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(Decanter)   With arctic weather this winter, Canadian ice wine industry expects boom year both for ice-wine lovers and Americans who haven't yet realized the stuff is a gaggingly sweet, thick alcoholic syrup filtered through underpants   (decanter.com) divider line 49
    More: Obvious, icewine, Canadians, Americans  
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1226 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Jan 2014 at 9:43 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-16 09:45:09 AM  
The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.
 
2014-01-16 09:46:30 AM  
weathwer.
 
2014-01-16 09:51:32 AM  

PowerSlacker: weathwer.


i190.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-16 09:52:38 AM  

flaminio: PowerSlacker: weathwer.

[i190.photobucket.com image 559x400]


Exactly where my thoughts went.
 
2014-01-16 09:52:43 AM  
It may be sweet but it is also very tasty.

You may enjoy it more if you don't try drinking it by the mug full.
 
2014-01-16 09:54:22 AM  

FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.


Especially since it's also good on its own or with a mild cheese platter.
 
2014-01-16 09:55:43 AM  
Good stuff. The Lake Erie wineries make this stuff and the Alcohol content is beyond insane. Can't do too much of it at once though.
 
2014-01-16 09:55:47 AM  
I guess "run on sentence" never came up in English class.
 
2014-01-16 09:58:46 AM  

FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.


Ice wine is good. But i prefer a nice Vin Santo wit a biscotti.

The 'annoying' thing is the fact that both (VS and Icewine) start at $35-40 a 375ml bottle, but thats because the higher volume of grapes that are needed to make it.
 
2014-01-16 10:06:22 AM  
Thanks for the heads up about this wine subby, and for the good laugh too.
 
2014-01-16 10:12:43 AM  
This reminds me I've had a Sauterne in the cellar since before the internet. Might be time to pull that dude out and drink it.
 
2014-01-16 10:13:42 AM  

LemSkroob: FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.

Ice wine is good. But i prefer a nice Vin Santo wit a biscotti.

The 'annoying' thing is the fact that both (VS and Icewine) start at $35-40 a 375ml bottle, but thats because the higher volume of grapes that are needed to make it.


Not to mention they're freezing their fingers off to pick the grapes.

I've only had the ice wine once and I enjoyed it.  It seems to fit in with the notion of craft that is prevalent in food and beverage.  Craft beers, farm-to-table craft food, etc.

Not to hijack the thread but the notion of picking the grapes after they've frozen redefines the German notion of spaetlese.  Another product that has gained traction recently is cider - great ciders, as a matter of fact.  Does anyone happen to know if those straggler apples hanging from the tree could be used for cider or are they just rotten and useless?
 
2014-01-16 10:18:42 AM  

trotsky: Good stuff. The Lake Erie wineries make this stuff and the Alcohol content is beyond insane. Can't do too much of it at once though.


Drinking 100% alcohol isn't even beyond insane. You must have a very delicate system.
 
2014-01-16 10:23:37 AM  
I like ice wine better than most other alcoholic beverages out there.

Fark you, Subby!
 
2014-01-16 10:26:56 AM  
Some of my best stories start with "so after finishing the bottle of ice wine...."
 
2014-01-16 10:37:02 AM  

Mr. Right: LemSkroob: FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.

Ice wine is good. But i prefer a nice Vin Santo wit a biscotti.

The 'annoying' thing is the fact that both (VS and Icewine) start at $35-40 a 375ml bottle, but thats because the higher volume of grapes that are needed to make it.

Not to mention they're freezing their fingers off to pick the grapes.

I've only had the ice wine once and I enjoyed it.  It seems to fit in with the notion of craft that is prevalent in food and beverage.  Craft beers, farm-to-table craft food, etc.

Not to hijack the thread but the notion of picking the grapes after they've frozen redefines the German notion of spaetlese.  Another product that has gained traction recently is cider - great ciders, as a matter of fact.  Does anyone happen to know if those straggler apples hanging from the tree could be used for cider or are they just rotten and useless?


That's right, cider did gain traction... hundreds of years ago. Good call.
 
2014-01-16 10:38:08 AM  

Russ1642: trotsky: Good stuff. The Lake Erie wineries make this stuff and the Alcohol content is beyond insane. Can't do too much of it at once though.

Drinking 100% alcohol isn't even beyond insane. You must have a very delicate system.


a) 100% ethanol would be nasty to drink.
b) Where are you getting 100% ethanol? It cannot be distilled past 95.6% as it has an azeotrope with water. (yes there are ways to get it purer but I wouldn't drink it after that)
 
2014-01-16 10:41:17 AM  
I know a guy who owns a commercial cider mill right in the heart of apple country. He still picks his own and bottles it and sells it for a premium but says he can't afford to do it much longer - a tanker of apple juice from Chile is WAY cheaper than hiring migrant labour to pick the orchards that made the valley such a great place for cider. And rules say if it's like 10 per cent Canadian apple juice or something, you can sell it as all-Canadian cider. It's insane.
 
2014-01-16 10:43:42 AM  
For non-oenophiles, ice wine is a sweet dessert wine made by allowing the grapes to freeze before picking. Canada makes some very good prize-winning ice wines, as does Germany. Sauternes is made from grapes that are left on the vine until they get moldy (with what is called "noble rot"). The long stay on the vine makes both wines very sweet, ice wines because the ice is removed, leaving a higher sugar to water ratio, and Sauternes because the grapes are well on their way to being moldy raisins.

Both types of wine are very expensive due to small production runs and higher production costs. Sauternes easily run you several hundred dollars a bottle for ordinary and recent vintages. Canadian ice wines are cheaper but are usually sold in small bottles, so the cost is also higher than a regular wine bottle.

Canada is not a noted wine-producing country. Formerly (before the War) this was because most Canadian wine was cheap port or sherry type wines of low quality, often made with import grape concentrate, as Quebec wines are today. Canadian wine-making has been much improved, partly by the efforts of Algerian immigrants and small bespoke vintners, but Canada exports very little wine from its relatively small production, so it is largely unknown and certainly not on the scale of Australian or Californian production, let alone general quality. Canada has high excise taxes which make it hard to educate and supply a wine-drinking population big enough to support a bigger wine industry. I wish they wouldn't be so stupid and protectionist as I'd like to eat more European cheeses, etc.

Global warming may destroy many of the great wines of Europe, California and Australia, however, in which case wines made in Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and the other two wine-growing regions of Canada, Ontario and Nova Scotia, may improve and become more abundant.

The same is no doubt true of New York wines, although many of them are made with native North American grapes such as the Concord and are not comparable to the best wines of Europe or California.
The biggest market for some of these Concord wines are Jews who like their distinctive taste and buy them because they are Kosher.

Israel now makes some very good kosher wines, as it did in ancient times. Until the final destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem (started by factions in the besieged city according to Josephus) the Holy Land was rich in vines, fruit and figs. The massive destruction of these by the armies of Generals Titus and Vespasian took centuries to repair and Israel today is probably closer to its Biblical climate than it has been in 2000 years, which shows how much impact humans can have on the environment. It was a sad impoverished desert in the 1800s if we can believe Mark Twain, and I think we can although he was a joker and an Unbeliever.
 
2014-01-16 10:57:00 AM  
Whose underpants? This is important.
 
2014-01-16 10:58:42 AM  

brantgoose: For non-oenophiles, ice wine is a sweet dessert wine made by allowing the grapes to freeze before picking. Canada makes some very good prize-winning ice wines, as does Germany. Sauternes is made from grapes that are left on the vine until they get moldy (with what is called "noble rot"). The long stay on the vine makes both wines very sweet, ice wines because the ice is removed, leaving a higher sugar to water ratio, and Sauternes because the grapes are well on their way to being moldy raisins.

Both types of wine are very expensive due to small production runs and higher production costs. Sauternes easily run you several hundred dollars a bottle for ordinary and recent vintages. Canadian ice wines are cheaper but are usually sold in small bottles, so the cost is also higher than a regular wine bottle.

Canada is not a noted wine-producing country. Formerly (before the War) this was because most Canadian wine was cheap port or sherry type wines of low quality, often made with import grape concentrate, as Quebec wines are today. Canadian wine-making has been much improved, partly by the efforts of Algerian immigrants and small bespoke vintners, but Canada exports very little wine from its relatively small production, so it is largely unknown and certainly not on the scale of Australian or Californian production, let alone general quality. Canada has high excise taxes which make it hard to educate and supply a wine-drinking population big enough to support a bigger wine industry. I wish they wouldn't be so stupid and protectionist as I'd like to eat more European cheeses, etc.

Global warming may destroy many of the great wines of Europe, California and Australia, however, in which case wines made in Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and the other two wine-growing regions of Canada, Ontario and Nova Scotia, may improve and become more abundant.

The same is no doubt true of New York wines, although many of them are made with native North American grapes such as the ...


What he said.

I explain the cost of dessert wine the following way:

To make ordinary wine, you grow 1000 pounds of grapes, juice them, ferment them, etc and get about 800 pounds of wine.
To make dessert wine, you grow 1000 pounds of grapes, throw out 90% of the water weight, and get 80 pounds of wine.

All the costs (land, labor, equipment, etc.) are spread over a much smaller amount of finished product.  So of course it's going to cost 5x to 10x more.
 
2014-01-16 11:01:19 AM  

LemSkroob: FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.

Ice wine is good. But i prefer a nice Vin Santo wit a biscotti.

The 'annoying' thing is the fact that both (VS and Icewine) start at $35-40 a 375ml bottle, but thats because the higher volume of grapes that are needed to make it.


Try a Pineau des Charantes sometime.  It's a vin doux naturel from the lower Loire valley.  You can find good 375ml bottles in the $20-$25 range, and the flavor notes are clean apricot and melon, with honey on the finish.  Good acidity, too.
 
2014-01-16 11:16:33 AM  

TwowheelinTim: That's right, cider did gain traction... hundreds of years ago. Good call.


OK, smartass.  Beer has been around for hundreds of years also but if you're older than 40, you recall the profound lack of decent beer in the U.S., you remember when domestic wines were not very good, and when most ciders around were home made - except for the fresh, non-alcoholic stuff we gave schoolkids.  Craft ciders have recently made a resurgence.

Now, can you answer the question or is snark all you've got?
 
2014-01-16 11:21:18 AM  
I had zero interest in wine until we drove through the Niagara-on-the-Lake countryside during an anniversary trip.  I have zero farking clue how we found this winery but we enjoyed their Vidal icewine immensely and brought back several bottles - easily the most expensive part of our anniversary.  When we went back of course we got more, and they had a plum wine that was also good.

http://www.carolinecellars.com/


/About the only wine snobbery this beer drinker can manage.
 
2014-01-16 11:24:18 AM  

brantgoose: For non-oenophiles, ice wine is a sweet dessert wine made by allowing the grapes to freeze before picking. Canada makes some very good prize-winning ice wines, as does Germany. Sauternes is made from grapes that are left on the vine until they get moldy (with what is called "noble rot"). The long stay on the vine makes both wines very sweet, ice wines because the ice is removed, leaving a higher sugar to water ratio, and Sauternes because the grapes are well on their way to being moldy raisins.

Both types of wine are very expensive due to small production runs and higher production costs. Sauternes easily run you several hundred dollars a bottle for ordinary and recent vintages. Canadian ice wines are cheaper but are usually sold in small bottles, so the cost is also higher than a regular wine bottle.

Canada is not a noted wine-producing country. Formerly (before the War) this was because most Canadian wine was cheap port or sherry type wines of low quality, often made with import grape concentrate, as Quebec wines are today. Canadian wine-making has been much improved, partly by the efforts of Algerian immigrants and small bespoke vintners, but Canada exports very little wine from its relatively small production, so it is largely unknown and certainly not on the scale of Australian or Californian production, let alone general quality. Canada has high excise taxes which make it hard to educate and supply a wine-drinking population big enough to support a bigger wine industry. I wish they wouldn't be so stupid and protectionist as I'd like to eat more European cheeses, etc.

Global warming may destroy many of the great wines of Europe, California and Australia, however, in which case wines made in Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and the other two wine-growing regions of Canada, Ontario and Nova Scotia, may improve and become more abundant.

The same is no doubt true of New York wines, although many of them are made with native North American grapes such as the ...


I've been to almost every winery in Nova Scotia...  They don't make good wine, unless you consider fruit wines to be wine worth drinking.  BC has some decent ones, but I find the level of pretentiousness and cost at the wineries there isn't justified by the quality of the wines.  In the race to get product to market, a lot of wineries there release the bottles before they are ready.  It's really annoying when 90% of the stock that a winery is selling won't be drinkable for another year or two.  You can get wines for $15 (in Canada) that taste far better than most BC wines selling for $30 or $35 a bottle.

Also, my favourite pairing for any of the really sweet wines is some stinky cured meat of some sort (italian pepper coated type stuff) and some soft cheese...  very pleasing combo.
 
2014-01-16 11:28:57 AM  

foxy_canuck: Also, my favourite pairing for any of the really sweet wines is some stinky cured meat of some sort (italian pepper coated type stuff) and some soft cheese... very pleasing combo.


Sauternes and foie gras are a classic pairing.
 
2014-01-16 11:37:47 AM  
LOL @ the people who believe that ice wine is made from grapes that have frozen on the vine.

Most wineries rent refrigerated semi trailers, throw barrels of harvested grapes in there, and voila.
 
2014-01-16 11:43:30 AM  

TanHamster: LOL @ the people who believe that ice wine is made from grapes that have frozen on the vine.

Most wineries rent refrigerated semi trailers, throw barrels of harvested grapes in there, and voila.


Depends on the country.  Cryoextraction in conjunction with the name "Icewine" is illegal in the US, Germany, Austria, and Canada.  Cryoextraction is banned, period, in Germany.
 
2014-01-16 11:55:29 AM  
But I was told there won't be any more cold winters. What we endured this winter was a mass hallucination.
 
2014-01-16 11:59:47 AM  

sure haven't: But I was told there won't be any more cold winters.


[citation needed]
 
2014-01-16 12:08:54 PM  

FrancoFile: TanHamster: LOL @ the people who believe that ice wine is made from grapes that have frozen on the vine.

Most wineries rent refrigerated semi trailers, throw barrels of harvested grapes in there, and voila.

Depends on the country.  Cryoextraction in conjunction with the name "Icewine" is illegal in the US, Germany, Austria, and Canada.  Cryoextraction is banned, period, in Germany.



Whelp.  All I know is that it's standard operating procedure up the road from me in the Finger Lakes of NY.  Maybe the bottle itself doesn't say "Ice Wine" but gullible, intoxicated customers don't care.  They think they're buying bona fine ice wine / eiswein.
 
2014-01-16 12:13:56 PM  

TanHamster: FrancoFile: TanHamster: LOL @ the people who believe that ice wine is made from grapes that have frozen on the vine.

Most wineries rent refrigerated semi trailers, throw barrels of harvested grapes in there, and voila.

Depends on the country.  Cryoextraction in conjunction with the name "Icewine" is illegal in the US, Germany, Austria, and Canada.  Cryoextraction is banned, period, in Germany.


Whelp.  All I know is that it's standard operating procedure up the road from me in the Finger Lakes of NY.  Maybe the bottle itself doesn't say "Ice Wine" but gullible, intoxicated customers don't care.  They think they're buying bona fine ice wine / eiswein.


Caveat emptor.  The government is only going to do so much.

These are the same kind of dumbasses who buy yogurt and get disgusted that there's tilapia-derived gelatin in it.
Or the same kind of dumbasses who claim to be able to tell when you make their vodka-and-diet-coke with Belvedere instead of Grey Goose.
 
2014-01-16 12:44:10 PM  

FrancoFile: TanHamster: FrancoFile: TanHamster: LOL @ the people who believe that ice wine is made from grapes that have frozen on the vine.

Most wineries rent refrigerated semi trailers, throw barrels of harvested grapes in there, and voila.

Depends on the country.  Cryoextraction in conjunction with the name "Icewine" is illegal in the US, Germany, Austria, and Canada.  Cryoextraction is banned, period, in Germany.


Whelp.  All I know is that it's standard operating procedure up the road from me in the Finger Lakes of NY.  Maybe the bottle itself doesn't say "Ice Wine" but gullible, intoxicated customers don't care.  They think they're buying bona fine ice wine / eiswein.

Caveat emptor.  The government is only going to do so much.

These are the same kind of dumbasses who buy yogurt and get disgusted that there's tilapia-derived gelatin in it.
Or the same kind of dumbasses who claim to be able to tell when you make their vodka-and-diet-coke with Belvedere instead of Grey Goose.


On a related note, I used to buy Makers Mark.  One day, I had my wife administer a blind tasting of $45/750mL Makers Mark versus $20/1L plastic bottle bourbon.  I couldn't identify one from the other.  I've been buying the cheap stuff ever since.  If someone can tell the difference, and it matters that much to them, and they're willing to pay $40 more per liter for it, more power to 'em.  They obviously don't have kids!

Didn't know that about the yogurt!  That's gross.  I just made a batch of whole milk, blueberry yogurt, and I thickened it with a tablespoon of corn starch (for 42 oz of milk.)  The yogurt culture I use just doesn't quite thicken it enough.

I brew my beer, bake my bread, and make my yogurt.  I purchase NY wine and mass-produced bourbon.  I hunt deer, buy local beef and factory-farmed bacon.  I'm not very consistent...
 
2014-01-16 12:50:40 PM  

TanHamster: Didn't know that about the yogurt!


You missed the thread yesterday.
www.fark.com/comments/8101447/Pardon-me-but-does-this-yogurt-taste-l ik e-tilapia-to-you
 
2014-01-16 01:03:40 PM  

brantgoose: The same is no doubt true of New York wines, although many of them are made with native North American grapes such as the Concord and are not comparable to the best wines of Europe or California.
The biggest market for some of these Concord wines are Jews who like their distinctive taste and buy them because they are Kosher.

Israel now makes some very good kosher wines, as it did in ancient times. Until the final destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem (started by factions in the besieged city according to Josephus) the Holy Land was rich in vines, fruit and figs. The massive destruction of these by the armies of Generals Titus and Vespasian took centuries to repair and Israel today is probably closer to its Biblical climate than it has been in 2000 years, which shows how much impact humans can have on the environment. It was a sad impoverished desert in the 1800s if we can believe Mark Twain, and I think we can although he was a joker and an Unbeliever.



friend of mine brought back a dessert wine from isreal a few years back. it was quite good. NY wines are also quite good, but you have to be smart about it. a new york chardonnay is obviously not going to be made with local wines. If you go for the german grape varietals (i recommend the Dr. Konstantine Frank winery for a general 'can't miss') you can get some truly excellent NY wines. I just had a bottle of dr k's dry riesling from last years press and it was phenomenal and the gewürztraminer is always a good choice.
 
2014-01-16 01:19:58 PM  
Thing is, I live here, and. I. Just. Don't. Like. Ice Wine.
Waaaaay too sweet for my palate.
 
2014-01-16 01:42:05 PM  
yes ... but WHO'S underpants?

Jessica Alba's? OK, I'll take a case.
 
2014-01-16 03:21:19 PM  

Mr. Right: LemSkroob: FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.

Ice wine is good. But i prefer a nice Vin Santo wit a biscotti.

The 'annoying' thing is the fact that both (VS and Icewine) start at $35-40 a 375ml bottle, but thats because the higher volume of grapes that are needed to make it.

Not to mention they're freezing their fingers off to pick the grapes.

I've only had the ice wine once and I enjoyed it.  It seems to fit in with the notion of craft that is prevalent in food and beverage.  Craft beers, farm-to-table craft food, etc.

Not to hijack the thread but the notion of picking the grapes after they've frozen redefines the German notion of spaetlese.  Another product that has gained traction recently is cider - great ciders, as a matter of fact.  Does anyone happen to know if those straggler apples hanging from the tree could be used for cider or are they just rotten and useless?


Quebec makes a lot of Cidre de Glace. I assume that's made from frozen apples, but I'm not sure. They're making some fantastic ciders (and beer. and cheese. and charcuterie) - clearly a valiant attempt to heal the wound on the national soul caused by a climate not conducive to winemaking.
 
2014-01-16 03:34:07 PM  

angrycrank: Mr. Right: LemSkroob: FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.

Ice wine is good. But i prefer a nice Vin Santo wit a biscotti.

The 'annoying' thing is the fact that both (VS and Icewine) start at $35-40 a 375ml bottle, but thats because the higher volume of grapes that are needed to make it.

Not to mention they're freezing their fingers off to pick the grapes.

I've only had the ice wine once and I enjoyed it.  It seems to fit in with the notion of craft that is prevalent in food and beverage.  Craft beers, farm-to-table craft food, etc.

Not to hijack the thread but the notion of picking the grapes after they've frozen redefines the German notion of spaetlese.  Another product that has gained traction recently is cider - great ciders, as a matter of fact.  Does anyone happen to know if those straggler apples hanging from the tree could be used for cider or are they just rotten and useless?

Quebec makes a lot of Cidre de Glace. I assume that's made from frozen apples, but I'm not sure. They're making some fantastic ciders (and beer. and cheese. and charcuterie) - clearly a valiant attempt to heal the wound on the national soul caused by a climate not conducive to winemaking.


I've never thought about it, but you'd have to consider how the ice crystals form, cell walls, etc.  Apples have about the same percentage of water as grapes, but they are a hell of a lot bigger.  Off the top of my head, I think it would be tough to get a press that could be calibrated finely enough to squeeze out the sugary unfrozen juice while leaving the ice crystals behind. You probably couldn't use a normal basket press or cylinder press - you might have to have 2 grooved steel plates.

Also, what would be the point - is there really a market for ultra-sweet hard cider?
 
2014-01-16 03:53:27 PM  

angrycrank: Quebec makes a lot of Cidre de Glace. I assume that's made from frozen apples, but I'm not sure. They're making some fantastic ciders (and beer. and cheese. and charcuterie) - clearly a valiant attempt to heal the wound on the national soul caused by a climate not conducive to winemaking.


I'll have to check out the Cidre de Glace.

Down here in the States, there are also many areas where there are some fantastic ciders, beers, cheese, charcuterie, independent restaurants, etc.  We do have a climate conducive to winemaking.  I thought this movement was to heal the open, gaping, sucking chest wounds caused by a generation of industrial food and drink.

Regardless of the impetus, I am enjoying the hell out of the efforts.
 
2014-01-16 03:55:48 PM  

FrancoFile: Also, what would be the point - is there really a market for ultra-sweet hard cider?


I have no idea.  But some local breweries, distilleries, wineries, and the local cider mill have been trying a bunch of different things.  Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't.  You'll never know until you've tried it.

Given that there is currently no use for the un-picked and frozen apples, it's not like you'd be passing up a fortune to give it a shot.
 
2014-01-16 04:03:16 PM  

FrancoFile: angrycrank: Mr. Right: LemSkroob: FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.

Ice wine is good. But i prefer a nice Vin Santo wit a biscotti.

The 'annoying' thing is the fact that both (VS and Icewine) start at $35-40 a 375ml bottle, but thats because the higher volume of grapes that are needed to make it.

Not to mention they're freezing their fingers off to pick the grapes.

I've only had the ice wine once and I enjoyed it.  It seems to fit in with the notion of craft that is prevalent in food and beverage.  Craft beers, farm-to-table craft food, etc.

Not to hijack the thread but the notion of picking the grapes after they've frozen redefines the German notion of spaetlese.  Another product that has gained traction recently is cider - great ciders, as a matter of fact.  Does anyone happen to know if those straggler apples hanging from the tree could be used for cider or are they just rotten and useless?

Quebec makes a lot of Cidre de Glace. I assume that's made from frozen apples, but I'm not sure. They're making some fantastic ciders (and beer. and cheese. and charcuterie) - clearly a valiant attempt to heal the wound on the national soul caused by a climate not conducive to winemaking.

I've never thought about it, but you'd have to consider how the ice crystals form, cell walls, etc.  Apples have about the same percentage of water as grapes, but they are a hell of a lot bigger.  Off the top of my head, I think it would be tough to get a press that could be calibrated finely enough to squeeze out the sugary unfrozen juice while leaving the ice crystals behind. You probably couldn't use a normal basket press or cylinder press - you might have to have 2 grooved steel plates.

Also, what would be the point - is there really a market for ultra-sweet hard cider?


There seems to be in Quebec. If you go someplace like Le marché des saveurs du Québec at Jean Talon Market (highly recommended!), there will be a whole room of the stuff. There are occasionally some available in Ontario. I don't know if they export it much beyond that. I've had some and it wasn't bad, but I prefer the dry sparkling ciders.

Wikipedia suggests that cidre de glace can be made either by storing the apples for a while, pressing them, and freezing the juice or by using frozen apples, like ice wine.
 
2014-01-16 05:14:55 PM  
Why does it have to be picked frozen? Wouldn't you get the same result in freeze distilling like you would do with an Eisbock?
 
2014-01-16 05:20:53 PM  

mochunk: Why does it have to be picked frozen? Wouldn't you get the same result in freeze distilling like you would do with an Eisbock?


Partially romance.  Wine is an agricultural product, not an industrial product.
Partially marketing.  "We had to pick these between 3 am and 8 am on the coldest day in December"
Partially self-defense.  If nobody cared about how it was made, then people who farmed in marginal areas would have no competitive advantage over the guy with 10000 acres and a 6000 sq ft refrigerated warehouse in the Central Valley.
 
2014-01-16 05:30:33 PM  

Arkanaut: Whose underpants? This is important.


This.  So very this.
 
2014-01-16 06:02:19 PM  

FrancoFile: The most annoying thing about ice wine?  The people who think that ice wine is the only kind of dessert wine.


I've taken a number of wine appreciation classes.  The instructor described it as a "boudoir wine".  If I caught his drift, and I think I did, he was implying that you should drizzle it on your loved one, and then lick it off.

/ I use to like Ripple, so I needed some schooling.
 
2014-01-16 08:19:49 PM  
Ice wine is fantastic. White wines are milder than reds, so it's often difficult to pick out really fine details about them, but, in ice wine form, you get all the awesome character a white wine can have.

Plus, there's nothing in this world like ice wine on vanilla ice cream.
 
2014-01-16 09:13:49 PM  

FrancoFile: mochunk: Why does it have to be picked frozen? Wouldn't you get the same result in freeze distilling like you would do with an Eisbock?

Partially romance.  Wine is an agricultural product, not an industrial product.
Partially marketing.  "We had to pick these between 3 am and 8 am on the coldest day in December"
Partially self-defense.  If nobody cared about how it was made, then people who farmed in marginal areas would have no competitive advantage over the guy with 10000 acres and a 6000 sq ft refrigerated warehouse in the Central Valley.


Aren't those the same reasons that drive everything the wine industry does?  Picking grapes frozen isn't nearly as bad as one region of France insisting it has a monopoly on a type of sparkling wine.
 
2014-01-17 08:40:17 AM  

llortcM_yllort: FrancoFile: mochunk: Why does it have to be picked frozen? Wouldn't you get the same result in freeze distilling like you would do with an Eisbock?

Partially romance.  Wine is an agricultural product, not an industrial product.
Partially marketing.  "We had to pick these between 3 am and 8 am on the coldest day in December"
Partially self-defense.  If nobody cared about how it was made, then people who farmed in marginal areas would have no competitive advantage over the guy with 10000 acres and a 6000 sq ft refrigerated warehouse in the Central Valley.

Aren't those the same reasons that drive everything the wine industry does?  Picking grapes frozen isn't nearly as bad as one region of France insisting it has a monopoly on a type of sparkling wine.


Nah, you misunderstand appellations.

That one region has a monopoly on the NAME of the region.  Plenty of places, in France and in other countries, make sparkling wine with the same grapes and the same process.  But the appellation & terroir system is about protecting the regional trademark on the name.

You can make corn-mash whisky anywhere in the US.  But you can't call it Kentucky Bourbon if it doesn't come from... guess where...
 
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