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(WRAL)   Watch as this straight-line wind event deals Three Little Pigs Construction a major setback   (wral.com) divider line 4
    More: Scary, structural failure  
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5487 clicks; posted to Video » on 11 Jan 2014 at 11:07 PM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-01-12 02:52:01 AM
1 votes:
Soft story, insufficient lateral bracing, shear panels that were installed on lower level not nailed off properly. Who the hell builds the next level up without finishing the shearply on the lower level first? I would not call that "an act of God". The contractor is going to eat that one.
2014-01-12 01:48:08 AM
1 votes:
I was at home today when that gust came through.  It was unexpected and very, very intense for a brief period there.  I was wondering what the heck was going on.

I had been looking outside to gauge how hard it was raining.  When the rain stopped, I finished folding some laundry, threw some clean clothes on, and was ready to hop in the car to run some errands.

Next thing I saw, very suddenly the wind picked up and it went from no rain to torrential downpour, no transition.  Finally, the blast of wind blew in.  The rain was almost literally coming down sideways.  Limbs were flying out of the trees, I thought one of the trees across the street was going to come down.
2014-01-12 12:30:08 AM
1 votes:

sheep snorter: Nails are for chumps.
The building 'hinge' effect is cool to see live.

Unfortunately is some building codes consider drywall to be a structural member for the total structural load. There is also those contractors who pull out all the temp internal braces early.

/I hope that is OSB or plywood on the walls and not that shiatty press-board.
//Less nails means all that board is still good to use again.


Those buildings did look pretty flimsy.  The entire frame was just wood and plywood or particle board?  You'd think for something that size you'd want some sort of masonry for the structure, or at least a steel frame anchored into concrete.
2014-01-12 12:03:16 AM
1 votes:
Well, it's a bit of a stretch to call Raleigh "a hurricane area", especially in January. Windy days can come along at any time of the year, though.

I was watching this unfold live on the RDU high-res radar. In the velocity encoding, the values go from (IIRC) +64 to -64 kph (speed toward or away from the radar site). There was a sizable blob of darkest-color-on-the-map that came across southwest Wake County and headed over the airport -- where they measured a gust of 86 mph, the highest ever recorded there.

I'd expect construction projects to be braced against any reasonably strong wind. This wind was unreasonable.

/subby
//wondering what I'll find on the way to work tomorrow -- that blob went over part of my commute
 
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