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(North Jersey)   Why frozen food is nutritionally better for you than fresh   (northjersey.com) divider line 26
    More: Interesting, frozen foods, frozen vegetables, North Jersey, nutritionists, blueberries  
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3256 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jan 2014 at 8:03 AM (13 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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das
2014-01-14 08:11:52 AM
So, where do I buy frozen tomato's????
 
2014-01-14 08:18:37 AM
What the article says: "Fruits and vegetables that are picked ripe and flash frozen are likely better for you in winter when those same fruits and vegetables are out of season."

What I hear as an American:

"Frozen dinners are practically a health food."

img.fark.net

Looks like staying on my diet will be easier than I thought
 
2014-01-14 08:19:31 AM

das: So, where do I buy frozen tomato's????


Tomatoes.

Apostrophe-s makes it possessive. Buy frozen tomato's what?

/twitching pedant
 
2014-01-14 08:24:00 AM
Well if the "fresh" veggies have been left out in the elements, then yes, frozen will be more nutritious.


/Obvious tag peeks out from under some month old lettuce...
 
2014-01-14 08:29:01 AM

SmackLT: What the article says: "Fruits and vegetables that are picked ripe and flash frozen are likely better for you in winter when those same fruits and vegetables are out of season."

What I hear as an American:

"Frozen dinners are practically a health food."

[img.fark.net image 500x363]

Looks like staying on my diet will be easier than I thought


Got me. LMAO this early in the morning is good for the health I hear.
 
2014-01-14 08:40:51 AM
Both fresh and frozen are better than canned.
 
2014-01-14 08:43:44 AM

brimed03: das: So, where do I buy frozen tomato's????

Tomatoes.

Apostrophe-s makes it possessive. Buy frozen tomato's what?

/twitching pedant


Don't twitch. Go have some pea's and you'll feel better. :P
 
2014-01-14 08:43:56 AM
frozen okra and collared greens are practically the only way i know how to get those vegetables because i dont shop at no hippie fruit/nut stand at a farmers market.
 
2014-01-14 08:48:27 AM
And when they say "fresh", they mean "stale and wilted".
 
2014-01-14 08:52:43 AM

BizarreMan: Both fresh and frozen are better than canned.


Really just because of the sodium. Although I grew up on mostly home-canned vegetables in the winter time. My parents have a fairly large vegetable garden so peas, string beans, etc were all canned. I'm guessing home-canning often uses way less sodium than industrial canning though. And you should really cook them in fresh water, rinse them off well, etc beforehand anyway. That gets rid of quite a bit of the sodium.
 
2014-01-14 09:23:49 AM

entropic_existence: BizarreMan: Both fresh and frozen are better than canned.

Really just because of the sodium. Although I grew up on mostly home-canned vegetables in the winter time. My parents have a fairly large vegetable garden so peas, string beans, etc were all canned. I'm guessing home-canning often uses way less sodium than industrial canning though. And you should really cook them in fresh water, rinse them off well, etc beforehand anyway. That gets rid of quite a bit of the sodium.


You'd be surprised about the salt content. Many home canners use more than the companies. Then again, they don't put in other stuff to preserve them. Fruit is another one where people probably don't realize how much sugar they put into the jar.

/YMMV
/depends on the canning recipe
 
2014-01-14 09:52:05 AM
The living-food folks are going to have a fit over this.
 
das
2014-01-14 09:59:40 AM

brimed03: das: So, where do I buy frozen tomato's????

Tomatoes.

Apostrophe-s makes it possessive. Buy frozen tomato's what?

/twitching pedant

Never post before coffee.
 
2014-01-14 11:10:55 AM

legion_of_doo: frozen okra and collared greens are practically the only way i know how to get those vegetables because i dont shop at no hippie fruit/nut stand at a farmers market.


No, no, collared greens are only available from douchebag fratboys, and they smell like Axe.
 
2014-01-14 11:25:48 AM
Bla bla bla canned veggies bla bla bla sodiums!!!!111 Who cares? What I care about is that canned is usually from 2x to 5x the cost of frozen!

store brand, 32 ounce, frozen, mixed veggies = ~ 10 cents an ounce
name brand, single serve, canned, mixed veggies = ~ 40 cents an ounce

Fark You... I'm keeping my monies!
 
2014-01-14 12:02:28 PM
No they aren't, and I don't know of a single nutritionist or dietary councilor who would tell you that.  This article is wrong from beginning to end, and you cannot get wronger than that.
 
2014-01-14 12:14:40 PM
Article title should really read "Frozen food is better for you than fresh food that you can't get because it's out of season."
 
2014-01-14 12:44:17 PM
Yes...but it hurts my teeth eating it frozen.
 
2014-01-14 01:02:50 PM

rogue49: Yes...but it hurts my teeth eating it frozen.


This. The problem is that the article only tell you 1/2 the story. The downside to frozen foods is that you have to heat them and then when you heat them you lose most if not all the the nutritional advantage. For example, if you want to get all the nutritional punch you have to drink all the liquid residue. That's assuming you do not like most Americans and nuke the hell out of everything.

So yes, when you buy the actual product frozen has more nutrition off the shelf than fresh, in many cases. But by the time one is done preparing the foods fresh tends to win hands down.
 
2014-01-14 01:10:36 PM

worlddan: The downside to frozen foods is that you have to heat them and then when you heat them you lose most if not all the the nutritional advantage.


That's only true if you eat all your fresh vegetables raw.
 
2014-01-14 03:41:40 PM
Sponsored by Stouffers, Swansson, Lean Cuisine, Hungry Man, etc, etc.

Yes, when you compared them to vegetables that have been sitting on the truck for a month, frozen vegetables ARE better. No shiat.

Course, it's doubtful that anybody's local supermarket has a supply-chain so horrible that it takes that long for a fresh vegetable to go from field to aisle so it's a non-issue.
 
2014-01-14 06:15:24 PM

worlddan: rogue49: Yes...but it hurts my teeth eating it frozen.

This. The problem is that the article only tell you 1/2 the story. The downside to frozen foods is that you have to heat them and then when you heat them you lose most if not all the the nutritional advantage. For example, if you want to get all the nutritional punch you have to drink all the liquid residue. That's assuming you do not like most Americans and nuke the hell out of everything.

So yes, when you buy the actual product frozen has more nutrition off the shelf than fresh, in many cases. But by the time one is done preparing the foods fresh tends to win hands down.


Comparing cooked frozen to fresh raw isn't anywhere near a fair comparison. And not every method of cooking is the same.

Terrible Old Man: Sponsored by Stouffers, Swansson, Lean Cuisine, Hungry Man, etc, etc.


They were explicitly not talking about prepared dinners. Just raw frozen vegetables

Yes, when you compared them to vegetables that have been sitting on the truck for a month, frozen vegetables ARE better. No shiat.

Course, it's doubtful that anybody's local supermarket has a supply-chain so horrible that it takes that long for a fresh vegetable to go from field to aisle so it's a non-issue.


They were talking about out of season. So unless you happen to live in saw, California, you would be surprised just how long that supply chain can be. Besides, they've done comparisons looking at vegetables that have been in a fridge for as little as three days and there is a measurable difference. Produce that needs to be shipped is picked when it isn't even ripe yet, which also influences nutrient content.

For the most part there is really very little practical difference between flash frozen produce and fresh produce in terms of nutrition. Even when there are measurable differences, they aren't of the sort that will really have much actual impact on your health. But I think people should know that flash frozen produce is as nutritious.

It is also worth pointing out that what gets frozen includes the equivalent of "seconds." Produce that is perfectly good but considered too ugly looking to go on display, because consumers are idiots about what their food needs to look like apparently. Making sure all of that gets used is good in terms of environmental impact.

For the length of time produce can sit around in the supply chain before it gets to the consumer for most people you should read the book The American Way of Eating. Really interesting when a journalist spends several months each as a food picker, produce employee at wal-mart, and in the kitchen of an applebee's.
 
2014-01-14 09:39:18 PM
Hydroponics is very useful here.

I ship all my lettuce with the roots attached.  The leaves aren't separated from the plant until it's ready to go on a plate.  No nutrient decay, no hurt teeth, and fresh flavor.
 
2014-01-14 10:29:46 PM
Here's what I do each summer and fall:

1. Buy fresh vegetables in bulk at farmer's market, focusing on beans, carrots, parsnips, turnip, onion, garlic, broccoli, corn. Avoid stuff that turns to mush, like peppers, tomatoes, and anything leafy.

2. Dodge old people in out-of-control cars, go home.

3. Peel, snap, slice, mince, otherwise prepare veggies, lay out on cookie sheets

4. Freeze, bag, date and store in a chest freezer WITHOUT an automatic defrost.

5. Enjoy wholesome, great tasting, like-fresh vegetables in meals throughout the winter.

I also buy and dry fresh herbs, like basil, oregano, mint, sage, and parsley. Dry in a dehydrator or oven set on the lowest possible setting (mine is 170°F). The herbs will retain their bright coloring and have a vibrant taste compared to store-bought herbs which are basically flash baked to dry rapidly.
 
2014-01-15 12:49:17 AM

worlddan: rogue49: Yes...but it hurts my teeth eating it frozen.

This. The problem is that the article only tell you 1/2 the story. The downside to frozen foods is that you have to heat them and then when you heat them you lose most if not all the the nutritional advantage. For example, if you want to get all the nutritional punch you have to drink all the liquid residue. That's assuming you do not like most Americans and nuke the hell out of everything.

So yes, when you buy the actual product frozen has more nutrition off the shelf than fresh, in many cases. But by the time one is done preparing the foods fresh tends to win hands down.


The solution to that is to steam your veggies, not boil them. And the article is trying to make the point that frozen veggies retain more nutrients when frozen quickly after harvest, than veggies that have been riding in a truck for several days or more with the nutrients breaking down.
 
2014-01-15 12:59:52 AM

Macular Degenerate: Here's what I do each summer and fall:

1. Buy fresh vegetables in bulk at farmer's market, focusing on beans, carrots, parsnips, turnip, onion, garlic, broccoli, corn. Avoid stuff that turns to mush, like peppers, tomatoes, and anything leafy.

2. Dodge old people in out-of-control cars, go home.

3. Peel, snap, slice, mince, otherwise prepare veggies, lay out on cookie sheets

4. Freeze, bag, date and store in a chest freezer WITHOUT an automatic defrost.

5. Enjoy wholesome, great tasting, like-fresh vegetables in meals throughout the winter.

I also buy and dry fresh herbs, like basil, oregano, mint, sage, and parsley. Dry in a dehydrator or oven set on the lowest possible setting (mine is 170°F). The herbs will retain their bright coloring and have a vibrant taste compared to store-bought herbs which are basically flash baked to dry rapidly.


If all you have is a self defrosting freezer, fill your bags or containers with water before freezing. It takes longer to defrost, but will keep practically forever without freezer burn. When I lived in Alaska, we saved all our milk cartons, and used them to freeze our fish. Put in the fish, top off with water. Had halibut and salmon perfectly good, even after 2 years in the freezer.
 
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