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(Marketwatch)   Have you been at your job longer than 4.6 years? Congratulations - you're above average   ( marketwatch.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, U.S., Harris Interactive, CareerBuilder, average wage, Bureau of Labor Statistics  
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5141 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2014 at 9:11 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



142 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-12 06:22:24 AM  
almost 18 years .....
 
2014-01-12 06:46:17 AM  
24+
 
2014-01-12 07:42:29 AM  
Just about 4.5 here.
 
2014-01-12 08:17:22 AM  
Two and a half so far, but it's my first job since retiring after 23 years in the Air Force.
 
2014-01-12 08:22:34 AM  
15 so far. I love my job, so I wouldn't want to change, but I've seen good people in the same field lose their jobs and struggle for months and years to find another. I can certainly see the desire to hang on tooth and nail if you've got a good gig.
 
2014-01-12 09:14:36 AM  
Coming up on 20 years.
 
2014-01-12 09:16:16 AM  
Only 1 year at my current job, but I might stick around at this one for a while.  Depends on how much money other places are willing to throw at me, I suppose.
 
2014-01-12 09:16:36 AM  
52 years!  I've been a walmart greeter since I was 16 and I can't retire because walmart.

Please kill me!
 
2014-01-12 09:17:44 AM  
Just quit my job of 8+ years. Starting week two.

//Hope I didn't make a horrible mistake
 
2014-01-12 09:18:31 AM  
7 and change here.

/luck
 
2014-01-12 09:18:46 AM  

BumpInTheNight: 52 years!  I've been a walmart greeter since I was 16 and I can't retire because walmart.

Please kill me!


you're already dead.
 
2014-01-12 09:18:52 AM  
12 years. Not a bad job, didn't mind the insane hours when I was single and kidless. The perks are decent. Recently been going back to school to get in another industry or at least have something to fall back on.
 
2014-01-12 09:19:03 AM  
5 months, and loving it.  Hopefully it will be a while.

6 years in the job before that.
 
2014-01-12 09:19:48 AM  
Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.
 
2014-01-12 09:20:46 AM  
Does being a scum contractor doing the exact same job for three years count? If so, I'm on the path to set a personal best of 4+ years. Previous best was 3 1/2 years.
 
2014-01-12 09:21:39 AM  
Obviously most of us have had jobs for longer than average, we know how to not get fired for reading Fark all day.

/10 and a half years
 
2014-01-12 09:21:41 AM  
Previous job - 5.2 yrs.  Quit this job because it's hard to have a family when you travel 90% of the time.
Current job - 2.5 yrs.
 
2014-01-12 09:22:10 AM  
31 years.   I'm a dedicated committed sucker.
 
2014-01-12 09:22:13 AM  
Never had a job longer than 4 years.
 
2014-01-12 09:22:27 AM  
Sometimes leaving is the only way to get what you're now worth.  I don't begrudge anyone who has no other option for moving up, but to quit.  Other times, lots of times, it's because employers are dicks and most people decide to quit their jobs before they kill themselves.
 
2014-01-12 09:22:40 AM  
Soon to be 8 years which will exceed my previous maximum tenure.

52 y/o

Have a very good job.
 
2014-01-12 09:23:52 AM  
Considering that only 62% of working age people are in the workforce, I'm surprised the number is not lower.
 
2014-01-12 09:24:04 AM  
I think that people get a job, learn their role, find it tolerable, then a new boss or supervisor is hired. If you thought your place of work, or job performance was acceptable, they'll soon rectify that opinion. Whether you, or the new boss, is correct, the sense of self worth an employee has is reduced to dust. That, almost uniformly, sees the employee become dead wood that needs removing. I've seen it four times, twice when I was brought in by a new manager, and twice when a new boss took over from someone who moved on. The best thing you can have for a good career is a competent boss that isn't likely to leave in the foreseeable future.
 
2014-01-12 09:24:05 AM  

BizarreMan: Coming up on 20 years.


Same here. I just want to stay until I can retire, another 9 years to go.
 
2014-01-12 09:24:17 AM  

dg41: Just quit my job of 8+ years. Starting week two.

//Hope I didn't make a horrible mistake


Had/have the same feelings. Left a permanent shiatty job of 7.5 years about 2 months ago for a contract to hire job, which I was assured they are planning to hire on full time.  At some point...  It's how the company hires all their engineers which I now see is true.  They did lie to me about the length of time though, which I'm not happy about.  But I'm making a good amount more money though.
 
2014-01-12 09:28:33 AM  
1 year. Will stick with this startup until it sells and is settled with new company. Never had a job more than 3 years ever. Never want to. I know my industry and I prepare for the down times.
 
2014-01-12 09:28:38 AM  

rwhamann: Two and a half so far, but it's my first job since retiring after 23 years in the Air Force.



Quitter!
 
2014-01-12 09:29:27 AM  
What is this "Job" you speak of?
 
2014-01-12 09:29:41 AM  
That is just farking sad and pathetic. How the fark do the job hoppers expect to ever earn a decent pension?  Not to mention that it generally takes about 5 years to become really proficient at a job.  Its no wonder so many of the folks around me don't know what the hell they are doing.  I was with the first company that I started working with for 17 years and have been at my current employer for 11 years and am planning to retire from it in another 19 years.

Unless they mean that folks change job within the same company every 4.5 years.  I suppose that makes more sense.  Then you can ignore everything I just said.
 
2014-01-12 09:30:18 AM  
Two jobs in the past 27 years, not including the part-time bartending gig; I really need a change...
 
2014-01-12 09:31:20 AM  
Yes, but that's not why I'm above average, subby, if you know what I mean.
 
2014-01-12 09:31:37 AM  
Most people don't even know they're free.
 
2014-01-12 09:31:39 AM  

sycraft: Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.


Many people don't get a choice to chase higher wages. I have been in the workforce for over 20 years. The longest job I had was four years. Some I changed by choice and all the good ones were by lay off. I am really tired of getting a good job and losing because of reasons beyond my power.
 
2014-01-12 09:32:42 AM  
Going on 23 years for me.  Could probably make more money elsewhere, but the benefits and pension keep me where I am.
 
2014-01-12 09:33:43 AM  
Nope, and at this rate hope to never be again.

My last 2 jobs laid me off right around the 5-year mark.  Now I'm doing contract consultant work and making 3x what I used to while doing less stupid, useless work.
 
2014-01-12 09:35:52 AM  
19 years of death defying stupidity under my belt, 16 to go.  Less death defying, more stupidity these days, getting older sucks...
 
2014-01-12 09:37:54 AM  
37 years. My Grandfather started the business. My Mother-in-law retired from there. I work with my mother, brother, two sisters, two nieces, two nephews, my wife, my two sons, my brothers brother-in-law, my cousins two kids... oh I'm sure I'm forgetting somebody. F.B.I. Friends, brothers and in-laws.
 
2014-01-12 09:39:17 AM  

gadian: Sometimes leaving is the only way to get what you're now worth.  I don't begrudge anyone who has no other option for moving up, but to quit.  Other times, lots of times, it's because employers are dicks and most people decide to quit their jobs before they kill themselves.


I'm probably going to have to change companies every two years because my industry never gives raises unless you get promoted...which you can only do like 4 times.
 
2014-01-12 09:39:28 AM  
I think the 4.6 years ties in with many 401K plans not 100% vesting you until 5 years. For those of you planning to stay in your jobs until you retire, remember that in many company's you have a target on you once you hit 50-55 and plan accordingly.
 
2014-01-12 09:39:54 AM  

Ima4nic8or: That is just farking sad and pathetic. How the fark do the job hoppers expect to ever earn a decent pension?  Not to mention that it generally takes about 5 years to become really proficient at a job.  Its no wonder so many of the folks around me don't know what the hell they are doing.  I was with the first company that I started working with for 17 years and have been at my current employer for 11 years and am planning to retire from it in another 19 years.

Unless they mean that folks change job within the same company every 4.5 years.  I suppose that makes more sense.  Then you can ignore everything I just said.

Pension?  What the hell is a pension?

  Is what many people are probably asking themselves of your post.  The trend is to change companies to get that raise/promotion, a lot of jobs are very interchangeable and it doesn't take 5 years to get good at it all over again if you switch companies for a better deal.  Company loyalty has been eroded to nothing and that goes both ways, companies making all decisions based on short-term gains has rubbed off and employees are forced to adapt as well.  All it takes is a ringer CEO showing up to turn the company around and your decades of loyal service and pension can get wiped out by their decision to re-envision the company or what ever excuse they want to call it.

Sure there's companies with old-school thinking still around and it sounds like you're part of one and that's great and I also think its better for the employee.  But that's not the trend anymore and I agree its sad.
 
2014-01-12 09:42:12 AM  
14 and counting...until my employer decides I've Farked enough on company time.
 
2014-01-12 09:42:21 AM  
This May will be 9 years.
 
2014-01-12 09:42:23 AM  
I've had over 40 jobs in my 46 years.
The longest I kept a job was 7 years.  The shortest was 3 days.
I've never been fired.
Sometimes, I worked 3 jobs at a time.
for about 10 years I always had 2 jobs.

I get bored easily.
Recently sold a business I started.

I'm about to lock myself into "the family business" in Ohio for at least 15 years.  Running the show with my brother as my Pops is about to retire.

/I'm one of those "Jane's of all Trades".
 
2014-01-12 09:42:58 AM  
Eight and a half years. I work with nice people, and probably a less than normal amount of office aggravation.

Sure, sometime I will exclaim "ARRGH! I FEEL LIKE I HAVE A BRAIN TUMOR!" or "PLEASE SHOOT ME NOW BEFORE SOMEONE ELSE CALLS!" but I don't really mean it.

BTW, has anyone else noticed that phone lines are like artificial gravity in Star Trek, and never, ever go out (ignoring that one movie)? The server room could be hit with a photon torpedo, and the torpedo would take out the T1, and leave the phone line intact.

/And you didn't have crew members in Star Trek pestering engineering by saying things "Is this from that update you did last year?" "No, Cap'n, that was a fix for the whooshing noise on the door. This is a harmonic instability in the antimatter coils. Completely different system." Apparently, every problem is traceable to a security update from the distant past, not from them plugging in space heaters into their computer's UPS.
 
2014-01-12 09:43:06 AM  

sycraft: Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.


^^^ This.

I've been with the same company for 8 years. There is always a recruiter or two offering me a higher wage to go to another company within the same field.

/ain't going anywhere.
 
2014-01-12 09:43:20 AM  
they're staying in their jobs longer rather than seeking new opportunities

Are they talking about staying at a company or in a position?  I've been at my company for over 8 years but current position for about 2.  It's a little scary going from top dog coasting in one position to a promotion where you have to prove yourself all over again.
 
2014-01-12 09:44:20 AM  
It will be 3 years in July. The pay and benefits aren't bad. I'm usually done by 3:30-4:00. I treat children no one else wants to treat (like humans anyway). I also don't have to worry about owning my own practice (payroll, employees, etc). My boss should have retired 5 years, but eventually he'll die and that'll be fine. All in all, it could be worse.
 
2014-01-12 09:44:33 AM  
Since 1981, been in the same field.  Fourth company.  Every time I jump, it's for more money.
Been with this one for almost 16 years.
 
2014-01-12 09:45:08 AM  
20 years come March 7 (newspaper guy, turned 50 in September)
 
2014-01-12 09:47:07 AM  

Snarfangel: Eight and a half years. I work with nice people, and probably a less than normal amount of office aggravation.

Sure, sometime I will exclaim "ARRGH! I FEEL LIKE I HAVE A BRAIN TUMOR!" or "PLEASE SHOOT ME NOW BEFORE SOMEONE ELSE CALLS!" but I don't really mean it.

BTW, has anyone else noticed that phone lines are like artificial gravity in Star Trek, and never, ever go out (ignoring that one movie)? The server room could be hit with a photon torpedo, and the torpedo would take out the T1, and leave the phone line intact.

/And you didn't have crew members in Star Trek pestering engineering by saying things "Is this from that update you did last year?" "No, Cap'n, that was a fix for the whooshing noise on the door. This is a harmonic instability in the antimatter coils. Completely different system." Apparently, every problem is traceable to a security update from the distant past, not from them plugging in space heaters into their computer's UPS.


Hah yup, call center hell eh?  I remember those days, it also seemed that the sturdier the PBX systems were at a place the crappier they were at supporting all the other applications you had to use.  I always hated the "break out a pad of paper and make tickets later" crap, never did follow through with that either.
 
2014-01-12 09:48:13 AM  
I'm in my 30's, I got my current job in 2003, professional office.  So I'm going on 11 years now pretty soon.

My girlfriend is 40, with a four year degree (from a top school, no less,) and her longest job ever is 4.5 years.  She's lived in about a dozen places all over the world.  The last good job she had was in 2007 (the one that lasted 4.5 years.)  As a result of that, she can't even get an interview for shiat.  She sometimes spends three hours a day looking at jobs on the internet, she calls, she e-mails.  About once every eight months she gets a face to face interview, gets the occasional phone interview with "we'll call you back."

The saddest thing is SHE quit that last job she had, in 2007, because she thought she could roll into another one easy (peak of the economy.)  Well, it never happened, years are passing, and her resume is poison.  She's just been working odd jobs, the occasional full time job, the occasional part time job, nothing resume worthy.  She acknowledges it was the worst mistake she ever made to quit her last good job in 2007.
 
2014-01-12 09:48:33 AM  
My average gig lasts about 18 months.  Just the nature of what I do as an IT consultant.  The longest I've worked anywhere in my 17 years in IT is 3 years.
 
2014-01-12 09:48:35 AM  

dg41: Just quit my job of 8+ years. Starting week two.

//Hope I didn't make a horrible mistake


Same here. Quit a job of 7+ years in October, just finished my first month at the new place. I've already been promoted. It's amazing what working for a competent manager who is able to acknowledge and utilize your individual talents will do for you.
 
2014-01-12 09:51:59 AM  
My 45th and final year here. (started when I was 18)
I still love my job. I like learning. I like helping.
The people I work with (with a few exceptions) are great,supportive and dedicated.
I work at a local college.
 
2014-01-12 09:54:24 AM  
I had to move companies in to order to get an average compensation for my education, location and experience based on numbers farmed from the IEEE. Nothing wrong with that. I won't move on my own from my current company even if I'm doomed to earn only 3% every year because the retirement benefits are unheard of.
The free market flows both ways, employers. Those with a better deal to offer will attract the best and more employees.
 
2014-01-12 09:54:29 AM  
My fist ten years out of school were "if I'm still doing this same job a year from now, just shoot me." Then I hit pay dirt. 17 years and my biggest fear is something will prevent me from doing the exact same thing for 13 more.
 
2014-01-12 09:57:05 AM  

hovsm: sycraft: Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.

Many people don't get a choice to chase higher wages. I have been in the workforce for over 20 years. The longest job I had was four years. Some I changed by choice and all the good ones were by lay off. I am really tired of getting a good job and losing because of reasons beyond my power.


ya....this. longest job i had was 5 years, and business took a downturn. on the other hand i have been in the same profession for almost 20 years, and changing jobs every couple of years seems not too bad.
 
2014-01-12 09:57:08 AM  
4.6 years is hardly committed to anything. The cost of this high turnover is just another reason the economy is in the tank, and why the US quality of service and/or product has decreased drastically in the last decade.
 
2014-01-12 10:00:33 AM  
Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.
 
2014-01-12 10:02:02 AM  
I don't understand the concept of employer loyalty. Regardless of any pledges to you an employer may have implied, as soon as some bean counter decides the company is better off without you, your loyalty to them means squat.

The balance of power between worked and employer is better served when both parties understand the other is ruled by the bottom line.
 
2014-01-12 10:03:17 AM  
12 years in the job working for the same customer but under 3 different contact winners...

I need a new job, cant stand stand having the contract come up every 5 years and then ride out extensions for a year or 2 then sweat bullets if the new contract holder is going to hire my with out taking a pay cut. That and I'm over 12 hours shifts and getting up at 4 something in the morning.
 
2014-01-12 10:03:34 AM  
First part time job I had lasted about 4.5 years (library). Next 2 jobs about 6 months(museum guard) and 1.5 years(server room/support op), respectively. Current - and first full time - job(programmer) is at 6.5 years. They tried to downsize me after a year and change but boss hooked me up in colleague's organization (pretty big company). Sitting at 23 days PTO plus sick days, 401k, pension, pretty decent health plan and I usually telecommute. I'm not going anywhere for a while.
 
2014-01-12 10:03:49 AM  

bearcats1983: Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.


The only reason would be if the retirement benefits can't be matched. I.e. Pension or similar
 
2014-01-12 10:03:54 AM  
Started part time when I was 21.
45 now.
 
2014-01-12 10:05:22 AM  
What if I don't want to be above average?

\my pay sure as fark isn't
 
2014-01-12 10:07:16 AM  

cards fan by association: bearcats1983: Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.

The only reason would be if the retirement benefits can't be matched. I.e. Pension or similar


A retail pharmacy job where you do not work nights is hard to find.
When I do work a Saturday it is only until 1pm.
No Sundays

Sure I could make more $$$ working for a big chain, but it is not worth it, IMO.
A job isn't all about money.
 
2014-01-12 10:10:50 AM  
this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.

So many people with long running jobs that dont know why others "change jobs".
 
2014-01-12 10:11:37 AM  

Broktun: cards fan by association: bearcats1983: Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.

The only reason would be if the retirement benefits can't be matched. I.e. Pension or similar

A retail pharmacy job where you do not work nights is hard to find.
When I do work a Saturday it is only until 1pm.
No Sundays

Sure I could make more $$$ working for a big chain, but it is not worth it, IMO.
A job isn't all about money.


That's true too I suppose. In my case, the small company I worked for was miserable, had no perks, subpar compensation and a terrible retirement plan. Anything would have been better...
 
2014-01-12 10:11:59 AM  
45 years on Welfare. Life's been good to me so far.
 
2014-01-12 10:12:43 AM  
7 years for me, technically for two companies but working for the same people. I can't be promoted any further. Benefits aren't great but the working environment is the best I've ever had, and my sanity at the end of the day is worth it.
 
2014-01-12 10:13:43 AM  

topcon: I'm in my 30's, I got my current job in 2003, professional office.  So I'm going on 11 years now pretty soon.

My girlfriend is 40, with a four year degree (from a top school, no less,) and her longest job ever is 4.5 years.  She's lived in about a dozen places all over the world.  The last good job she had was in 2007 (the one that lasted 4.5 years.)  As a result of that, she can't even get an interview for shiat.  She sometimes spends three hours a day looking at jobs on the internet, she calls, she e-mails.  About once every eight months she gets a face to face interview, gets the occasional phone interview with "we'll call you back."

The saddest thing is SHE quit that last job she had, in 2007, because she thought she could roll into another one easy (peak of the economy.)  Well, it never happened, years are passing, and her resume is poison.  She's just been working odd jobs, the occasional full time job, the occasional part time job, nothing resume worthy.  She acknowledges it was the worst mistake she ever made to quit her last good job in 2007.


If it makes you feel any better I know someone who's in his 40s and has never held a job longer than about 4 - 5 months. He can't figure out why no businesses will go near him *sigh*
 
hej [TotalFark]
2014-01-12 10:13:55 AM  
I've stayed at one place for about 5 years. That aside, almost every job I've had had lasted about a year.
 
2014-01-12 10:14:39 AM  
My last two jobs were 8 and my current one just hit 9 years.
 
2014-01-12 10:15:28 AM  
39 years old. Part of the X generation. Worked in the same field for 23 years now (pharmacy). I've worked in 5 different pharmacies over that time period. Never been without a job, except for when I quit Walmart at 27, took my "retirement" money, and took a month off between jobs. (I already had the next one lined up.)
These days, you can't up and quit a job. Mostly because there are 400 people clamoring for your position. Wen I first started working, I worked to get my bills paid and have enough to go see whatever concert was coming up next. These days, I'm content to have my bills paid, and I feel lucky that I can. There is a glass ceiling that I can't get past, at least not without going to school and spending a hundred thousand to get a degree. It's ridiculous. That's why I've been at my current employer for 5.5 years.
 
2014-01-12 10:18:29 AM  
So let me get this straight - the average person stays at one job 4.6 years right now - and this is considered a bad thing, when we used to be a country where people could work for the same employer until they day they died, with financial security guaranteed as long as a good job was done? What the hell has happened to us?

/"The American dream? It came true. You're lookin' at it" - The Comedian, Watchmen
 
2014-01-12 10:19:28 AM  
So thankful obama has fixed the job market for us 99%'ers.
 
2014-01-12 10:20:47 AM  
14 awful, miserable years. Great pay and benefits though.

/kill me
 
2014-01-12 10:22:36 AM  

IcedTorch: this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.

So many people with long running jobs that dont know why others "change jobs".


I've been at my job a while and I've wanted to 'change jobs' quote often. I worry about quitting my current job and going into a situation that might end up being worse, or having it fall through completely, leaving me jobless for weeks or even months, and unable to go back to my former employer. This happened to me in 2005, and it was terrifying, even though times were 'good.'
 
2014-01-12 10:24:55 AM  
My longest non-professional job was about 6 years. My longest professional job was about 7 years. I left it when budget cuts would've put me in a part-time position.
 
2014-01-12 10:26:50 AM  
25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.
 
2014-01-12 10:28:43 AM  
I'd be willing to bet that average tenure is quite a bit less than 4.6 years in the software industry.  I don't leave employers for more money (anymore).  These days, I make more than I "need."  What I, and many other programmers are afraid of is getting caught unemployed with irrelevant skills because we stayed too long somewhere maintaining legacy code (even new development projects turn into long-term maintenance work, if they're successful).  Once you crest the learning curve at a new job, it's time to start looking.

I made the mistake of staying 3 years (2 years too long) at a job I took because I was desperate (previous job laid me off right before the great recession kicked off in '08), maintaining legacy code written in the late 80s/early 90s in Ada (the code was obviously originally written by boomers... I was the youngest person in the shop).  It took a long time to convince another company to take a chance on someone with no "professional" experience in anything modern (had only my hobby projects to show for experience with 'new hotness' tech).  Never again will I make such a mistake (plenty of others to make, though :) ).

I keep hoping I'll find a shop that hasn't completely ossified around a single technology stack and is willing to try out new stuff (when appropriate), but so far, no....
 
2014-01-12 10:30:43 AM  
5.5 years and I'd jump ship in a heartbeat. I keep getting passed up for promotions and it's pissing me off.
 
2014-01-12 10:31:00 AM  
36 years in the electronic security industry.
 
2014-01-12 10:31:50 AM  
Software developer - in 20 years, only one job lasted longer than three years.

I gave up caring about doctors/dentists because health insurance changed every year even when my job didn't change.

Also, having to wait a year to start contributing to a 401k? Whoever wrote that rule needs to burn in Hell.
 
2014-01-12 10:33:32 AM  
Worked in the same place going on 4 years now (will make it 5 when I get done), but switched positions to another department while I was in. Does that count? 'Cause if not, I've never held a job longer than 3 years.
 
2014-01-12 10:34:30 AM  
I stayed at my last company for 5 years, switching positions three times.  I remained PRN the whole time and didn't earn any benefits, raises, or vacation time.  I spent the last two years finishing my degree to get out of that dead end.  I was offered a position in the department which my degree would apply, but it would still be PRN, and while I would get a much larger pay increase because of the job, I'd be back in the same position of never getting a raise or benefits unless one of the full time employees clinging tenaciously to their job decided to quit or retire.  This is a very big company with facilities in quite a few states and countries, and they've been increasing the number of PRN positions and decreasing the amount of positions that qualify for benefits and raises.  If they were the only company in my field doing that, it'd be easy to dismiss them, but it's become a common practice that seems to completely kill any sense of loyalty towards the employer.
 
2014-01-12 10:35:44 AM  
sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)

topcon:
My girlfriend is 40, with a four year degree (from a top school, no less,) and her longest job ever is 4.5 years.  She's lived in about a dozen places all over the world.  The last good job she had was in 2007 (the one that lasted 4.5 years.)  As a result of that, she can't even get an interview for shiat.  She sometimes spends three hours a day looking at jobs on the internet, she calls, she e-mails.  About once every eight months she gets a face to face interview, gets the occasional phone interview with "we'll call you back."

The saddest thing is SHE quit that last job she had, in 2007, because she thought she could roll into another one easy (peak of the economy.)  Well, it never happened, years are passing, and her resume is poison.  She's just been working odd jobs, the occasional full time job, the occasional part time job, nothing resume worthy.  She acknowledges it was the worst mistake she ever made to quit her last good job in 2007.


My wife had basically one job in her field (print journalism), for a few years.  Then the jobs basically dried up entirely; every newspaper seems to have one or two reporters who do everything, and nobody's hiring.  The last paper she freelanced for demanded that their freelancers not do work for anyone else, but didn't give out enough assignments to pay the bills.  So now she works at an organic food store and they're probably the nicest bosses she's ever had.
 
2014-01-12 10:37:15 AM  
25 years. when I walked in I was starry eyed 20 something with dreams in his eyes. planning to see how far this life would take me! what magical journey I was on, how I would set the world afire!
and now,
my life almost over, no dreams realized, no real accomplishments to fruition. just a lonely empty husk of a man with no future no goals within reach. cursing every morning when I wake up whatever god's there may be, that I have to continue this pitiful, worthless existence that is my life.
/but the pays o.k. and it's steady.
 
2014-01-12 10:38:12 AM  

InternetSecurityGuard: 36 years in the electronic security industry.



Oops, sorry, wrong account. How embarrassing. I hope this is the Snarfangel one.
 
2014-01-12 10:38:15 AM  

No Such Agency: sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)


This.
 
2014-01-12 10:41:26 AM  

Moron Police: 5 months, and loving it.  Hopefully it will be a while.

6 years in the job before that.


About the same for me.  Lost my previous job (where I'd been for 5 years) and found another one in another state, where I've been since July.  Looking good so far...
 
2014-01-12 10:44:44 AM  

Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.


You mean like washing/detailing cars? I would love that job! My wife is a financial adviser and I've told her that once she makes enough money, I'm quitting this corporate, cubical farm job. Maybe get a part-time job doing landscaping or at a warehouse or something. Back in the day I loved warehouse work. Driving a fork-lift, loading trucks etc.. Unfortunately it doesn't pay the bills. Maybe even a volunteer job at the Arboretum here. I like to get my hands dirty. The corporate life and politics aren't my thing, but it's hard to give up the money and benefits.
 
2014-01-12 10:48:18 AM  

numb3r5ev3n: No Such Agency: sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)

This.



I second the THIS^^^^^

Nearly every person at my employer who went onto "greener pastures" has either hit a downward spiral of lesser and lesser jobs, or is working harder with less stability.

The place where I work is pretty great, all this considered, and is run by people who really know how to balance capitalism and getting wealthy with just enough caring for the employees to make us feel like we're getting our fair share of the pie.  A couple of the executives have done personal off-the-books favors for me that really helped me cross over a few bumps in my private life.

/I'm 44 and been there almost 18 years.
//Don't plan on leaving unless technology takes my job away.
 
2014-01-12 10:48:27 AM  

IcedTorch: this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.


Yes, but then you'd sound like a stupid college kid, so don't do that.
 
2014-01-12 10:48:52 AM  
10 years here, moved up 3 times. The next promotion would require me to travel 90% of the year so I'm holding off on that..

Company flights, company credit cards, company cars all sounds great, unless you actually like your wife and kids and kinda like to see em once in awhile.
 
2014-01-12 10:57:46 AM  

fickenchucker: numb3r5ev3n: No Such Agency: sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)

This.


I second the THIS^^^^^

Nearly every person at my employer who went onto "greener pastures" has either hit a downward spiral of lesser and lesser jobs, or is working harder with less stability.

The place where I work is pretty great, all this considered, and is run by people who really know how to balance capitalism and getting wealthy with just enough caring for the employees to make us feel like we're getting our fair share of the pie.  A couple of the executives have done personal off-the-books favors for me that really helped me cross over a few bumps in my private life.

/I'm 44 and been there almost 18 years.
//Don't plan on leaving unless technology takes my job away.


The place where I work has its ups and downs, and there have been situations where I have seriously wanted to tear all my hair out and walk out...but there is no guarantee that any job I hopped to would be any better, unless they pay substantially better. My immediate superior is nice, and her immediate superior is nice. I have been lucky to have landed in some really demanding jobs that were made better or at least tolerable by understanding and compassionate management, and I have had one really great job that was destroyed by blundering and incompetent management and type-A near sociopath types. I was raised on the 'do a good job and retire at 65 with a gold watch' mentality by my parents and grandparents, and I really had to work to get my head around the fact that there is no job security anymore, and nothing is guaranteed.
 
GBB
2014-01-12 10:58:18 AM  

Gentoolive: 10 years here, moved up 3 times. The next promotion would require me to travel 90% of the year so I'm holding off on that..

Company flights, company credit cards, company cars all sounds great, unless you actually like your wife and kids and kinda like to see em once in awhile.


Let's switch jobs.  I work 7 out of every 14 days; accumulate 30 days off a year with 100% rollover of unused time.   My schedule is set in stone.  It's a dead easy job if you don't mind the possibility that the next phone call could be the last words of a desperate person, or someone upset that McD's just ran out of nuggets.
 
2014-01-12 11:00:05 AM  

abhorrent1: Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.

You mean like washing/detailing cars? I would love that job! My wife is a financial adviser and I've told her that once she makes enough money, I'm quitting this corporate, cubical farm job. Maybe get a part-time job doing landscaping or at a warehouse or something. Back in the day I loved warehouse work. Driving a fork-lift, loading trucks etc.. Unfortunately it doesn't pay the bills. Maybe even a volunteer job at the Arboretum here. I like to get my hands dirty. The corporate life and politics aren't my thing, but it's hard to give up the money and benefits.


Essentially. Significantly more in depth than a carwash kind of place, but pretty much making dirty cars clean. I'm the shop people come to for paint correction, repairing upholstery, dying trim and stains, etc.

It's a labor of love, for sure, much like having a desire to work in food service.
 
2014-01-12 11:04:43 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
f'in a
 
2014-01-12 11:10:02 AM  
7 years as of August.

Haven't had a raise in 4 years.

I've applied over 100 places in the past year and gotten nothing.  I want out, but I can't get out until I get something else because I can't have no income in life.  So, instead, I just stick it out and slowly die inside more and more every day.

Ask me if I'm bitter.
 
2014-01-12 11:15:18 AM  

Tchernobog: Essentially. Significantly more in depth than a carwash kind of place, but pretty much making dirty cars clean. I'm the shop people come to for paint correction, repairing upholstery, dying trim and stains, etc.

It's a labor of love, for sure, much like having a desire to work in food service.


There's a lot to be said for knowing that at the end of the day you can point to things you actually accomplished: "This car looked like a hobo's ass before, now it gleams".  Often, the best I can say is "yay, this place didn't fall apart around our ears... today." (though admittedly, preventing that is a big part of my job)
 
2014-01-12 11:15:19 AM  

IcedTorch: this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.

So many people with long running jobs that dont know why others "change jobs".


Working hard and making yourself valuable to your company is "privilege" now?
 
2014-01-12 11:16:01 AM  
I've never had a full-time, year-round job. Never. Part of it is my career field, part where I live, and part you don't even want to know.

/I HAVE worked seasonal jobs for multiple years. And a lot of those I only did it because I couldn't find anything better.
 
2014-01-12 11:16:01 AM  
Ive been at my current job 8 years in July. It has had its ups and downs right now it is in an up. I actually have compotent bosses over me. And with that we are doing much better. I hope to be promoted again soon. The job I had before this was for 8 years and it was part time most of the time so I had another job during that for 11 years. The 8 year job turned full time so I quit the 11 year job but I got laid off from it. I could have gone back to the 11 year job, but decided not to, it was in the printing indusrty and they had been cutting back a lot since then. The thing I hate the most is people have offered me jobs at other places but they are insulting with the salary. Even though my job isnt the best it has been better than I have seen.
 
2014-01-12 11:31:53 AM  

cryinoutloud: I've never had a full-time, year-round job. Never. Part of it is my career field, part where I live, and part you don't even want to know.

/I HAVE worked seasonal jobs for multiple years. And a lot of those I only did it because I couldn't find anything better.


Is that you, A-Rod?
 
2014-01-12 11:32:49 AM  

Tchernobog: abhorrent1: Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.

You mean like washing/detailing cars? I would love that job! My wife is a financial adviser and I've told her that once she makes enough money, I'm quitting this corporate, cubical farm job. Maybe get a part-time job doing landscaping or at a warehouse or something. Back in the day I loved warehouse work. Driving a fork-lift, loading trucks etc.. Unfortunately it doesn't pay the bills. Maybe even a volunteer job at the Arboretum here. I like to get my hands dirty. The corporate life and politics aren't my thing, but it's hard to give up the money and benefits.

Essentially. Significantly more in depth than a carwash kind of place, but pretty much making dirty cars clean. I'm the shop people come to for paint correction, repairing upholstery, dying trim and stains, etc.

It's a labor of love, for sure, much like having a desire to work in food service.


Maybe that's what I can do, start a detail business. Probably 10 or 15 years ago I took the only "new" car I ever owned to a detail shop. I paid them like $200 and they did a half-ass job.  Wax paste left in the seams, clogging the windshield washer nozzles etc.. Spending my days detailing nice cars would be something I would definitely love doing.

BTW: WTF is the trick too clean the wheels? I can never get all the break dust crud off of them.
 
2014-01-12 11:36:48 AM  
Well after getting my contracting business wiped out from the thriving Bush economy in California in 07-08...and enduring a series of wage slave work at the mines in Elko and oil in Wyoming last few years...back in Boise and a solid 8 months with a 'good' company. And by good I mean a place where there is not totally a bunch of dog c*ck conservative good ol' boys who insist on constantly and chronically biatching about Obama and politics etc. Lulz.

8 months...until the job creators decide to un-create my job to open the door for the next wave of cheaper labor.

God Bless America and Capt. Bligh...
 
2014-01-12 11:41:45 AM  
Same job for 8 years.

For the fourth vendor to take over this contract.

Lost seniority every time the contract was bought out.

Same pay and for shait benefits as when I started.

Now doing the work of 6 people that have quit.

/They tell me I'm lucky to have a job...
 
2014-01-12 11:43:55 AM  

Heraclitus: Same job for 8 years.

For the fourth vendor to take over this contract.

Lost seniority every time the contract was bought out.

Same pay and for shait benefits as when I started.

Now doing the work of 6 people that have quit.

/They tell me I'm lucky to have a job...


The new American Dream.
 
2014-01-12 11:46:18 AM  
11 years.  Only making ~$13.50/hr., but most days I get to go in, throw my headphones on, and have minimal interaction with people all day.  I like it.
 
2014-01-12 11:47:37 AM  

Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.


If it's a good dealership and you're a decent employee, it can be a great place to work. I've been doing web design/digital marketing for a dealer group  for a year and a half and I love it and would be happy to stay at this job until I retire. I'm treated well, paid well, and my work is appreciated.

Some people in other departments seem more disgruntled and I think it's more a matter of them being the kind of people who think that as long as they meet the bare minimums of their job requirements, they've done all they ever need to do. And while that may be enough to keep them employed, it's not the kind of attitude that earns you appreciation, respect, or significant raises and advancement.

And I'm no major go-getter myself. I never bring work home with me, I only work through lunch if the creepy guy is in the break room, and I don't go around glad-handing like a lot of folks at the dealership do. I just do what my boss tells me to, keep an eye out for new ideas to bring to him, and make sure that he sees the results of what I do.
 
2014-01-12 11:56:33 AM  
Well having gotten rid of pensions,  why the heck would anyone stick around?  If company B says they'll give me 20% more and company A won't match it (and they never do)  company A can go suck a bag of lemons.
 
2014-01-12 11:59:58 AM  
Since we are comparing jerbs....

8 years, I work with underwater robots, company is stable and awesome, plenty of work, good pay and benefits... Oh did I mention I get to work with robots???


/corporate shill
//and proud!
 
2014-01-12 12:04:30 PM  
I've had 5 jobs since graduating college in '91, all but one less than 4.5 years duration (12 years). Oddly enough, that job was the only one I lost rather than left on my own.

/ 9 months at current job
 
2014-01-12 12:08:52 PM  

jcadam: I'd be willing to bet that average tenure is quite a bit less than 4.6 years in the software industry.  I don't leave employers for more money (anymore).  These days, I make more than I "need."  What I, and many other programmers are afraid of is getting caught unemployed with irrelevant skills because we stayed too long somewhere maintaining legacy code (even new development projects turn into long-term maintenance work, if they're successful).  Once you crest the learning curve at a new job, it's time to start looking.

I made the mistake of staying 3 years (2 years too long) at a job I took because I was desperate (previous job laid me off right before the great recession kicked off in '08), maintaining legacy code written in the late 80s/early 90s in Ada (the code was obviously originally written by boomers... I was the youngest person in the shop).  It took a long time to convince another company to take a chance on someone with no "professional" experience in anything modern (had only my hobby projects to show for experience with 'new hotness' tech).  Never again will I make such a mistake (plenty of others to make, though :) ).

I keep hoping I'll find a shop that hasn't completely ossified around a single technology stack and is willing to try out new stuff (when appropriate), but so far, no....




And yet companies claim there is a shortage of tech workers.
 
2014-01-12 12:13:25 PM  

StopLurkListen: Software developer - in 20 years, only one job lasted longer than three years. I gave up caring about doctors/dentists because health insurance changed every year even when my job didn't change. Also, having to wait a year to start contributing to a 401k? Whoever wrote that rule needs to burn in Hell.


They need to burn along with the person who designed my 401k plan.  You don't get to keep 100% of the company match until you have been with the company 5 years.
 
2014-01-12 12:13:35 PM  

Outlawtsar: Obviously most of us have had jobs for longer than average, we know how to not get fired for reading Fark all day.

/10 and a half years


Good point!

Been at my job for 20 years, and farking 10 1/2.

Fark.
 
2014-01-12 12:18:08 PM  
I've been at my job for (you couldn't flucking care less) years.  At the job before that I was there for (seriously, no one gives a shiat about your irrelevant, annecdotal data) years.
 
2014-01-12 12:33:05 PM  
6 and a half years for me.  i like my job and it pays well, and i'll work there till i retire if i have anything to say about it.  i'm only 34 so i have 30 years to go, but i see no reason to leave yet.  of course, 5 or 10 years down the road, who knows where my life will lead.
 
2014-01-12 12:56:42 PM  
15 years. Started as a temporary "until I find something better" job, then: "wait, I like it here."
 
2014-01-12 01:03:33 PM  

trappedspirit: I've been at my job for (you couldn't flucking care less) years.  At the job before that I was there for (seriously, no one gives a shiat about your irrelevant, annecdotal data) years.


I bet you've read the entire thread. Well, you pretty much had to, to post that.
 
2014-01-12 01:15:12 PM  
The job I have now, I started almost 12 years ago, working for another company in a delivery capacity.  When I started, it turned out to be the best job I ever had.  Good benefits, bosses in a family-owned company that treated you like family.  This was a delivery job where, on either very hot or very cold days, the president of the company would actually call me first thing in the morning and say, "Madcity, be careful out there today".  Even got to go to a college basketball game with the president.  Then, the company hired the presdent's brother-in-law to run the place as General Manager.  This assclown felt he had to re-invent the wheel, depite the fact he wasn't that bright to start with; hell, the only reason he was available was he was shiatcanned from his previous job because of his incompetence.  Anyway, his bright idea was to get out of my little niche part of the business, and sell off my customers (along with my job), to the company who was supplying my product.  Sad day indeed, but as it turned out, it wasn't so bad because the owner of my new company was a good guy.  He treated me great; then his health started to decline enough that HE then sold his business. Everything went okay for the first couple years, new boss said they were going to make things easier for me, which as it turned out was a complete lie.  Every week, I get more work shoved on me despite no increase in pay, beyond what I make in the increased overtime and the slight increase in commissions. I need to pop 1000 mgs of Ibuprofin every morning when I get out of bed just to be able to get out the door. Living proof that money isn't everything- I made more money in 2013 than any year in my life, but I'm miserable.  I keep my eyes open every day for something new, but the jobs just aren't there in a situation where anything similar would be considered semi-skilled at best.  EVERY DAMN DAY, I kick myself in the arse for not finishing college, though because of all the changes in the newspaper industry, I'd probably just be an unemployed sportswriter anyway.  Please kill me.
 
2014-01-12 01:23:44 PM  
7 years as a Plumber.  I enjoy the job because it's mainly new construction, no day is the same.  I can listen to sports radio during the day, smoke on certain jobs, and if you're having a particularly bad day, you can tell your boss, who you just had a few drinks with the night before, to go fark himself in his ass and still have a job at the end of the day.

Plan on "retiring" at age 36 in about 6 months.  Paying cash to build our dream home.  Appraise it, home equity loan, and start building 2-3 houses a year.  Good income and I become my own boss.  I can't wait.
 
2014-01-12 01:53:10 PM  

BizarreMan: Coming up on 20 years.


20 years in april
FFS, the same boss for 20 years ....

who knew?!
 
2014-01-12 01:58:25 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Pension?  What the hell is a pension?  Is what many people are probably asking themselves of your post.

Pension is that nice check that I get every month on the 1st.

28.7 years with the company before I was encouraged to take medical retirement due to heart condition.

 
2014-01-12 02:01:05 PM  

StopLurkListen: Also, having to wait a year to start contributing to a 401k? Whoever wrote that rule needs to burn in Hell.


I had a job like that. After my year was up I told them to take 100% of my salary. Once I hit the contribution cap, I quit the job and rolled everything from that bullshait 401(k) into my IRA.
 
2014-01-12 02:24:08 PM  
Seven years at this job and I love the company, usually.  Promoted a year ago and the position is okay.  I'm looking to transfer to a nicer place.  A demotion wouldn't be bad because I'd automatically be topped out in the new position, and the pay for that is almost the same as what I get now.

Otherwise I'm looking elsewhere and won't rule out a sizable (to me) pay cut.  Money is important but I learned the hard way that quality of life is just as important.
 
2014-01-12 03:09:27 PM  
Since I started my career I've been a federal contractor.  I got about 48 months at one place, but there was a split in the middle there, I spent 7 months at another company before getting called about a better position.  I left that stable one to move back to my hometown, and that company only kept me for 2 years before they lost the contract through their own incompetence.  I'm in private industry now, could last a long time as this company is huge and growing, but they have me on third shift Tues-Sat. and I don't know how long I can handle that schedule.   I value a social life more than I do money.
 
2014-01-12 03:53:35 PM  

sycraft: Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.


Ditto. 14 years with one employer, 6 jobs, 3 fields, and 3 promotions. All while they pay for my education and relocation to two countries and 4 US cities. No reason to jump ship since the fringe package gets to be the best at 10+ years.
 
2014-01-12 04:23:14 PM  
Twenty seven. Planning on retiring in seven.
 
2014-01-12 05:08:51 PM  

Gene Masseth Jr.: 7 years as of August.

Haven't had a raise in 4 years.

I've applied over 100 places in the past year and gotten nothing.  I want out, but I can't get out until I get something else because I can't have no income in life.  So, instead, I just stick it out and slowly die inside more and more every day.

Ask me if I'm bitter.


^This

Been at my "job" for only a year. In that time I've had 3 supervisors, 4 team leads, including one that I had to file a harassment complaint on (he was moved to another agency and later promoted of course), and my duties significantly reduced in retaliation for not putting up with his advances/treatment despite me continually asking for more work. I'm working on my master's so that keeps my mind from turning to mush and Fark keeps me entertained throughout the day.
As soon as I graduate I'm gone.

/If my job was a person, I'd stab it in the eye
 
2014-01-12 05:09:35 PM  
25 Years old...four years with this company with 5 promotions. 401k but overworked and underpaid. no college degrre n got bills to pay though...oh well
 
2014-01-12 05:16:02 PM  
16 years in my last job, then one day they decide I'm no longer necessary and out the door I go. Would enjoy seeing the company go down in flames.
 
2014-01-12 06:36:29 PM  
The longest I've ever worked is 4.5 years at one place.  I've switched five times since my professional career started in 2007, and have garnered at least a $20,000 base salary increase each time.  If HR understood technology workers, they'd focus on retention.
 
2014-01-12 07:01:25 PM  
Hooray, I'm average! 4.6 years almost exactly right now, although the Corporate Boffins are acting like they're trying to have people quit. Like other Pharmacy Farkers though, there's no way in hell I'm going back to retail. Besides, how many people get to say they make radioactive drugs every day?


Old enough to know better: 16 years in my last job, then one day they decide I'm no longer necessary and out the door I go. Would enjoy seeing the company go down in flames.


Did they ask you to move your desk to the basement first?
 
2014-01-12 08:01:04 PM  
I feel extremely lucky to have had the same job for 7 years now.  I survived some re-orgs etc....  I even have a pension which I think is rare anymore.
But I always have this fear it could end anytime.
Keeps me motivated.

I do fear that because of people job hopping it's hard to get a loyal employee base.
 
2014-01-12 09:03:07 PM  
This is already having a profound effect on the economy that won't show up for about 20 or 30 years.  All these kids are listening to how their parents went through school, worked their butts off, graduated at the top of their class, and that's how they got the cushy job as a server down at Oliver Garden and the cart attendant part time at Walmart.  The moral of the story is the perceived value of the college degree is dropping like a rock to younger generations, because this is the shiat they see.  Hey you did a lot of great work but we think we can eek out 1% more productivity by replacing you with four or five children from Indonesia whom we won't actually pay a livable wage.  They won't even DO the work really, but it'll look good on pen and paper, until I can get my bonus and scram.  So get the hell out of here, Loyal Worker.
 
2014-01-12 09:03:21 PM  
Just hit my 30 year mark on Jan 3rd. Can't wait to retire so I can spend all night on Fark.

/oh wait....
 
2014-01-12 11:16:36 PM  
I've learned the hard way that, in my industry, it's a good idea to change jobs regularly. Otherwise, you get stale and become well night unemployable.
 
2014-01-13 02:06:13 AM  
Just passed 4.6 years at my full-time job.  Coming up on 7 at my part-time one (but it's a project that will end this year or next) and later this year will hit 10 years at my occasional one.
 
2014-01-13 02:35:45 PM  
7 years, 3 months, 25 days, 2 hours, 35 minutes, 30 seconds...
 
2014-01-13 09:57:03 PM  
was ten (state of louisiana)...then 2.0 (feds)...yup...we have some ammunition for the Old Dominion :)
 
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