearly you've never had rabbit stew.
 
2014-01-16 03:52:08 PM  

DGS: Score!


LOL  Git you cookin' and eatin'!
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-01-16 03:55:15 PM  

MIAppologia: DGS: Score!

LOL  Git you cookin' and eatin'!


Ain't gotta tell me twice.
 
2014-01-16 03:59:28 PM  
My all time favorite is to get some smoked ham hocks and render them down for the stock. Once you get them simmering for several hours the meat (which there is a surprising amount of) will strip off easily. Add beans. Sometimes I do those 15 bean packages, then add a couple of onions to the pot about 30 minutes before serving.
 
2014-01-16 04:00:47 PM  

LlamaGirl: maddman: OOOOH will you share your recipe? I suck at french onion....

I uhm, don't really have one? I kinda just make it.

Beef stock, onions, worchestershire, hot sauce, black pepper, au jus... pretty much all to taste! heh


OK, Take those onions I guarontee, and cut them up jullienne style.
You sautee' them in Butter.
And keep stirring and letting set, and stirring and letting set. Once they are clear, keep cooking them. You want ot caramelize them. get it? Brown sweet, sticky and delish.
Then you put that into a beef stock, you can use Better than bullion if you are not inclined to have a mirepoix in your kitchen.
you boil the beef stock and onions, and toss in a dash of Sherry, and a pinch of black pepper. And pour into a crock pot type bowl, one you can put under the broiler.
You put the cups, bowls on a cookie sheet and put a big crouton on top of each

make the croutons first, cut up some nice crusty bread so you have like 1" slices and punch a circle out of them with a glass upside down, so they just fit in the soup crocks/bowls.
Brush those with garlic butter and dust with Parmesan cheese, and toast both sides like this under the broiler on the cookie sheet. Cool. those are your croutons.

OK, so once you put the cool croutons on the top of the hot crocks full of boiling beef stock sherry and onions, you layer on top some thick slices of Swiss cheese, enough slices so there are no holes. Slide under the broiler and let her go until the cheese is lightly brown, and bubble on top. Slide the cookie sheet out and set it on a thick wooden cutting board as a trivet.

Slide the hot cups/bowls/crocks onto a serving plate with a paper doily under them so they don't slide all over the place.
Serve with a spoon, and a caveat that that farker is very hot.
 
2014-01-16 04:02:06 PM  

Epicedion: Whoa whoa whoa. Hoppin John isn't a soup.


It is a sacrament.

Let's see. Black eyed peas.
Ham
pepper
onion.
You can drink it.
 
2014-01-16 04:19:39 PM  

Epicedion: maddman: they have recipes and it will make a piping hot soup in like 15 min.  But they are all neon colors and by nature, thin.  THey taste good but need something to keep me from thinking I my drinking my soup.

Why not just nuke a can of V8?

LOL it is a lot like that.....

 
2014-01-16 04:20:09 PM  

Old_Chief_Scott: My all time favorite is to get some smoked ham hocks and render them down for the stock. Once you get them simmering for several hours the meat (which there is a surprising amount of) will strip off easily. Add beans. Sometimes I do those 15 bean packages, then add a couple of onions to the pot about 30 minutes before serving.


Isnt' that farking hoppin john?
 
2014-01-16 04:21:15 PM  

LlamaGirl: maddman: OOOOH will you share your recipe? I suck at french onion....

I uhm, don't really have one? I kinda just make it.

Beef stock, onions, worchestershire, hot sauce, black pepper, au jus... pretty much all to taste! heh


Thanks


vudukungfu:
LlamaGirl: maddman: OOOOH will you share your recipe? I suck at french onion....

I uhm, don't really have one? I kinda just make it.

Beef stock, onions, worchestershire, hot sauce, black pepper, au jus... pretty much all to taste! heh

OK, Take those onions I guarontee, and cut them up jullienne style.
You sautee' them in Butter.
And keep stirring and letting set, and stirring and letting set. Once they are clear, keep cooking them. You want ot caramelize them. get it? Brown sweet, sticky and delish.
Then you put that into a beef stock, you can use Better than bullion if you are not inclined to have a mirepoix in your kitchen.
you boil the beef stock and onions, and toss in a dash of Sherry, and a pinch of black pepper. And pour into a crock pot type bowl, one you can put under the broiler.
You put the cups, bowls on a cookie sheet and put a big crouton on top of each

make the croutons first, cut up some nice crusty bread so you have like 1" slices and punch a circle out of them with a glass upside down, so they just fit in the soup crocks/bowls.
Brush those with garlic butter and dust with Parmesan cheese, and toast both sides like this under the broiler on the cookie sheet. Cool. those are your croutons.

OK, so once you put the cool croutons on the top of the hot crocks full of boiling beef stock sherry and onions, you layer on top some thick slices of Swiss cheese, enough slices so there are no holes. Slide under the broiler and let her go until the cheese is lightly brown, and bubble on top. Slide the cookie sheet out and set it on a thick wooden cutting board as a trivet.

Slide the hot cups/bowls/crocks onto a serving plate with a paper doily under them so they don't slide all over the place.
Serve with a spoon, and a caveat that that farker is very hot.


......and Thanks!

I will try this very soon.  I made my last french onion in a crockpot and it kind of sucked.  It is not really a set-it and forget-it dish.
 
2014-01-16 04:22:50 PM  
My favorite sick time soup was taught to me by a wee Puerto Rican sous chef. He called it "Bring Back the Dead" soup.

It is simple enough to do a la minute. And in fact, it's best done to order, and served immediately.

1t chopped garlic
1T chopped shallot
5-6 peeled and deveined Tiger shrimp
3T chopped fresh tomato
2t fresh chopped parsley
1t crushed red pepper
1 lime--juice and zest from half
1 C chicken stock
Splash of white wine to deglaze pan
Chopped scallion to taste as garnish, and for the onion goodness

Sauté garlic and shallot in light oil for about a minute, the sear shrimp, turn, then deglaze with white wine. Add tomato, chicken stock, lime juice, crushed red pepper, and bring to a boil. When soup reaches a rolling boil, toss in lime zest and parsley, stir for a moment to help release the citrus oils, salt and pepper to taste, and then pour into serving bowl, and garnish with fresh scallion. Done. Cook time is fair quick in a standard sauté pan, and takes less than five minutes.

You have protein from the shrimp and stock, citrus from the lime, and loads of flavor and a scent that will penetrate even the most stubborn of head colds, and enough hot pepper to help penetrate said fog and loosen up stuffy noses. It is also a damn effective hangover cure.

Even on a busy line, the ingredients are easy to have on hand, and it's what I feed waitstaff and cooks alike when they feel under the weather or are just feeling the effects of a bender. It is marvelous stuff.
 
2014-01-16 04:27:44 PM  

maddman: flucto: maddman: I love our vitamix! but I like it better when I am blending soup that I made on a stovetop to thicken rather than straight up vitamix soup. It is good just not hearty enough for me.

I've never even tried to actually cook the soup in mine. But I couldn't make carrot ginger soup, or a dozen others, without it. I love that thing.

they have recipes and it will make a piping hot soup in like 15 min.  But they are all neon colors and by nature, thin.  THey taste good but need something to keep me from thinking I my drinking my soup.



I bought one for my wife for Christmas (wide container) and the soups we've made have been awesome.  I did the potato soup recipe from the book that comes with it and it turned out nice and thick and restaurant quality perfect.

That thing is amazing.  I thought it was going to lift off the first time we took it above 5.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2014-01-16 04:27:50 PM  

hubiestubert: My favorite sick time soup was taught to me by a wee Puerto Rican sous chef. He called it "Bring Back the Dead" soup.

It is simple enough to do a la minute. And in fact, it's best done to order, and served immediately.

1t chopped garlic
1T chopped shallot
5-6 peeled and deveined Tiger shrimp
3T chopped fresh tomato
2t fresh chopped parsley
1t crushed red pepper
1 lime--juice and zest from half
1 C chicken stock
Splash of white wine to deglaze pan
Chopped scallion to taste as garnish, and for the onion goodness

Sauté garlic and shallot in light oil for about a minute, the sear shrimp, turn, then deglaze with white wine. Add tomato, chicken stock, lime juice, crushed red pepper, and bring to a boil. When soup reaches a rolling boil, toss in lime zest and parsley, stir for a moment to help release the citrus oils, salt and pepper to taste, and then pour into serving bowl, and garnish with fresh scallion. Done. Cook time is fair quick in a standard sauté pan, and takes less than five minutes.

You have protein from the shrimp and stock, citrus from the lime, and loads of flavor and a scent that will penetrate even the most stubborn of head colds, and enough hot pepper to help penetrate said fog and loosen up stuffy noses. It is also a damn effective hangover cure.

Even on a busy line, the ingredients are easy to have on hand, and it's what I feed waitstaff and cooks alike when they feel under the weather or are just feeling the effects of a bender. It is marvelous stuff.


Definitely saving this. Not that I have shrimp handy all that often, but this sounds worth it.
 
2014-01-16 04:48:51 PM  

Purelilac: Donnchadha: Purelilac: One rotisserie chicken carcass
half an onion
hacked up carrot
Any leftover or wilting veggies you have around.
Salt, pepper, garlic, rosemary, parsley, poultry seasoning, half a bay leaf

Simmer for an hour. Strain.

Throw in chicken, veggies, noodles or whatever and eat it.

Haven't eaten much soup this joke of a winter.

Half an onion? Half a bay leaf?

The hell is wrong with you?

I'm not making a gallon of soup, FFS. It's like 2 bowls.


One chicken carcass = 2 bowls? You're not helping your case here
 
2014-01-16 04:55:53 PM  

maddman: It is not really a set-it and forget-it dish.


Diff betwixt a soup and a stew.

Soups can be labor intensive.
 
2014-01-16 05:04:22 PM  
vudukungfu:
Isnt' that farking hoppin john?

We never called it that where I grew up.
 
2014-01-16 05:07:23 PM  
Chicken tortilla soup. Making some this weekend.
 
Bf+
2014-01-16 05:07:59 PM  
If using beef, sear it lightly, mostly-cook it in the oven, then let it cool overnight before adding it to the soup.  It will retain its shape better.
Unless you prefer finely-shredded string meat, of course.
 
2014-01-16 05:08:31 PM  
A good soup is one that comes free with the purchase of a hat.

i1226.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-16 05:09:51 PM  

vudukungfu: Old_Chief_Scott: My all time favorite is to get some smoked ham hocks and render them down for the stock. Once you get them simmering for several hours the meat (which there is a surprising amount of) will strip off easily. Add beans. Sometimes I do those 15 bean packages, then add a couple of onions to the pot about 30 minutes before serving.

Isnt' that farking hoppin john?


OK, looked up Hoppin John and it is not Hoppin John because there is no rice in it.
 
Bf+
2014-01-16 05:09:56 PM  

Donnchadha: Purelilac: One rotisserie chicken carcass
half an onion
hacked up carrot
Any leftover or wilting veggies you have around.
Salt, pepper, garlic, rosemary, parsley, poultry seasoning, half a bay leaf

Simmer for an hour. Strain.

Throw in chicken, veggies, noodles or whatever and eat it.

Haven't eaten much soup this joke of a winter.

Half an onion? Half a bay leaf?

The hell is wrong with you?



You forgot:
Simmer for only an hour?
Throw in vegetables and eat it?
Joke of a winter?

/WTH is wrong with you?
 
2014-01-16 05:10:22 PM  

hubiestubert: My favorite sick time soup was taught to me by a wee Puerto Rican sous chef. He called it "Bring Back the Dead" soup.

It is simple enough to do a la minute. And in fact, it's best done to order, and served immediately.

1t chopped garlic
1T chopped shallot
5-6 peeled and deveined Tiger shrimp
3T chopped fresh tomato
2t fresh chopped parsley
1t crushed red pepper
1 lime--juice and zest from half
1 C chicken stock
Splash of white wine to deglaze pan
Chopped scallion to taste as garnish, and for the onion goodness

Sauté garlic and shallot in light oil for about a minute, the sear shrimp, turn, then deglaze with white wine. Add tomato, chicken stock, lime juice, crushed red pepper, and bring to a boil. When soup reaches a rolling boil, toss in lime zest and parsley, stir for a moment to help release the citrus oils, salt and pepper to taste, and then pour into serving bowl, and garnish with fresh scallion. Done. Cook time is fair quick in a standard sauté pan, and takes less than five minutes.

You have protein from the shrimp and stock, citrus from the lime, and loads of flavor and a scent that will penetrate even the most stubborn of head colds, and enough hot pepper to help penetrate said fog and loosen up stuffy noses. It is also a damn effective hangover cure.

Even on a busy line, the ingredients are easy to have on hand, and it's what I feed waitstaff and cooks alike when they feel under the weather or are just feeling the effects of a bender. It is marvelous stuff.


Looks tasty.  I will be trying this soon!
 
2014-01-16 05:11:02 PM  
 
2014-01-16 05:11:29 PM  
Mmmm, love making soup! I love making something hearty like minestrone, and freezing leftovers for later. I got an immersion blender for Christmas, so I've been having fun making some nice blended, creamy (but healthy! soups.

Most recently I made a curried cauliflower soup that is awesome: http://cookieandkate.com/2013/curried-cauliflower-soup/
 
2014-01-16 05:11:55 PM  
Go to the butcher and add bones. Not the Star Trek guy, mind you.
 
Bf+
2014-01-16 05:12:41 PM  

UDel_Kitty: Mmmm, love making soup! I love making something hearty like minestrone, and freezing leftovers for later. I got an immersion blender for Christmas, so I've been having fun making some nice blended, creamy (but healthy! soups.

Most recently I made a curried cauliflower soup that is awesome: http://cookieandkate.com/2013/curried-cauliflower-soup/



uh, so that looks way awesome.
Sold.
 
2014-01-16 05:13:31 PM  
This is really, really simple and quick

Leek and Rice (adapted from the Frugal Gourmet)

2-3 medium leeks, cleaned well and sliced into 1/4 inch rings. Use as much of the greens as are tender
1 quart chicken stock
1/4 cup uncooked rice or 1/2 cup leftover cooked rice

Sweat the leeks in butter until they soften.  Pre-heat the chicken stock and add to the leeks.
Cook over medium heat for 15 minutes.
If using uncooked rice: add, reduce heat to a simmer, cover, and cook 20-25 minutes.
If using cooked rice: reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook 10 minutes. Then add rice and cook 5 more minutes.

Add a couple twists of black pepper and serve.
 
2014-01-16 05:13:53 PM  
I like to make chowda, here is what it look like as it just get started:

img.fark.net

That is cod, lobsta and little neck chowder.

\New England Expat
 
Bf+
2014-01-16 05:16:38 PM  
Carrots,
Chicken Broth
Ginger,
1 tbs Butter,
Blender,
Glance briefly at turmeric.

Serve cold.
 
2014-01-16 05:17:11 PM  
Simplicity... When I don't feel well, my wife makes Chicken Noodle soup, and all it really is is chicken, broth, noodles and veggies, but it's awesome. She can still whip up a batch within about 1/2 an hour because it really is pretty simple. Thick noodles though, like homemade egg noodles, that's important.

Of course, she also learned this kick ass Thai Curry soup that is pretty easy and absolutely phenomenal...
 
2014-01-16 05:20:38 PM  
Split pea w/ Polish Kielbasa

1 bag split peas
1 pound real polish Kielbasa
4 cups vegetable broth
4 cups chicken broth
4 cups water
2 chicken or vegetable bullion cubes
2 bay leaves
1 small onion, diced
1 celery stack, chopped
1 carrot, sliced
2 tsp minced garlic (~ 2 cloves)
1/4 tsp marjoram
1/2 tsp black pepper

Toss everything into a slow cooker.  Let cook on low for 8 hours+.  Serve with crusty bread.  Delicious
 
2014-01-16 05:21:24 PM  
This thread is not a bookmark.  Not.  At.  All.
 
2014-01-16 05:21:41 PM  
s3.amazonaws.com
Whoa, whoa, whoa. There's still plenty of meat on that bone! Now you take this home, throw it in a pot, add some broth, a potato....Baby, you've got a stew going!
 
2014-01-16 05:22:52 PM  
Chicken Curry Corn Chowder:

Ingredients:
1 whole chicken (no neck or giblets)
As needed: water

Sachet:
3-4 black peppercorns, crushed
2 sprigs of thyme, or ½ tsp dried thyme
4-5 parsley stems
½ bay leaf
As needed: Cheesecloth

6-8 oz large diced mirepoix (50% onion, 25% carrot, 25% celery)

2 Tbls butter
2-3 oz Very Small(brunoise if you want to be anal) diced mirepoix (50% onion, 25% carrot, 25% celery)
1 large peeled potato, 1/4 inch dice
1 can corn kernels

Seasonings:
2 tsp curry powder
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
To Taste: Salt and pepper

Roux: ¼ cup flour and ¼ cup butter (4 Tbls each)

1) Cut out a pouch of cheesecloth for the sachet.  Put sachet ingredients inside and tie closed with butcher's twine and set aside.
2) Fabricate the chicken (cut off the legs and thighs and set aside.  Cut off the breasts from the chicken and put into freezer for later use.  Cut the bones out of the legs/thighs/wings and set the meat aside for use in the chowder. Cut as much meat from the chicken carcass as possible.  Keep all the meat in a bowl in the refrigerator.  This will be used later. Put all bones and the leftover chicken carcass into a stockpot.)

3) Fill the stockpot with water to 1 inch higher than the bones sit in the pot.  Bring to a simmer to start the stock.  Simmer chicken bones for up to 4 hours, skimming scum from the top of the stock as needed.
4) While the chicken bones are simmering, cut up the onion, carrot and celery for both the small and large mirepoix.  Set the small mirepoix aside for later.

5) Half an hour before the stock is going to be completed, add the sachet and the large mirepoix.  Simmer until completed.  (side note here: most people in the foodservice industry believe that you need to add the mirepoix in about halfway through the cooking of the stock, or about 2 hours before it is done.  They are wrong.  When you do that, you actually cook the flavor out of the vegetables and into the air.  When you add the aromatics with about 30 minutes to go you get the maximum amount of flavor from them...I have been involved in taste tests that prove this is the case)

6) Once the stock is ready, strain the stock, throwing away the bones, mirepoix and sachet.  Clean out the pot used to make the stock with a paper towel.  Degrease the stock if needed.

7) Once pot is cleaned, put back on the stove at a medium heat.  Add the 2 Tbls of butter.  Once butter is melted, add the small mirepoix and sweat for 3-5 minutes.

8) Once finished sweating the small mirepoix, add the chicken stock back to the pot.  Bring up to a simmer, and add the chicken meat to the simmering stock.  Let simmer for 2-3 minutes, then add the diced potatoes to the pot.  After you have added the potatoes, melt the butter for the roux at a medium heat.  Once the butter is melted, add the flour to the butter, stirring continuously.  Make a blonde roux, stirring it constantly to get all the flour dissolved in the butter.

9) Continue simmering the chicken for 7 more minutes (9 total), or however long you need to simmer until the chicken is almost cooked through. Then, add the can of corn kernels, cilantro, curry powder and salt and pepper while continuing to simmer for at most 3 more minutes.  Check for seasoning until the flavors are right.  Add whatever is needed to balance out the flavors.  Once the flavors are balanced and the 3 minutes are up, add the roux to the soup, stirring continuously.  You should see the soup thicken.

10) Serve hot with cornbread.

 You're welcome
 
2014-01-16 05:23:16 PM  
This is my kids' favorite soup of all.  In cold weather I make it two or three times a month.  It can be made in a slow cooker if you're not home during the day but it's better if you can baby it along and adjust the seasoning as you go.

Potato Leek Soup
  2 leeks
  1 medium  sweet onion
  1 large  russet potato -- peeled and diced
  3 large  white potato -- peeled and diced (Yukon Gold)
  1 stick  butter
  4 cups  chicken stock
salt -- to taste
white pepper -- to taste

Melt butter in stock pot
Trim and chop leeks and onions
Sweat leeks and onions in melted butter until translucent (10 minutes)
Add diced potatoes
Saute until potatoes are softened (about 5 minutes)
Add chicken stock
Simmer at least 2 hours, adjusting seasoning as necessary
Puree with immersion blender or food processor
Serve with fresh chives
 
2014-01-16 05:23:47 PM  

LlamaGirl: My French onion soup is pretty awesome. I caramelize a farkton of onions to make it, which is a pain in the butt. It sure is worth it in the end though.

/the secret is worchestershire sauce


caramelizing onions is easy, slice with v cutter into  a crock pot. little butter, olive oil and a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar. If storage onions rather than sweet a little brown sugar. Done
 
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