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(Marketwatch)   Have you been at your job longer than 4.6 years? Congratulations - you're above average   (marketwatch.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, U.S., Harris Interactive, CareerBuilder, average wage, Bureau of Labor Statistics  
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5085 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2014 at 9:11 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-01-12 09:19:48 AM
4 votes:
Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.
2014-01-12 09:39:54 AM
3 votes:

Ima4nic8or: That is just farking sad and pathetic. How the fark do the job hoppers expect to ever earn a decent pension?  Not to mention that it generally takes about 5 years to become really proficient at a job.  Its no wonder so many of the folks around me don't know what the hell they are doing.  I was with the first company that I started working with for 17 years and have been at my current employer for 11 years and am planning to retire from it in another 19 years.

Unless they mean that folks change job within the same company every 4.5 years.  I suppose that makes more sense.  Then you can ignore everything I just said.

Pension?  What the hell is a pension?

  Is what many people are probably asking themselves of your post.  The trend is to change companies to get that raise/promotion, a lot of jobs are very interchangeable and it doesn't take 5 years to get good at it all over again if you switch companies for a better deal.  Company loyalty has been eroded to nothing and that goes both ways, companies making all decisions based on short-term gains has rubbed off and employees are forced to adapt as well.  All it takes is a ringer CEO showing up to turn the company around and your decades of loyal service and pension can get wiped out by their decision to re-envision the company or what ever excuse they want to call it.

Sure there's companies with old-school thinking still around and it sounds like you're part of one and that's great and I also think its better for the employee.  But that's not the trend anymore and I agree its sad.
2014-01-12 08:22:34 AM
3 votes:
15 so far. I love my job, so I wouldn't want to change, but I've seen good people in the same field lose their jobs and struggle for months and years to find another. I can certainly see the desire to hang on tooth and nail if you've got a good gig.
2014-01-12 10:28:43 AM
2 votes:
I'd be willing to bet that average tenure is quite a bit less than 4.6 years in the software industry.  I don't leave employers for more money (anymore).  These days, I make more than I "need."  What I, and many other programmers are afraid of is getting caught unemployed with irrelevant skills because we stayed too long somewhere maintaining legacy code (even new development projects turn into long-term maintenance work, if they're successful).  Once you crest the learning curve at a new job, it's time to start looking.

I made the mistake of staying 3 years (2 years too long) at a job I took because I was desperate (previous job laid me off right before the great recession kicked off in '08), maintaining legacy code written in the late 80s/early 90s in Ada (the code was obviously originally written by boomers... I was the youngest person in the shop).  It took a long time to convince another company to take a chance on someone with no "professional" experience in anything modern (had only my hobby projects to show for experience with 'new hotness' tech).  Never again will I make such a mistake (plenty of others to make, though :) ).

I keep hoping I'll find a shop that hasn't completely ossified around a single technology stack and is willing to try out new stuff (when appropriate), but so far, no....
2014-01-12 09:24:04 AM
2 votes:
I think that people get a job, learn their role, find it tolerable, then a new boss or supervisor is hired. If you thought your place of work, or job performance was acceptable, they'll soon rectify that opinion. Whether you, or the new boss, is correct, the sense of self worth an employee has is reduced to dust. That, almost uniformly, sees the employee become dead wood that needs removing. I've seen it four times, twice when I was brought in by a new manager, and twice when a new boss took over from someone who moved on. The best thing you can have for a good career is a competent boss that isn't likely to leave in the foreseeable future.
2014-01-12 09:22:27 AM
2 votes:
Sometimes leaving is the only way to get what you're now worth.  I don't begrudge anyone who has no other option for moving up, but to quit.  Other times, lots of times, it's because employers are dicks and most people decide to quit their jobs before they kill themselves.
2014-01-12 09:19:03 AM
2 votes:
5 months, and loving it.  Hopefully it will be a while.

6 years in the job before that.
2014-01-12 11:56:33 AM
1 votes:
Well having gotten rid of pensions,  why the heck would anyone stick around?  If company B says they'll give me 20% more and company A won't match it (and they never do)  company A can go suck a bag of lemons.
2014-01-12 10:48:52 AM
1 votes:
10 years here, moved up 3 times. The next promotion would require me to travel 90% of the year so I'm holding off on that..

Company flights, company credit cards, company cars all sounds great, unless you actually like your wife and kids and kinda like to see em once in awhile.
2014-01-12 10:33:32 AM
1 votes:
Worked in the same place going on 4 years now (will make it 5 when I get done), but switched positions to another department while I was in. Does that count? 'Cause if not, I've never held a job longer than 3 years.
2014-01-12 10:18:29 AM
1 votes:
So let me get this straight - the average person stays at one job 4.6 years right now - and this is considered a bad thing, when we used to be a country where people could work for the same employer until they day they died, with financial security guaranteed as long as a good job was done? What the hell has happened to us?

/"The American dream? It came true. You're lookin' at it" - The Comedian, Watchmen
2014-01-12 10:10:50 AM
1 votes:
this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.

So many people with long running jobs that dont know why others "change jobs".
2014-01-12 10:03:17 AM
1 votes:
12 years in the job working for the same customer but under 3 different contact winners...

I need a new job, cant stand stand having the contract come up every 5 years and then ride out extensions for a year or 2 then sweat bullets if the new contract holder is going to hire my with out taking a pay cut. That and I'm over 12 hours shifts and getting up at 4 something in the morning.
2014-01-12 09:54:29 AM
1 votes:
My fist ten years out of school were "if I'm still doing this same job a year from now, just shoot me." Then I hit pay dirt. 17 years and my biggest fear is something will prevent me from doing the exact same thing for 13 more.
2014-01-12 09:51:59 AM
1 votes:
My 45th and final year here. (started when I was 18)
I still love my job. I like learning. I like helping.
The people I work with (with a few exceptions) are great,supportive and dedicated.
I work at a local college.
2014-01-12 09:32:42 AM
1 votes:
Going on 23 years for me.  Could probably make more money elsewhere, but the benefits and pension keep me where I am.
2014-01-12 09:31:39 AM
1 votes:

sycraft: Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.


Many people don't get a choice to chase higher wages. I have been in the workforce for over 20 years. The longest job I had was four years. Some I changed by choice and all the good ones were by lay off. I am really tired of getting a good job and losing because of reasons beyond my power.
2014-01-12 09:31:37 AM
1 votes:
Most people don't even know they're free.
2014-01-12 09:24:05 AM
1 votes:

BizarreMan: Coming up on 20 years.


Same here. I just want to stay until I can retire, another 9 years to go.
2014-01-12 09:18:31 AM
1 votes:
7 and change here.

/luck
2014-01-12 09:17:44 AM
1 votes:
Just quit my job of 8+ years. Starting week two.

//Hope I didn't make a horrible mistake
2014-01-12 09:16:16 AM
1 votes:
Only 1 year at my current job, but I might stick around at this one for a while.  Depends on how much money other places are willing to throw at me, I suppose.
 
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