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(PR Newswire)   New study finds 80 percent of people support green products, but almost no one wants to pay extra because labels such as 'green' and 'organic' and 'eco-' have lost all their meaning after years of being slapped on absolutely everything   (prnewswire.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, BrandSpark International, Canadian Shopper, Canadians, product information, CNW  
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363 clicks; posted to Business » on 14 Jan 2014 at 9:50 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-14 10:09:32 AM  
I think the best products advertised on television have to be the ones with the first word of Euro in them.
 
2014-01-14 10:16:17 AM  
It isn't easy...

static1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-01-14 10:37:24 AM  
I only buy organic free range locally sourced non gmo sustainable artisinal products..
 
2014-01-14 10:59:10 AM  
I eco-agree with this article's organic headline.
 
2014-01-14 11:03:29 AM  

lilplatinum: I only buy organic free range locally sourced non gmo sustainable artisinal products..


I was at a Christmas party last month where they discussed that in dead seriousness. The conversation then turned to the best way to compost when you live in an apartment and whether it was morally justifiable to have a Christmas tree. I'm really glad I won a bottle of rum in the secret Santa.
 
2014-01-14 11:19:46 AM  
I used to associate 'green' with 'doesn't work at all' when it came to cleaning products, especially laundry and dishwasher detergent. The green ones have gotten a bit better, I'll admit, but I'm not likely to pay a premium for it.
 
2014-01-14 11:22:05 AM  
That's the real problem, though. The idea that "organic", "green", "eco-", and so on automatically justifies much higher prices, even for items that have always been "organic" and "green." That's where the "misleading" part comes in, with assholes using these terms as marketing gimmicks. They're not supposed to be marketing gimmicks, and the misleading usages increase distrust of producers, especially when coupled to ridiculous-appearing markups. Yes, some products have markups because it's harder to produce them in an organic manner, but, seriously, if I can't tell the difference between an organically-produced and a mass-produced piece of produce, the price on the former had better not be twice the price of the latter, or, well, I'm going with the mass-produced piece of produce. Your radishes don't cure cancer, taste incredible, or glow in the dark - they just weren't sprayed with pesticides and involved slightly more labor. They're not worth it.
 
2014-01-14 11:40:50 AM  

FormlessOne: That's the real problem, though. The idea that "organic", "green", "eco-", and so on automatically justifies much higher prices, even for items that have always been "organic" and "green." That's where the "misleading" part comes in, with assholes using these terms as marketing gimmicks. They're not supposed to be marketing gimmicks, and the misleading usages increase distrust of producers, especially when coupled to ridiculous-appearing markups. Yes, some products have markups because it's harder to produce them in an organic manner, but, seriously, if I can't tell the difference between an organically-produced and a mass-produced piece of produce, the price on the former had better not be twice the price of the latter, or, well, I'm going with the mass-produced piece of produce. Your radishes don't cure cancer, taste incredible, or glow in the dark - they just weren't sprayed with pesticides and involved slightly more labor. They're not worth it.


Organic doesn't mean pesticide free. They can use pesticides that are "organic".
 
2014-01-14 11:51:11 AM  
I always thought that 'organic' was just really stupid sounding.  "Organic Apples!"   So, the other apples int he store are what?  Inorganic?  And how can you grow inorganically?  It's an apple, it's on a tree.  Photosynthesis, roots, air, water... all sounds pretty organic to me.  Now if the apple was grown in a petri dish in a lab... okay.  But, jesus... it's just an apple.  Bring it home, wash it and eat that shiat up.
 
2014-01-14 11:51:50 AM  

To The Escape Zeppelin!: lilplatinum: I only buy organic free range locally sourced non gmo sustainable artisinal products..

I was at a Christmas party last month where they discussed that in dead seriousness. The conversation then turned to the best way to compost when you live in an apartment and whether it was morally justifiable to have a Christmas tree. I'm really glad I won a bottle of rum in the secret Santa.


I wish I could say I have never had a similar experience, but I live in Brooklyn...
 
2014-01-14 12:20:45 PM  
That's why the best marketers have moved on to a new term:


graphics8.nytimes.com

icdn5.digitaltrends.com

2.bp.blogspot.com

electriccarsreport.com

www.nissan-at-gms.com


Blue is the new Green.
 
2014-01-14 12:54:48 PM  

Tellingthem: FormlessOne: That's the real problem, though. The idea that "organic", "green", "eco-", and so on automatically justifies much higher prices, even for items that have always been "organic" and "green." That's where the "misleading" part comes in, with assholes using these terms as marketing gimmicks. They're not supposed to be marketing gimmicks, and the misleading usages increase distrust of producers, especially when coupled to ridiculous-appearing markups. Yes, some products have markups because it's harder to produce them in an organic manner, but, seriously, if I can't tell the difference between an organically-produced and a mass-produced piece of produce, the price on the former had better not be twice the price of the latter, or, well, I'm going with the mass-produced piece of produce. Your radishes don't cure cancer, taste incredible, or glow in the dark - they just weren't sprayed with pesticides and involved slightly more labor. They're not worth it.

Organic doesn't mean pesticide free. They can use pesticides that are "organic".


When I worked at Trader Joe's, I had people asking for organic salt.
 
2014-01-14 01:31:00 PM  
People are so weird about this topic. On one hand you have weirdos who won't eat anything that isn't organic, and on the other side people who seem to revel in the fact that they don't care about organic foods.

It's not all that hard to maintain a reasonable approach. All it takes is identifying which foods you eat are just loaded with pesticides and if that matters to you compared to the price increase. For example, buying organic bananas is pointless because the skin keeps most of the pesticides out. Something like a strawberry though, they are just swimming in chemicals so that extra dollar for the package may be a good investment if you think that eating fewer poisons is a good thing.

netizencain: I always thought that 'organic' was just really stupid sounding.  "Organic Apples!"   So, the other apples int he store are what?  Inorganic?  And how can you grow inorganically?  It's an apple, it's on a tree.  Photosynthesis, roots, air, water... all sounds pretty organic to me.  Now if the apple was grown in a petri dish in a lab... okay.  But, jesus... it's just an apple.  Bring it home, wash it and eat that shiat up.


It means it was farmed organically. I.e. not doused in DDT. Calling it organic is just an easy descriptor.
 
2014-01-14 01:43:51 PM  

Kraftwerk Orange: That's why the best marketers have moved on to a new term:


[graphics8.nytimes.com image 600x318]

[icdn5.digitaltrends.com image 625x416]

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 520x347]

[electriccarsreport.com image 620x338]

[www.nissan-at-gms.com image 850x452]


Blue is the new Green.


It's always been that way in other countries.  There's a big world outside of our borders you know.
 
2014-01-14 02:05:42 PM  

Tellingthem: FormlessOne: That's the real problem, though. The idea that "organic", "green", "eco-", and so on automatically justifies much higher prices, even for items that have always been "organic" and "green." That's where the "misleading" part comes in, with assholes using these terms as marketing gimmicks. They're not supposed to be marketing gimmicks, and the misleading usages increase distrust of producers, especially when coupled to ridiculous-appearing markups. Yes, some products have markups because it's harder to produce them in an organic manner, but, seriously, if I can't tell the difference between an organically-produced and a mass-produced piece of produce, the price on the former had better not be twice the price of the latter, or, well, I'm going with the mass-produced piece of produce. Your radishes don't cure cancer, taste incredible, or glow in the dark - they just weren't sprayed with pesticides and involved slightly more labor. They're not worth it.

Organic doesn't mean pesticide free. They can use pesticides that are "organic".


True. Should've added "synthetic" in front of that. Per the OFPA, does require that the soil & water be free of prohibited pesticides and substances at least 3 years before harvest, and that prevention serves as the first form of pest control. No synthetic fertilizers or pesticides can be used.
 
2014-01-14 04:59:04 PM  
Buy only green products that save you money.

* Locally sourced food and building materials.

*  Products that have less advertising, packaging and travel miles.

*  Seasonal fruits and vegetables, etc.

*  Things that safe energy (LED and CFL lightbulbs).

*  Insulation, green power, and other home renovation ideas that save money and pay for themselves.

Leave the rest of the crap that calls itself green or eco or organic but isn't really on the shelves and it will go away. A lot of conservatives, even global warming deniers, are surprisingly green when the product saves them water, money, energy, materiel, money, money and money. The lefties and greens should be just as pragmatic. Saving money gives you money to invest elsewhere. Spending money on one "green" item may cost you opportunities to have a greater effect.

I generally don't buy organic produce unless it is something like bananas, which are grown with massive amounts of pesticides and fertilizer, or something reasonably priced with a quality difference that helps to make up for the higher cost, like naturally ripened organic tomatoes. They are not healthier because they are organic. They are healthier because they aren't pallid, watery shadows of the real thing. More colour means more phytochemicals. Many of the antioxidants are made by plants to protect themselves from the Sun or pests. Good stuff those antioxydants, and vitamins, and minerals.
 
2014-01-14 05:53:24 PM  

netizencain: I always thought that 'organic' was just really stupid sounding.  "Organic Apples!"   So, the other apples int he store are what?  Inorganic?  And how can you grow inorganically?  It's an apple, it's on a tree.  Photosynthesis, roots, air, water... all sounds pretty organic to me.  Now if the apple was grown in a petri dish in a lab... okay.  But, jesus... it's just an apple.  Bring it home, wash it and eat that shiat up.


What inorganic may look like:

i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-01-14 06:17:05 PM  

nocturnal001: It's not all that hard to maintain a reasonable approach.


You know what?  My heart agrees with you, it really does.  But I'm sorry, based on everything I've seen, my brain is forcing me to do this to you:

[CITATION NEEDED]
 
2014-01-15 12:17:32 AM  

nocturnal001: People are so weird about this topic. On one hand you have weirdos who won't eat anything that isn't organic, and on the other side people who seem to revel in the fact that they don't care about organic foods.

It's not all that hard to maintain a reasonable approach. All it takes is identifying which foods you eat are just loaded with pesticides and if that matters to you compared to the price increase. For example, buying organic bananas is pointless because the skin keeps most of the pesticides out. Something like a strawberry though, they are just swimming in chemicals so that extra dollar for the package may be a good investment if you think that eating fewer poisons is a good thing.


Well I don't exactly revel in it, the truth is I honestly don't give a shiat about organic food because it never crosses my mind.  As far as chemicals and pesticides, I have this new cutting edge device installed in my kitchen that removes those from the surface of fruits and vegetables, it's called a sink.To me this seems like a pretty reasonable approach.
 
2014-01-15 01:21:25 AM  
As far as green products, I have no problem with things that save energy. light bulbs, energy star rated appliances, home insulation etc. are all worth the extra money because they pay for themselves over time for the most part.

Although I use them I do have several issues with both LED and CFL bulbs. First off, LED is simply to expensive at this point in time and they offer no significant cost savings over CFL. Two comparable bulbs, the LED will only save you 10-15 cents a year (based on 3 hours a day) yet cost you 9 times as much and they only last 3 times longer. I also don't buy this 25 year lifespan on LED's. For one thing, how many people live in one place for 25 years? Are you seriously going to swap out all your bulbs when you move?

Not only that but after 5 or 6 years those bulbs are going to be dull and yellowed from household dust (even less if you're a smoker) and look like crap. If you have a fixture with 2 or more bulbs, good luck getting a new one to match if one burns out in 10 years, you're going to end up replacing all of them, costing more money.

I've already been running into this problem with the CFLs in my house. I'll replace one bulb in a 4 light ceiling fan and it's brighter and has a different color than the other 3 so I have to change them all out. They have a nice coating of dust, but there is no way to really clean them so all 4 end up getting tossed out. With the exception of a couple lamps and one light fixture, everything else in my house takes two or more bulbs.

At least incandescent bulbs didn't last long enough to really get yellowed and if you accidentally bought the wrong type it was no biggie because they'd burn out in 6 months anyway.
 
2014-01-15 08:35:50 AM  

ReapTheChaos: nocturnal001: People are so weird about this topic. On one hand you have weirdos who won't eat anything that isn't organic, and on the other side people who seem to revel in the fact that they don't care about organic foods.

It's not all that hard to maintain a reasonable approach. All it takes is identifying which foods you eat are just loaded with pesticides and if that matters to you compared to the price increase. For example, buying organic bananas is pointless because the skin keeps most of the pesticides out. Something like a strawberry though, they are just swimming in chemicals so that extra dollar for the package may be a good investment if you think that eating fewer poisons is a good thing.

Well I don't exactly revel in it, the truth is I honestly don't give a shiat about organic food because it never crosses my mind.  As far as chemicals and pesticides, I have this new cutting edge device installed in my kitchen that removes those from the surface of fruits and vegetables, it's called a sink.To me this seems like a pretty reasonable approach.


Washing only removes a portion of the chemicals. To say nothing of hormones and antibiotics in our meat and dairy.

There is no question on whether or not all this crap is good for you. Its clearly not. The only question is if long term exposure in relatively low doses can cause cancer or hormone imbalances. In some cases this is proven, in others the answer is less clear.
 
2014-01-15 12:42:03 PM  

ReapTheChaos: As far as green products, I have no problem with things that save energy. light bulbs, energy star rated appliances, home insulation etc. are all worth the extra money because they pay for themselves over time for the most part.

Although I use them I do have several issues with both LED and CFL bulbs. First off, LED is simply to expensive at this point in time and they offer no significant cost savings over CFL. Two comparable bulbs, the LED will only save you 10-15 cents a year (based on 3 hours a day) yet cost you 9 times as much and they only last 3 times longer. I also don't buy this 25 year lifespan on LED's. For one thing, how many people live in one place for 25 years? Are you seriously going to swap out all your bulbs when you move?

Not only that but after 5 or 6 years those bulbs are going to be dull and yellowed from household dust (even less if you're a smoker) and look like crap. If you have a fixture with 2 or more bulbs, good luck getting a new one to match if one burns out in 10 years, you're going to end up replacing all of them, costing more money.

I've already been running into this problem with the CFLs in my house. I'll replace one bulb in a 4 light ceiling fan and it's brighter and has a different color than the other 3 so I have to change them all out. They have a nice coating of dust, but there is no way to really clean them so all 4 end up getting tossed out. With the exception of a couple lamps and one light fixture, everything else in my house takes two or more bulbs.

At least incandescent bulbs didn't last long enough to really get yellowed and if you accidentally bought the wrong type it was no biggie because they'd burn out in 6 months anyway.


Also, I don't enjoy having to save up my spent CFLs to recycle at Home Depot. For one, if CFLs lasted as long as the EPA has been trying to convince me, why do I have so many expired ones? Second, I could just pitch incandescent in the trash.
 
2014-01-15 08:23:20 PM  

stewbert: I don't enjoy having to save up my spent CFLs to recycle at Home Depot. For one, if CFLs lasted as long as the EPA has been trying to convince me, why do I have so many expired ones? Second, I could just pitch incandescent in the trash.


The newer ones have a much longer life than ones made just a few years ago. Also you have to keep in mind the lifespan they list is for 3 hours continuous use per day. If you use them longer, or turn them on and off frequently, you wont get as much life out of them.
 
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