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(KCCI Des Moines)   Not News: Little boy donates $18.59 to replace lost library books. News: Locals start spontaneously matching his gift. Shakespeare: So shines a good deed in a weary world   (kcci.com) divider line 43
    More: Hero, Shakespeare, library, gifts, public libraries  
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3412 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jan 2014 at 11:58 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-10 11:06:31 PM
Cool on the kid. Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.
 
2014-01-10 11:21:40 PM

ajgeek: Cool on the kid. Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.


Way to start the thread off in a positive direction.
 
2014-01-10 11:38:48 PM

ajgeek: Cool on the kid. Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.


Just look at the kid's name:

Lalo Nunez-al-Faisal

Clearly he's some kind of illegal immigrant terrorist.
 
2014-01-11 12:00:32 AM
i.ytimg.com

Actually, a little impressed.
 
2014-01-11 12:03:47 AM
Damned dusty books...
 
2014-01-11 12:07:45 AM
I liked this article. Thanks, Submitter.
 
2014-01-11 12:10:53 AM
I'm still so ticked off at my local library for getting rid of the copy of bukowski's 'post office' I donated in the name of my grandfather I'll likely never give them another book again.
 
2014-01-11 12:15:28 AM

ajgeek: Cool on the kid. Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.


You know, there's cynical, and then there's being a complete asshole. You are the latter, my friend.
 
2014-01-11 12:15:47 AM

Omahawg: I'm still so ticked off at my local library for getting rid of the copy of bukowski's 'post office' I donated in the name of my grandfather I'll likely never give them another book again.


"Ham on Rye" mysteriously disappeared from mine. Jerks.
 
2014-01-11 12:16:47 AM
There's got to be something illegal going on here.
 
2014-01-11 12:17:49 AM

cameroncrazy1984: ajgeek: Cool on the kid. Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.

Way to start the thread off in a positive direction.


Fark dot com: come for the unrepentant cynicism, pessimism, and misanthropy. Stay for the... um, well... hmm...
 
2014-01-11 12:22:00 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

It will take 10,072,627 Lalos to donate enough for one of these. And that's if we just put it in a museum dry.

U.S.A.! U.S.A.!

/Priorities!
 
2014-01-11 12:23:46 AM

ajgeek:  Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.


You mean like visited by the spirits of librarians past?  They return in undead form and influence children to do evil things like...."Donate your chore money to the library!  Muh ha ha ha haha."

I've heard about that.
 
2014-01-11 12:25:30 AM

ajgeek: Cool on the kid. Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.


His sister had a "give" jar, too: seems like the parents are teaching them the virtues of giving back to the community. AKA: parenting. The shock.


/mum and dad deserve a hero tag, too
//hope sister's donation also gets matched
///slashies for warm fuzzies
 
2014-01-11 12:26:01 AM

ThrobblefootSpectre: ajgeek:  Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.

You mean like visited by the spirits of librarians past?  They return in undead form and influence children to do evil things like...."Donate your chore money to the library!  Muh ha ha ha haha."

I've heard about that.


www.wearysloth.com
 
2014-01-11 12:32:14 AM
Omahawg:

See?  And those quacks at the behavioural health clinic didn't believe me.
 
2014-01-11 12:34:39 AM

Omahawg: I'm still so ticked off at my local library for getting rid of the copy of bukowski's 'post office' I donated in the name of my grandfather I'll likely never give them another book again.


Don't.  It's called weeding.  All libraries do it.  It helps make room for new items, and allows us to discard items that may be out of date or too damaged to circulate.  If a weeded book is in good enough condition, often times the book will be sold in order to raise finds to buy more materials.

/Work in public library, getting kick out of your reply
//I helped weed one of our small town branches in our county's system after their previous librarian retired.  She was a notorious packrat when it came to books.  Amongst the materials that were still circulating  that we eventually ended up weeding:
 A book on the Winter Olympics copyrighted 1979.
 A children's book that provided a behind-the-scenes look at a newspaper, complete with teletypes, computers sporting modems with acoustic couplers, phototelegraphy, and manual paste-up.
 A badly beat up copy ofLittle Women that was printed in 1957.
 A book on how to start your own small business that was brand new when slap bracelets and Tiger LCD handheld games were all the rage.
 All their VHS tapes, Including a couple one of my co workers ended up buying and sending off to  Everything is Terrible!
A Baseball card price guide from 1999
///People from that library were royally pissed and biatched and moaned to the head of our system because they thought we were throwing away "perfectly good books."
 
2014-01-11 12:37:29 AM

quo vadimus: [upload.wikimedia.org image 850x667]

It will take 10,072,627 Lalos to donate enough for one of these. And that's if we just put it in a museum dry.

U.S.A.! U.S.A.!

/Priorities!


Sort of related. From Robert R. Wilson's wikipedia page.


In 1967 he took a leave of absence from Cornell to assume directorship of the not-yet-created National Accelerator Laboratory which was to create the largest particle accelerator of its day at Batavia, Illinois. In 1969, Wilson was called to justify the multimillion-dollar machine to the Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. Bucking the trend of the day, Wilson emphasized it had nothing at all to do with national security, rather:

It only has to do with the respect with which we regard one another, the dignity of men, our love of culture... it has to do with: Are we good painters, good sculptors, great poets? I mean all the things that we really venerate and honor in our country and are patriotic about. In that sense, this new knowledge has all to do with honor and country but it has nothing to do directly with defending our country except to help make it worth defending. -Robert R. Wilson



Btw, Europe now has the largest particle accelerator.  Priorities indeed. >.>
 
2014-01-11 12:41:47 AM

Omahawg: I'm still so ticked off at my local library for getting rid of the copy of bukowski's 'post office' I donated in the name of my grandfather I'll likely never give them another book again.


"Weeding" used to be done by degreed professionals. With "the economy" many libraries now are basically just printing reports of how many times each book has been checked out and pulling whatever hasn't met the criteria. The one I worked at often had people who hadn't completed even undergraduate degrees doing the pulling, meaning no one with a degree of any kind ever assessed the material in terms of belonging to a 'base' collection, quality, future need, etc. before removing it from the collection.

Sometimes the results were funny. The List would tell you to pull three copies of Hamlet that had only been checked out once or twice (and purchased maybe eight months prior) and send them to the basement to be sold for fifty cents. The next week every school in town would assign Shakespeare and we'd order fifteen more copies of Hamlet. I only say funny because I gave up trying to offer logic and reason to those people long before that process began.

In cases like yours, the result is not as funny. I at least wish they had set up some way to offer you back the book.

There is another possibility, though I think it's pretty rare. There are reports of very conservative people stealing, or checking out and "losing" books they consider to be offensive in an effort to keep them out of collections. Don't think Buk's been on that type of person's radar for quite some time, but you never know.
 
2014-01-11 12:43:09 AM
Good on the kid, I know I enjoyed the hell out of their library system when I was a kid.  They even had a bookmobile that would park within walking distance of my house so I could get new books every week.  Got dammit, HONEY GET MY CHECKBOOK!


They are in the middle of a major expansion of their main branch, which is refreshing to see in this day and age.

Ames, we're not just a four-letter crossword puzzle solution anymore!
 
2014-01-11 12:43:46 AM

GoldSpider: There's got to be something illegal going on here.


That got me to wondering how many other municipal government services accept unsolicited donations (in cash, no less).  Could I walk into the local sewage treatment plant and donate some money?  I mean, it's important for growing kids to have clean water, right?

What about the city prosecutor's office, or the mayor?  If I walk in there and hand them a wad of cash, is that legal?
 
2014-01-11 12:53:11 AM
I'm being twisted by an unseen hand right now, if you know what I mean, Leftie.
 
2014-01-11 12:54:08 AM
www.quickmeme.com
 
2014-01-11 12:56:36 AM

quo vadimus: Omahawg: I'm still so ticked off at my local library for getting rid of the copy of bukowski's 'post office' I donated in the name of my grandfather I'll likely never give them another book again.

"Weeding" used to be done by degreed professionals. With "the economy" many libraries now are basically just printing reports of how many times each book has been checked out and pulling whatever hasn't met the criteria. The one I worked at often had people who hadn't completed even undergraduate degrees doing the pulling, meaning no one with a degree of any kind ever assessed the material in terms of belonging to a 'base' collection, quality, future need, etc. before removing it from the collection.

Sometimes the results were funny. The List would tell you to pull three copies of Hamlet that had only been checked out once or twice (and purchased maybe eight months prior) and send them to the basement to be sold for fifty cents. The next week every school in town would assign Shakespeare and we'd order fifteen more copies of Hamlet. I only say funny because I gave up trying to offer logic and reason to those people long before that process began.

In cases like yours, the result is not as funny. I at least wish they had set up some way to offer you back the book.

There is another possibility, though I think it's pretty rare. There are reports of very conservative people stealing, or checking out and "losing" books they consider to be offensive in an effort to keep them out of collections. Don't think Buk's been on that type of person's radar for quite some time, but you never know.


Or it could be people just stealing them.  I think we're on our third set of D&D 4th ed corebooks.

/Our GED prep books always get ripped off, too.  I think we ended up buying three last year.  This time, we just said "fark it," and only bought an ebook version.
//We lost half our Thomas the Tank Engine DVDs to thieves
///Our worst problem we ever had with item theft:  I shiat you not, it was the Christian music CDs.
 
2014-01-11 01:03:00 AM

ThrobblefootSpectre: GoldSpider: There's got to be something illegal going on here.

That got me to wondering how many other municipal government services accept unsolicited donations (in cash, no less).  Could I walk into the local sewage treatment plant and donate some money?  I mean, it's important for growing kids to have clean water, right?

What about the city prosecutor's office, or the mayor?  If I walk in there and hand them a wad of cash, is that legal?


Interesting thought. Maybe a library is not considered a "municipal government service." Community resource? Here in Texas libraries receive very little from taxes and survive mainly on donations. Unlike the DA or PD.
 
2014-01-11 01:40:38 AM
So shines a good deed in a weary world

img.fark.net
 
2014-01-11 01:47:21 AM

the_cnidarian: ThrobblefootSpectre: GoldSpider: There's got to be something illegal going on here.

That got me to wondering how many other municipal government services accept unsolicited donations (in cash, no less).  Could I walk into the local sewage treatment plant and donate some money?  I mean, it's important for growing kids to have clean water, right?

What about the city prosecutor's office, or the mayor?  If I walk in there and hand them a wad of cash, is that legal?

Interesting thought. Maybe a library is not considered a "municipal government service." Community resource? Here in Texas libraries receive very little from taxes and survive mainly on donations. Unlike the DA or PD.


Wait, wait, wait! You're telling me Texas actually has libraries? Huh.

I'm actually a Texan. I just suffer from a crippling condition that won't allow me to pass up low-hanging fruit. Plus the sweet tears of Texas hate that seems to pervade Fark is one of the reasons I love this place.
 
2014-01-11 02:50:27 AM

GoldSpider: There's got to be something illegal going on here.


FOLLOW THE MONEY
 
2014-01-11 02:58:07 AM

Surool: So shines a good deed in a weary world

[img.fark.net image 446x248]



Your jib, I like the cut of it.
 
2014-01-11 03:14:05 AM

Surool: So shines a good deed in a weary world

[img.fark.net image 446x248]


Well done
 
2014-01-11 03:15:14 AM

everlastinggobstopper: Surool: So shines a good deed in a weary world

[img.fark.net image 446x248]


Your jib, I like the cut of it.


HAHA, farking awesome.
 
2014-01-11 04:25:20 AM
7 or 8 years ago, the KC public library computers went down. They lost all record of what books were checked out, and who they were checked out by. I had a good dozen books out at the time.

I wonder how many books the system lost.
 
2014-01-11 04:42:06 AM
nerd alert!
 
2014-01-11 04:51:31 AM

Surool: So shines a good deed in a weary world

[img.fark.net image 446x248]


That was my thinking.   Merchant of Venice, it was Willy Wonka!
 
2014-01-11 06:38:45 AM

JonathanChance: Omahawg: I'm still so ticked off at my local library for getting rid of the copy of bukowski's 'post office' I donated in the name of my grandfather I'll likely never give them another book again.

Don't.  It's called weeding.  All libraries do it.  It helps make room for new items, and allows us to discard items that may be out of date or too damaged to circulate.  If a weeded book is in good enough condition, often times the book will be sold in order to raise finds to buy more materials.

/Work in public library, getting kick out of your reply
//I helped weed one of our small town branches in our county's system after their previous librarian retired.  She was a notorious packrat when it came to books.  Amongst the materials that were still circulating  that we eventually ended up weeding:
 A book on the Winter Olympics copyrighted 1979.
 A children's book that provided a behind-the-scenes look at a newspaper, complete with teletypes, computers sporting modems with acoustic couplers, phototelegraphy, and manual paste-up.
 A badly beat up copy ofLittle Women that was printed in 1957.
 A book on how to start your own small business that was brand new when slap bracelets and Tiger LCD handheld games were all the rage.
 All their VHS tapes, Including a couple one of my co workers ended up buying and sending off to  Everything is Terrible!
A Baseball card price guide from 1999
///People from that library were royally pissed and biatched and moaned to the head of our system because they thought we were throwing away "perfectly good books."


Your list of weeded books is fine with me. But over the past five years, my personal library has enjoyed some disturbing weeding practices. I have purchased former library books via half.com and ebay.

1. A Lincoln biography
2. A concordance of Shakespeare's grammar
3. A copy of Euripides' The Trojan Women
4. Planets For Man by Asimov, 1960ish (ok that one I understand but so fun to read!)

And it goes on and on. All in excellent condition.

Your list reflects good weeding practice. My list reflects a dip in our cultural heritage. Shouldn't libraries hold the line a bit?
 
2014-01-11 06:52:42 AM
Anyone else read the headline as LoLCats?  I was so confused why cats were donating to a library....
 
2014-01-11 06:56:56 AM
What a sucker.
 
2014-01-11 07:34:57 AM
Shakespeare: So shines a good deed in a weary world

Shakespeare stole that from Willy Wonka.
 
2014-01-11 08:24:20 AM

balisane: ajgeek: Cool on the kid. Here's to hoping he wasn't being twisted by an unseen hand here.

His sister had a "give" jar, too: seems like the parents are teaching them the virtues of giving back to the community. AKA: parenting. The shock.


/mum and dad deserve a hero tag, too
//hope sister's donation also gets matched
///slashies for warm fuzzies


Saw that and I agree. Parenting done right.
 
2014-01-11 08:49:25 AM
$18.59?  Really?  The USA still uses pennies?  I don't believe it!

/Next thing, you'll be telling me that they still use avoirdupois and British imperial units.
 
2014-01-11 08:51:16 AM

NutWrench: Shakespeare: So shines a good deed in a weary world

Shakespeare stole that from Willy Wonka.


Wonka stole it and butchered it.

"So shines a good deed in a naughty world." ~ Shakespeare
 
2014-01-11 09:16:34 AM
Cool story. Thanks subs.
 
2014-01-11 03:42:13 PM
Cool! Glad to see a person that actually deserves the 'hero' tag.

But I think it's wrong to 'pay' a child for doing something that he should do for free (picking up his toys). As a member of the family we all should do our part.
 
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