Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(WMUR New Hampshire)   NH house to decide if pot is cool or not. Hopefully, the decriminalization will puff, pass   (wmur.com) divider line 53
    More: Spiffy, New Hampshire House, New Hampshire, Maggie Hassan, marijuana  
•       •       •

2930 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2014 at 4:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



53 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-01-12 10:12:52 PM  
*because "drugs are bad, mmkay"

FTFM
 
2014-01-12 10:13:18 PM  

hotrod2001: hubiestubert: hotrod2001: Maybe one of those BFE states like Mississippi, Arkansas or Alabama will get on the bandwagon and completely rejuvenate their economy.

If you legalize marijuana, you could also legalize industrial hemp and really give the textile industry, which has been decimated in the south, a major jolt.

The problem is that the cotton industry has been one of the most vociferous opponents of hemp legalization. As has timber. Hemp would be a great start for new players, and it would cut the market share for the folks who are already invested, and that has always been the issue with hemp for commercial uses. Between that, and medicinal uses, as well as hemp seed oil and a variety of other commercial uses, legal hemp is the bugbear that CEOs throw out because it would force them to compete with a plant that has multifaceted uses, and put them at a disadvantage, since they've railed against it for years, and thus, if they backpedal, they put their whole line of reasoning at risk.

Hemp legalization would mean a lot of new, and much smaller players, and that means a lot more competition. And infrastructure changes that the largest in textile and paper have absolutely no interest in making, and haven't been interested in for nearly a hundred years. Never mind that in early America, it was considered legal tender in parts of the Colonies. Never mind that hemp was considered such an important crop that its growth was required in some states. Hemp was important for rope, for sails, and for clothing, not to mention for medicinal uses.

The problem arose when a cheap and relatively easy method of harvesting came into production, and the corticator began the real push against hemp. It has always been about commercial interests wanting to cut out competition. Always. And it still is.

True, but in this day of diversifying your portfolios through multiple outlets, why would companies like Levi Strauss, Coates North America, Georgia Pacific and Kimberly Clark not want to have their cake and eat it too?  They can have their timber, canola oil and paper along with this added market.  And like I said, there are many southern communities whose economies have been decimated by NAFTA and textile industries in places like Pakistan which still have mills and other infrastructure still in place.
If not, I see a movement similar to the craft beer market of many small entrepreneurs getting into the game.  It might be a niche market at first but in time it could become lucrative again.


Hemp has huge potential for revitalizing markets across the country. Not just in the South, but up in Maine, in New Hampshire, Massachusetts and yes, even in Colorado and California. And that is really the problem. The competition. The money spent in the campaigns to KEEP marijuana illegal, and thus hemp, center on protecting players already in the game, and keeping new players out. Couple it with law enforcement and a prison industry, and you get the fine soup of folks who profit well from continued prohibition, and a lot of politicians who can use the inflated numbers of convictions to "show" how the War on Drugs is just keeping the wolves at bay, all while lining their pockets.

No prohibition means competition in the markets, it means losses for conviction rates, it means for profit prisons take a hit, it means that seizures drop, budgets are cut, and folks might have to work at catching real criminals, as opposed to busting college students and half assed dealers. It would turn a black market into a 'Revenoooooors! problem, and that is sort of the problem. A lot of folks profit well enough, and network to keep that competition at bay. Pharmaceuticals have been working tirelessly to KEEP weed illegal as well, because they can't market Marinol or other derivatives when folks can just grow their medicine, or buy stronger stuff at a dispensary. And they can't patent products when there are growers out there doing their job. Not to mention, you've got large agribusiness that really doesn't want new players.

Legalization would have widespread effect, and positive throughout the economy, and the opponents are fearful of exactly that, because it would mean that their positions would be threatened. It would mean a lot of new players, small growers, craft growers, small businesses and with a LOT more experience would be entering the market, and the largest of players would have to fight for those folks' services, and at a disadvantage for the first time in a hundred years.

Couple that, with law enforcement fears of having to go after real criminals for their convictions, a smaller slice for the seizure pie, lowered conviction rates, less folks going to prison and thus smaller prison budgets to siphon from and hand out contracts upon, and you've got a wonderful stew of corruption garnished with blind market fears of competition. It's not going to be an easy fight, because a lot of folks really hate competition. I mean hate it with the heat of a thousand million suns...
 
2014-01-13 12:15:14 AM  

hubiestubert: Hemp has huge potential for revitalizing markets across the country. Not just in the South, but up in Maine, in New Hampshire, Massachusetts and yes, even in Colorado and California. And that is really the problem. The competition. The money spent in the campaigns to KEEP marijuana illegal, and thus hemp, center on protecting players already in the game, and keeping new players out. Couple it with law enforcement and a prison industry, and you get the fine soup of folks who profit well from continued prohibition, and a lot of politicians who can use the inflated numbers of convictions to "show" how the War on Drugs is just keeping the wolves at bay, all while lining their pockets.

No prohibition means competition in the markets, it means losses for conviction rates, it means for profit prisons take a hit, it means that seizures drop, budgets are cut, and folks might have to work at catching real criminals, as opposed to busting college students and half assed dealers. It would turn a black market into a 'Revenoooooors! problem, and that is sort of the problem. A lot of folks profit well enough, and network to keep that competition at bay. Pharmaceuticals have been working tirelessly to KEEP weed illegal as well, because they can't market Marinol or other derivatives when folks can just grow their medicine, or buy stronger stuff at a dispensary. And they can't patent products when there are growers out there doing their job. Not to mention, you've got large agribusiness that really doesn't want new players.

Legalization would have widespread effect, and positive throughout the economy, and the opponents are fearful of exactly that, because it would mean that their positions would be threatened. It would mean a lot of new players, small growers, craft growers, small businesses and with a LOT more experience would be entering the market, and the largest of players would have to fight for those folks' services, and at a disadvantage for the first time in a hundred ...


You forgot the most crucial group that keeps it illegal, HATERS. They are the people who were either indoctrinated into the false propaganda or the idiot former users who feel that even though they did it no one else should be able to, because you know other people are stupid and don't have their will power (those are the people who I hate the most)

CSB/  I use to work in a dispensary, we were a coffee shop/ink cartridge refiller before we got into the medical biz. When our post man found out he was all biatch about it. "I don't support it, it's just a scam for stoners to get high", well after talking with him a bit turns out he use to not only smoke pot, but used heroin. I can't remember my exact words, but I basically called him a hypocrite and pointed out that I never felt the urge to use stronger drugs and felt that people who did were idiots. It shut him up and he never brought it up again.

/Seriously, if you have smoked pot and still want it to be illegal, then go turn yourself in and serve your time in jail.
 
Displayed 3 of 53 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report