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(CNBC)   Stock market traders say that the characters in "The Wolf of Wall Street" are exaggerated. For one thing, who is going to believe that the main character actually goes to jail for committing financial crimes?   (cnbc.com) divider line 21
    More: Obvious, stock traders, trading floors, Wall Street, financial crimes, Money Never Sleeps, arbitrages  
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2926 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 Jan 2014 at 10:21 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-01-13 09:13:38 AM  
7 votes:
Oh really, is that why you assholes started cheering during the screening?  If the French Revolution ever comes here and they put a new reality version of the Running Man only with bankers and stockbrokerrs, the second coming won't have the Nielson ratings that does.
2014-01-13 10:31:36 AM  
3 votes:
Sure. The reality is far less funny and charismatic.
2014-01-13 12:11:57 PM  
2 votes:
The trader in the article can suck a dick.

He obviously hasn't seen the movie because the scene with the cash taped to the girl is in the trailer and doesn't take place on a trading floor.

Plus he 'warns' wannabe traders that they won't buy their Ferrari until they've been doing this for thirty years? Oh man, 30 years till they have enough disposable income to buy a half million dollar car? Most Americans would be thrilled to have that in a 401k.

Seriously, suck a dick.
2014-01-13 11:40:05 AM  
2 votes:

ongbok: He is telling a story through the eyes of the subject of the story. In this story the subject of the story is a egomaniac psychopath, so of course their is never going to be a part in the movie were it distinctly points out that this person and their actions are bad because the person telling the story doesn't believe it himself. If the audience needs the story teller to point out that Belfort's actions were bad, then there is something wrong with them.


It is almost impossible to create a compelling story where the villain doesn't think he's the hero, simply because most sane minds (and most insane minds, for that matter) don't work that way. Villains are masters of excusing the inexcusable, and so it is all but impossible to create a compelling story around a villain who cannot (or does not) do this.

Does it mean that there's something wrong with an audience who cheers him on? I don't think so. I think it merely means that the storyteller has done his job well, by bringing us so close to the mindset that we can empathize. Judgment is for later, when we are no longer caught up in the story's spell.

And quite a judgment it can be, too. Think about it: you got far enough into the guy's head to cheer him on, but for what? What grand justification is there for this? Where is the big thing that makes it all OK? The answer is simple: there was nothing. Just pure self-gratification. You should know: you saw it through his eyes, and felt enough of what he felt to cheer him on. And yet it was so empty, so shallow; there was nothing good or noble in what this man did. They say you shouldn't judge a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes, but now you've clocked in your mile, and your cheers prove how genuine a mile it was. It's time for the verdict.
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-01-13 10:52:25 AM  
2 votes:

Mrtraveler01: DrPainMD: I love it when millionaire capitalists rake in more millions by making a movie about the evils of capitalism. I hear they're going to team up next to make a movie about the evils of income inequality; they're predicting that it will gross more than Avatar.

You know that capitalism isn't perfect right?


corporatism =/= capitalism.
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-01-13 10:51:47 AM  
2 votes:
Our hero worship in the US is TOTALLY farkED UP.  This guy isn't a hero, but I am sure the assholes on Wall Street think he is.
2014-01-13 10:36:33 AM  
2 votes:
Jordan Belfort has a huge ego, and the story is written by himself.

So, yeah, no shiat sherlock, the movie is you watching his ego.
2014-01-13 10:36:13 AM  
2 votes:
That about settles it.
Nudity and Wall Street Glory To The Theft is not enough to get my money the old fashioned way.
Nannys gonna have to make new taxes, you want mine.
2014-01-13 02:18:00 PM  
1 votes:

Nemo's Brother: There have been numerous movies where we cheer for the villain in the past. It if funny that people are making a big point about it now. Henry Hill from Goodfellas, Michael Corleone from Godfather, Billy the Kid from Young Guns, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Al from Deadwood, etc. I think the financial collapse has hit a soft spot in our psyche.  Unlike gangsters and gunslingers of old, these people have never really met justice. Maybe that is why that is the issue?


I think maybe it hit too close to home for some people. I mean this shiat goes on right now and these guys are alive right now, making money. Even in Goodfellas. that was a long time ago and the really only killed each other. If  these Wall Street douchebags who were screwing old people out of their life savings, in the guys from Goodfellas' neighborhood, they'd end up in the East River.

And people need to get over the concept of "karma". Doesn't exist. Never did.
2014-01-13 01:15:57 PM  
1 votes:

Millennium: ongbok: He is telling a story through the eyes of the subject of the story. In this story the subject of the story is a egomaniac psychopath, so of course their is never going to be a part in the movie were it distinctly points out that this person and their actions are bad because the person telling the story doesn't believe it himself. If the audience needs the story teller to point out that Belfort's actions were bad, then there is something wrong with them.

It is almost impossible to create a compelling story where the villain doesn't think he's the hero, simply because most sane minds (and most insane minds, for that matter) don't work that way. Villains are masters of excusing the inexcusable, and so it is all but impossible to create a compelling story around a villain who cannot (or does not) do this.

Does it mean that there's something wrong with an audience who cheers him on? I don't think so. I think it merely means that the storyteller has done his job well, by bringing us so close to the mindset that we can empathize. Judgment is for later, when we are no longer caught up in the story's spell.

And quite a judgment it can be, too. Think about it: you got far enough into the guy's head to cheer him on, but for what? What grand justification is there for this? Where is the big thing that makes it all OK? The answer is simple: there was nothing. Just pure self-gratification. You should know: you saw it through his eyes, and felt enough of what he felt to cheer him on. And yet it was so empty, so shallow; there was nothing good or noble in what this man did. They say you shouldn't judge a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes, but now you've clocked in your mile, and your cheers prove how genuine a mile it was. It's time for the verdict.


There have been numerous movies where we cheer for the villain in the past. It if funny that people are making a big point about it now. Henry Hill from Goodfellas, Michael Corleone from Godfather, Billy the Kid from Young Guns, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Al from Deadwood, etc. I think the financial collapse has hit a soft spot in our psyche.  Unlike gangsters and gunslingers of old, these people have never really met justice. Maybe that is why that is the issue?
2014-01-13 12:41:06 PM  
1 votes:
Those kind of movies are the equivalent of dramas about "computer hackers". Showing the real things that go on in Wall Street firms are boring and slow. Who's going to be thrilled by watching an analyst studying spreadsheets and financial statements late in to the night? How about the exciting trips to Bentonville and Minneapolis for meeting CEOs? Be still my beating heart.
2014-01-13 12:19:33 PM  
1 votes:

StrikitRich: Joe Rundle, head of trading at ETX Capital, London, stressed that the trading floors depicted in these types of films are often far removed from reality.

That's because 'Wolf of Wall Street' and its predecessor, 'Boiler Room,' were not about staid Wall Street firms but penny trading bucket shops churning crap for big spreads.

'Margin Call' was about a small group trading CDOs and I have not seen 'Arbitrage.'

'Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps'  did show Shia Labouf working on a trading floor, but I don't remember it being displayed as a hectic frenzy.


Yeah, this.  Using "The Wolf of Wall Street" to explain the financial crisis is like using a movie about the hijinks at a used car dealership to explain the GM bankruptcy.

"Arbitrage" is worth seeing, but "Margin Call" is the only one of the movies you mention that's actually about the financial crisis.
2014-01-13 11:27:42 AM  
1 votes:
Have to do everything around here, I guess ...

www.esquire.com
2014-01-13 11:20:02 AM  
1 votes:

Mugato: The Stealth Hippopotamus: DrPainMD: I love it when millionaire capitalists rake in more millions by making a movie about the evils of capitalism. I hear they're going to team up next to make a movie about the evils of income inequality; they're predicting that it will gross more than Avatar.

You know that was what I was expecting. I was expecting a 3 hour long movie about how capitalists and capitalism sucked. I was ready to rage about millionaires decrying the system that made them wealthy.

Didn't get that.

Scorsese makes a lot of movies about scumbags but he doesn't judge them. Like Goodfellas, Casino, ect. he doesn't even really try to make a point that the mafia is bad. He just sort of reports what happens and lets the audience make up their minds.


This.

He is telling a story through the eyes of the subject of the story. In this story the subject of the story is a egomaniac psychopath, so of course their is never  going to be a part in the movie were it distinctly points out that this person and their actions are bad because the person telling the story doesn't believe it himself. If the audience needs the story teller to point out that Belfort's actions were bad, then there is something wrong with them.
2014-01-13 11:09:59 AM  
1 votes:

Mugato: The Stealth Hippopotamus: DrPainMD: I love it when millionaire capitalists rake in more millions by making a movie about the evils of capitalism. I hear they're going to team up next to make a movie about the evils of income inequality; they're predicting that it will gross more than Avatar.

You know that was what I was expecting. I was expecting a 3 hour long movie about how capitalists and capitalism sucked. I was ready to rage about millionaires decrying the system that made them wealthy.

Didn't get that.

Scorsese makes a lot of movies about scumbags but he doesn't judge them. Like Goodfellas, Casino, ect. he doesn't even really try to make a point that the mafia is bad. He just sort of reports what happens and lets the audience make up their minds.


There was a scene in the book that Goodfellas was based on that I wish Scorsese had put in the movie. One of the older women on the block was walking home from the bus. After she got down the street aways, a black kid (he obviously didn't live in the neighborhood) was walking fast and closing on her. The kid didn't notice that every 300 pound goodfella along the block was watching him stalk the lady. She got the door open to her building and the kid jumped in behind her. And right after him came 8 or 9 behemoths. They threw the kid off the top of the building.

I thought that expressed a lot about community back then. And about how goodfellas resolved problems on their own.
2014-01-13 11:04:05 AM  
1 votes:

snocone: It really is a shame that that this Too Big To Jail has come home to roost.
It makes a great fairytale, but as a Business Plan, it really sucks to be us.


too big to jail
too big to fail
too big to wrest political control from
2014-01-13 10:56:29 AM  
1 votes:
All this talk of "it should've had an NC-17 rating" makes me want to see this now.
2014-01-13 10:48:53 AM  
1 votes:
I love it when millionaire capitalists rake in more millions by making a movie about the evils of capitalism. I hear they're going to team up next to make a movie about the evils of income inequality; they're predicting that it will gross more than Avatar.
2014-01-13 10:46:12 AM  
1 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: At least the DiCaprio character committed suicide at the end.


The real life version did not and many feel he has not done nearly enough to repay his victims. He is out of prison and living a pretty good life from the looks of things. I don't know if he picked up a check from this movie but one would hope that if he did it is being divided across the people he stole the money from.
2014-01-13 10:41:18 AM  
1 votes:
 Not as much nudity as you might think... there's a bunch of topless strippers in a couple of scenes, but that's about it...

Either we did not watch the same movie, or there is far more nudity in the version shown in France, because there are a lot of pussy shots in the one I've seen, including the main female character.
2014-01-13 10:38:49 AM  
1 votes:
It really is a shame that that this Too Big To Jail has come home to roost.
It makes a great fairytale, but as a Business Plan, it really sucks to be us.
 
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