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(WMUR New Hampshire)   NH house to decide if pot is cool or not. Hopefully, the decriminalization will puff, pass   (wmur.com) divider line 53
    More: Spiffy, New Hampshire House, New Hampshire, Maggie Hassan, marijuana  
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2919 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2014 at 4:41 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-12 12:47:23 PM  
Looks like the tide is turning!
 
2014-01-12 01:02:02 PM  
NH and VT both seem like great legalization candidates, as it should appeal equally to NH's libertarian as well as VT's extremely liberal sensibilities.  Pot, bringing opposite ends of the political spectrum together since 2013.
 
2014-01-12 01:09:13 PM  
It is silly being a crime.
 
2014-01-12 01:36:29 PM  
As a New Yorker..much, much closer to this matter than to Colorado..I approve..

/and go-go for the legal approval of medical use in my state..it's a beginning..
 
2014-01-12 02:08:18 PM  
4 hour drive from my house. Well worth a day trip...

As I said before, the first state in the north east to legalize it will reap a huge windfall. NYS politicians are too stupid to think that rationally though.
 
2014-01-12 03:15:08 PM  

Dinki: 4 hour drive from my house. Well worth a day trip...

As I said before, the first state in the north east to legalize it will reap a huge windfall. NYS politicians are too stupid to think that rationally though.


This.
 
2014-01-12 03:20:51 PM  

CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED: Dinki: 4 hour drive from my house. Well worth a day trip...

As I said before, the first state in the north east to legalize it will reap a huge windfall. NYS politicians are too stupid to think that rationally though.

This.


Rhode Island or Delaware should do it.  Both are relatively low-population states smack dab in the middle of some of the most densely populated areas in the country.  The tax revenue from legal pot tourism would give them tons of money to play around with.
 
2014-01-12 03:38:12 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED: Dinki: 4 hour drive from my house. Well worth a day trip...

As I said before, the first state in the north east to legalize it will reap a huge windfall. NYS politicians are too stupid to think that rationally though.

This.

Rhode Island or Delaware should do it.  Both are relatively low-population states smack dab in the middle of some of the most densely populated areas in the country.  The tax revenue from legal pot tourism would give them tons of money to play around with.


I honestly don't care who goes first..just do it..keep the ball rolling..  Marijuana, gay marriage..just do it..step into the future and lets get over all this meaningless crap and focus on handling real problems..

Get out of my house/bedroom and back to doing your jobs, Politicians..
 
2014-01-12 04:44:46 PM  

CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED: TuteTibiImperes: CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED: Dinki: 4 hour drive from my house. Well worth a day trip...

As I said before, the first state in the north east to legalize it will reap a huge windfall. NYS politicians are too stupid to think that rationally though.

This.

Rhode Island or Delaware should do it.  Both are relatively low-population states smack dab in the middle of some of the most densely populated areas in the country.  The tax revenue from legal pot tourism would give them tons of money to play around with.

I honestly don't care who goes first..just do it..keep the ball rolling..  Marijuana, gay marriage..just do it..step into the future and lets get over all this meaningless crap and focus on handling real problems..

Get out of my house/bedroom and back to doing your jobs, Politicians..


Here, here.

Can't be said enough.
 
2014-01-12 04:47:24 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: NH and VT both seem like great legalization candidates, as it should appeal equally to NH's libertarian as well as VT's extremely liberal sensibilities.  Pot, bringing opposite ends of the political spectrum together since 2013.


Libertarian is not the opposite of liberal.
 
2014-01-12 04:48:01 PM  
CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED:

Get out of my house/bedroom and back to doing your jobs, Politicians..

I kind of like them in my bedroom. Keeps things spicy and weird and totally illegal.
 
2014-01-12 04:49:01 PM  
Don't bogart that law!
 
2014-01-12 04:51:36 PM  

SecretAgentWoman: Don't bogart that law!


hehe
 
2014-01-12 04:51:40 PM  
Cool. Good for them.

Of course, the MA and CT police will extend their firework monitoring system...
 
2014-01-12 04:52:02 PM  
silly  subby, it's puff  puff pass
 
2014-01-12 04:52:54 PM  
Oh, NH House.  I thought it was three roommates taking a vote or something, and was wondering why this was news.

It does indeed help to RTFA.
 
2014-01-12 04:54:21 PM  
And as I and others have been saying.. Colorado tax revenue is being watched when it comes to MJ. Both politicians and citizens love the green, just a different type of it.
 
2014-01-12 05:01:08 PM  
Probably the only way it would pass is if it was the only way to prevent implementing a state income tax, which would cause riots.
 
2014-01-12 05:03:45 PM  
If the republicans don't block it, New Hampshire's governor (a democrat) says she will veto the bill.

NH legalized medical marijuana last year, but still can't figure out how to implement it.  Meanwhile Massachusetts and Rhode Island have both decriminalized possession of 1 ounce of pot or hash, and Maine is only slightly more strict.   Between decriminalization and medical laws, there would be a lot of cross-border quasi-legal sales.

NH needs to legalize it and start selling through the state liquor stores on the MA/ME borders.  Profit!
 
2014-01-12 05:04:13 PM  

ten foiled hats: Oh, NH House.  I thought it was three roommates taking a vote or something, and was wondering why this was news.

It does indeed help to RTFA.


I don't know. The amount of Representatives in the NH House means that one of those three housemates could vote on this.

I think I'm two votes short of the five needed to get elected.
 
2014-01-12 05:09:04 PM  
Live free or  Die High
 
2014-01-12 05:10:36 PM  
Have you ever legislated..

...ON WEED!?
 
2014-01-12 05:18:48 PM  
Dominoes.
 
2014-01-12 05:19:34 PM  
Didn't Illinois have medical go live Jan. 1?   We are a lot closer to real legalization than we were just a few years ago. It's inevitable.
 
2014-01-12 05:32:02 PM  
Nice. Another cash crop for my New Hampshire retirement farm....

/feed it to my horsies and ride Stoned Ponies....
 
2014-01-12 05:41:41 PM  
d3uu04du0cb2p3.cloudfront.net
 
2014-01-12 05:43:07 PM  
$30 an oz? What are they high?
 
2014-01-12 05:53:40 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: NH and VT both seem like great legalization candidates, as it should appeal equally to NH's libertarian as well as VT's extremely liberal sensibilities.  Pot, bringing opposite ends of the political spectrum together since 2013.

Libertarian is not the opposite of liberal.


On the issue of government regulation of the economy they are.

On the issue of government regulation of your private life, they agree
 
2014-01-12 05:55:57 PM  
Subby, the?
 
2014-01-12 05:59:30 PM  

ChicagoKev: If the republicans don't block it, New Hampshire's governor (a democrat) says she will veto the bill.

NH legalized medical marijuana last year, but still can't figure out how to implement it.  Meanwhile Massachusetts and Rhode Island have both decriminalized possession of 1 ounce of pot or hash, and Maine is only slightly more strict.   Between decriminalization and medical laws, there would be a lot of cross-border quasi-legal sales.

NH needs to legalize it and start selling through the state liquor stores on the MA/ME borders.  Profit!


Anything to help her best buds in the Mexican cartels, eh?

/know nothing about NH politics
//figure that the cartels are HUGE proponents of the War on Drugs since it gives them a de facto monopoly on large scale distribution
///or perhaps the for-profit prison industry but the cartels make a more interesting story
 
2014-01-12 06:02:02 PM  
 
2014-01-12 06:04:23 PM  

BolloxReader: ChicagoKev: If the republicans don't block it, New Hampshire's governor (a democrat) says she will veto the bill.

NH legalized medical marijuana last year, but still can't figure out how to implement it.  Meanwhile Massachusetts and Rhode Island have both decriminalized possession of 1 ounce of pot or hash, and Maine is only slightly more strict.   Between decriminalization and medical laws, there would be a lot of cross-border quasi-legal sales.

NH needs to legalize it and start selling through the state liquor stores on the MA/ME borders.  Profit!

Anything to help her best buds in the Mexican cartels, eh?

/know nothing about NH politics
//figure that the cartels are HUGE proponents of the War on Drugs since it gives them a de facto monopoly on large scale distribution
///or perhaps the for-profit prison industry but the cartels make a more interesting story


New England democrats are a pretty diverse group.  Then run the gamut from genuine progressives to puritanical throwbacks who share conservative social values but can't call themselves Republicans because they have genuine concern for the poor.
 
2014-01-12 06:08:28 PM  
As someone who lives in Massachusetts, please take my money.
 
2014-01-12 06:10:00 PM  

Superjoe: As someone who lives in Massachusetts, please take my money.


Sure, mind sending it to my PO Box?
 
2014-01-12 06:20:29 PM  
A million dollars a week would be good earnings for any business.

Colorado pot dealers predict sales of 5 million+ dollars a week, when the suppliers can catch up to the demand.

I don't see any other state scoffing at those figures, yet.
 
2014-01-12 06:22:21 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED: Dinki: 4 hour drive from my house. Well worth a day trip...

As I said before, the first state in the north east to legalize it will reap a huge windfall. NYS politicians are too stupid to think that rationally though.

This.

Rhode Island or Delaware should do it.  Both are relatively low-population states smack dab in the middle of some of the most densely populated areas in the country.  The tax revenue from legal pot tourism would give them tons of money to play around with.


Legalization has a lot of momentum in RI.
Link

The current governor, Chaffee, is a vocal proponent but he is not seeking re-election in 2014
 
2014-01-12 06:33:36 PM  
Legalize, subby, I know the article title says decriminalization too, but that's not what the article says. Decriminalization is just not punishing people for having it, but it remains illegal, so it can't be sold and therefore can't be taxed. Legalization makes it legal to sell and therefore tax. It's a huge difference. for example weed has been decriminalize in NYC since 77 and there still have been 440,000 marijuana arrests since 2002.
 
2014-01-12 06:50:50 PM  
live free or die
 
2014-01-12 06:55:16 PM  

BolloxReader: ChicagoKev: If the republicans don't block it, New Hampshire's governor (a democrat) says she will veto the bill.

NH legalized medical marijuana last year, but still can't figure out how to implement it.  Meanwhile Massachusetts and Rhode Island have both decriminalized possession of 1 ounce of pot or hash, and Maine is only slightly more strict.   Between decriminalization and medical laws, there would be a lot of cross-border quasi-legal sales.

NH needs to legalize it and start selling through the state liquor stores on the MA/ME borders.  Profit!

Anything to help her best buds in the Mexican cartels, eh?

/know nothing about NH politics
//figure that the cartels are HUGE proponents of the War on Drugs since it gives them a de facto monopoly on large scale distribution
///or perhaps the for-profit prison industry but the cartels make a more interesting story


Weed in New England is pretty much a local affair. Between Maine and New Hampshire, and for damn sure in Western Mass, there is a LOT of weed grown here already. There IS a lot of ditchweed that is brought in, but the Mexican cartels don't really see a lot of profit from New England on pot.

The thing is: there are reasons for Conservatives to support legalization. I simply don't care what people do in their own damn homes. I do care that we keep a LOT of money in play to continue to service this idiotic War on Drugs that siphons off a lot of dollars to keeping a prison system propped up, and wastes dollars for legal defense, care for prisoners, and drains a lot of money that could go into local development, and chasing real criminals. I do think that legal weed will open up a LOT of commercial aspects that are just NOT being talked about, that have far greater potential for job growth than just the drug aspect. The aspects that motivated the policy and odd scheduling of a non-narcotic, as being one of the Worst Drugs EVAR, yet oddly enough, gave the Navy a pass on hemp rope...

We need to see the stuff legalized. Just to save money at the state and Federal level. To open up potential industry--and not just for the drug aspects. We need to stop the corruption that infects this whole "War" because it poisons the whole system, and erodes folks' faith in that system. This is as someone who doesn't smoke the stuff even. I don't care what folks do in their free time, and there are valid medical uses as well, so maybe we should just stop this ludicrous campaign. It was begun as an anti competitive measure to protect timber and cotton interests, and it's only grown more silly.
 
2014-01-12 07:16:26 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: NH and VT both seem like great legalization candidates, as it should appeal equally to NH's libertarian as well as VT's extremely liberal sensibilities.  Pot, bringing opposite ends of the political spectrum together since 2013.

Libertarian is not the opposite of liberal.


Liberal used to mean what libertarian means today,
 
2014-01-12 07:18:58 PM  

shtychkn: ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: NH and VT both seem like great legalization candidates, as it should appeal equally to NH's libertarian as well as VT's extremely liberal sensibilities.  Pot, bringing opposite ends of the political spectrum together since 2013.

Libertarian is not the opposite of liberal.

On the issue of government regulation of the economy they are.

On the issue of government regulation of your private life, they agree


What if buying and selling are part of my private life?
 
2014-01-12 07:36:49 PM  

megarian: CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED:

Get out of my house/bedroom and back to doing your jobs, Politicians..

I kind of like them in my bedroom. Keeps things spicy and weird and totally illegal.


Newsletter..yadda, yadda..
 
2014-01-12 07:44:51 PM  

CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED: megarian: CAT-LIKE TYPING DETECTED:

Get out of my house/bedroom and back to doing your jobs, Politicians..

I kind of like them in my bedroom. Keeps things spicy and weird and totally illegal.

Newsletter..yadda, yadda..


Oh of course! It's only good manners. And I'm classy as f*ck.
 
2014-01-12 08:04:01 PM  
My friends call the ride between Massachusetts and Maine the must harrowing 13 miles if their trip to and from Maine when they go skiing.

/stoners, the lot of them.
 
2014-01-12 08:16:41 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: NH and VT both seem like great legalization candidates, as it should appeal equally to NH's libertarian as well as VT's extremely liberal sensibilities.  Pot, bringing opposite ends of the political spectrum together since 2013.

Libertarian is not the opposite of liberal.


Neither is libertarian the opposite of communist. Libertarian is an adjective as much as a noun.

From the article: "The House will vote Wednesday on a bill that proposes taxing the drug when it is sold at retail at a rate of $30 per ounce and letting people grow up to six marijuana plants in a controlled environment."

Selling it at $30/oz or taxing each ounce at $30? If they start selling weed at $30 an ounce weed I might move and even stay in winter.
 
2014-01-12 08:56:52 PM  

The One True TheDavid: ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: NH and VT both seem like great legalization candidates, as it should appeal equally to NH's libertarian as well as VT's extremely liberal sensibilities.  Pot, bringing opposite ends of the political spectrum together since 2013.

Libertarian is not the opposite of liberal.

Neither is libertarian the opposite of communist. Libertarian is an adjective as much as a noun.

From the article: "The House will vote Wednesday on a bill that proposes taxing the drug when it is sold at retail at a rate of $30 per ounce and letting people grow up to six marijuana plants in a controlled environment."

Selling it at $30/oz or taxing each ounce at $30? If they start selling weed at $30 an ounce weed I might move and even stay in winter.


Fairly sure they're taxing $30 an ounce on top of your price. So if ounces are $250, you'd pay $280 with tax.

$30 an ounce does seen awfully low to me though. An ounce is a pretty sizeable amount for personal use unless you're a rapper or in college. At my current consumption they'd barely get $4 in tax out of me a week.

You know, assuming this passes. And I lived there...sigh.

/I'm hoping Maryland legalizes next...that's within driving distance!
 
2014-01-12 09:19:24 PM  
Maybe one of those BFE states like Mississippi, Arkansas or Alabama will get on the bandwagon and completely rejuvenate their economy.

If you legalize marijuana, you could also legalize industrial hemp and really give the textile industry, which has been decimated in the south, a major jolt.
 
2014-01-12 09:38:16 PM  

hotrod2001: Maybe one of those BFE states like Mississippi, Arkansas or Alabama will get on the bandwagon and completely rejuvenate their economy.

If you legalize marijuana, you could also legalize industrial hemp and really give the textile industry, which has been decimated in the south, a major jolt.


The problem is that the cotton industry has been one of the most vociferous opponents of hemp legalization. As has timber. Hemp would be a great start for new players, and it would cut the market share for the folks who are already invested, and that has always been the issue with hemp for commercial uses. Between that, and medicinal uses, as well as hemp seed oil and a variety of other commercial uses, legal hemp is the bugbear that CEOs throw out because it would force them to compete with a plant that has multifaceted uses, and put them at a disadvantage, since they've railed against it for years, and thus, if they backpedal, they put their whole line of reasoning at risk.

Hemp legalization would mean a lot of new, and much smaller players, and that means a lot more competition. And infrastructure changes that the largest in textile and paper have absolutely no interest in making, and haven't been interested in for nearly a hundred years. Never mind that in early America, it was considered legal tender in parts of the Colonies. Never mind that hemp was considered such an important crop that its growth was required in some states. Hemp was important for rope, for sails, and for clothing, not to mention for medicinal uses.

The problem arose when a cheap and relatively easy method of harvesting came into production, and the corticator began the real push against hemp. It has always been about commercial interests wanting to cut out competition. Always. And it still is.
 
2014-01-12 09:55:44 PM  

hubiestubert: hotrod2001: Maybe one of those BFE states like Mississippi, Arkansas or Alabama will get on the bandwagon and completely rejuvenate their economy.

If you legalize marijuana, you could also legalize industrial hemp and really give the textile industry, which has been decimated in the south, a major jolt.

The problem is that the cotton industry has been one of the most vociferous opponents of hemp legalization. As has timber. Hemp would be a great start for new players, and it would cut the market share for the folks who are already invested, and that has always been the issue with hemp for commercial uses. Between that, and medicinal uses, as well as hemp seed oil and a variety of other commercial uses, legal hemp is the bugbear that CEOs throw out because it would force them to compete with a plant that has multifaceted uses, and put them at a disadvantage, since they've railed against it for years, and thus, if they backpedal, they put their whole line of reasoning at risk.

Hemp legalization would mean a lot of new, and much smaller players, and that means a lot more competition. And infrastructure changes that the largest in textile and paper have absolutely no interest in making, and haven't been interested in for nearly a hundred years. Never mind that in early America, it was considered legal tender in parts of the Colonies. Never mind that hemp was considered such an important crop that its growth was required in some states. Hemp was important for rope, for sails, and for clothing, not to mention for medicinal uses.

The problem arose when a cheap and relatively easy method of harvesting came into production, and the corticator began the real push against hemp. It has always been about commercial interests wanting to cut out competition. Always. And it still is.


True, but in this day of diversifying your portfolios through multiple outlets, why would companies like Levi Strauss, Coates North America, Georgia Pacific and Kimberly Clark not want to have their cake and eat it too?  They can have their timber, canola oil and paper along with this added market.  And like I said, there are many southern communities whose economies have been decimated by NAFTA and textile industries in places like Pakistan which still have mills and other infrastructure still in place.

If not, I see a movement similar to the craft beer market of many small entrepreneurs getting into the game.  It might be a niche market at first but in time it could become lucrative again.
 
2014-01-12 10:11:58 PM  
I've never tried smoking pot.  I have no interest in it.  I used to be strongly against it be "drugs are bad, mmkay" and the neighbor's son was killed in a one car DUI accident coming home from work.

Still, having read some things and spoken with people, I can't understand why it isn't legalized and treated the same as alcohol.  There seems to be no real down-size to doing so, unless you're raking in cartel bribe money...

/NH resident
 
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