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(Kotaku)   Court rules that parents are not responsible for their precious snowflakes making in-app purchases without their permission, orders Apple to pay $32.5 million   (kotaku.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, regulations, mobile apps, CEO Tim Cook, parents, iPhone, informed consent  
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2404 clicks; posted to Business » on 15 Jan 2014 at 8:24 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-01-15 09:16:23 PM  
3 votes:

Flappyhead: Mikey1969: Yeah, I have no problem with this decision... They have had years to fix this shiat, this cropped up awhile ago, and they haven't worked to prevent it because it has them rolling in dough.

I seem to recall an incident last year with a Simpsons freemium game that operated along those same lines.  You'd input the password for an in-game purchase once and then you could just keep buying shiat without ever entering it again during that play session.  Some kid racked up a few thousand in a month and mom didn't even realize it until the bill arrived.


And THAT'S why I have no problem with this, it's obviously doing exactly what it's designed to do, which is take advantage of kids being kids while the parents think they're safe because they entered the password. Hell, it's so easy to do that I can even see younger kids buying things without even realizing that they are costing their parents more money.
2014-01-15 11:49:26 PM  
2 votes:
It's too bad there isn't an easy solution to this problem like I don't know, not giving your kid an iPhone.
2014-01-15 08:48:25 PM  
2 votes:
The article I saw on this says the $32.5 million is SEVEN HOURS of Apple profits.

They got off light, didn't they?
2014-01-15 08:45:40 PM  
2 votes:
In other news subby is a dumbass who thinks six year old children should be able to contract for goods and services on their own
2014-01-16 01:19:14 AM  
1 vote:

Somaticasual: In the 90s, parents did this amazing thing called "take responsibility, lecture the kid, and pay it anyways". What the heck happened, america? I realize we've given away a lot of our freedom over the years, but did we give away the personal responsibility with it?


Hahahahahahahaha nope. I had friends who made a fun game of milking Columbia Music House out of tons of CDs and then not paying anything because they were minors. Their parents didn't pay a damn thing either. You're going to have to go further back than the 90s for those qualities....

/doesn't apply in this case anyway
2014-01-16 12:32:00 AM  
1 vote:

rugman11: hitmanric: Can you buy aps, music, etc.... without an itunes card?  If you can use a credit card and you leave that info on your kids iphone then maybe it's not really apples fault.

/didnt RTFA
//obviously

I always have to enter my iTunes password when I'm buying something, though I think I've only made one in-app purchase.  Do in-app purchases not have those same controls or is it something you have to set up manually?


Depends on the app. The people who design these kids games know what they're doing.
2014-01-16 12:29:35 AM  
1 vote:

Somaticasual: In the 90s, parents did this amazing thing called "take responsibility, lecture the kid, and pay it anyways". What the heck happened, america? I realize we've given away a lot of our freedom over the years, but did we give away the personal responsibility with it?


Contracts entered into by minors have always been voidable. I read a case in intro to business law where a 16 year old girl bought a car, gave it to her boyfriend, broke up with said boyfriend, and then decided she didn't want to be making payments on the thing. The court ruled that as a minor, she could void the contract at any time, and while the rule is that you have to return anything you can, she was no longer in possession of the car, so she could just walk out of the deal. Dealer had to eat the loss. Same rule here. Any purchase a kid makes is voidable. The people who make these apps are scum, and deserve every lawsuit they get.
2014-01-16 12:26:52 AM  
1 vote:

if_i_really_have_to: I was recently "forced" to get an itunes account as something I wanted was only available through them. Upon hitting that screen I said "fark you, you're not even getting my real name, you certainly aren't getting my credit card number" and left off until I could be bothered to buy an itunes card.


And people wonder why piracy is so popular. Most people have no problem paying for stuff. What they do have a problem with is hassle. I'd put apps with mini-transactions hidden throughout as a hassle.
You can't blame a person for incorrectly dealing with a problem there's no good reason they have to deal with in the first place. There's only so much personal responsibility that can be assigned before we have to stop and ask "Why do we have to deal with all these hidden ways to nickel and dime?"
2014-01-15 11:16:31 PM  
1 vote:

Mikey1969: Flappyhead: Mikey1969: Yeah, I have no problem with this decision... They have had years to fix this shiat, this cropped up awhile ago, and they haven't worked to prevent it because it has them rolling in dough.

I seem to recall an incident last year with a Simpsons freemium game that operated along those same lines.  You'd input the password for an in-game purchase once and then you could just keep buying shiat without ever entering it again during that play session.  Some kid racked up a few thousand in a month and mom didn't even realize it until the bill arrived.

And THAT'S why I have no problem with this, it's obviously doing exactly what it's designed to do, which is take advantage of kids being kids while the parents think they're safe because they entered the password. Hell, it's so easy to do that I can even see younger kids buying things without even realizing that they are costing their parents more money.


Exactly.

What was happening:-

"Mom can you install this game for me? it's FREE!"
Mom: OK.. let me enter the secret password.  Don't look!
Kid:  Thanks mom!,  proceeds to play 'smurfs', 'simpsons', 'candy crush' or whatever and rack up thousands of dollars via in-app purchases on what was supposed to be a 'free' game,

App doesn't require the password because mom just entered it.  Mom doesn't suspect the app is costing her money as it said 'free' when she installed it.  App doesn't require "re-"entry of the password as it's just been done.  Apple doesn't ask every single time due to the 15 minute window.  Kid thinks all these dollars they're spending are play money.


What happens now:
There is a setting to disable in-app purchases completely
There are warnings on apps with in-app purchases


Althought it's not a lot of money Apple is paying, it probably covers a decent amount of the sneaky in-app money they gained from this.
2014-01-15 10:26:12 PM  
1 vote:

The6502Man: Hell, I don't know.... Turn on Airplane mode before handing the phone off to little johnny?  If I can't lock out in-app purchasing somehow, AND the game MUST be on-line to play, then they ain't playing.  It's not like there aren't a bazillion games on the iPhone store.


No, the point is that little Johnny asks to buy a powerup for his game, and you enter your password, thinking that you're good, but that leaves the card approved for a 15 minute window, and Johnny gets a bunch more popups, not realizing that you only approved the one.

That's what bothers me, even when you think you're doing it right, and even if you have an honest kid, these things can add up quickly and pretty much under the radar.
2014-01-15 09:49:59 PM  
1 vote:

The6502Man: Hell, I don't know.... Turn on Airplane mode before handing the phone off to little johnny?  If I can't lock out in-app purchasing somehow, AND the game MUST be on-line to play, then they ain't playing.  It's not like there aren't a bazillion games on the iPhone store.


They had no reason to expect that the card could be charged again without entering another password. No doubt there's some escape clause for Apple but it's a crock of shiat excuse. Parents did everything as responsibly as anyone could expect, Apple farked them over.
2014-01-15 09:00:18 PM  
1 vote:
Yeah, I have no problem with this decision... They have had years to fix this shiat, this cropped up awhile ago, and they haven't worked to prevent it because it has them rolling in dough.

At least the Google store now has a setting to require a password for purchases even if the credit card is stored, but it isn't on by default, and I don't know if you have that 15-minute window like iTunes has.
2014-01-15 08:52:10 PM  
1 vote:
One more loss for personal responsibility!
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-01-15 08:19:01 PM  
1 vote:
The FTC alleged Apple violated the law by failing to notify parents that by entering a password, not only were they approving the immediate in-app purchase, but all in-app purchases made for the next 15 minutes, without additional action.

One of the standard Apple 20 page contracts that nobody reads warns about this now.
 
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