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(The Week)   Hipsters and music snobs still trying to convince people that Vinyl LPs are making a comeback, perhaps even in pog form   (theweek.com) divider line 182
    More: Unlikely, LPs, Vampire Weekend, Nielsen SoundScan, Rdio, record players, record sleeves, Daft Punk, software portability  
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1087 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 11 Jan 2014 at 7:20 AM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-11 04:01:04 AM
Oddly, all the "Oh em gee U R teh h1pst3r l0lz!" pigeonholing aside, they sort of are.  Most of the "Indie" artists and bands I mix have their merch tables stocked with vinyl releases next to the CDs and T-Shirts.  Start refurbing those thrift shop turntables, y'all.
 
2014-01-11 07:35:29 AM
Two years ago, the piano player at my parents' church died. My dad and I went to his estate sale, where we learned that the piano player was a huge Beatles and Rolling Stones fan, and had damn near every release those bands ever made on vinly, including the 45s.

Dad took the 45s and I walked out with 8 albums, including Abbey Road, Rubber Soul, Revolver, Help, Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers, and Through the Past Darkly (the octagon cover) for 75 bucks.

Sure, I had them on CD, but there is something pretty cool about being able to pull out the old vinyls and look at the cover, the liner notes, and everything else. Plus, the ones that had scratches on them, I could frame and put on the wall over the stereo.

Since then, I've picked up a few albums here and there, mostly classic rock like Floyd or the Ramones or Bob Marley or Johnny Cash. It's just a nice hobby and a cool looking conversation piece around my house.

Sorry if that clashes with the tekkies dream of one day owning a living room with just a chair, a laptop, and nothing else.Tangible media still has its charms.
 
2014-01-11 07:44:05 AM
Any Farker electrical engineer: how hard would it be to come up with a filter that degrades CD quality down to vinyl quality?  Seriously,  I am tired of old folks and effete ironists insisting that vinyl is better, when it should be easy to provide a "crappy vinyl sound" button next to the bass and treble.
 
2014-01-11 07:47:03 AM
Well, hate to point this out, but most digital formats decimate the dynamic range of the music. I suppose if your prime listening is using earbuds in your cube at work, knock yourself out with your mp3s bro.

CD's sound awesome, and vinyl sounds great, and you can really tell on a halfway decent stereo how much better they both sound than your typical mp3 or aac of the same music.

/feels like the guy getting blown back in his chair listening to kyuss on vinyl
 
2014-01-11 07:49:40 AM
guyism.com
 
2014-01-11 07:49:51 AM
Most new vinyl comes with a download code now, so you get the pristine digital version to listen to and a tangible physical object to look at, which is much prettier than a cd. Or bigger, at least.
 
2014-01-11 07:52:29 AM

neongoats: I suppose if your prime listening is using earbuds in your cube at work, knock yourself out with your mp3s bro.


Truth. Your first upgrade must always be to actual speakers. Ones that didn't come with a PC.
And bluetooth from your iphone doesn't count either.

Only then need you bother with anything other than an mp3.
 
2014-01-11 07:54:27 AM
To paraphrase LL Cool J, they aren't making a comeback, they've been here for years.  Same with cassettes.

People like to collect them.  It's a way to support the music you love and show it off.  You can be assured that anyone with a vinyl or cassette copy of an album also has a digital version as well.
 
2014-01-11 07:55:06 AM
The 6.1 million U.S. LP sales still represent only about  , versus 57 percent for CDs and 41 percent for digital albums.


This is a figure that seems to be conspicuously absent in any article proclaiming the rebirth of vinyl. I mean, it's a comeback compared to being mostly dead, but I'm confused as to why people act like vinyl is dominating music sales.
 
2014-01-11 07:56:12 AM

Glitchwerks: To paraphrase LL Cool J, they aren't making a comeback, they've been here for years.  Same with cassettes.

People like to collect them.  It's a way to support the music you love and show it off.  You can be assured that anyone with a vinyl or cassette copy of an album also has a digital version as well.



Yep. Vinyl collecting is the music fan equivalent of collecting baseball cards.
 
2014-01-11 07:57:10 AM

FeedTheCollapse: The 6.1 million U.S. LP sales still represent only about  , versus 57 percent for CDs and 41 percent for digital albums.


This is a figure that seems to be conspicuously absent in any article proclaiming the rebirth of vinyl. I mean, it's a comeback compared to being mostly dead, but I'm confused as to why people act like vinyl is dominating music sales.


The point they are making is that it is the only sector of music sales that is growing in comparison to the rest.
 
2014-01-11 08:01:19 AM
Horse drawn carriages are making a comeback too.
Also outhouses, dysentery and cave paintings!
 
2014-01-11 08:16:02 AM
My husband would love it if I would get rid of my music collection in "physical form". Can't/won't do it. There is something about owning the physical product that appeals to me. Also why I continue to buy real books rather than a Kindle, I guess.

/748 CDs and counting....
//.... not including any burned CDs
///at least it's not 748 LPs space-wise
 
2014-01-11 08:19:10 AM
Same in every hobbyist field. In photography, you still have a lot of holdouts using old school film, even if the couple of small advantages it has over digital doesn't come close to justifying the trouble and expense. Some people just like the smell of darkroom chemicals and the ritual of swapping out roles of film.

I'm not one of them, and I'll keep my 5D, thanks. But everyone had to have a passion I guess.
 
2014-01-11 08:21:08 AM
I was listening to my Sgt. Pepper's record only the other day. Aside from the occasional pop and a bit of hiss, the only other problem was the needle skipping across the record every time I went around a corner.
 
2014-01-11 08:21:51 AM
I have many vinyl albums from the 70's.  Strangely, manly of them have a greenish residue in the inside fold.
 
2014-01-11 08:23:19 AM
Yep.  I'm one of the old farkers  that loves vinyl.  I budget $25 a month for the used record store down the street.  For Christmas a friend gifted me 12 $25 gift certificates for the store.  Awesome.  And yet, I love my iTunes playlist.  Beats the crap out of making those mixed tapes with your vinyl like us old people did way back when.
 
2014-01-11 08:23:52 AM
If you're really into music, you probably already have a turntable because there is a lot of out-of-print music that never made it to a digital format.

I still buy vinyl here and there. It's not entirely logical. Sometimes I just want to go through the ritual, or browse liner notes/art that I can actually read. Sometimes the vinyl itself has artwork pressed into it (when the music spans three sides, for instance). And colored vinyl just looks really neat, what can I say.

Warmth? Not usually. In fact a lot of moving magnet cartridges (the most common) are poorly matched to the phono preamp and have a rise in the upper treble. In other words, "bright" sounding. But for really cheap system, you probably start rolling off around 12 kHz anyway. Harmonic distortion can sound "warm" but that is more of an issue with tube amplification (specifically single ended designs).

Another issue is how the album was mastered. The brickwalling of a lot of digital music (hard limiting, plus gobs of just normal dynamic-range-reducing compression) gives it a fatiguing sound. Vinyl typically (but not always) is mastered with less brute-force techniques because the format can't handle it as well. But I've seen that change as well. A lot of crappy sounding vinyl has the same mastering as the digital, and they just record it more quietly (further reducing the dynamic range) so the needle doesn't jump out of the groove.

Finally never underestimate the power of the fetish factor when it comes to music collectors/enthusiasts. Having a physical product means a lot to some people.

Turntable manufacturers like VPI (American - I have one of theirs) are pushing out units steadily. There has been a recent Renaissance of new "mid-priced" turntables (around $1k) that sound very, very nice. That "hissing" they talk about? Can't hear it on my table with clean vinyl (yeah I have the ubiquitous VPI record cleaning machine as well) that was shipped in good shape (a lot of new vinyl has noise embedded into the grooves; there are too few pressing plants and quality control is a real issue) and you forget you're listening to a record; it's just music.

I suspect this trend will level off. Dedicated music listening just isn't practiced by many people anymore. There are too many other things competing for attention. But for me it can be a nice relaxing respite from reality (that also goes well with that stuff you can get in Colrado).
 
2014-01-11 08:24:12 AM

Bob Down: I was listening to my Sgt. Pepper's record only the other day. Aside from the occasional pop and a bit of hiss, the only other problem was the needle skipping across the record every time I went around a corner.


That's what 8-tracks are for, rocket scientist.
 
2014-01-11 08:33:59 AM

riverwalk barfly: Yep.  I'm one of the old farkers  that loves vinyl.  I budget $25 a month for the used record store down the street.  For Christmas a friend gifted me 12 $25 gift certificates for the store.  Awesome.  And yet, I love my iTunes playlist.  Beats the crap out of making those mixed tapes with your vinyl like us old people did way back when.


Today's hipsters don't make playlists, it ruins the artistic integrity. You can only listen to a complete album if you want your modern hipster cred.
 
2014-01-11 08:35:34 AM

Shadowknight:In photography, you still have a lot of holdouts using old school film, even if the couple of small advantages it has over digital doesn't come close to justifying the trouble and expense. Some people just like the smell of darkroom chemicals and the ritual of swapping out roles of film.

I have very fond memories of an amateur photographer's darkroom.  She was a psychological basket case, but I still stand at attention for the smell of developer.  Okay, point taken.  Someone might have the same feelings for vinyl. 

buntz: Horse drawn carriages are making a comeback too.
Also outhouses, dysentery and cave paintings!


Well, polio and whooping cough, at least.  Damn anti-vax hipsters and their vinyl.
 
2014-01-11 08:39:26 AM

b0rscht: If you're really into music, you probably already have a turntable because there is a lot of out-of-print music that never made it to a digital format.


Most of it is in digital format thanks to file sharers.
 
2014-01-11 08:43:10 AM

stoli n coke: Yep. Vinyl collecting is the music fan equivalent of collecting baseball cards.



Link
 
2014-01-11 08:45:41 AM
I have a dilemma - last Saturday I bought a sealed album of the Pretenders "Learning to Crawl"  I think the release was 1983?  Anyway, Now I'm thinking why the hell did I buy that.  I don't want to break the seal and I own it on CD and MP3..... But as was pointed out above, I'm a collector.  But boy I want to break the seal and put it on the turntable.  It's like a virgin.
 
2014-01-11 08:53:00 AM

stoli n coke: Bob Down: I was listening to my Sgt. Pepper's record only the other day. Aside from the occasional pop and a bit of hiss, the only other problem was the needle skipping across the record every time I went around a corner.

That's what 8-tracks are for, rocket scientist.


I can honestly say I've never seen or heard an 8-track (and I'm 50+ yrs) They must have been pretty annoying if an album had 10 tracks.
 
2014-01-11 08:54:59 AM

sarajlewis83: My husband would love it if I would get rid of my music collection in "physical form". Can't/won't do it. There is something about owning the physical product that appeals to me. Also why I continue to buy real books rather than a Kindle, I guess.

/748 CDs and counting....
//.... not including any burned CDs
///at least it's not 748 LPs space-wise



I don't get the reasoning behind KIndles. I can't see having to make sure an electrical device is fully charged every time I want to read for a few hours, when I could just grab a book, find a light source, sit down, and read.

As for the CDs, a good idea is to go through them, figure out which ones you only bought for 1 or 2 songs, upload them into iTunes, and take them to a music shop and sell them. Then, keep the ones that have lots of songs you still listen to.

Did that when I first got iTunes. Because of that, my first iPod only cost me about 35 bucks out of pocket, and i freed up an entire bookcase.
 
2014-01-11 08:56:28 AM

Bob Down: I was listening to my Sgt. Pepper's record only the other day. Aside from the occasional pop and a bit of hiss, the only other problem was the needle skipping across the record every time I went around a corner.


gatheringbooks.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-01-11 08:58:11 AM

Bob Down: stoli n coke: Bob Down: I was listening to my Sgt. Pepper's record only the other day. Aside from the occasional pop and a bit of hiss, the only other problem was the needle skipping across the record every time I went around a corner.

That's what 8-tracks are for, rocket scientist.

I can honestly say I've never seen or heard an 8-track (and I'm 50+ yrs) They must have been pretty annoying if an album had 10 tracks.



They usually had 2 or 3 songs for each one.
It is interesting how bands in the 60s and 70s got most of their fans to double dip, buying a vinyl copy of the album for their homes and an 8-track for their cars.

It's also why the most of the top selling albums of all time came out before 1984.
 
2014-01-11 09:00:19 AM

Bob Down: stoli n coke: Bob Down: I was listening to my Sgt. Pepper's record only the other day. Aside from the occasional pop and a bit of hiss, the only other problem was the needle skipping across the record every time I went around a corner.

That's what 8-tracks are for, rocket scientist.

I can honestly say I've never seen or heard an 8-track (and I'm 50+ yrs) They must have been pretty annoying if an album had 10 tracks.


No fast forward, no rewind.  If you wanted to hear a song again you just had to wait until it came back around on that channel.
 
2014-01-11 09:03:25 AM
stoli n coke:

It's also why the most of the top selling albums of all time came out before 1984.

"Larry Harris, co-founder of Casablanca Records, in Behind the Mask: "With my association with Billboard, I was able to get five Kiss albums on the charts at one time; this was around '77, '78. I walked in and gave them inflated sales figures, which they could have easily checked if they chose to but they didn't ... This was happening all over the business. In the record industry, if you go top 100 in Billboard with your product, the rack jobbers, the people who sell records in Wal-Mart and Kmart, those huge mass merchandisers, will take your record. If you're not top 100 in Billboard they won't."
 
2014-01-11 09:06:50 AM

stoli n coke: sarajlewis83: My husband would love it if I would get rid of my music collection in "physical form". Can't/won't do it. There is something about owning the physical product that appeals to me. Also why I continue to buy real books rather than a Kindle, I guess.

/748 CDs and counting....
//.... not including any burned CDs
///at least it's not 748 LPs space-wise


I don't get the reasoning behind KIndles. I can't see having to make sure an electrical device is fully charged every time I want to read for a few hours, when I could just grab a book, find a light source, sit down, and read.

As for the CDs, a good idea is to go through them, figure out which ones you only bought for 1 or 2 songs, upload them into iTunes, and take them to a music shop and sell them. Then, keep the ones that have lots of songs you still listen to.

Did that when I first got iTunes. Because of that, my first iPod only cost me about 35 bucks out of pocket, and i freed up an entire bookcase.


Well, I dunno about the kindles you have used, but I can read for a week straight, several hours a day on my kindle before needing to recharge.
 
2014-01-11 09:10:01 AM
OK now I understand why everybody takes the piss out of 8-tracks. That auto record player is quite cool for 1960 though. I guess they had to move the steering wheel to the other side to fit it in...
 
2014-01-11 09:16:08 AM
I used to amp up the phono from the Kenwood turntable so loud on the Sansui stand-alone floor speakers that the dust cover on the turntable had to be removed to prevent violent feedback.

/Get off my gravel lawn.
 
2014-01-11 09:16:33 AM
Still have one of these.

www.swapsellit.com
 
2014-01-11 09:19:40 AM

theflatline: Still have one of these.

[www.swapsellit.com image 640x480]


The only 8 track that I've ever owed was Frank Zappa & the mothers Billy the mountain.
 
2014-01-11 09:23:00 AM

Bob Down: OK now I understand why everybody takes the piss out of 8-tracks. That auto record player is quite cool for 1960 though. I guess they had to move the steering wheel to the other side to fit it in...


The driver's seat is normally on the left in countries where cars are driven on the right hand side of the road.
 
2014-01-11 09:24:17 AM

Evil Mackerel: theflatline: Still have one of these.

[www.swapsellit.com image 640x480]

The only 8 track that I've ever owed was Frank Zappa & the mothers Billy the mountain.


I am 44, I owned Blondie Auto American, Glenn Campbells greatest hits, and the soundtrack to Goldfinger.

My mom had a 1980 corvette with an 8 track so I saved my pennies and bought a couple.\\

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2014-01-11 09:25:27 AM
I honestly don't care what products people spend their money on. You want to listen to music on vinyl. go for it. You want to drink micro-brewed craft beer at $7 a bottle, have at it. Just stop trying to act as if your choices are somehow superior to mine and everyone else.
 
2014-01-11 09:32:33 AM
Between myself, my wife and my brother we have a thousand vinyl records. I could probably sell the whole collection to some stupid hipster for a fortune.  Difficulty: Finding a hipster with a fortune.
 
2014-01-11 09:33:10 AM

FeedTheCollapse: The 6.1 million U.S. LP sales still represent only about  , versus 57 percent for CDs and 41 percent for digital albums.


This is a figure that seems to be conspicuously absent in any article proclaiming the rebirth of vinyl. I mean, it's a comeback compared to being mostly dead, but I'm confused as to why people act like vinyl is dominating music sales.


There's a great analogy in the article regarding a double amputee and gloves.
 
2014-01-11 09:45:29 AM

ReapTheChaos: I honestly don't care what products people spend their money on. You want to listen to music on vinyl. go for it. You want to drink micro-brewed craft beer at $7 a bottle, have at it. Just stop trying to act as if your choices are somehow superior to mine and everyone else.


You sound like a Natty Light man.
 
2014-01-11 09:45:38 AM
I have a few albums.  I got them for like $5 from goodwill. They're hanging on the wall above my guitars, just because they look cool.
 
2014-01-11 09:51:43 AM
Everybody wants to buy vinyl. I'm trying to get rid of mine. Zeppelin, Who, Zappa, Doors. Cool at one point, now just takes up space.
 
x23
2014-01-11 09:53:28 AM

Wyalt Derp: Most new vinyl comes with a download code now, so you get the pristine digital version to listen to and a tangible physical object to look at, which is much prettier than a cd. Or bigger, at least.


yup.

i haven't bought a CD in ages. but have bought a bunch of new releases / reissues / remasters on vinyl in the past year or so. if that didn't exist i just wouldn't have bought anything most likely. or less anyway.

most the releases are limited edition too. which is cool.
 
2014-01-11 09:55:50 AM

riverwalk barfly: I have a dilemma - last Saturday I bought a sealed album of the Pretenders "Learning to Crawl"  I think the release was 1983?  Anyway, Now I'm thinking why the hell did I buy that.  I don't want to break the seal and I own it on CD and MP3..... But as was pointed out above, I'm a collector.  But boy I want to break the seal and put it on the turntable.  It's like a virgin.


Go ahead, touch it for the.very first time.
 
2014-01-11 10:08:09 AM
I buy vinyl - new and old stuff. I also listen to digital and streaming music (iTunes, Spotify, Songza) in the car or on the metro or at work. I listen to vinyl records at home when I just want to sit with a glass of whiskey and actively listen to an entire album all the way through.

I admit it may be some kind of "fetish" to have the physical copy, but I think a lot of music fans (and "snobs") buy records for the same reason - to sit and enjoy the music, rather than just have it as background noise while doing something else.
 
2014-01-11 10:09:27 AM

stoli n coke: I don't get the reasoning behind KIndles. I can't see having to make sure an electrical device is fully charged every time I want to read for a few hours, when I could just grab a book, find a light source, sit down, and read


because a Kindle can easily hold thousands of books. If I finish one book, I can move onto the next, which is especially helpful if I'm not reading at home. Also I only have to charge my Kindle about once a week if I keep my Wi-Fi on, otherwise it can go weeks without recharging.
 
2014-01-11 10:12:08 AM

Bob Down: stoli n coke: Bob Down: I was listening to my Sgt. Pepper's record only the other day. Aside from the occasional pop and a bit of hiss, the only other problem was the needle skipping across the record every time I went around a corner.

That's what 8-tracks are for, rocket scientist.

I can honestly say I've never seen or heard an 8-track (and I'm 50+ yrs) They must have been pretty annoying if an album had 10 tracks.


8 track refers to how many sound channels the tape held, not the number of songs.

One stereo program is composed of two tracks, so each tape had four parallel stereo programs.

Given the size of the cartridge, there was enough tape for each program to hold the equivalent of half an LP side -- around 10 minutes of music.

So an LP with two sides of music was four programs on 8-track.

However, since there was a fixed maximum amount of tape compared with vinyl where the time per side could be fudged a bit, spreading two LP sides of material over four programs sometimes meant rearranging track order, splitting up long tracks between two programs, etc. 8 track really sucked.

Once and a while 8-tracks did get some extra material, though, padding needed to fill a program on albums or tracks that were supposed to be continuous--Plnk Floyd's Animals and Lou Reed's Berlin had bridging music that wasn't on the LP. Because making Berlin a little bit longer was important if you needed extra time to find a knife to slit your wrist with.

/The first new car my dad ever had was a brown Buick Riviera with 8-track...unfortunately the only tape he had was one that came with the car, disco hits including Disco Duck and Kung Fu fighting.
//Fark the seventies. Seventies sucked azz.
///Other than that time I turned on my crappy Soundesign all-in-one radio/turntable/cassette expecting to hear more bloated prog coming out of it and instead got London's Calling.
 
2014-01-11 10:15:05 AM

wozzeck: Because making Berlin a little bit longer was important if you needed extra time to find a knife to slit your wrist with.


Now that was farking funny.
 
2014-01-11 10:38:34 AM

Cat Food Sandwiches: I have many vinyl albums from the 70's.  Strangely, manly of them have a greenish residue in the inside fold.


Ah, back in the day of stems and seeds that we don't need...
 
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