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(Political Blind Spot)   Steubenville hacker faces 10 years in prison, Steubenville rapist is already out of juvenile detention   (politicalblindspot.com ) divider line
    More: Followup, Steubenville, juvenile detention, rapists, convicts, Deric Lostutter, Steubenville High School  
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8781 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jan 2014 at 10:29 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-14 11:38:25 AM  

Lucky LaRue: html_007: Lucky LaRue: I don't see how anyone can be upset that a criminal is getting punished.

I see your point he broke the law.  I'm not saying he shouldn't be punished but damn 10 years?  That is a case of the punishment not fitting the crime.

Maybe, but I wonder if we (collectively) would say the same thing about the people that hacked Target and exposed the financial/personal information of 70 million people.  Do they deserve something less than 10 years?  The difference here is not in the crime, but in the outcome.  I am not particularly interested in having a body of laws that differentiates on outcome - if the judge chooses to do that, then fine, but let's keep the laws fair and balanced.


Really? Cuz nearly every law does that.
Grand theft vs larceny?
Unsafe Discharge of a fire arm vs second degree murder?
Murder vs assault?
 
2014-01-14 11:40:07 AM  
The rapist was a football player, and the hacker didn't even try to claim he enjoyed playing Madden, so, such is life.
 
2014-01-14 11:41:53 AM  
Joe Paterno is smiling down on this great nation.
 
2014-01-14 11:43:32 AM  

dletter: The rapist was a football player, and the hacker didn't even try to claim he enjoyed playing Madden, so, such is life.


"At boy's gonna be all pro some day!  NFL!  Yew get that little sh*t who ratted him out and yew git 'im good!"  I shudder to think what HS and college coaches tell their best racehorses the world has to offer them, and with impunity.  I shudder more that this proves it may be true.
 
2014-01-14 11:44:28 AM  
Is it another case of too rich and white for prison?
 
2014-01-14 11:47:10 AM  

James!: ReverendJasen: James!: The hacker was over 18 and the rapist was under 18.  18 is the magical line of responsibility for your actions.

Unless you're black.  Then you get tried as an adult because you're such a risk to society.

[static2.businessinsider.com image 480x360]


thatsthejoke.jpg

/I don't hold it against you, everyone was distracted by that troll in the boobies
 
2014-01-14 11:47:13 AM  

bunner: Millennium: Nor should they, really. It's not worth it.

Yeah, couple of daft broads got taken around the block and dropped off crying.  Meh.  Gotta look out for the greater good.


And "the greater good" is to encourage theft and invasion of privacy in a de facto dragnet that might catch a couple of wrongdoers? Especially when that dragnet isn't evenly applied, and can thus only catch people who have made enemies?
 
2014-01-14 11:49:13 AM  

pippi longstocking: Is it another case of too rich and white for prison?


No. Too football.
 
2014-01-14 11:49:13 AM  

Lucky LaRue: html_007: Lucky LaRue: I don't see how anyone can be upset that a criminal is getting punished.

I see your point he broke the law.  I'm not saying he shouldn't be punished but damn 10 years?  That is a case of the punishment not fitting the crime.

Maybe, but I wonder if we (collectively) would say the same thing about the people that hacked Target and exposed the financial/personal information of 70 million people.  Do they deserve something less than 10 years?  The difference here is not in the crime, but in the outcome.  I am not particularly interested in having a body of laws that differentiates on outcome - if the judge chooses to do that, then fine, but let's keep the laws fair and balanced.


Yeah what ever happened with that? Are we still looking for a suspect?

Gotta love the quiet no-results investigation into the mishandling of 70 million CC numbers.
 
2014-01-14 11:50:06 AM  

DON.MAC: I've played in the IT security game and to me that says they were keeping the whole credit card number.


Congrats on being an idiot and not knowing how transaction ID #'s or batch processing work. Please stay out of IT.
 
2014-01-14 11:52:50 AM  

Millennium: bunner: Millennium: Nor should they, really. It's not worth it.

Yeah, couple of daft broads got taken around the block and dropped off crying.  Meh.  Gotta look out for the greater good.

And "the greater good" is to encourage theft and invasion of privacy in a de facto dragnet that might catch a couple of wrongdoers? Especially when that dragnet isn't evenly applied, and can thus only catch people who have made enemies?

www.trbimg.com


You mean like now?  Oh, do you mean, "Only the people who are allowed to should"?
 
2014-01-14 11:54:00 AM  

Nabb1: James!: The hacker was over 18 and the rapist was under 18.  18 is the magical line of responsibility for your actions.

Except in states where they can involve juvenile transfer to move bad boys to big boy court.


Huh, Ohio is one of those states, too.
 
2014-01-14 11:54:32 AM  

WTFDYW: Ah. Ma'Lik Richmond. Rapist from Steubenville, Ohio whom should have been tried as an adult.


Is that the same guy as the Steubenville Rapist named Ma'Lik Richmond?
 
2014-01-14 11:56:30 AM  
 Well of course, they have to punish them for making them prosecute one of their glorious football players. This is about revenge not some petty rape thing, they've got to take this seriously.

/there is no justice in this country
 
2014-01-14 11:57:35 AM  
If everything is worse over the computer, and sentencing is harsher because of it, wait til the first rape via this:

cdn2.ubergizmo.com

/link probably NSFW
 
2014-01-14 11:58:28 AM  

bunner: Millennium: bunner: Millennium: Nor should they, really. It's not worth it.

Yeah, couple of daft broads got taken around the block and dropped off crying.  Meh.  Gotta look out for the greater good.

And "the greater good" is to encourage theft and invasion of privacy in a de facto dragnet that might catch a couple of wrongdoers? Especially when that dragnet isn't evenly applied, and can thus only catch people who have made enemies?

[www.trbimg.com image 600x398]

You mean like now?  Oh, do you mean, "Only the people who are allowed to should"?


I don't support that either. But what you suggest is not a solution, only a compounding of the problem.
 
2014-01-14 11:59:14 AM  
Hey, does this thread have anything to do with Ma'lik Richmond, The Rapist from Steubenville, Ohio?
 
2014-01-14 12:00:48 PM  
Ma'Lik.

Come on. when you name a kid like that, there is no way they arent going to grow up to be a rapist.
 
2014-01-14 12:01:37 PM  
Well, c'mon now. One is just a rape. Big deal.

The other crime demonstrated the incompetence and corruption of a municipal criminal justice system. We can't have that. People might get the impression that cops and district attorneys don't care about violent crime because there's no money in pursuing it (unlike civil forfeiture involving drugs, for example, or writing speeding tickets).

Can't make a profit on prosecuting rape cases. shiatty ROI.
 
2014-01-14 12:06:02 PM  

Millennium: But what you suggest is not a solution, only a compounding of the problem.


Let me brush all this straw off of my lawn and pull the plug on this projector.  There.  What I suggest is that the justice system be utilized to get to the TRUTH in any given case, by  what ever means are extant and to act accordingly.  Not a gymnastic set of monkey bar chimps swinging and ooking and shoving as much overwrought banana oil through the goose as they can in search of what serves the interests of people for whom the law is a petty nuisance, and one that only needs some money thrown at it via a couple of friends in power.  Justice.  What is just.  Not what is expedient, convenient or heels the sh*t down the drain so you can get back to business.  That's what's on the label.   I don't know what you think the appropriate amount of rat feces per million is on what you're having for lunch.
 
2014-01-14 12:10:36 PM  

CapeFearCadaver: doglover: Lucky LaRue: You take things entirely too seriously.

Trolling is an art.

You have to practice.

He's only been trying his hand at it for about a week. Give him more time....


Meh. I'm not really for all the troll-shaming that goes on around here. The guy is engaging you all in conversation and attempting to back his points up. That's not trolling, that's called disagreeing. Lets keep that title for the folks who threadshiat and leave or who are obviously just muddying the water.

/I do not agree with him.
 
2014-01-14 12:11:43 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: /I do not agree with him.


Dude, keep reading. I know him and was teasing. You so serious.
 
2014-01-14 12:11:46 PM  

gfid: Lucky LaRue: html_007: Lucky LaRue: I don't see how anyone can be upset that a criminal is getting punished.

I see your point he broke the law.  I'm not saying he shouldn't be punished but damn 10 years?  That is a case of the punishment not fitting the crime.

Maybe, but I wonder if we (collectively) would say the same thing about the people that hacked Target and exposed the financial/personal information of 70 million people.  Do they deserve something less than 10 years?  The difference here is not in the crime, but in the outcome.  I am not particularly interested in having a body of laws that differentiates on outcome - if the judge chooses to do that, then fine, but let's keep the laws fair and balanced.

There definitely should be room for a judge when deciding a sentence.  I also understand the desire to send a strong message towards hackers, but what this guy did wasn't even malicious except possibly to a worse criminal than he is.

The Target hackers?  Throw the book at them.  Throw the whole goddammed library at them.

I think outcome as well as intent should be weighed carefully during sentencing.


Yeah I think the target ones should get in a lot more trouble. If you look at it they could fark up 70 million credit/debit accounts and hurt way more people. The hackers at Steubenville just exposed a coverup by a school and town. And I think what pisses me off the most is the people in Steubenville that got away with rape. Yeah 2 went to jail for a whole year or less but wernt there more that got away with it?
 
2014-01-14 12:12:30 PM  
HE HASN'T EVEN BEEN INDICTED YET. Calm the fark down.
 
2014-01-14 12:15:41 PM  
James!: The hacker was over 18 and the rapist was under 18.  18 is the magical line of responsibility for your actions.

Unless you're black.  Then you get tried as an adult because you're such a risk to society



unless you're a girl and had too much to drink
 
2014-01-14 12:15:59 PM  

00sweeney: HE HASN'T EVEN BEEN INDICTED YET. Calm the fark down.


*taps watch*
 
2014-01-14 12:16:39 PM  

bunner: Millennium: But what you suggest is not a solution, only a compounding of the problem.

Let me brush all this straw off of my lawn and pull the plug on this projector.  There.  What I suggest is that the justice system be utilized to get to the TRUTH in any given case, by  what ever means are extant and to act accordingly.  Not a gymnastic set of monkey bar chimps swinging and ooking and shoving as much overwrought banana oil through the goose as they can in search of what serves the interests of people for whom the law is a petty nuisance, and one that only needs some money thrown at it via a couple of friends in power.


And you call my argument a strawman? All I posted was the logical and inevitable consequence of letting things like this slide. You're the one making ridiculous caricatures of the current situation.

Justice.  What is just.

According to whom? To you? I can't call the way you'd let things slide or bring the hammer down, based on seemingly arbitrary factors, particularly just. Quite the opposite, in fact. The first principle of justice is that it must be applied consistently, based solely on the deeds done and not on extraneous factors. The US has never done a stellar job of living up to that ideal, but is nevertheless light-years ahead of what you propose.

I reiterate that the over-light sentencing of the rapists is a travesty, and the people involved in the cover-up should all go to prison for a very long time for their parts in this. But none of this absolves the hacker of what he did: he is not squaky-clean, and shouldn't be treated as such.
 
2014-01-14 12:17:22 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: troll-shaming


Now THAT, my friends, is how you troll.
 
2014-01-14 12:19:11 PM  
Millennium:  According to whom? To you? I can't call the way you'd let things slide or bring the hammer down, based on seemingly arbitrary factors, particularly just. Quite the opposite, in fact. The first principle of justice is that it must be applied consistently, based solely on the deeds done and not on extraneous factors.

No, dear.  According to YOU.  Of course.  You can stop trying to pin your tail on me, now.  Thanks.
 
2014-01-14 12:22:42 PM  
as someone who went to school in Steubenville for a number of years, I'm getting a kick (or not...I can't decide).
 
2014-01-14 12:22:56 PM  
Rapists should get short sentences.  How is the family of the victim supposed to get justice when the criminal is in protective custody?
 
2014-01-14 12:26:58 PM  

bunner: Millennium:  According to whom? To you? I can't call the way you'd let things slide or bring the hammer down, based on seemingly arbitrary factors, particularly just. Quite the opposite, in fact. The first principle of justice is that it must be applied consistently, based solely on the deeds done and not on extraneous factors.

No, dear.  According to YOU.  Of course.


I admit to not being terribly keen on sharing society with those of your philosophical ilk, but ultimately, you have a point here. Who am I to determine the definition of justice? I'm nobody, just like you. And that means we get to duke it out in the public dialogue, winning hearts and minds as best we can. For the moment, it looks like my side is winning, at least on this score: people understand that it makes no sense to drop the whole basket of nuts just to chase the one that fell out.

You can stop trying to pin your tail on me, now.  Thanks.

Oh, but you're making yourself such prime real estate for pinning tails on.
 
2014-01-14 12:27:23 PM  

Lucky LaRue: The difference here is not in the crime, but in the outcome. I am not particularly interested in having a body of laws that differentiates on outcome - if the judge chooses to do that, then fine, but let's keep the laws fair and balanced.


Fair & Balanced® laws are the problem here.

/And yes, it is a registered trademark
 
2014-01-14 12:31:30 PM  
The really sad and overlooked thing about this case was that the kid who organized the whole thing to get back at the girl because she was his ex, and drove them around to the different parties was the DA's nephew, so he got to testify against the two who were convicted and was able to walk away.
 
2014-01-14 12:35:15 PM  

Millennium: Oh, but you're making yourself such prime real estate for pinning tails on.


Annnd, the other shoe has dropped.  Took you long enough

So, presenting damning evidence in a felony criminal matter is extraneous and peripheral and should be punished should it be convenient to string up the presenter on some arcane points of law that the very government that rules us are not obliged to adhere to.  Justice really is about the innocent and the helpful not getting the sh*tty end of he stick.  With or without me, you, a bunch overwrought legal cites or who knows the judge.  It really is.  The justice *system*?  Dear me, no.  That's an utter pigsh*t farm.  Justice, yes.  Because behind every law.  Every single law, when you peel back the layers - is nothing more than who has the most guns and money and the most worrisome authority pose.  And that, sir, is f*cked up.

Oh...

i.imgur.com

Have a thoroughly terrible day.  Bye.  :  )
 
2014-01-14 12:36:34 PM  

alice_600: The Muthaship: alice_600: Remember:

If you steal evidence it can't be used in court.

Not really the case.

Unless the person is acting on behalf of the government when they illegally obtain the evidence, it can usually be used.

Still illegally obtained and can't be used. That's where Snowden farked himself.


Wrong.
 
2014-01-14 12:37:14 PM  
Do so love the "justice" system.
 
2014-01-14 12:38:03 PM  
So the lesson here is dont rape anyone with a computer, you will do serious time.
 
2014-01-14 12:39:06 PM  

stuffy: Do so love the "justice" system.


There is no template for arrival at justice.  There is no .xls you can pound stuff into and retrieve the truth.  And if our criminal justice system doesn't prove that, I don't know what will.
 
2014-01-14 12:43:57 PM  
Remember folks, embarrassing the authorities is *always* a more grievous crime than rape. Always.

Especially if your embarrassment extends to them actually having to do something about the rape...you know, do their job.

If they could assign the death penalty to something, it would be "embarrassing the state".

Remember Citizen. Pick up that can.

img.fark.net
 
2014-01-14 12:47:01 PM  

James!: The hacker was over 18 and the rapist was under 18.  18 is the magical line of responsibility for your actions.


No, hasn't been that way for a long time.  Every year a lesser crime becomes eligible for being tried as an adult and the ages are getting lowe

pueblonative: Steubenville hacker faces up to 10 years in prison, Steubenville rapist is already out of juvenile detention

FTFS.

Sentencing guidelines; how do they motherfarking work?


Terribly, like the have pretty much for always.
 
2014-01-14 12:48:39 PM  

bunner: Millennium: Oh, but you're making yourself such prime real estate for pinning tails on.

Annnd, the other shoe has dropped.  Took you long enough


Generic wordplay concerning endurance.

So, presenting damning evidence in a felony criminal matter is extraneous and peripheral and should be punished should it be convenient to string up the presenter on some arcane points of law that the very government that rules us are not obliged to adhere to.

Certainly I believe that the government should be held strictly and absolutely to these same rules. Some would call me a fundamentalist on that score, in fact. But that is another battle, to be fought in other discussions, and the fact that it hasn't yet been won still doesn't absolve this guy of his crimes.

Justice really is about the innocent and the helpful not getting the sh*tty end of he stick.

That's only half of it. You've forgotten the equally-important part where those who do harm are brought to account for their actions. That part has already failed to apply to some of the people involved with this case -including those who our society most desperately needs to hold accountable- but this still doesn't absolve the hacker of his crimes. Even in the face of partial failure, we must do what we can.

With or without me, you, a bunch overwrought legal cites or who knows the judge.  It really is.  The justice *system*?  Dear me, no.  That's an utter pigsh*t farm.  Justice, yes.  Because behind every law.  Every single law, when you peel back the layers - is nothing more than who has the most guns and money and the most worrisome authority pose.  And that, sir, is f*cked up.

Is this the part where you don the V mask and spraypaint the anarchy symbol on your local library? Because that would totally add punch to your argument. Your brand of justice is your six-grade gym class for all of society: not so different from what you characterize mine, except that instead of the slim hope of holding the officials accountable that exists in my system, yours has no hope at all. I'll pass.
 
2014-01-14 12:49:23 PM  

bunner: The Muthaship: bunner: I've never actually seen a meeting.

Oh, I've been to several of those.....

And there it is.  Quod Erat Demonstratum


Ooh! You speak French!
 
2014-01-14 12:50:07 PM  

Lucky LaRue: I don't see how anyone can be upset that a criminal is getting punished.


images.sodahead.com
 
2014-01-14 12:51:10 PM  

Ghastly: Ooh! You speak French!


I hevv eh priceless entique grahhnd peyenno.
 
2014-01-14 12:58:15 PM  
Let me get this out of the way. It's great that he helped expose a horrendous crime.  Now, that part where he farked himself is the trying to get school administrators and others involved in this case to take extra-legal steps using blackmail of personal information ABOUT THEM(SSN, etc) while the investigation was ongoing.
 
2014-01-14 01:04:53 PM  
Here is a case where there clearly was evidence to uncover, and the prosecution wasn't able to provide it.  So some dude who is not constrained by the rules of obtaining such evidence, went ahead and did it.

Seems kind of a shame to me that he may end up doing time for that.  He really should have kept his mouth shut.  If he hadn't come forward, he wouldn't have gotten caught.

Not that I advocate hacking, or what this guy did.  But he exposes a serious flaw in our system that the evidence in question, though it existed, could not be obtained legally.

Considering that the ends justify the means in this case, I hope that he is treated more like the guy from Catch Me if You Can.  That would be, to let him do some time, because, yes, he broke the law.  But have him do some teaching as to how he got the information afterward.
 
2014-01-14 01:11:21 PM  

durbnpoisn: That would be, to let him do some time, because, yes, he broke the law.


You man like all those Wall St. firms, brokerages and banks that conspired to decimate an entire economic sector did?
 
2014-01-14 01:13:04 PM  

durbnpoisn: Considering that the ends justify the means in this case


I wonder how many people were murdered in the 20th Century alone on the basis of this exact sentiment.
 
2014-01-14 01:18:27 PM  

DON.MAC: Maybe they had their database encrypted but if you have the key to say "This is Sam's card, please encrypted it and put it in the database", you also have the key to decrypt it.


I just wanted to point out that this sentence is totally false.  Encryption schemes in which you use a different key to encrypt something than you use to decrypt it are use so frequently that most of you who were unaware of the fact would call me a liar if I told you exactly how often.

/not ALL the packets, but SOOOOO many
 
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