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(Marketwatch)   Have you been at your job longer than 4.6 years? Congratulations - you're above average   (marketwatch.com) divider line 142
    More: Interesting, U.S., Harris Interactive, CareerBuilder, average wage, Bureau of Labor Statistics  
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5088 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2014 at 9:11 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-12 11:15:18 AM

Tchernobog: Essentially. Significantly more in depth than a carwash kind of place, but pretty much making dirty cars clean. I'm the shop people come to for paint correction, repairing upholstery, dying trim and stains, etc.

It's a labor of love, for sure, much like having a desire to work in food service.


There's a lot to be said for knowing that at the end of the day you can point to things you actually accomplished: "This car looked like a hobo's ass before, now it gleams".  Often, the best I can say is "yay, this place didn't fall apart around our ears... today." (though admittedly, preventing that is a big part of my job)
 
2014-01-12 11:15:19 AM

IcedTorch: this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.

So many people with long running jobs that dont know why others "change jobs".


Working hard and making yourself valuable to your company is "privilege" now?
 
2014-01-12 11:16:01 AM
I've never had a full-time, year-round job. Never. Part of it is my career field, part where I live, and part you don't even want to know.

/I HAVE worked seasonal jobs for multiple years. And a lot of those I only did it because I couldn't find anything better.
 
2014-01-12 11:16:01 AM
Ive been at my current job 8 years in July. It has had its ups and downs right now it is in an up. I actually have compotent bosses over me. And with that we are doing much better. I hope to be promoted again soon. The job I had before this was for 8 years and it was part time most of the time so I had another job during that for 11 years. The 8 year job turned full time so I quit the 11 year job but I got laid off from it. I could have gone back to the 11 year job, but decided not to, it was in the printing indusrty and they had been cutting back a lot since then. The thing I hate the most is people have offered me jobs at other places but they are insulting with the salary. Even though my job isnt the best it has been better than I have seen.
 
2014-01-12 11:31:53 AM

cryinoutloud: I've never had a full-time, year-round job. Never. Part of it is my career field, part where I live, and part you don't even want to know.

/I HAVE worked seasonal jobs for multiple years. And a lot of those I only did it because I couldn't find anything better.


Is that you, A-Rod?
 
2014-01-12 11:32:49 AM

Tchernobog: abhorrent1: Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.

You mean like washing/detailing cars? I would love that job! My wife is a financial adviser and I've told her that once she makes enough money, I'm quitting this corporate, cubical farm job. Maybe get a part-time job doing landscaping or at a warehouse or something. Back in the day I loved warehouse work. Driving a fork-lift, loading trucks etc.. Unfortunately it doesn't pay the bills. Maybe even a volunteer job at the Arboretum here. I like to get my hands dirty. The corporate life and politics aren't my thing, but it's hard to give up the money and benefits.

Essentially. Significantly more in depth than a carwash kind of place, but pretty much making dirty cars clean. I'm the shop people come to for paint correction, repairing upholstery, dying trim and stains, etc.

It's a labor of love, for sure, much like having a desire to work in food service.


Maybe that's what I can do, start a detail business. Probably 10 or 15 years ago I took the only "new" car I ever owned to a detail shop. I paid them like $200 and they did a half-ass job.  Wax paste left in the seams, clogging the windshield washer nozzles etc.. Spending my days detailing nice cars would be something I would definitely love doing.

BTW: WTF is the trick too clean the wheels? I can never get all the break dust crud off of them.
 
2014-01-12 11:36:48 AM
Well after getting my contracting business wiped out from the thriving Bush economy in California in 07-08...and enduring a series of wage slave work at the mines in Elko and oil in Wyoming last few years...back in Boise and a solid 8 months with a 'good' company. And by good I mean a place where there is not totally a bunch of dog c*ck conservative good ol' boys who insist on constantly and chronically biatching about Obama and politics etc. Lulz.

8 months...until the job creators decide to un-create my job to open the door for the next wave of cheaper labor.

God Bless America and Capt. Bligh...
 
2014-01-12 11:41:45 AM
Same job for 8 years.

For the fourth vendor to take over this contract.

Lost seniority every time the contract was bought out.

Same pay and for shait benefits as when I started.

Now doing the work of 6 people that have quit.

/They tell me I'm lucky to have a job...
 
2014-01-12 11:43:55 AM

Heraclitus: Same job for 8 years.

For the fourth vendor to take over this contract.

Lost seniority every time the contract was bought out.

Same pay and for shait benefits as when I started.

Now doing the work of 6 people that have quit.

/They tell me I'm lucky to have a job...


The new American Dream.
 
2014-01-12 11:46:18 AM
11 years.  Only making ~$13.50/hr., but most days I get to go in, throw my headphones on, and have minimal interaction with people all day.  I like it.
 
2014-01-12 11:47:37 AM

Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.


If it's a good dealership and you're a decent employee, it can be a great place to work. I've been doing web design/digital marketing for a dealer group  for a year and a half and I love it and would be happy to stay at this job until I retire. I'm treated well, paid well, and my work is appreciated.

Some people in other departments seem more disgruntled and I think it's more a matter of them being the kind of people who think that as long as they meet the bare minimums of their job requirements, they've done all they ever need to do. And while that may be enough to keep them employed, it's not the kind of attitude that earns you appreciation, respect, or significant raises and advancement.

And I'm no major go-getter myself. I never bring work home with me, I only work through lunch if the creepy guy is in the break room, and I don't go around glad-handing like a lot of folks at the dealership do. I just do what my boss tells me to, keep an eye out for new ideas to bring to him, and make sure that he sees the results of what I do.
 
2014-01-12 11:56:33 AM
Well having gotten rid of pensions,  why the heck would anyone stick around?  If company B says they'll give me 20% more and company A won't match it (and they never do)  company A can go suck a bag of lemons.
 
2014-01-12 11:59:58 AM
Since we are comparing jerbs....

8 years, I work with underwater robots, company is stable and awesome, plenty of work, good pay and benefits... Oh did I mention I get to work with robots???


/corporate shill
//and proud!
 
2014-01-12 12:04:30 PM
I've had 5 jobs since graduating college in '91, all but one less than 4.5 years duration (12 years). Oddly enough, that job was the only one I lost rather than left on my own.

/ 9 months at current job
 
2014-01-12 12:08:52 PM

jcadam: I'd be willing to bet that average tenure is quite a bit less than 4.6 years in the software industry.  I don't leave employers for more money (anymore).  These days, I make more than I "need."  What I, and many other programmers are afraid of is getting caught unemployed with irrelevant skills because we stayed too long somewhere maintaining legacy code (even new development projects turn into long-term maintenance work, if they're successful).  Once you crest the learning curve at a new job, it's time to start looking.

I made the mistake of staying 3 years (2 years too long) at a job I took because I was desperate (previous job laid me off right before the great recession kicked off in '08), maintaining legacy code written in the late 80s/early 90s in Ada (the code was obviously originally written by boomers... I was the youngest person in the shop).  It took a long time to convince another company to take a chance on someone with no "professional" experience in anything modern (had only my hobby projects to show for experience with 'new hotness' tech).  Never again will I make such a mistake (plenty of others to make, though :) ).

I keep hoping I'll find a shop that hasn't completely ossified around a single technology stack and is willing to try out new stuff (when appropriate), but so far, no....




And yet companies claim there is a shortage of tech workers.
 
2014-01-12 12:13:25 PM

StopLurkListen: Software developer - in 20 years, only one job lasted longer than three years. I gave up caring about doctors/dentists because health insurance changed every year even when my job didn't change. Also, having to wait a year to start contributing to a 401k? Whoever wrote that rule needs to burn in Hell.


They need to burn along with the person who designed my 401k plan.  You don't get to keep 100% of the company match until you have been with the company 5 years.
 
2014-01-12 12:13:35 PM

Outlawtsar: Obviously most of us have had jobs for longer than average, we know how to not get fired for reading Fark all day.

/10 and a half years


Good point!

Been at my job for 20 years, and farking 10 1/2.

Fark.
 
2014-01-12 12:18:08 PM
I've been at my job for (you couldn't flucking care less) years.  At the job before that I was there for (seriously, no one gives a shiat about your irrelevant, annecdotal data) years.
 
2014-01-12 12:33:05 PM
6 and a half years for me.  i like my job and it pays well, and i'll work there till i retire if i have anything to say about it.  i'm only 34 so i have 30 years to go, but i see no reason to leave yet.  of course, 5 or 10 years down the road, who knows where my life will lead.
 
2014-01-12 12:56:42 PM
15 years. Started as a temporary "until I find something better" job, then: "wait, I like it here."
 
2014-01-12 01:03:33 PM

trappedspirit: I've been at my job for (you couldn't flucking care less) years.  At the job before that I was there for (seriously, no one gives a shiat about your irrelevant, annecdotal data) years.


I bet you've read the entire thread. Well, you pretty much had to, to post that.
 
2014-01-12 01:15:12 PM
The job I have now, I started almost 12 years ago, working for another company in a delivery capacity.  When I started, it turned out to be the best job I ever had.  Good benefits, bosses in a family-owned company that treated you like family.  This was a delivery job where, on either very hot or very cold days, the president of the company would actually call me first thing in the morning and say, "Madcity, be careful out there today".  Even got to go to a college basketball game with the president.  Then, the company hired the presdent's brother-in-law to run the place as General Manager.  This assclown felt he had to re-invent the wheel, depite the fact he wasn't that bright to start with; hell, the only reason he was available was he was shiatcanned from his previous job because of his incompetence.  Anyway, his bright idea was to get out of my little niche part of the business, and sell off my customers (along with my job), to the company who was supplying my product.  Sad day indeed, but as it turned out, it wasn't so bad because the owner of my new company was a good guy.  He treated me great; then his health started to decline enough that HE then sold his business. Everything went okay for the first couple years, new boss said they were going to make things easier for me, which as it turned out was a complete lie.  Every week, I get more work shoved on me despite no increase in pay, beyond what I make in the increased overtime and the slight increase in commissions. I need to pop 1000 mgs of Ibuprofin every morning when I get out of bed just to be able to get out the door. Living proof that money isn't everything- I made more money in 2013 than any year in my life, but I'm miserable.  I keep my eyes open every day for something new, but the jobs just aren't there in a situation where anything similar would be considered semi-skilled at best.  EVERY DAMN DAY, I kick myself in the arse for not finishing college, though because of all the changes in the newspaper industry, I'd probably just be an unemployed sportswriter anyway.  Please kill me.
 
2014-01-12 01:23:44 PM
7 years as a Plumber.  I enjoy the job because it's mainly new construction, no day is the same.  I can listen to sports radio during the day, smoke on certain jobs, and if you're having a particularly bad day, you can tell your boss, who you just had a few drinks with the night before, to go fark himself in his ass and still have a job at the end of the day.

Plan on "retiring" at age 36 in about 6 months.  Paying cash to build our dream home.  Appraise it, home equity loan, and start building 2-3 houses a year.  Good income and I become my own boss.  I can't wait.
 
2014-01-12 01:53:10 PM

BizarreMan: Coming up on 20 years.


20 years in april
FFS, the same boss for 20 years ....

who knew?!
 
2014-01-12 01:58:25 PM

BumpInTheNight: Pension?  What the hell is a pension?  Is what many people are probably asking themselves of your post.

Pension is that nice check that I get every month on the 1st.

28.7 years with the company before I was encouraged to take medical retirement due to heart condition.

 
2014-01-12 02:01:05 PM

StopLurkListen: Also, having to wait a year to start contributing to a 401k? Whoever wrote that rule needs to burn in Hell.


I had a job like that. After my year was up I told them to take 100% of my salary. Once I hit the contribution cap, I quit the job and rolled everything from that bullshait 401(k) into my IRA.
 
2014-01-12 02:24:08 PM
Seven years at this job and I love the company, usually.  Promoted a year ago and the position is okay.  I'm looking to transfer to a nicer place.  A demotion wouldn't be bad because I'd automatically be topped out in the new position, and the pay for that is almost the same as what I get now.

Otherwise I'm looking elsewhere and won't rule out a sizable (to me) pay cut.  Money is important but I learned the hard way that quality of life is just as important.
 
2014-01-12 03:09:27 PM
Since I started my career I've been a federal contractor.  I got about 48 months at one place, but there was a split in the middle there, I spent 7 months at another company before getting called about a better position.  I left that stable one to move back to my hometown, and that company only kept me for 2 years before they lost the contract through their own incompetence.  I'm in private industry now, could last a long time as this company is huge and growing, but they have me on third shift Tues-Sat. and I don't know how long I can handle that schedule.   I value a social life more than I do money.
 
2014-01-12 03:53:35 PM

sycraft: Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.


Ditto. 14 years with one employer, 6 jobs, 3 fields, and 3 promotions. All while they pay for my education and relocation to two countries and 4 US cities. No reason to jump ship since the fringe package gets to be the best at 10+ years.
 
2014-01-12 04:23:14 PM
Twenty seven. Planning on retiring in seven.
 
2014-01-12 05:08:51 PM

Gene Masseth Jr.: 7 years as of August.

Haven't had a raise in 4 years.

I've applied over 100 places in the past year and gotten nothing.  I want out, but I can't get out until I get something else because I can't have no income in life.  So, instead, I just stick it out and slowly die inside more and more every day.

Ask me if I'm bitter.


^This

Been at my "job" for only a year. In that time I've had 3 supervisors, 4 team leads, including one that I had to file a harassment complaint on (he was moved to another agency and later promoted of course), and my duties significantly reduced in retaliation for not putting up with his advances/treatment despite me continually asking for more work. I'm working on my master's so that keeps my mind from turning to mush and Fark keeps me entertained throughout the day.
As soon as I graduate I'm gone.

/If my job was a person, I'd stab it in the eye
 
2014-01-12 05:09:35 PM
25 Years old...four years with this company with 5 promotions. 401k but overworked and underpaid. no college degrre n got bills to pay though...oh well
 
2014-01-12 05:16:02 PM
16 years in my last job, then one day they decide I'm no longer necessary and out the door I go. Would enjoy seeing the company go down in flames.
 
2014-01-12 06:36:29 PM
The longest I've ever worked is 4.5 years at one place.  I've switched five times since my professional career started in 2007, and have garnered at least a $20,000 base salary increase each time.  If HR understood technology workers, they'd focus on retention.
 
2014-01-12 07:01:25 PM
Hooray, I'm average! 4.6 years almost exactly right now, although the Corporate Boffins are acting like they're trying to have people quit. Like other Pharmacy Farkers though, there's no way in hell I'm going back to retail. Besides, how many people get to say they make radioactive drugs every day?


Old enough to know better: 16 years in my last job, then one day they decide I'm no longer necessary and out the door I go. Would enjoy seeing the company go down in flames.


Did they ask you to move your desk to the basement first?
 
2014-01-12 08:01:04 PM
I feel extremely lucky to have had the same job for 7 years now.  I survived some re-orgs etc....  I even have a pension which I think is rare anymore.
But I always have this fear it could end anytime.
Keeps me motivated.

I do fear that because of people job hopping it's hard to get a loyal employee base.
 
2014-01-12 09:03:07 PM
This is already having a profound effect on the economy that won't show up for about 20 or 30 years.  All these kids are listening to how their parents went through school, worked their butts off, graduated at the top of their class, and that's how they got the cushy job as a server down at Oliver Garden and the cart attendant part time at Walmart.  The moral of the story is the perceived value of the college degree is dropping like a rock to younger generations, because this is the shiat they see.  Hey you did a lot of great work but we think we can eek out 1% more productivity by replacing you with four or five children from Indonesia whom we won't actually pay a livable wage.  They won't even DO the work really, but it'll look good on pen and paper, until I can get my bonus and scram.  So get the hell out of here, Loyal Worker.
 
2014-01-12 09:03:21 PM
Just hit my 30 year mark on Jan 3rd. Can't wait to retire so I can spend all night on Fark.

/oh wait....
 
2014-01-12 11:16:36 PM
I've learned the hard way that, in my industry, it's a good idea to change jobs regularly. Otherwise, you get stale and become well night unemployable.
 
2014-01-13 02:06:13 AM
Just passed 4.6 years at my full-time job.  Coming up on 7 at my part-time one (but it's a project that will end this year or next) and later this year will hit 10 years at my occasional one.
 
2014-01-13 02:35:45 PM
7 years, 3 months, 25 days, 2 hours, 35 minutes, 30 seconds...
 
2014-01-13 09:57:03 PM
was ten (state of louisiana)...then 2.0 (feds)...yup...we have some ammunition for the Old Dominion :)
 
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