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(Mother Nature Network)   Tips for donating blood. Always B positive   (mnn.com) divider line 106
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4827 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jan 2014 at 7:36 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



106 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-01-12 01:59:00 AM
static1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-01-12 03:41:13 AM
Isn't O like a universal donor?  I'm AB- and people are always going on about how important it is for me to donate, but I think it's more important for the O people to donate.  Am I wrong?
 
2014-01-12 07:09:05 AM

Lsherm: Isn't O like a universal donor?  I'm AB- and people are always going on about how important it is for me to donate, but I think it's more important for the O people to donate.  Am I wrong?


No, you're right. You're the universal receiver (that doesn't sound right) so if you ever need a transfusion you're in luck.

/unless it's infected with AIDS but that's just common sense
 
2014-01-12 07:21:53 AM
I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?
 
2014-01-12 07:29:54 AM

Radak: I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?


Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.
 
2014-01-12 07:33:38 AM

Mugato: Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.


Call off your own, person who obviously lacks a sense of humour.

/it's GLAAD, btw
 
2014-01-12 07:44:37 AM

Lsherm: Isn't O like a universal donor?  I'm AB- and people are always going on about how important it is for me to donate, but I think it's more important for the O people to donate.  Am I wrong?


It depends on what the blood will be used for. O- is the universal donor, and AB+ the universal receiver in general, but there are some things where it doesn't work like that. An exact match is generally preferred or neccessary for whole blood, IIRC.

/A+
 
2014-01-12 07:45:53 AM

Mugato: Radak: I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.


For some reason, when I talk about that year-long beef tour in England that I went on with my African boyfriend, they don't want to take my blood anymore.
 
2014-01-12 07:48:26 AM
Heh.  "Beef tour" sounds like a euphemism.

I couldn't think of a more concise way of describing travelling the country, visiting restaurant after restaurant, shoving hot meat down our throats.  Er, I mean eating beef.
 
2014-01-12 07:51:32 AM
I don't donate, they ask too many questions.
 
2014-01-12 07:52:32 AM
I'm always afraid my blood will leap out at someone and kill them.
 
2014-01-12 07:53:30 AM
B+ represent!

Another thing the article doesn't mention - sports. It takes weeks for the body to replace the hemoglobin lost in the blood donation. So while you'll probably feel fine, your blood will be missing certain key oxygen-carrying components and this can affect performance.

In other words, wait until AFTER the marathon to donate. Seriously.
 
2014-01-12 07:58:47 AM
A Cultural History of Giving Blood
Also - they SELL your blood to hospitals. It's not free to them. Ave. = $300.00. Blood is a commodity with it's own market.
 
2014-01-12 08:01:40 AM
Please, give generously!

Signed,

Richard Chase,
Professional Ghoul

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-01-12 08:05:36 AM
Oddly enough, they do not directly mention buttsex. You're asked if- that is, if you're a guy, you have had sex with another guy at any time since Saturday Night Fever came out, if you've ever been in prison or belonged to a HS Glee Club (ok, just kidding about the ladder), or if- regardless of gender, you've been in the sack with someone who has done the above. No mention of actual activities is made- not buttsex, rusty trombones, Cleveland Steamers, the Halifax Heimlich, the Naughty Nun, nothin'.
Now, if you're a straight guy, you could've been doing buttsex marathons non-stop in a Peurto Rican cathouse for six months, but as long as it was over a year ago and as far as you know, no trannies were involved, you're good to go.
 
2014-01-12 08:09:32 AM
The "lifestyle" questions are useless anyway, people could just lie. Unless you have a bandage over your new eyebrow ring or painfully limp into the place wearing your Barbara Streisand t-shirt, they can't prove you're lying. They probably just have to go through the motions of asking for legal reasons.
 
2014-01-12 08:17:00 AM

cynicalbastard: Oddly enough, they do not directly mention buttsex. You're asked if- that is, if you're a guy, you have had sex with another guy at any time since Saturday Night Fever came out, if you've ever been in prison or belonged to a HS Glee Club (ok, just kidding about the ladder), or if- regardless of gender, you've been in the sack with someone who has done the above. No mention of actual activities is made- not buttsex, rusty trombones, Cleveland Steamers, the Halifax Heimlich, the Naughty Nun, nothin'.
Now, if you're a straight guy, you could've been doing buttsex marathons non-stop in a Peurto Rican cathouse for six months, but as long as it was over a year ago and as far as you know, no trannies were involved, you're good to go.


That's because it has to do with the much higher rate of HIV in gay people, not the method of transmission.
 
2014-01-12 08:19:53 AM
Heh, that was my blood donating joke as well, subby.

/B+
 
2014-01-12 08:21:14 AM

Hardy-r-r: Also - they SELL your blood to hospitals. It's not free to them. Ave. = $300.00. Blood is a commodity with it's own market.


Well, yeah.  The phlebotomists, the guys who test your blood, the guys who arrange drives, etc all get paid even if your regional Red Cross or independent blood bank is non-profit.

/ 5 gallons 4 pints of B+ so far
 
2014-01-12 08:24:42 AM

Mugato: The "lifestyle" questions are useless anyway, people could just lie. Unless you have a bandage over your new eyebrow ring or painfully limp into the place wearing your Barbara Streisand t-shirt, they can't prove you're lying. They probably just have to go through the motions of asking for legal reasons.


Well, of course you can lie, but why would anyone do that? If you're enough of a decent human being to donate, you're not going to lie about recent tattoos or travel or anything just to get a free cookie.

The weird thing about blood types is if you have a very common one, you should donate simply because it's common and more people need it. If your type is more rare, it's also in demand.

/ A+
 
2014-01-12 08:28:15 AM

Lsherm: Isn't O like a universal donor?  I'm AB- and people are always going on about how important it is for me to donate, but I think it's more important for the O people to donate.  Am I wrong?


Yes for whole blood your right. But for platelets and plasma, the opposite is true and AB blood types can give to anyone. I give at the local Red Cross office once every two months. It takes about 2.5 hours. It's pretty painless. I sit down and stream Netflix while the nurse and machine do there thing.
 
2014-01-12 08:30:25 AM
s3-ec.buzzfed.com
Approves
 
2014-01-12 08:30:53 AM
When they see my blood type it always seem like they're trying to ask me to commit suicide by donation.

/B-
//I think you ought to know, I'm feeling very depressed.
 
2014-01-12 08:40:44 AM

Mugato: Radak: I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.


Mother Nature Network??   You know how I know that you're gay subby?


/just sayin'   NTTATWWT
 
2014-01-12 08:43:47 AM

Mugato: Lsherm: Isn't O like a universal donor?  I'm AB- and people are always going on about how important it is for me to donate, but I think it's more important for the O people to donate.  Am I wrong?

No, you're right. You're the universal receiver (that doesn't sound right) so if you ever need a transfusion you're in luck.

/unless it's infected with AIDS but that's just common sense


No, subby's Mom is the universal receiver.

/ sorry. I feel bad now
 
2014-01-12 08:55:23 AM
Back off the alcohol after donating? I thought needing less booze to get lit afterwards was one of the perks.

/jk
 
2014-01-12 08:56:02 AM

gadian: Heh, that was my blood donating joke as well, subby.

/B+


I don't donate every six months anymore, but when I did, this was my persistant, tired, drained joke.

/B+
 
2014-01-12 08:59:15 AM
A blood donation story, not for the squeamish:  In college, our track coach decided that our team would have 100% "voluntary" participation at the school's blood drive.  On the day of a track meet.  Only problem was, that was also the day that the Red Cross was training several newly-hired phlebotomists.  The person I got could not get the needle into a vein to save her life, even with help from the person supposedly supervising her.  She consistently poked it THROUGH the vein, leaving a dozen or so of us with large hematomata in the crooks of our elbows.  On my turn, she not only missed the vein but managed to find the radial nerve (a needle to which is an experience everyone should have at least once- it's electrifying).  When she eventually managed to get blood flowing into the bag, it filled extremely slow and the process was painful in the extreme.  A doctor came over and told her she was actually draining blood that was leaking out into the space next to the vein (which was punctured).  Despite having 2/3 of a pint already extracted, she pleaded with me to allow her to stick the other arm.  Being stupid, I said yes.  All went well with that vein, luckily.  So I staggered out of there nearly two pints of blood low, chugging Gatorade like it was the nectar of the gods.  The enormous hematoma on the first-attempt side was so swollen that I literally could not bend that arm.

Two hours later at the track meet, it was like watching a zombie movie.  Our team, still sporting gauze-pad-and-medical-tape brassards, stumbled and staggered around the track.  Javelin throwers feebly tried to toss their sticks more than a dozen yards, having forgotten to get their non-dominant arm stuck.  Hammer throwers spurted blood out of their reopened puncture wounds.  I had two races, a short sprint and a mid-distance run.  I barely made it through the sprint, nearly fainting at the end as grey and red spots filled my narrowing vision.  The long run, well I don't remember any of it.  They tell me that halfway through, I passed out and began vomiting and passing diarrhea.  I was taken to the hospital and put on a banana bag (IV hydration and electrolytes).

Needless to say, we lost the track meet.  And the coach got fired.  And I still have a deformed vein that looks like someone embedded a ball bearing in my left arm.
 
2014-01-12 08:59:18 AM
Never donated and actually don't know my blood type. Once asked my doc to type it and told me that ins doesn't cover it and it cost 200 bucks...how bad did I want to know? Sounded not right to me.
 
2014-01-12 09:02:39 AM
I'm Type O-.  It's highly encouraged I donate, as it's useful to everyone.

Sucks though, because I can only receive Type O- back.  Seems a little unfair, like I'm a superhero who everyone despises.
 
2014-01-12 09:04:47 AM
Put that back! Coffee is for donors!
 
2014-01-12 09:16:28 AM
I'm A-, which means that when I had my little "accident" I was pretty much lucky as Hells that the hospital had enough blood at the time, and I pretty much depleted their supply when I was under the knife, since the final tally was about 267 units all told. Mind you, some of that was just plasma, and some was platelets, so the nearly five 5-gallon buckets of blood products that they threw into me wasn't quite so catastrophic to the blood supply as it first sounds, but I did single handedly force a blood drive in the Western Mass area for A-.

What drives me nuts, is that because of the artificial valve that they threw in, that I can't give blood now--I'm on blood thinners for the rest of my natural days, and that means that I can't give blood. I can't pay back the gift that was given to me, by a lot of anonymous folks, save by thanking the folks who gave, and be glad that I was a donor before I had my little kerfuffle. My life was saved by the kindness of folks I'll never meet, and who probably don't know the difference that their taking some time out of their week made. So, thank you. All of the folks who give, because when bad things happen, y'all have given very much the gift of life. I wouldn't be here today if it weren't for folks who took a few minutes out of their day, and got a glass of juice and a cookie, and a cute band aid. Thank you to all of you who donate. Hopefully you'll never have to be on the receiving end, but it means everything for the folks who do.
 
2014-01-12 09:18:52 AM

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: I'm Type O-.  It's highly encouraged I donate, as it's useful to everyone.

Sucks though, because I can only receive Type O- back.  Seems a little unfair, like I'm a superhero who everyone despises.


That's why people like you need to donate, so when it's needed it's there. As mentioned before, proper type-matching is preferred when transfusing, if anything else so that if some poor sod with O neg comes in needing a few pints the entire stash won't be dry because it all got used on some AB pos person who could have just as well have taken something else. :)

/B neg here, my husband is O neg
//the local blood bank always calls us up a day or two before we're eligible to donate again to set up appointment times
///half of the staff there recognizes us on sight :D
 
2014-01-12 09:25:31 AM
A+ here, which makes my blood dime-a-dozen. It is the most common type for folks of European decent.

Generally do the platelets.
 
2014-01-12 09:28:12 AM
Sure buttsex is a no no, until the gays can not have way higher levels of HIV and hepatitis it will remain that way.

O negative is universal blood donor. AB positive is universal plasma donor however.

Tips for donating are kinda pointless because donating effects everyone differently. I'm 28 and have donated pretty much every two months since I was seventeen and have never had a problem. Physical activities after donating seem unaffected for me, obviously my alcohol tolerance drops somewhat.

Eat lots of red meat throughout the couple months between donations. Iron levels can be hard to maintain especially for women cause of periods and stuff or something.

/ o negative cmv negative
 
2014-01-12 09:28:53 AM

tripleseven: Never donated and actually don't know my blood type. Once asked my doc to type it and told me that ins doesn't cover it and it cost 200 bucks...how bad did I want to know? Sounded not right to me.


Home typing kits are $10 or less.
 
2014-01-12 09:46:46 AM

Hardy-r-r: A Cultural History of Giving Blood
Also - they SELL your blood to hospitals. It's not free to them. Ave. = $300.00. Blood is a commodity with it's own market.


At $300 a pint, you donate for free so they can make huge profits, It's the 'mericun way.
 
2014-01-12 09:51:40 AM
O+ here with 2 gallons, 2 pints donated. (It was 2 gallons, 6 pints until I had to take 4 pints back over New Years due to severe anemia)

I tried to give every 2 to 3 months but got turned away half of the time because I was always on the borderline of the hemoglobin count. They knew me well enough that they wouldn't do any of the other screening stuff until after testing it. I stopped a couple of years ago when I couldn't get my number over the cutoff of 12. Didn't realize it until almost too late but my number kept going down until it was so low when I did a blood test that they sent me to the hospital immediately for a transfusion.

Donating blood is a simple way to do good and get pampered and made to feel special for a little while. Anybody who can, should. It's good for the body, soul, and society.
 
2014-01-12 09:52:39 AM

tripleseven: Never donated and actually don't know my blood type. Once asked my doc to type it and told me that ins doesn't cover it and it cost 200 bucks...how bad did I want to know? Sounded not right to me.


Exactly the same for me.  I'm curious to know what mine is.  Do they tell you what it is when you donate?
 
2014-01-12 10:01:12 AM

oukewldave: Do they tell you what it is when you donate?


That they do (not right there, but they'll send you a card with it after your first donation).  My local bank also used to give you a cholesterol reading with every donation, but I think they may have stopped doing that recently.
 
2014-01-12 10:02:25 AM
I'm a relatively rare AB+ and I use to give blood long ago.

Unfortunately, ever since mad cow disease struck Europe I've been barred from giving blood anywhere in Québec.  According to Héma-Québec's guidelines, I have spent too much time in the UK and too much time in continental Europe.

Apparently, the risk that I will turn into a mad cow (or mad bull, in my case) is just too high.
 
2014-01-12 10:05:14 AM

Error 482: Lsherm: Isn't O like a universal donor?  I'm AB- and people are always going on about how important it is for me to donate, but I think it's more important for the O people to donate.  Am I wrong?

It depends on what the blood will be used for. O- is the universal donor, and AB+ the universal receiver in general, but there are some things where it doesn't work like that. An exact match is generally preferred or necessary for whole blood, IIRC.


Correct, that's the rule for whole blood. It's the opposite for plasma.
 
2014-01-12 10:07:54 AM

Radak: Mugato: Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.

Call off your own, person who obviously lacks a sense of humour.

/it's GLAAD, btw


Really? So they're admitting the don't give a shiat about the driving and it's all about the drunk!? God damn prohibitionists!

/O neg, appointment to give tomorrow, actually, so I'm getting a kick from the replies this morning
 
2014-01-12 10:09:01 AM

dforkus: A+ here, which makes my blood dime-a-dozen. It is the most common type for folks of European decent.

Generally do the platelets.


Much to the chagrin of Asians dads everywhere.
 
2014-01-12 10:10:57 AM
O+, CMV-, 10+ gallons... Lifestyle questions aren't just teh gaysex, travel can also prevent you from donating. I've been on the naughty list for a year after traveling in areas where malaria is an issue a few times.

My tips:

Keep a jug of gatorade in the car and drink some before and the rest right after donating. Cookies and juice don't cut it.

Do double red donations if you can... then you only have to give 3 times a year.

Don't hit on that cute phlebotomist... sure, you might get lucky, but they can put you in a world of hurt if not.
 
2014-01-12 10:14:53 AM
Don't even know my type. Blood transfusions carry too many hidden de diseases though. I prefer blood expanders when I have surgery.
 
2014-01-12 10:15:57 AM
O+ here, I donate every three months when the Bloodmobile comes to work, and alternate with platelets until I'm eligible again. Red Cross is constantly calling me, but every time I donate platelets, I imagine a child with cancer getting a needed transfusion which makes me keep going.

Donating so much and being vegetarian, I was having iron count problems and was sometimes too low to donate. Iron supplements work wonders, last time I went I was 13.5.
 
2014-01-12 10:18:52 AM

pjbreeze: Hardy-r-r: A Cultural History of Giving Blood
Also - they SELL your blood to hospitals. It's not free to them. Ave. = $300.00. Blood is a commodity with it's own market.

At $300 a pint, you donate for free so they can make huge profits, It's the 'mericun way.


Red Cross evidently has an arrangement whereby if you've donated over 2-3 gallons they will provide *any* amount of blood free if you need it. That's one reason I keep my donor card in my wallet.
 
2014-01-12 10:19:39 AM
silently waits for a new liver
 
2014-01-12 10:21:47 AM

Mugato: Radak: I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.


Tattoo within a year is a big one. IV drug user is another.
 
2014-01-12 10:22:51 AM
I'm not just sure.
I'm HIV positive.
 
2014-01-12 10:25:43 AM

SomeoneDumb: Mugato: The "lifestyle" questions are useless anyway, people could just lie. Unless you have a bandage over your new eyebrow ring or painfully limp into the place wearing your Barbara Streisand t-shirt, they can't prove you're lying. They probably just have to go through the motions of asking for legal reasons.

Well, of course you can lie, but why would anyone do that? If you're enough of a decent human being to donate, you're not going to lie about recent tattoos or travel or anything just to get a free cookie.

The weird thing about blood types is if you have a very common one, you should donate simply because it's common and more people need it. If your type is more rare, it's also in demand.

/ A+


Actually some of the roughest most shot out homeless people sell blood all the time.
 
2014-01-12 10:41:26 AM
O+ here with a fun story. In my college days, the ball team participated in a university blood drive (we did early workout and it was pre-season, so extra short). I was the team manager, because 6ft tall white guys that can't jump aren't in huge demand for basketball teams. A few players get turned away for things like tattoos, and one guy was a recruit from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

I had no problem with donating and just ate my cookie in peace. But people 6-7 inches taller than me, with FAR better physical conditions were absolutely blindsided by the feeling. The team trainer came with us to monitor things, so no long term negatives happened. I don't know if they hadn't donated before or if lower body fat makes it harder. Lesson to take away: Eat more cookies and do less running, blood donation day you'll be fine.
 
2014-01-12 10:44:25 AM
I stopped giving when they stopped the donor "credit" toward blood products. "Administrative fees" adding up to a googleable salary at the top. They also weren't screening the blood for some insane length of time after a number of pathogens were well known coupled with having to answer the same stupid questions even with a frequent donor card.

/grumpy A+
 
2014-01-12 10:46:23 AM

CBob: I stopped giving when they stopped the donor "credit" toward blood products. "Administrative fees" adding up to a googleable salary at the top. They also weren't screening the blood for some insane length of time after a number of pathogens were well known coupled with having to answer the same stupid questions even with a frequent donor card.


When did they do that? I've always been able to do donor credit and only stopped giving blood about a year ago when I was turned down for too-low iron.

/ended up on iron supplements
//back to normal and will be donating again this week.
 
2014-01-12 10:53:25 AM
s2.quickmeme.com
 
2014-01-12 10:53:30 AM

Por que tan serioso: Tattoo within a year is a big one. IV drug user is another.


Although my original post was (somewhat) a joke, I was wondering what other things they'd ask that would be considered "lifestyle" rather than "health".  I looked at the Red Cross list and it seems almost everything is health-related rather than lifestyle-related (hence my remark), but I guess the two examples you gave do also qualify as lifestyle.

They ask a lot fewer questions where I live, and the buttsex thing isn't an issue at all.  The only sex-related question here is "Have you changed/added sexual partners within the past 90 days?"  I do recall being asked your two examples as well last time I donated, however.  It just never struck me as a lifestyle question since, well, they're not part of mine.  :)
 
2014-01-12 10:54:42 AM
I AM B+. Unfortunately, I guess the blood doesn't go all the way to my brain and fill it with happy thoughts.
 
2014-01-12 11:02:03 AM

Hardy-r-r: A Cultural History of Giving Blood
Also - they SELL your blood to hospitals. It's not free to them. Ave. = $300.00. Blood is a commodity with it's own market.


They had a long story about this on RadioLab just yesterday. Pretty interesting. I don't know how I feel about donating now--probably the same. I imagine blood collecting has a big overhead, and it's a business, just like anything else.

I don't donate anymore though--I'm very squeamish, and I usually come back a hair too low in iron to do it. I used to do plasma when I was a drunk. Then one day they messed it up, and my entire arm turned black and blue. End of THAT.
 
2014-01-12 11:03:10 AM

bagumpity: A blood donation story, not for the squeamish:  In college, our track coach decided that our team would have 100% "voluntary" participation at the school's blood drive.  On the day of a track meet.  Only problem was, that was also the day that the Red Cross was training several newly-hired phlebotomists.  The person I got could not get the needle into a vein to save her life, even with help from the person supposedly supervising her.  She consistently poked it THROUGH the vein, leaving a dozen or so of us with large hematomata in the crooks of our elbows.  On my turn, she not only missed the vein but managed to find the radial nerve (a needle to which is an experience everyone should have at least once- it's electrifying).  When she eventually managed to get blood flowing into the bag, it filled extremely slow and the process was painful in the extreme.  A doctor came over and told her she was actually draining blood that was leaking out into the space next to the vein (which was punctured).  Despite having 2/3 of a pint already extracted, she pleaded with me to allow her to stick the other arm.  Being stupid, I said yes.  All went well with that vein, luckily.  So I staggered out of there nearly two pints of blood low, chugging Gatorade like it was the nectar of the gods.  The enormous hematoma on the first-attempt side was so swollen that I literally could not bend that arm.

Two hours later at the track meet, it was like watching a zombie movie.  Our team, still sporting gauze-pad-and-medical-tape brassards, stumbled and staggered around the track.  Javelin throwers feebly tried to toss their sticks more than a dozen yards, having forgotten to get their non-dominant arm stuck.  Hammer throwers spurted blood out of their reopened puncture wounds.  I had two races, a short sprint and a mid-distance run.  I barely made it through the sprint, nearly fainting at the end as grey and red spots filled my narrowing vision.  The long run, well I don't remember any of it.  ...



Some people should not be allowed anywhere near the medical field.  I greatly prefer having older nurses/RNs do the blood-taking. Some of them have been nurses longer than I've been alive so actually hitting someone's vein/artery and getting blood easily is like breathing to them. Some of the staff attack your arm like Norman farking Bates in that shower scene... *KREE KREE KREE KREE*
 
2014-01-12 11:03:19 AM
B+ is often short. It's relatively more common among African-Americans (which I'm largely not). African-Americans have higher-than-average demand (sickle cell anemia, mostly, though also guns), and decidedly lower donation rates.

/ bleedin for ma homies
 
2014-01-12 11:07:11 AM
O- here.  They're worse than bill collectors - I'll get 2-3 calls before I can even donate again, and they always want double red cells when I go. :-)

pjbreeze: At $300 a pint, you donate for free so they can make huge profits, It's the 'mericun way.


But...but...they have cookies!  And orange juice and soda!
 
2014-01-12 11:23:14 AM
Mugato:

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.

No, it's about gay buttsex. You can be a gay man who is in a monogamous relationship in which you practice safe sex and don't engage in anal sex, and your blood is still too dirty for the Red Cross.

If it's ok to not take blood from gays because statistically they are more likely to have HIV, then they shouldn't take blood from African Americans either; as HIV rates in the African American community is higher than in the general populace.
 
2014-01-12 11:24:09 AM

AgentKGB: Some people should not be allowed anywhere near the medical field. I greatly prefer having older nurses/RNs do the blood-taking. Some of them have been nurses longer than I've been alive so actually hitting someone's vein/artery and getting blood easily is like breathing to them. Some of the staff attack your arm like Norman farking Bates in that shower scene... *KREE KREE KREE KREE*


Agreed! I had to have bloodwork one day and the girl admitted to having been nervous since it was her first week on the job, and to having too much coffee. Her hand was shaking so bad I told her to put the needle down and go get someone else. She said she could do it and I shouldn't worry, but f*ck that, I wasn't letting her blow my damn vein or completely miss it just to show a bit of faith.

Her supervisor was steady-handed and seemed unimpressed with the girl's shaking hands.

Lawnchair: B+ is often short. It's relatively more common among African-Americans (which I'm largely not). African-Americans have higher-than-average demand (sickle cell anemia, mostly, though also guns), and decidedly lower donation rates.


B+ makes up something like 20% of the population. I get phone calls a lot reminding me to donate regularly.

/also B+
 
2014-01-12 11:24:24 AM

Por que tan serioso: Mugato: Radak: I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.

Tattoo within a year is a big one. IV drug user is another.


They have lightened up on the tattoo thing. Here is the info from my local donation center website and it is my understanding that most states have similar rules:

"Restrictions concerning tattoos have changed. If your tattoo was applied by a licensed facility in Wisconsin, you can donate blood. If your tattoo was applied by an unlicensed facility or a facility outside Wisconsin, we require a 12-month waiting period from the time the tattoo was applied."
 
2014-01-12 11:28:59 AM
Give platelets.

One person giving platelets is equal to six people giving whole blood.
 
2014-01-12 11:50:18 AM
My blood type is B positive and have used that same joke, so I'm getting a kick out of these comments.

Over 6 gallons lifetime.
 
2014-01-12 12:18:19 PM
HailRobonia:

No, it's about gay buttsex. You can be a gay man who is in a monogamous relationship in which you practice safe sex and don't engage in anal sex, and your blood is still too dirty for the Red Cross.

If it's ok to not take blood from gays because statistically they are more likely to have HIV, then they shouldn't take blood from African Americans either; as HIV rates in the African American community is higher than in the general populace.


You don't seem to grasp the particulars of this issue.  Men how have sex with men (MSM) are not excluded because they have somewhat higher rates of HIV similar to other minorities.  They are excluded because they are a tiny minority of the population that account for the majority of new HIV cases in the US.  This is not even close to true about any other group.  MSM account for about 2% of the population but an estimated 63% of the new HIV cases in 2010 according to the CDC.  So by eliminating one tiny group off the top they're reducing the risk of someone who has HIV but doesn't know it yet giving blood by over half.  Organizations who collect blood would be idiotic to not exclude this group.

Besides that, I'm unaware of a constitutionally given right to have your body fluids anonymously injected into others.  Get over it.  There are plenty of other ways to help the world.
 
2014-01-12 12:34:57 PM

Dinkledort: HailRobonia:

No, it's about gay buttsex. You can be a gay man who is in a monogamous relationship in which you practice safe sex and don't engage in anal sex, and your blood is still too dirty for the Red Cross.

If it's ok to not take blood from gays because statistically they are more likely to have HIV, then they shouldn't take blood from African Americans either; as HIV rates in the African American community is higher than in the general populace.

You don't seem to grasp the particulars of this issue.  Men how have sex with men (MSM) are not excluded because they have somewhat higher rates of HIV similar to other minorities.  They are excluded because they are a tiny minority of the population that account for the majority of new HIV cases in the US.  This is not even close to true about any other group.  MSM account for about 2% of the population but an estimated 63% of the new HIV cases in 2010 according to the CDC.  So by eliminating one tiny group off the top they're reducing the risk of someone who has HIV but doesn't know it yet giving blood by over half.  Organizations who collect blood would be idiotic to not exclude this group.

Besides that, I'm unaware of a constitutionally given right to have your body fluids anonymously injected into others.  Get over it.  There are plenty of other ways to help the world.


+1 for statistics
 
2014-01-12 12:40:46 PM
I will never be allowed to donate blood.

From the red crosses web site:

You are not eligible to donate if:

You were a member of the of the U.S. military, a civilian military employee, or a dependent of a member of the U.S. military who spent a total time of 6 months on or associated with a military base in any of the following areas during the specified time frames
From 1980 through 1990 - Belgium, the Netherlands (Holland), or Germany
From 1980 through 1996 - Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece.
 
2014-01-12 12:43:25 PM
Type O is the universal donor type ( esp. O- ). However giving blood that is not the type specific to the recipient is a matter of last resort.  There are actually many different blood types (E,e,K,Lea,Leb etc.etc. etc).
The occurrence of these other types have a statistical relationship the the "primary" blood type (ABO) It is always better to give "type specific" blood.  But, even giving type specific blood can easily lead to a reaction, the occurrence is less.
All those other blood types are not considered when giving blood, initially.  Most people will only need blood once in there lifetime max. It's the poor folks who have conditions that require regular transfusions, that will eventually become sensitive to these other blood types and have "transfusion reactions" (can be hives, anaphylaxis, fevers, blood pressure crashing etc.)   I've done this kind of work and there are names that you hope to never see on your shift.  Just one of these persons showing up needing blood can keep you busy.
 
2014-01-12 12:49:36 PM

Por que tan serioso: SomeoneDumb: Mugato: The "lifestyle" questions are useless anyway, people could just lie. Unless you have a bandage over your new eyebrow ring or painfully limp into the place wearing your Barbara Streisand t-shirt, they can't prove you're lying. They probably just have to go through the motions of asking for legal reasons.

Well, of course you can lie, but why would anyone do that? If you're enough of a decent human being to donate, you're not going to lie about recent tattoos or travel or anything just to get a free cookie.

The weird thing about blood types is if you have a very common one, you should donate simply because it's common and more people need it. If your type is more rare, it's also in demand.

/ A+

Actually some of the roughest most shot out homeless people sell blood all the time.


Trolling but 0/10: no takers. No paid blood donations since the 1960s in North America.
 
2014-01-12 12:59:19 PM

catmandu: O+ here with 2 gallons, 2 pints donated. (It was 2 gallons, 6 pints until I had to take 4 pints back over New Years due to severe anemia)

I tried to give every 2 to 3 months but got turned away half of the time because I was always on the borderline of the hemoglobin count. They knew me well enough that they wouldn't do any of the other screening stuff until after testing it. I stopped a couple of years ago when I couldn't get my number over the cutoff of 12. Didn't realize it until almost too late but my number kept going down until it was so low when I did a blood test that they sent me to the hospital immediately for a transfusion.

Donating blood is a simple way to do good and get pampered and made to feel special for a little while. Anybody who can, should. It's good for the body, soul, and society.


Anemia is a very common condition and very treatable. I know, I've been through it. At one point my hemoglobin was 7. Last year I had my ferritin tested and it was so low the doctor was amazed I was walking around and functional.

Through certain dietary changes and, if necessary, supplements, you can get your levels right back up.
 
2014-01-12 01:01:22 PM

HailRobonia: Mugato:

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.

No, it's about gay buttsex. You can be a gay man who is in a monogamous relationship in which you practice safe sex and don't engage in anal sex, and your blood is still too dirty for the Red Cross.

If it's ok to not take blood from gays because statistically they are more likely to have HIV, then they shouldn't take blood from African Americans either; as HIV rates in the African American community is higher than in the general populace.


You sound butthurt
 
2014-01-12 01:06:27 PM
Once I was giving blood and a man came in who had apparently never donated in his ~40 years of life. Fine and good, he's checked out, hooked up, and then gets curious about the whole thing. He was a big guy and very generously offered to give two liters rather than one.

The staff explained that donations were limited for a reason ;-)
 
2014-01-12 01:21:41 PM
I up donated my 110th pint of blood at the beginning of December.  I am Bpositve and they seem  to have a courier  waiting  to take my donation to Children's Hospital of Wisconsin.  I don't have a common virus in my blood that 50% of the population does have.  My blood is great for new borns.
 
2014-01-12 01:24:29 PM

Willie_One_Eye: Por que tan serioso: SomeoneDumb: Mugato: The "lifestyle" questions are useless anyway, people could just lie. Unless you have a bandage over your new eyebrow ring or painfully limp into the place wearing your Barbara Streisand t-shirt, they can't prove you're lying. They probably just have to go through the motions of asking for legal reasons.

Well, of course you can lie, but why would anyone do that? If you're enough of a decent human being to donate, you're not going to lie about recent tattoos or travel or anything just to get a free cookie.

The weird thing about blood types is if you have a very common one, you should donate simply because it's common and more people need it. If your type is more rare, it's also in demand.

/ A+

Actually some of the roughest most shot out homeless people sell blood all the time.

Trolling but 0/10: no takers. No paid blood donations since the 1960s in North America.


You could not be more wrong. Plasma and such are in high demand and are most certainly still paid. You lose the alleged troll and the knowledge.
 
2014-01-12 01:29:08 PM

Willie_One_Eye: Trolling but 0/10: no takers. No paid blood donations since the 1960s in North America.


Plasma donations are still often paid, however, and is probably what they're actually doing.  You can also give plasma a lot more frequently than whole blood or red cells.
 
2014-01-12 01:30:25 PM

opiumpoopy: Mugato: Lsherm: Isn't O like a universal donor?  I'm AB- and people are always going on about how important it is for me to donate, but I think it's more important for the O people to donate.  Am I wrong?

No, you're right. You're the universal receiver (that doesn't sound right) so if you ever need a transfusion you're in luck.

/unless it's infected with AIDS but that's just common sense

No, subby's Mom is the universal receiver.

/ sorry. I feel bad now


It's OK.  If I had seen that comment before you I was going to make a "universal receiver" joke, too.  Because I am a 48 year old child.

/doesn't look like I'm growing up any time soon.
 
2014-01-12 01:31:13 PM
And actually whole blood donations can be paid, but they can't be used by hospitals - only for research and other situations where the blood won't go directly into a patient.
 
2014-01-12 01:35:09 PM

Por que tan serioso: You could not be more wrong. Plasma and such are in high demand and are most certainly still paid. You lose the alleged troll and the knowledge.


I give plasma and the most I ever got were movie tickets.
 
2014-01-12 01:47:28 PM

cgremlin: And actually whole blood donations can be paid, but they can't be used by hospitals - only for research and other situations where the blood won't go directly into a patient.


Interesting. I've never seen any org saying "we'll pay you to donate blood", but that may just mean paid blood donations are not advertised heavily or are uncommon. Or they have strict requirements (must have $RARE_TYPE, or a combo of certain specific ABO, Rh, K, and MNS types). No one ever talks about any blood groups other than the ABO/Rh (pickyweedia article covering high points of non-ABO groups), so it's interesting to hear that some people are or can be sensitive to those antigens.

A+ here. Work holds blood drives several times a year. The last 2 times they've done that, I've been unable to donate because there was high probability of something that only I could fix happening that morning, so me being away from my desk could've caused Unscheduled Downtime. Sigh. Maybe next time. They said I have a lot of platelets and want me to donate those too....
 
2014-01-12 02:09:33 PM

Mugato: Por que tan serioso: You could not be more wrong. Plasma and such are in high demand and are most certainly still paid. You lose the alleged troll and the knowledge.

I give plasma and the most I ever got were movie tickets.


I just Googled "san diego paid blood donation" and got four companies and one hospital that all pay on the first page results. My experience comes from attending a morning meeting wherein o several occasions some shot out ragged dirty guy referred to selling blood.
 
2014-01-12 02:15:45 PM

Por que tan serioso: SomeoneDumb: Mugato: The "lifestyle" questions are useless anyway, people could just lie. Unless you have a bandage over your new eyebrow ring or painfully limp into the place wearing your Barbara Streisand t-shirt, they can't prove you're lying. They probably just have to go through the motions of asking for legal reasons.

Well, of course you can lie, but why would anyone do that? If you're enough of a decent human being to donate, you're not going to lie about recent tattoos or travel or anything just to get a free cookie.

The weird thing about blood types is if you have a very common one, you should donate simply because it's common and more people need it. If your type is more rare, it's also in demand.

/ A+

Actually some of the roughest most shot out homeless people sell blood all the time.


I guess that's true. I've never seen a donation place that pays you, though.
/That's why we have sperm
 
2014-01-12 02:16:21 PM

Mugato: I give plasma and the most I ever got were movie tickets.


Figures. I used to get $15 each time, way back in the early 80's. And you could do it twice a week. Now nobody can get a job, but we're all supposed to be "donating" and "volunteering" and "giving of ourselves" instead.

/OK, I'm taking a break before I go into Fark rage-posting.
 
2014-01-12 02:40:19 PM
They have lightened up on the tattoo thing. Here is the info from my local donation center website and it is my understanding that most states have similar rules:

"Restrictions concerning tattoos have changed. If your tattoo was applied by a licensed facility in Wisconsin, you can donate blood. If your tattoo was applied by an unlicensed facility or a facility outside Wisconsin, we require a 12-month waiting period from the time the tattoo was applied."


That's the case in Washington state now as well.

Also - new federal regulations require picture ID to donate. This can be your license, military ID, ASB card, Costco card - as long as it has your face and name on it, we'll take it.

For a brief period the blood centers here in western Washington were having us ask new donors for "your sex at birth?"...O.o
Finally someone pointed out it was a violation of HIPPA laws to be asking this at the front counter. They now cover that during the intake interview in private.

I've only had one person get angry at me for having to complete the questionnaire "I've been married to the same woman for 56 years and it's nobodies goddamn business what I do..." Yeah, Mister, I just get you registered, I don't personally care What you do in your private life.

Been volunteering my time with the Puget Sound Blood Center for 6 years, usually 2x a month. I go to high schools - we get a Lot of blood from high schools, that's why the supply suffers in the summer, and to various businesses that organize blood drives. Boeing is a huge supporter of our supply in the Puget Sound area, we go there 6 times a month in 10 different locations.

Thanks to each and every one of you who've donated - one pint can be separated into 3 major components. Donating once has an impact on three people! (One gallon donor myself)
 
2014-01-12 02:41:29 PM

Momzilla59: were having us ask new donors for "your sex at birth?"...O.o


I don't remember, I was awfully young.
 
2014-01-12 03:37:21 PM

cryinoutloud: They had a long story about this on RadioLab just yesterday.


Heard it, couldn't find the replay link for reference to my statement.  That segment was another 'stay in the truck 'til over' moment
 
2014-01-12 03:52:58 PM

capt.hollister: I'm a relatively rare AB+ and I use to give blood long ago.

Unfortunately, ever since mad cow disease struck Europe I've been barred from giving blood anywhere in Québec.  According to Héma-Québec's guidelines, I have spent too much time in the UK and too much time in continental Europe.

Apparently, the risk that I will turn into a mad cow (or mad bull, in my case) is just too high.


I'm AB+ and used to donate plasma and platelets because ABs are the universal donors for those, and we aren't a huge percentage of the population. Thennnnnn I had my third baby and I got a call from a very apologetic woman telling me that I have certain antibodies in my blood which could lead to a TRALI reaction in a recipient (long story short, antibodies formed during pregnancy can adversely affect about 1 in 3000 recipients of platelets/plasma, and by "adversely" I mean "their lungs stop working.") I was pretty unhappy about it. On the bright side, the baby who inadvertently gave me antibodies is an AB-, so when she's old enough, her platelets and plasma will be GOLD.
 
2014-01-12 03:55:46 PM

cgremlin: Willie_One_Eye: Trolling but 0/10: no takers. No paid blood donations since the 1960s in North America.

Plasma donations are still often paid, however, and is probably what they're actually doing.  You can also give plasma a lot more frequently than whole blood or red cells.


You can get paid for plasma, but that plasma won't be going to patients -- too much motivation for people for people to lie. From what I've been told, a lot of it goes towards making cosmetics, of all things.

/never got more than a granola bar for my plasma
 
2014-01-12 04:14:27 PM

Por que tan serioso: I just Googled "san diego paid blood donation" and got four companies and one hospital that all pay on the first page results.


I DuckDuckGoed "phoenix paid blood donation" and found nothing but plasma donation centers and irrelevant results. There's a plasma donation center a few miles away from my place. I have never donated plasma, but since 2 donations are possible per week and you get $20 for the first donation and $25 for the second one, it might be something worth investigating. I'm not a huge fan of needles though. And how do they keep people's veins from collapsing if they're getting poked in the arm twice/week?
 
2014-01-12 04:36:32 PM
12.5 Gallons to date.
O+

O- is universal doner. They can give that to anyone before they are typed to find the best match.
/Go every 16 weeks to do double red blood donations.
 
2014-01-12 04:37:57 PM

Nogale: catmandu:

Anemia is a very common condition and very treatable. I know, I've been through it. At one point my hemoglobin was 7. Last year I had my ferritin tested and it was so low the doctor was amazed I was walking around and functional.

Through certain dietary changes and, if necessary, supplements, you can get your levels right back up.


I am already seeing that. My hemoglobin was 5.7 which is why they sent me to the hospital (my ferritin was also extremely low: 3 where the range is 10-204). They were expecting me to keel over at any time. The first two pints brought it immediately up to 7.2 and the second two to 9.3. I got tested again on Thursday and I am up to 11.4. I am on a higher iron diet plus a supplement.

Thanks to the donors who gave their blood!
 
2014-01-12 05:07:58 PM

Por que tan serioso: Mugato: Radak: I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.

Tattoo within a year is a big one. IV drug user is another.


Just donated last week.  Had a tattoo in April 2013.  The rules have changed.
 
2014-01-12 05:16:51 PM

Willie_One_Eye: Por que tan serioso: SomeoneDumb: Mugato: The "lifestyle" questions are useless anyway, people could just lie. Unless you have a bandage over your new eyebrow ring or painfully limp into the place wearing your Barbara Streisand t-shirt, they can't prove you're lying. They probably just have to go through the motions of asking for legal reasons.

Well, of course you can lie, but why would anyone do that? If you're enough of a decent human being to donate, you're not going to lie about recent tattoos or travel or anything just to get a free cookie.

The weird thing about blood types is if you have a very common one, you should donate simply because it's common and more people need it. If your type is more rare, it's also in demand.

/ A+

Actually some of the roughest most shot out homeless people sell blood all the time.

Trolling but 0/10: no takers. No paid blood donations since the 1960s in North America.


Actually I sold my blood in Florida in the early 80's for 10 bucks and we got an extra ten if we got a tetanus shot too
 
2014-01-12 05:40:50 PM
Type O Negative was a great band..
 
2014-01-12 06:08:11 PM

hubiestubert: I'm A-, which means that when I had my little "accident" I was pretty much lucky as Hells that the hospital had enough blood at the time, and I pretty much depleted their supply when I was under the knife, since the final tally was about 267 units all told. Mind you, some of that was just plasma, and some was platelets, so the nearly five 5-gallon buckets of blood products that they threw into me wasn't quite so catastrophic to the blood supply as it first sounds, but I did single handedly force a blood drive in the Western Mass area for A-.

What drives me nuts, is that because of the artificial valve that they threw in, that I can't give blood now--I'm on blood thinners for the rest of my natural days, and that means that I can't give blood. I can't pay back the gift that was given to me, by a lot of anonymous folks, save by thanking the folks who gave, and be glad that I was a donor before I had my little kerfuffle. My life was saved by the kindness of folks I'll never meet, and who probably don't know the difference that their taking some time out of their week made. So, thank you. All of the folks who give, because when bad things happen, y'all have given very much the gift of life. I wouldn't be here today if it weren't for folks who took a few minutes out of their day, and got a glass of juice and a cookie, and a cute band aid. Thank you to all of you who donate. Hopefully you'll never have to be on the receiving end, but it means everything for the folks who do.


Don't worry about it.  We got your back.
 
2014-01-12 06:29:54 PM

Badafuco: silently waits for a new liver


When they start doing live donor (it is a regenerative organ) you can have my larger lobe.  It's good to remind people to sign a donor card at the dmv and/or tell family.  I hope you get one that will allow a beer or martini.
 
2014-01-12 07:07:21 PM

Por que tan serioso: Mugato: Radak: I like how the first section is fairly specific about who can donate, until it gets to this part:

They'll also ask you a few basic questions about your health and lifestyle.

Trying to skirt around something there, are we?

Eh, call off the dogs, spokesperson for GLADD. There are a lot of lifestyle questions, too many to list individually in one article  It's not all about the gay buttsex.

Tattoo within a year is a big one. IV drug user is another.


I was denied because I don't mind earning my red wings.
 
2014-01-12 07:21:31 PM

bagumpity: *not gross, not gross, not gross...*

And I still have a deformed vein that looks like someone embedded a ball bearing in my left arm.


THAT...made me squeamish.  *shivers*

I had a similar situation in during my first summer physical in Germany. The 'medics' kept poking me like a pin cushion. I think I had seven attempts in one arm and 5 or 6 in the other. One of my friends, who was a medic, saw this and came over and got my vein on the first try. Apparently my veins are 'rollers'. I always imagine that when they stick the needle in, it's like a cartoon woman in the basket avoiding the swords (think Tex Avery).

That's not even the cool part of the story, bro! One of my 'tormenters' was an older, street seasoned, chicano from L.A. And a black belt in karate. I don't know what I did to him, but he always picked on me. Until he fainted during that physical when he got his blood taken. Hahaha.

/3rd ID! Rock of the Marne!
//meh
///always give blood when I can
 
2014-01-12 09:53:03 PM
30 years of giving O neg.  Most years 6 times, a couple times 7, 8 weeks to the day for years.  My dog was a regular donor for 4 years too.  Closing in on a 20 gallon pin.  Also gave marrow twice but not for transplant just leukemia study.   Did have to skip a year after visiting Kingston, Jamaica.  If I had stayed on the North side of the island no deferral would have been required.
 
2014-01-13 02:07:42 AM
CSS:
My mom worked for the American Red Cross for a few years on their mobile blood units. She has some great stories about all the different kinds of people who would come to donate blood. The doners had to answer several specific questions, and here are two of my favorites:

Mom: What is your gender?
Hard-of-hearing old man: Oh, uh-huh, ho, ho, ho.
Mom: What is your GENDER?
Old man: Right, uh-huh. yes.
Mom: WHAT IS YOUR SEX?
Old man: OH! I'm German.

Mom: What is your gender?
Lady: I'm a lesbian.
 
2014-01-13 02:52:03 AM

catmandu: Nogale: catmandu:

Anemia is a very common condition and very treatable. I know, I've been through it. At one point my hemoglobin was 7. Last year I had my ferritin tested and it was so low the doctor was amazed I was walking around and functional.

Through certain dietary changes and, if necessary, supplements, you can get your levels right back up.

I am already seeing that. My hemoglobin was 5.7 which is why they sent me to the hospital (my ferritin was also extremely low: 3 where the range is 10-204). They were expecting me to keel over at any time. The first two pints brought it immediately up to 7.2 and the second two to 9.3. I got tested again on Thursday and I am up to 11.4. I am on a higher iron diet plus a supplement.

Thanks to the donors who gave their blood!


I'm glad to hear it. Did the doctor discuss the other tweaks you should make? Two things inhibit the body's ability to absorb iron - dairy and caffeine. Which means if you pop an iron pill with your morning coffee, it's not doing as much good. Vitamin C is also key - it helps the body absorb iron. So have a red pepper with your steak ;-)
 
2014-01-13 09:23:49 AM

Nogale: catmandu: Nogale: catmandu:

I'm glad to hear it. Did the doctor discuss the other tweaks you should make? Two things inhibit the body's ability to absorb iron - dairy and caffeine. Which means if you pop an iron pill with your morning coffee, it's not doing as much good. Vitamin C is also key - it helps the body absorb iron. So have a red pepper with your steak ;-)


So having a grapefruit with breakfast and my iron pill is a good thing besides being my favorite fruit?

Thank you for the suggestions. I'm meeting with a nutritionist this week so i am sure I will get more.
 
2014-01-13 11:33:07 AM
I happen to be B+, so I'm getting a kick out of these comments...
 
2014-01-13 11:34:21 AM
According notalwaysworking.com, another tip is "try to look a little bit nervous."

FTFWebsite:

Really Gets The Blood Pumping
Health Clinic | Minneapolis, MN, USA | Employees, Extra Stupid, Health & Body

(I'm at a clinic to give a blood donation. Everything is going smoothly, and I'm making small talk with the nurses, until I lay down to actually make the donation.)
Nurse #1: "I'm sorry. I can't take your blood today."
Me: "What? I thought everything was in order. All my tests came back within normal range."
Nurse #1: "I know, but I can't take your blood. You're too calm."
Me: "What?"
Nurse #1: "You obviously get some kind of sexual satisfaction from donating, so I can't take your blood."
Me: "WHAT? That's ridiculous. Just because I don't freak out at needles doesn't mean I have a fetish for it!"
Nurse #1: "I'm sorry. I just can't-"
Nurse #2: "Shut the f*** up and stick the f****** kid!"
Nurse #1: "But he's going to-"
Nurse #2: "Stick. The. Kid."
(Nurse #1 took my blood and didn't say another word the rest of the time I was there.)
1 Thumbs (1,209 Thumbs Up!)
 
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