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(CBC)   Man repeatedly confronted by police for public drunkenness. Problem: It's actually Huntington's disease   (cbc.ca) divider line 12
    More: Asinine, public intoxication, false accusations, problems  
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5972 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jan 2014 at 10:09 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-14 09:27:09 PM
4 votes:
www.portable-essentials.com
/Just sayin'...
//couldn't hurt, anyway
2014-01-14 10:48:30 PM
3 votes:

fusillade762: The officers would ask me questions and it would take me quite some time to answer because I have issues with comprehension

So you have a condition that affects your motor skills and cognition in virtually the same way as being drunk? How is that different from actually being drunk?


It's different because Huntington's isn't voluntary.  It's not like he decided to go to the neighborhood bar and get plastered with Huntington's.

While he should avoid more complicated things like driving, I wouldn't go as far to say he shouldn't be allowed to appear in public at all.
2014-01-14 09:44:48 PM
3 votes:

fusillade762: The officers would ask me questions and it would take me quite some time to answer because I have issues with comprehension

So you have a condition that affects your motor skills and cognition in virtually the same way as being drunk? How is that different from actually being drunk?


MaudlinMutantMollusk: [www.portable-essentials.com image 768x559]
/Just sayin'...
//couldn't hurt, anyway

Yeah, somehow I doubt the cops would believe it anyway.


I think you have to register and provide medical proof, and you also get an ID card that describes your condition
 /I could be wrong

//still couldn't hurt
///you're probably right
2014-01-14 11:25:44 PM
2 votes:
Not making this story about me... but...

My great-grandmother, grandfather, father, and aunt all died of Huntington's. My sister has it. My cousin is at risk and does not know if she has it or not. I've been tested and do not have it...

It destroyed an entire half of my family- it was the worst for my grandmother, she had to see her husband (my grandfather) and her 2 children (my father and my aunt) die of it. She died a very depressed and angry woman...

It's a horrible, horrible disease. And it's especially cruel because unless you get tested you start showing symptoms at an age where you've likely had children and now they have a 50/50 risk of inheriting it... And if you get tested and you have it there is really nothing that can be done to delay symptoms or treat it...

I feel like I won the lottery when I tested negative... although I did have a few years of survivor guilt...

My sister and I are not close but when our father was sick and before she had symptoms she would get him from the nursing home on weekends and take him home. Sometimes she'd take him out for pizza or ice cream... Little kids would be scared and she would explain that he was sick and was not scary... When some teenage punk or young adult would make a comment or laugh she would go ballistic and the cops had to come out several times to break it up... I'll always give her credit for that.

Long story short- the cops should learn about this disease and know his situation- it's rare enough that there can't be a lot of people in town with it, he's probably the only one. And they should do what they can to let him live as normal a life as he can for as long as he can....
2014-01-14 10:25:32 PM
2 votes:

Trafficguy2000: cops have killed for less than this, watch your back dude.


ya, came here to say...lucky he aint dead yet.

img.ibtimes.com
just ask this dude...oh, wait...he dead.
2014-01-14 09:23:47 PM
2 votes:
I wouldn't wish that disease on a mortal enemy.  Sorry for your condition, dude.
2014-01-15 01:55:03 AM
1 votes:

Shadowknight: cryinoutloud: They don't know what Huntington's is and they can't be arsed to find out. It's more fun to pick on the guy.

I think Occam's Razor would say that they just didn't know what it was, and went with what was the most common explanation for the symptoms they were seeing, rather than some grand conspiracy to bully a cripple.

I'm a medically trained person, and even I suspected drunk or high when I first saw advanced Huntingtons.  It's not something you see every day, where someone being positive ETOH very much is.  I wouldn't expect a couple of non-medically trained police officers (outside of basic CPR and first aid) in the middle of BFE to know what they were looking at right away.  Besides, the article says where the man lives, but not necessarily where all of this incidents supposedly took place.  Yes, the folks in his town would maybe know him enough, but what about the next town over?  Are we really going to expect everyone in the surrounding communities to run around town with a picture of him on their dash that says "Not Drunk" at all times?


Occam might suggest to the cops that a drunk person would normally smell like booze.
2014-01-15 01:16:41 AM
1 votes:
I have Huntington's disease, so I'm getting an involuntary kick out of this.

Also, my mother has Huntington's too, and she gets accused of being drunk when she's just severely disabled.

/Still got a couple of decades left.
//Let the good times roll.
2014-01-14 11:06:45 PM
1 votes:

fusillade762: The officers would ask me questions and it would take me quite some time to answer because I have issues with comprehension

So you have a condition that affects your motor skills and cognition in virtually the same way as being drunk? How is that different from actually being drunk?


MaudlinMutantMollusk: [www.portable-essentials.com image 768x559]
/Just sayin'...
//couldn't hurt, anyway

Yeah, somehow I doubt the cops would believe it anyway.


It's different in that it's a completely different thing, and not illegal? How hard is that to understand? There is no law against being in public with impaired motor skills and cognition. There ARE laws against being drunk in public (although there shouldn't be, really...I don't see how it's an issue unless you're being a nuisance, in which case disorderly conduct ought to cover it).
2014-01-14 10:55:41 PM
1 votes:
So... how often in this town with 11 police officers dies this happen? I'm one of fifty in a town of 30,000. I know every "regular" by their first name and their drug of choice and most of their specific mental disorders. After the first encounter with this guy and email would get sent out and the whole department would know his issue and whether he needed or expected any help from us when out and about. For those of you who wouldn't accept that the cops would ever do anything for altruistic motives or, you know, a desire to to a good job, you can chalk it up to laziness. I'd much rather tell my dispatcher "oh, that's Bob, he's fine, I'm not gonna respond" when some passerby calls him in as drunk.
2014-01-14 10:33:18 PM
1 votes:
This might be one of the rare times a forehead tattoo might actually be a good idea. Something to the effect of "I'm NOT drunk! I have Huntington's disease." It's simple, direct, impossible to miss, and would immediately set the tone for any police encounter. Or really any awkward social encounter. I would go this route over any sort of just constantly carried I.D. because you just know dude would get shot trying to pull it out when some Barney Fife thinks he's going for a weapon.

That's a rough road in life, man. Much love.
2014-01-14 10:14:03 PM
1 votes:
cops have killed for less than this, watch your back dude.
 
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