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(Marketwatch)   Have you been at your job longer than 4.6 years? Congratulations - you're above average   (marketwatch.com) divider line 142
    More: Interesting, U.S., Harris Interactive, CareerBuilder, average wage, Bureau of Labor Statistics  
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5085 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2014 at 9:11 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-12 09:48:13 AM
I'm in my 30's, I got my current job in 2003, professional office.  So I'm going on 11 years now pretty soon.

My girlfriend is 40, with a four year degree (from a top school, no less,) and her longest job ever is 4.5 years.  She's lived in about a dozen places all over the world.  The last good job she had was in 2007 (the one that lasted 4.5 years.)  As a result of that, she can't even get an interview for shiat.  She sometimes spends three hours a day looking at jobs on the internet, she calls, she e-mails.  About once every eight months she gets a face to face interview, gets the occasional phone interview with "we'll call you back."

The saddest thing is SHE quit that last job she had, in 2007, because she thought she could roll into another one easy (peak of the economy.)  Well, it never happened, years are passing, and her resume is poison.  She's just been working odd jobs, the occasional full time job, the occasional part time job, nothing resume worthy.  She acknowledges it was the worst mistake she ever made to quit her last good job in 2007.
 
2014-01-12 09:48:33 AM
My average gig lasts about 18 months.  Just the nature of what I do as an IT consultant.  The longest I've worked anywhere in my 17 years in IT is 3 years.
 
2014-01-12 09:48:35 AM

dg41: Just quit my job of 8+ years. Starting week two.

//Hope I didn't make a horrible mistake


Same here. Quit a job of 7+ years in October, just finished my first month at the new place. I've already been promoted. It's amazing what working for a competent manager who is able to acknowledge and utilize your individual talents will do for you.
 
2014-01-12 09:51:59 AM
My 45th and final year here. (started when I was 18)
I still love my job. I like learning. I like helping.
The people I work with (with a few exceptions) are great,supportive and dedicated.
I work at a local college.
 
2014-01-12 09:54:24 AM
I had to move companies in to order to get an average compensation for my education, location and experience based on numbers farmed from the IEEE. Nothing wrong with that. I won't move on my own from my current company even if I'm doomed to earn only 3% every year because the retirement benefits are unheard of.
The free market flows both ways, employers. Those with a better deal to offer will attract the best and more employees.
 
2014-01-12 09:54:29 AM
My fist ten years out of school were "if I'm still doing this same job a year from now, just shoot me." Then I hit pay dirt. 17 years and my biggest fear is something will prevent me from doing the exact same thing for 13 more.
 
2014-01-12 09:57:05 AM

hovsm: sycraft: Depends on what they mean by same job. I've been working for the same employer for 10 years, but in that time I've been promoted twice. Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing. If you have a job you like, and that you're good at, why not keep it? This idea that we should always be off chasing "the next big thing" seems silly. In fact, I think it can be rather unhealthy when you get people who are just looking for the next higher salary number, who will leave something that works well for them just in an attempt to get more money that they don't actually need.

If you like your job, and it pays for all your needs, then I don't see any reason to go chasing a new one.

Many people don't get a choice to chase higher wages. I have been in the workforce for over 20 years. The longest job I had was four years. Some I changed by choice and all the good ones were by lay off. I am really tired of getting a good job and losing because of reasons beyond my power.


ya....this. longest job i had was 5 years, and business took a downturn. on the other hand i have been in the same profession for almost 20 years, and changing jobs every couple of years seems not too bad.
 
2014-01-12 09:57:08 AM
4.6 years is hardly committed to anything. The cost of this high turnover is just another reason the economy is in the tank, and why the US quality of service and/or product has decreased drastically in the last decade.
 
2014-01-12 10:00:33 AM
Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.
 
2014-01-12 10:02:02 AM
I don't understand the concept of employer loyalty. Regardless of any pledges to you an employer may have implied, as soon as some bean counter decides the company is better off without you, your loyalty to them means squat.

The balance of power between worked and employer is better served when both parties understand the other is ruled by the bottom line.
 
2014-01-12 10:03:17 AM
12 years in the job working for the same customer but under 3 different contact winners...

I need a new job, cant stand stand having the contract come up every 5 years and then ride out extensions for a year or 2 then sweat bullets if the new contract holder is going to hire my with out taking a pay cut. That and I'm over 12 hours shifts and getting up at 4 something in the morning.
 
2014-01-12 10:03:34 AM
First part time job I had lasted about 4.5 years (library). Next 2 jobs about 6 months(museum guard) and 1.5 years(server room/support op), respectively. Current - and first full time - job(programmer) is at 6.5 years. They tried to downsize me after a year and change but boss hooked me up in colleague's organization (pretty big company). Sitting at 23 days PTO plus sick days, 401k, pension, pretty decent health plan and I usually telecommute. I'm not going anywhere for a while.
 
2014-01-12 10:03:49 AM

bearcats1983: Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.


The only reason would be if the retirement benefits can't be matched. I.e. Pension or similar
 
2014-01-12 10:03:54 AM
Started part time when I was 21.
45 now.
 
2014-01-12 10:05:22 AM
What if I don't want to be above average?

\my pay sure as fark isn't
 
2014-01-12 10:07:16 AM

cards fan by association: bearcats1983: Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.

The only reason would be if the retirement benefits can't be matched. I.e. Pension or similar


A retail pharmacy job where you do not work nights is hard to find.
When I do work a Saturday it is only until 1pm.
No Sundays

Sure I could make more $$$ working for a big chain, but it is not worth it, IMO.
A job isn't all about money.
 
2014-01-12 10:10:50 AM
this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.

So many people with long running jobs that dont know why others "change jobs".
 
2014-01-12 10:11:37 AM

Broktun: cards fan by association: bearcats1983: Coming up on a year at my current job. Previous job was right around four years. I'm doing basically the same job and they offered me over $10k more, the last job offered me an extra $1k to stay. Seems like they made the decision for me.

Why stay at the same job your entire career? Your company is only as loyal as the bottom line allows.

The only reason would be if the retirement benefits can't be matched. I.e. Pension or similar

A retail pharmacy job where you do not work nights is hard to find.
When I do work a Saturday it is only until 1pm.
No Sundays

Sure I could make more $$$ working for a big chain, but it is not worth it, IMO.
A job isn't all about money.


That's true too I suppose. In my case, the small company I worked for was miserable, had no perks, subpar compensation and a terrible retirement plan. Anything would have been better...
 
2014-01-12 10:11:59 AM
45 years on Welfare. Life's been good to me so far.
 
2014-01-12 10:12:43 AM
7 years for me, technically for two companies but working for the same people. I can't be promoted any further. Benefits aren't great but the working environment is the best I've ever had, and my sanity at the end of the day is worth it.
 
2014-01-12 10:13:43 AM

topcon: I'm in my 30's, I got my current job in 2003, professional office.  So I'm going on 11 years now pretty soon.

My girlfriend is 40, with a four year degree (from a top school, no less,) and her longest job ever is 4.5 years.  She's lived in about a dozen places all over the world.  The last good job she had was in 2007 (the one that lasted 4.5 years.)  As a result of that, she can't even get an interview for shiat.  She sometimes spends three hours a day looking at jobs on the internet, she calls, she e-mails.  About once every eight months she gets a face to face interview, gets the occasional phone interview with "we'll call you back."

The saddest thing is SHE quit that last job she had, in 2007, because she thought she could roll into another one easy (peak of the economy.)  Well, it never happened, years are passing, and her resume is poison.  She's just been working odd jobs, the occasional full time job, the occasional part time job, nothing resume worthy.  She acknowledges it was the worst mistake she ever made to quit her last good job in 2007.


If it makes you feel any better I know someone who's in his 40s and has never held a job longer than about 4 - 5 months. He can't figure out why no businesses will go near him *sigh*
 
hej
2014-01-12 10:13:55 AM
I've stayed at one place for about 5 years. That aside, almost every job I've had had lasted about a year.
 
2014-01-12 10:14:39 AM
My last two jobs were 8 and my current one just hit 9 years.
 
2014-01-12 10:15:28 AM
39 years old. Part of the X generation. Worked in the same field for 23 years now (pharmacy). I've worked in 5 different pharmacies over that time period. Never been without a job, except for when I quit Walmart at 27, took my "retirement" money, and took a month off between jobs. (I already had the next one lined up.)
These days, you can't up and quit a job. Mostly because there are 400 people clamoring for your position. Wen I first started working, I worked to get my bills paid and have enough to go see whatever concert was coming up next. These days, I'm content to have my bills paid, and I feel lucky that I can. There is a glass ceiling that I can't get past, at least not without going to school and spending a hundred thousand to get a degree. It's ridiculous. That's why I've been at my current employer for 5.5 years.
 
2014-01-12 10:18:29 AM
So let me get this straight - the average person stays at one job 4.6 years right now - and this is considered a bad thing, when we used to be a country where people could work for the same employer until they day they died, with financial security guaranteed as long as a good job was done? What the hell has happened to us?

/"The American dream? It came true. You're lookin' at it" - The Comedian, Watchmen
 
2014-01-12 10:19:28 AM
So thankful obama has fixed the job market for us 99%'ers.
 
2014-01-12 10:20:47 AM
14 awful, miserable years. Great pay and benefits though.

/kill me
 
2014-01-12 10:22:36 AM

IcedTorch: this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.

So many people with long running jobs that dont know why others "change jobs".


I've been at my job a while and I've wanted to 'change jobs' quote often. I worry about quitting my current job and going into a situation that might end up being worse, or having it fall through completely, leaving me jobless for weeks or even months, and unable to go back to my former employer. This happened to me in 2005, and it was terrifying, even though times were 'good.'
 
2014-01-12 10:24:55 AM
My longest non-professional job was about 6 years. My longest professional job was about 7 years. I left it when budget cuts would've put me in a part-time position.
 
2014-01-12 10:26:50 AM
25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.
 
2014-01-12 10:28:43 AM
I'd be willing to bet that average tenure is quite a bit less than 4.6 years in the software industry.  I don't leave employers for more money (anymore).  These days, I make more than I "need."  What I, and many other programmers are afraid of is getting caught unemployed with irrelevant skills because we stayed too long somewhere maintaining legacy code (even new development projects turn into long-term maintenance work, if they're successful).  Once you crest the learning curve at a new job, it's time to start looking.

I made the mistake of staying 3 years (2 years too long) at a job I took because I was desperate (previous job laid me off right before the great recession kicked off in '08), maintaining legacy code written in the late 80s/early 90s in Ada (the code was obviously originally written by boomers... I was the youngest person in the shop).  It took a long time to convince another company to take a chance on someone with no "professional" experience in anything modern (had only my hobby projects to show for experience with 'new hotness' tech).  Never again will I make such a mistake (plenty of others to make, though :) ).

I keep hoping I'll find a shop that hasn't completely ossified around a single technology stack and is willing to try out new stuff (when appropriate), but so far, no....
 
2014-01-12 10:30:43 AM
5.5 years and I'd jump ship in a heartbeat. I keep getting passed up for promotions and it's pissing me off.
 
2014-01-12 10:31:00 AM
36 years in the electronic security industry.
 
2014-01-12 10:31:50 AM
Software developer - in 20 years, only one job lasted longer than three years.

I gave up caring about doctors/dentists because health insurance changed every year even when my job didn't change.

Also, having to wait a year to start contributing to a 401k? Whoever wrote that rule needs to burn in Hell.
 
2014-01-12 10:33:32 AM
Worked in the same place going on 4 years now (will make it 5 when I get done), but switched positions to another department while I was in. Does that count? 'Cause if not, I've never held a job longer than 3 years.
 
2014-01-12 10:34:30 AM
I stayed at my last company for 5 years, switching positions three times.  I remained PRN the whole time and didn't earn any benefits, raises, or vacation time.  I spent the last two years finishing my degree to get out of that dead end.  I was offered a position in the department which my degree would apply, but it would still be PRN, and while I would get a much larger pay increase because of the job, I'd be back in the same position of never getting a raise or benefits unless one of the full time employees clinging tenaciously to their job decided to quit or retire.  This is a very big company with facilities in quite a few states and countries, and they've been increasing the number of PRN positions and decreasing the amount of positions that qualify for benefits and raises.  If they were the only company in my field doing that, it'd be easy to dismiss them, but it's become a common practice that seems to completely kill any sense of loyalty towards the employer.
 
2014-01-12 10:35:44 AM
sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)

topcon:
My girlfriend is 40, with a four year degree (from a top school, no less,) and her longest job ever is 4.5 years.  She's lived in about a dozen places all over the world.  The last good job she had was in 2007 (the one that lasted 4.5 years.)  As a result of that, she can't even get an interview for shiat.  She sometimes spends three hours a day looking at jobs on the internet, she calls, she e-mails.  About once every eight months she gets a face to face interview, gets the occasional phone interview with "we'll call you back."

The saddest thing is SHE quit that last job she had, in 2007, because she thought she could roll into another one easy (peak of the economy.)  Well, it never happened, years are passing, and her resume is poison.  She's just been working odd jobs, the occasional full time job, the occasional part time job, nothing resume worthy.  She acknowledges it was the worst mistake she ever made to quit her last good job in 2007.


My wife had basically one job in her field (print journalism), for a few years.  Then the jobs basically dried up entirely; every newspaper seems to have one or two reporters who do everything, and nobody's hiring.  The last paper she freelanced for demanded that their freelancers not do work for anyone else, but didn't give out enough assignments to pay the bills.  So now she works at an organic food store and they're probably the nicest bosses she's ever had.
 
2014-01-12 10:37:15 AM
25 years. when I walked in I was starry eyed 20 something with dreams in his eyes. planning to see how far this life would take me! what magical journey I was on, how I would set the world afire!
and now,
my life almost over, no dreams realized, no real accomplishments to fruition. just a lonely empty husk of a man with no future no goals within reach. cursing every morning when I wake up whatever god's there may be, that I have to continue this pitiful, worthless existence that is my life.
/but the pays o.k. and it's steady.
 
2014-01-12 10:38:12 AM

InternetSecurityGuard: 36 years in the electronic security industry.



Oops, sorry, wrong account. How embarrassing. I hope this is the Snarfangel one.
 
2014-01-12 10:38:15 AM

No Such Agency: sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)


This.
 
2014-01-12 10:41:26 AM

Moron Police: 5 months, and loving it.  Hopefully it will be a while.

6 years in the job before that.


About the same for me.  Lost my previous job (where I'd been for 5 years) and found another one in another state, where I've been since July.  Looking good so far...
 
2014-01-12 10:44:44 AM

Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.


You mean like washing/detailing cars? I would love that job! My wife is a financial adviser and I've told her that once she makes enough money, I'm quitting this corporate, cubical farm job. Maybe get a part-time job doing landscaping or at a warehouse or something. Back in the day I loved warehouse work. Driving a fork-lift, loading trucks etc.. Unfortunately it doesn't pay the bills. Maybe even a volunteer job at the Arboretum here. I like to get my hands dirty. The corporate life and politics aren't my thing, but it's hard to give up the money and benefits.
 
2014-01-12 10:48:18 AM

numb3r5ev3n: No Such Agency: sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)

This.



I second the THIS^^^^^

Nearly every person at my employer who went onto "greener pastures" has either hit a downward spiral of lesser and lesser jobs, or is working harder with less stability.

The place where I work is pretty great, all this considered, and is run by people who really know how to balance capitalism and getting wealthy with just enough caring for the employees to make us feel like we're getting our fair share of the pie.  A couple of the executives have done personal off-the-books favors for me that really helped me cross over a few bumps in my private life.

/I'm 44 and been there almost 18 years.
//Don't plan on leaving unless technology takes my job away.
 
2014-01-12 10:48:27 AM

IcedTorch: this thread makes me want to throw the word privilege around.


Yes, but then you'd sound like a stupid college kid, so don't do that.
 
2014-01-12 10:48:52 AM
10 years here, moved up 3 times. The next promotion would require me to travel 90% of the year so I'm holding off on that..

Company flights, company credit cards, company cars all sounds great, unless you actually like your wife and kids and kinda like to see em once in awhile.
 
2014-01-12 10:57:46 AM

fickenchucker: numb3r5ev3n: No Such Agency: sycraft:
Personally, I don't see why changing jobs is supposed to be such a good thing.

It's a fiction perpetuated by business writers, and type-A near-sociopaths who never stop "networking" and have no concept of loyalty or working a job because you actually like it.  After all, Fortune 400 CEO's switch jobs every few years (with a golden parachute each time), so the guy who works the mail room should do the same (even though it costs him money to switch jobs, if there even is another job out there.)

This.


I second the THIS^^^^^

Nearly every person at my employer who went onto "greener pastures" has either hit a downward spiral of lesser and lesser jobs, or is working harder with less stability.

The place where I work is pretty great, all this considered, and is run by people who really know how to balance capitalism and getting wealthy with just enough caring for the employees to make us feel like we're getting our fair share of the pie.  A couple of the executives have done personal off-the-books favors for me that really helped me cross over a few bumps in my private life.

/I'm 44 and been there almost 18 years.
//Don't plan on leaving unless technology takes my job away.


The place where I work has its ups and downs, and there have been situations where I have seriously wanted to tear all my hair out and walk out...but there is no guarantee that any job I hopped to would be any better, unless they pay substantially better. My immediate superior is nice, and her immediate superior is nice. I have been lucky to have landed in some really demanding jobs that were made better or at least tolerable by understanding and compassionate management, and I have had one really great job that was destroyed by blundering and incompetent management and type-A near sociopath types. I was raised on the 'do a good job and retire at 65 with a gold watch' mentality by my parents and grandparents, and I really had to work to get my head around the fact that there is no job security anymore, and nothing is guaranteed.
 
GBB
2014-01-12 10:58:18 AM

Gentoolive: 10 years here, moved up 3 times. The next promotion would require me to travel 90% of the year so I'm holding off on that..

Company flights, company credit cards, company cars all sounds great, unless you actually like your wife and kids and kinda like to see em once in awhile.


Let's switch jobs.  I work 7 out of every 14 days; accumulate 30 days off a year with 100% rollover of unused time.   My schedule is set in stone.  It's a dead easy job if you don't mind the possibility that the next phone call could be the last words of a desperate person, or someone upset that McD's just ran out of nuggets.
 
2014-01-12 11:00:05 AM

abhorrent1: Tchernobog: 25, been at my current job about 5 years now, I love what I do, and my abilities are recognized.

It's certainly not the greatest job, but I leave every day feeling I accomplished something, and go in every day without dread.

/run the detail department at a large dealership.

You mean like washing/detailing cars? I would love that job! My wife is a financial adviser and I've told her that once she makes enough money, I'm quitting this corporate, cubical farm job. Maybe get a part-time job doing landscaping or at a warehouse or something. Back in the day I loved warehouse work. Driving a fork-lift, loading trucks etc.. Unfortunately it doesn't pay the bills. Maybe even a volunteer job at the Arboretum here. I like to get my hands dirty. The corporate life and politics aren't my thing, but it's hard to give up the money and benefits.


Essentially. Significantly more in depth than a carwash kind of place, but pretty much making dirty cars clean. I'm the shop people come to for paint correction, repairing upholstery, dying trim and stains, etc.

It's a labor of love, for sure, much like having a desire to work in food service.
 
2014-01-12 11:04:43 AM
1.bp.blogspot.com
f'in a
 
2014-01-12 11:10:02 AM
7 years as of August.

Haven't had a raise in 4 years.

I've applied over 100 places in the past year and gotten nothing.  I want out, but I can't get out until I get something else because I can't have no income in life.  So, instead, I just stick it out and slowly die inside more and more every day.

Ask me if I'm bitter.
 
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