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(YouTube) Video Car vs. Elephant. FIGHT (Link updated)   (youtube.com) divider line 114
    More: Video, South Africa, elephants, fights, footage  
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8191 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jan 2014 at 8:59 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-14 10:19:27 PM

libranoelrose: Ishkur: We're the only animal that does that.
[i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x779]


First of all, that's not throwing. Secondly, that's not killing it, that's knocking it off a leaf. And thirdly, let's see it do that to its own kind from thousands of feet away.

/what fish is that anyway? ...I want to know more.
 
2014-01-14 10:19:29 PM
god damnit Topsy
 
2014-01-14 10:20:18 PM

Daedalus27: The "abnormal behaviour" was also likely a result of an injury the elephant had suffered before the incident.

The people in the car were beyond stupid.  The elephant was in mating season and also had this "injury".   I hope it was the injury that led them to put the elephant down rather than the suicidal behavior of tourists that should have gotten them killed. These are wild animals not Disney animatronics.


The Afrikaners seemed to (mostly) know the score, based on the audio from TFV.  I'd like to hear the "cockpit voice recorder" audio from the blue car - alas, no such thing exists.  But just imagine what those two, intellectually impaired people might have been saying.

I'd *like* to think one of them was saying "step on it, drive the F out of here".  Probably the driver would be saying "Oh, but we're so close and elephants are such wonderful creatures..."
 
2014-01-14 10:21:53 PM

AbiNormal: Could have been worse.
[mallujokes.com image 720x480]


Somehow the moose sticking its head in our Buick when my family was visiting a nature preserve when I was a kid suddenly doesn't seem like that awesome a story.
 
2014-01-14 10:24:41 PM

libranoelrose: Ishkur: We're the only animal that does that.
[i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x779]


Cool. It's called the Archer fish.


/DANGERZONE!
 
2014-01-14 10:25:45 PM

Lsherm: Ishkur: JohnnyC: We've only had "bang-bang" sticks of any kind for roughly 800 years and they really weren't any good until about 400-500 years ago. We (the human species) have been rocking the top of the food chain for a lot longer than that. The real weapon that put us there is our big ass brains

Actually, it probably started when we figured out how to throw a rock.

Man is the only animal that can throw things really far and accurate. That is a crazy ridiculous advantage. We kill at a distance. Evolutionarily speaking, having a monopoly of that that ability is fricken' god mode.

After we learned how to throw pointy things at animals, we stopped fearing them.

Tools.  The minute we figured out we could carry a pointy stick with our opposable thumbs and then stick them into something to kill it, we were gold.  Throwing things probably happened concurrently, surely someone noticed if you threw a rock at someone it hurt.


Cooperation is our earliest, greatest advantage.

Because of what we are we can coordinate to a degree no other animal can. Our complex language allows us to coordinate with one another not just in the moment but also through time. We can pass complex information back and forth to one another which will be useful in the future, sharing knowledge which makes each human more effective. There's no animal that can coordinate with one another like we do.

Our tool use is a cooperative endeavour as well, toolmaking skills are shared and enhanced by human cooperation. Tools that we take for granted as primitive can actually take a lot of skill to master creating and using. Our ability to communicate means over time we can share and enhance the skills to create and use those tools, building on the knowledge of past generations.
 
2014-01-14 10:27:49 PM
This person recording needs to have his face stomped! This should be wiped off the Fark page it is so bad
 
2014-01-14 10:29:06 PM

HairBolus: SearchN: Apparently they forgot to bring the greatest protection from Elephants...

[static.tvtropes.org image 350x403]

Elephants, contrary to urban legends since the ancient Greeks, are NOT afraid of mice but avoid trees and bushes with heavy ant protection.

http://www.livescience.com/33261-elephants-afraid-of-mice-.html 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1308415/Elephants-NOT -a fraid-mice-terrified-ants.html


Well aware of that, I was making a joke. Couldn't even find the correct Looney Toons image in GIS.
 
2014-01-14 10:30:28 PM
The dialogue is beautiful to my ears.  XD

"Urbala bahalabrub, ahnshababla shurbala, get in the car, Shala bablabla uushh ala. *shiat!* Shabala hamala. shiat! shiat! shiat!"

Probably wouldn't be so funny to a bilingual person, I know.
 
2014-01-14 10:30:42 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-01-14 10:32:31 PM

mongbiohazard: Cooperation is our earliest, greatest advantage.


We are also the only animal that kills large quantities of itself.
 
2014-01-14 10:36:42 PM

AbiNormal: Could have been worse.
[mallujokes.com image 720x480]


lmao
 
2014-01-14 10:37:38 PM

Oblio13: I was in on the cull of a problem bull in a park in Zimbabwe. He'd figured out that he was stronger than cars and had been doing the same thing at a river crossing. I wasn't supposed to be the shooter, but the elephant didn't follow the plan. When a bull fans out his ears and trumpets and comes after you, it's very difficult to stand your ground, even knowing that it's the only viable option. My first shot was at about fifty yards, right between the eyes, and it had no effect. (Turned out it went over his brain at that angle.) My second shot was at 27 yards as he put his head down to use his tusks, and that one was good. It was the most exciting ten seconds of my life, and that includes landing on aircraft carriers, crashing a jet and sleeping with a redhead.


Oy!
*you-win-one-free-internet.jpg*
Scratch out 'internet' and write in 'lay'.
 
2014-01-14 10:39:49 PM

Ishkur: /what fish is that anyway? ...I want to know more.


It's an archerfish. Their aim is dead accurate. I used to have one, and rigged up a branch over the aquarium and put bugs on it to feed him. He never missed.
 
2014-01-14 10:40:01 PM

Ishkur: DANGERZONE


squints eyes
 
2014-01-14 10:41:52 PM
The elephant was later put down and was discovered to have been in musth, a condition that usually affects male elephants once a year when testosterone levels, aggression and sexual activity increase.

The "abnormal behaviour" was also likely a result of an injury the elephant had suffered before the incident.


Or from being in musth like you just mentioned.
 
2014-01-14 10:44:37 PM
As I have posted many times here, elephants are farking evil vindictive assholes
 
d3
2014-01-14 10:47:17 PM

Lonestar: Im going to be the first who says it? It looks fake.

Im not saying its fake, but its fake.


I agree. Any video I see on the internet where it is shaky and can't hold the subject in frame, especially at a critical drama moment where a dummy object can be substituted makes me think fake first. The article makes me think otherwise, but it still could end up being part of some viral B.S.
 
2014-01-14 10:50:57 PM

Oblio13: I was in on the cull of a problem bull in a park in Zimbabwe. He'd figured out that he was stronger than cars and had been doing the same thing at a river crossing. I wasn't supposed to be the shooter, but the elephant didn't follow the plan. When a bull fans out his ears and trumpets and comes after you, it's very difficult to stand your ground, even knowing that it's the only viable option. My first shot was at about fifty yards, right between the eyes, and it had no effect. (Turned out it went over his brain at that angle.) My second shot was at 27 yards as he put his head down to use his tusks, and that one was good. It was the most exciting ten seconds of my life, and that includes landing on aircraft carriers, crashing a jet and sleeping with a redhead.


Check out the big balls on Brad . . .

/not kidding
 
2014-01-14 10:59:18 PM

SuperNinjaToad: This is why you want to bring a minimum of at least an AR-15 when you go to the African safari so when animals go on a rampage you stand a chance from a distance.


Does Holland & Holland make a .375 H&H Mag version of the AR-15? I think only an idiot would take an AR-15 elephant hunting.
 
2014-01-14 10:59:56 PM

Ishkur: Lsherm: Tools. The minute we figured out we could carry a pointy stick with our opposable thumbs and then stick them into something to kill it, we were gold. Throwing things probably happened concurrently, surely someone noticed if you threw a rock at someone it hurt.

There is a big chicken and egg question in anthropology about which came first: opposable thumbs which necessitated a big brain to do creative things with them, or a big brain which wanted free appendages to work all sorts of mischief. I'm liable to think that that the two evolved together and pushed each other: The more we used one necessitated advancement in the other.

But tool use isn't that special. Lots of animals use tools. Just look at what crows can do with them. Otters, beavers, primates, octopus, dolphins... they all use tools in one form or another. But none of them can throw. I can't stress enough how much of a ecological game changer that is. We kill at a distance! Think about that.

We're the only animal that does that.


No, we already had opposable digits because of our primate ancestry before we ever came down from the trees and started farking with tools.

Our big brains were probably the result of many different evolutionary pressures and population bottlenecks over time, one after another. Climate changes may have led to us coming down from the trees, which put us in danger from predators (like big cats) that we hadn't needed to worry about before, which led to us developing a bipedal stance to keep a better eye out for predators (which also freed our forelimbs up for eventual tool use) as well as more complex communication. Our ever increasing mental capabilities were only further enhanced by extinctions and habitat pressures resulting in population bottlenecks where only the most capable proto humans survived.

Sort of a Rube Goldberg machine of death and mating resulting in an animal which could eventually invent Gucci jeans.
 
2014-01-14 11:01:41 PM

Ishkur: mongbiohazard: Cooperation is our earliest, greatest advantage.

We are also the only animal that kills large quantities of itself.


Yes, and we do so using cooperation. It's not like one human wages war and wipes out other populations of humans by themselves.
 
2014-01-14 11:02:51 PM

mongbiohazard: Lsherm: Ishkur: JohnnyC: We've only had "bang-bang" sticks of any kind for roughly 800 years and they really weren't any good until about 400-500 years ago. We (the human species) have been rocking the top of the food chain for a lot longer than that. The real weapon that put us there is our big ass brains

Actually, it probably started when we figured out how to throw a rock.

Man is the only animal that can throw things really far and accurate. That is a crazy ridiculous advantage. We kill at a distance. Evolutionarily speaking, having a monopoly of that that ability is fricken' god mode.

After we learned how to throw pointy things at animals, we stopped fearing them.

Tools.  The minute we figured out we could carry a pointy stick with our opposable thumbs and then stick them into something to kill it, we were gold.  Throwing things probably happened concurrently, surely someone noticed if you threw a rock at someone it hurt.

Cooperation is our earliest, greatest advantage.

Because of what we are we can coordinate to a degree no other animal can. Our complex language allows us to coordinate with one another not just in the moment but also through time. We can pass complex information back and forth to one another which will be useful in the future, sharing knowledge which makes each human more effective. There's no animal that can coordinate with one another like we do.

Our tool use is a cooperative endeavour as well, toolmaking skills are shared and enhanced by human cooperation. Tools that we take for granted as primitive can actually take a lot of skill to master creating and using. Our ability to communicate means over time we can share and enhance the skills to create and use those tools, building on the knowledge of past generations.


All of you guys seem to agree... it's our brains.
 
2014-01-14 11:07:57 PM

mongbiohazard: Ishkur: mongbiohazard: Cooperation is our earliest, greatest advantage.

We are also the only animal that kills large quantities of itself.

Yes, and we do so using cooperation. It's not like one human wages war and wipes out other populations of humans by themselves.


Correct. It takes at least 2.

thenewsjunkie.com

Or, none.

imagizer.imageshack.us
 
2014-01-14 11:08:45 PM

Ishkur: Lsherm: Tools. The minute we figured out we could carry a pointy stick with our opposable thumbs and then stick them into something to kill it, we were gold. Throwing things probably happened concurrently, surely someone noticed if you threw a rock at someone it hurt.

There is a big chicken and egg question in anthropology about which came first: opposable thumbs which necessitated a big brain to do creative things with them, or a big brain which wanted free appendages to work all sorts of mischief. I'm liable to think that that the two evolved together and pushed each other: The more we used one necessitated advancement in the other.

But tool use isn't that special. Lots of animals use tools. Just look at what crows can do with them. Otters, beavers, primates, octopus, dolphins... they all use tools in one form or another. But none of them can throw. I can't stress enough how much of a ecological game changer that is. We kill at a distance! Think about that.

We're the only animal that does that.


Lots of animals use tools, but we're the only animal that uses tools to make other tools.  No other animal has that kind of extrapolation ability.
 
2014-01-14 11:11:24 PM

mongbiohazard: Yes, and we do so using cooperation. It's not like one human wages war and wipes out other populations of humans by themselves.


No, ants do it too.
 
2014-01-14 11:11:37 PM

JohnnyC: mongbiohazard: Lsherm: Ishkur: JohnnyC: We've only had "bang-bang" sticks of any kind for roughly 800 years and they really weren't any good until about 400-500 years ago. We (the human species) have been rocking the top of the food chain for a lot longer than that. The real weapon that put us there is our big ass brains

Actually, it probably started when we figured out how to throw a rock.

Man is the only animal that can throw things really far and accurate. That is a crazy ridiculous advantage. We kill at a distance. Evolutionarily speaking, having a monopoly of that that ability is fricken' god mode.

After we learned how to throw pointy things at animals, we stopped fearing them.

Tools.  The minute we figured out we could carry a pointy stick with our opposable thumbs and then stick them into something to kill it, we were gold.  Throwing things probably happened concurrently, surely someone noticed if you threw a rock at someone it hurt.

Cooperation is our earliest, greatest advantage.

Because of what we are we can coordinate to a degree no other animal can. Our complex language allows us to coordinate with one another not just in the moment but also through time. We can pass complex information back and forth to one another which will be useful in the future, sharing knowledge which makes each human more effective. There's no animal that can coordinate with one another like we do.

Our tool use is a cooperative endeavour as well, toolmaking skills are shared and enhanced by human cooperation. Tools that we take for granted as primitive can actually take a lot of skill to master creating and using. Our ability to communicate means over time we can share and enhance the skills to create and use those tools, building on the knowledge of past generations.

All of you guys seem to agree... it's our brains.


I could agree with that, because ultimately it's that brain which allows us to do the cooperation and communication which lets us be so effective.
 
2014-01-14 11:13:25 PM

Merry Sunshine: Lots of animals use tools, but we're the only animal that uses tools to make other tools. No other animal has that kind of extrapolation ability.


Crows do.
 
2014-01-14 11:14:23 PM

Ishkur: mongbiohazard: Yes, and we do so using cooperation. It's not like one human wages war and wipes out other populations of humans by themselves.

No, ants do it too.


So? We still cooperate to a degree that ants could only dream of. Our language and memory allow us to share abstract concepts which can help us coordinate with and strengthen one another through time.
 
2014-01-14 11:16:10 PM

JohnnyC: All of you guys seem to agree...


We're not really arguing, we're just having fun pointing out exceptions in each other's arguments that are also true.
 
2014-01-14 11:21:15 PM

RoyBatty: Bathia_Mapes: Reminds me of the T-Rex vs car scene in Jurassic Park, but in this case you don't have to worry about the elephant eating you.

Kind of reminded me of the pon farr.

Video needed more Star Trek Fight Theme.


came for the pon farr reference.  leaving satisfied and less aggressive.
 
2014-01-14 11:23:42 PM

mongbiohazard: So? We still cooperate to a degree that ants could only dream of. Our language and memory allow us to share abstract concepts which can help us coordinate with and strengthen one another through time.


"Ants are so much like human beings as to be an embarrassment. They farm fungi, raise aphids as livestock, launch armies into war, use chemical sprays to alarm and confuse enemies, capture slaves, engage in child labour, exchange information ceaselessly. They do everything but watch television." ~Lewis Thomas
 
2014-01-14 11:31:23 PM

Ishkur: mongbiohazard: So? We still cooperate to a degree that ants could only dream of. Our language and memory allow us to share abstract concepts which can help us coordinate with and strengthen one another through time.

"Ants are so much like human beings as to be an embarrassment. They farm fungi, raise aphids as livestock, launch armies into war, use chemical sprays to alarm and confuse enemies, capture slaves, engage in child labour, exchange information ceaselessly. They do everything but watch television." ~Lewis Thomas


Except they do it all with preprogrammed instinct. We have the capability to communicate abstract concepts allowing us a versatility which makes ants look as simplistic as they are compared to us. Fascinating, capable, interesting to be sure... but quite simplistic in comparison.

Ants do all those things in the particular habitat they evolved in, with the resources particular to their environment. Humans invent whole new resources... Heck, we invent whole new NEEDS for ourselves. It's like comparing an Apollo mission to a top.
 
2014-01-14 11:35:58 PM

Ishkur: mongbiohazard: So? We still cooperate to a degree that ants could only dream of. Our language and memory allow us to share abstract concepts which can help us coordinate with and strengthen one another through time.

"Ants are so much like human beings as to be an embarrassment. They farm fungi, raise aphids as livestock, launch armies into war, use chemical sprays to alarm and confuse enemies, capture slaves, engage in child labour, exchange information ceaselessly. They do everything but watch television." ~Lewis Thomas


By the way, you should read the book "City" by Clifford D. Simak. One of ththe subplots is about how someone tinkers with ants, allowing them to overwinter and retain memories from the previous generation. Once they get to accumulate knowledge and pass it along from one generation to the next they quickly take over the world.
 
2014-01-14 11:36:09 PM

mongbiohazard: Except they do it all with preprogrammed instinct. We have the capability to communicate abstract concepts allowing us a versatility which makes ants look as simplistic as they are compared to us. Fascinating, capable, interesting to be sure... but quite simplistic in comparison.


Define "simplistic". Why do ants need to do complex things? They seem to be quite successful without them. In terms of sheer biomass, they are the largest organism in the world.

Your anthropocentrism is showing.
 
2014-01-14 11:45:12 PM
Ishkur:

We're the only animal that does that.

upload.wikimedia.org

Bang.  You're dead.
 
2014-01-14 11:48:31 PM

Ishkur: mongbiohazard: Except they do it all with preprogrammed instinct. We have the capability to communicate abstract concepts allowing us a versatility which makes ants look as simplistic as they are compared to us. Fascinating, capable, interesting to be sure... but quite simplistic in comparison.

Define "simplistic". Why do ants need to do complex things? They seem to be quite successful without them. In terms of sheer biomass, they are the largest organism in the world.

Your anthropocentrism is showing.


Nope, bacteria are the largest biomass in the world. Plants are also more than all insects (which stands to reason considering they're primary producers).

As for why would ants need to do complex things... I never said they needed to, I simply said that as a matter of fact they are incredibly simplistic compared to humans - and they most certainly are.
 
2014-01-15 12:07:48 AM
I call fake. No one is so stupid to sound like this and operate a camera so badly. No one.
 
2014-01-15 12:35:56 AM

Toriko: You guys are talking like the person filming is a master cinematographer who knew what was going to happen, how to frame a shot, had a steadycam, and wasn't in a moving vehicle on a dirt road while something frightening was happening.

Reality check, its just some person with a cell phone who happened to be filming this. They don't really deserved to be punched because their crappy camera filming under crappy circumstances makes a crappy video.


You're right.

/slinks away
 
2014-01-15 12:42:39 AM
Well, animals are not like people, Mrs. Simpson. Some of them act badly because they've had a hard life, or have been mistreated...but, like people, some of them are just jerks.

www.thesimpsons10.com.ar
One morning I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he got in my pajamas, I don't know.
 
2014-01-15 12:44:27 AM

mongbiohazard: I simply said that as a matter of fact they are incredibly simplistic compared to humans


That's an anthropocentric judgment call. It's implying that complexity is a valued trait and is a goal. It's not.
 
2014-01-15 12:56:24 AM

Ishkur: mongbiohazard: I simply said that as a matter of fact they are incredibly simplistic compared to humans

That's an anthropocentric judgment call. It's implying that complexity is a valued trait and is a goal. It's not.


No, you're the one inserting judgment. I'm merely making a plain statement of fact. I never said anything about it being a "valued trait and is a goal" - that's all in your own imagination.
 
2014-01-15 12:56:26 AM
Idiots. When the elephant was at the side of the car they should've just floored it.
 
2014-01-15 12:58:53 AM

SuperNinjaToad: This is why you want to bring a minimum of at least an AR-15 when you go to the African safari so when animals go on a rampage you stand a chance from a distance.


Pretty sure an elephant would shrug off rounds that small, unless you're trying to do some kind of racist joke here.
 
2014-01-15 01:00:17 AM

Prey4reign: Cinematography by Michael J. Fox?


want to know a fun fact?
 
2014-01-15 01:09:51 AM

some_beer_drinker: Prey4reign: Cinematography by Michael J. Fox?

want to know a fun fact?


Is it that levodopa used to treat Parkinson's causes tremors, and not the Parkinson's itself?
 
2014-01-15 02:09:24 AM

mongbiohazard: No, you're the one inserting judgment


No, you are. You are applying humancentric quantitative valuesets of "complexity" and "simplicity" onto stochastic processes and deriving value judgements from them. You are making the same fallacy ID proponents do. You think nature is under any obligation to validate your anthropocentrism?
 
2014-01-15 03:14:46 AM
The chick taking the vid? I wanna choke her. If yer gonna take vid, then take the farking vid. Farking cock tease.

The people driving the overturned car? W. T. F. Why would you get that close????

The people driving away? Samaritans, each one of em. Truly.
 
2014-01-15 03:31:01 AM

tonguedepressor: They should've hid in the trunk.


HA.
 
2014-01-15 03:34:34 AM

Oblio13: I was in on the cull of a problem bull in a park in Zimbabwe. He'd figured out that he was stronger than cars and had been doing the same thing at a river crossing. I wasn't supposed to be the shooter, but the elephant didn't follow the plan. When a bull fans out his ears and trumpets and comes after you, it's very difficult to stand your ground, even knowing that it's the only viable option. My first shot was at about fifty yards, right between the eyes, and it had no effect. (Turned out it went over his brain at that angle.) My second shot was at 27 yards as he put his head down to use his tusks, and that one was good. It was the most exciting ten seconds of my life, and that includes landing on aircraft carriers, crashing a jet and sleeping with a redhead.


Is your name Ernest Hemingway?  I felt a farking rush of testosterone reading your post.
 
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