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(Network World)   Target: Did we say 40 million victims? We meant 70 million   (networkworld.com) divider line 95
    More: Followup, Target, credit monitoring, data breach, Gregg Steinhafel  
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3529 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jan 2014 at 12:48 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-10 01:54:29 PM  

Incog_Neeto: DoBeDoBeDo: This theft is not a new breach, but was uncovered as part of the ongoing investigation. At this time, the investigation has determined that the stolen information includes names, mailing addresses, phone numbers or email addresses for up to 70 million individuals


But it was totally just a couple of hacked POS devices that were skimming cards.   We SWEAR we didn't have a database full of full track data!!!!!

Honestly, I think the brands should drop Target like a steaming turd.

I said in the other thread that I thought a POS hack was very unlikely and it was probably a database breach.   This will not change shiat about the way Target does business in any case, they make a living on targeted marketing,  They know your pregnant before your family does  http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured - out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/   and there is no way in hell they are giving that up over some trivial fine.


That's why I hope the card brands tell them they can no longer accept CC's, since it's obvious they were storing full track data and unencrypted at that.  They should be dropped and their QSA should be black listed for good.

But again that's just me hoping that someone wants the PCI-DSS to actually mean something.   But they'll get a slap on the wrist and sent on their way.   No way the government would let a company that big take a hit like that anyway.
 
2014-01-10 01:56:11 PM  
assets.diylol.com

The only way to go
 
2014-01-10 01:57:42 PM  

jtown: CitizenjaQ: jtown: I_Am_Weasel: Target has 70 million shoppers?

Had.  Had 70 million shoppers.

And, yeah, that sounds like a preposterous number unless they've been storing the data from every transaction they've ever had since they opened for business.

...and why wouldn't they?

Um...Because they shouldn't be storing credit card information from their POS systems.  There's no reason to retain that data once the transaction is complete.  Target shouldn't have access to it at all.  It should go straight to the payment processor who returns the appropriate code (complete, declined, error, etc.).


They keep all that data stored at the POS level for returns.  If you don't have your receipt, you can hand them the card you think you used for the original transaction.  All the previous transactions will pop up if it has ever been used in a Target.

Convenient for returns, but a security nightmare.
 
2014-01-10 01:57:54 PM  
They went from 40 million victims to 70 million?  We're gonna have to upgrade them from "Stalin+Hitler" to "Mao".
 
2014-01-10 02:01:51 PM  
jtown:You do realize that the issue here is the loss of personal information, right?  Nobody would be talking about this if it was just sales data.

Right, yes, I know. My initial question was phrased poorly. I just meant:

GIVEN that they apparently do store personal credit card information, why would it be surprising that they have that information for ALL their transactions as opposed to only recent ones?
 
2014-01-10 02:02:22 PM  

mayIFark: Nuclear Monk: I_Am_Weasel: Target has 70 million shoppers?

I suspect relatively few people actively hate and avoid the store.

I don't have any hate for them at all. Still last time I was there, was 8 years ago. I just don't see how they fit in anywhere on my buying list. Grocery? I don't think they even carry any. For everything else, there is Amazon and Costco for me. What do people exactly buy from Target?


Wet cat food (dry food comes from Petco), cat litter, things like laundry detergent, dishwasher detergent, toilet paper, any sort of medication from the pharmacy, health things like vitamins, nail clippers, lip balm. Baby stuff like clothes, diapers, (along with some things we get at Babies R' Us).  Just general things we need around the house we get from Target, unless it's grocery stuff then we always go to the grocery store (even though Target has all the same things).  I do have a terrible addiction to their Archer Farms puddings however (think that's the brand name...comes from their deli).

I've bought clothes at target (well t-shirts, lounge pants, socks), bed sheets, trash cans, kitchen utensils and appliances, desk/stand fans, light bulbs, window curtains, shower curtains.  Other bathroom things like toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant, body wash, shampoo, face wash, face lotion. 

But I suspect you already knew that Target is a store that has all sorts of things for your house.  But that's what I buy there, and I'm sure I'm leaving things off the list.
 
2014-01-10 02:05:56 PM  

CrazyCracka420: mayIFark: Nuclear Monk: I_Am_Weasel: Target has 70 million shoppers?

I suspect relatively few people actively hate and avoid the store.

I don't have any hate for them at all. Still last time I was there, was 8 years ago. I just don't see how they fit in anywhere on my buying list. Grocery? I don't think they even carry any. For everything else, there is Amazon and Costco for me. What do people exactly buy from Target?

Wet cat food (dry food comes from Petco), cat litter, things like laundry detergent, dishwasher detergent, toilet paper, any sort of medication from the pharmacy, health things like vitamins, nail clippers, lip balm. Baby stuff like clothes, diapers, (along with some things we get at Babies R' Us).  Just general things we need around the house we get from Target, unless it's grocery stuff then we always go to the grocery store (even though Target has all the same things).  I do have a terrible addiction to their Archer Farms puddings however (think that's the brand name...comes from their deli).

I've bought clothes at target (well t-shirts, lounge pants, socks), bed sheets, trash cans, kitchen utensils and appliances, desk/stand fans, light bulbs, window curtains, shower curtains.  Other bathroom things like toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant, body wash, shampoo, face wash, face lotion. 

But I suspect you already knew that Target is a store that has all sorts of things for your house.  But that's what I buy there, and I'm sure I'm leaving things off the list.


Also when I was single, I noticed there was always a lot of hot, young (professional/independent) type of women who would shop there.  And I save 5% when I use my Target card (as well as this CartWheel app which almost always has items for sale that I am going to be shopping for anyways).

What I don't get, is how this data breach happened, and how they are going to prevent it in the future.  Why are they storing customer's bank accounts, and credit card information in the first place?
 
2014-01-10 02:06:00 PM  
Would you believe 100 million?
How about anybody within 20 miles of a Target store?
 
2014-01-10 02:09:30 PM  

penthesilea: jtown: CitizenjaQ: jtown: I_Am_Weasel: Target has 70 million shoppers?

Had.  Had 70 million shoppers.

And, yeah, that sounds like a preposterous number unless they've been storing the data from every transaction they've ever had since they opened for business.

...and why wouldn't they?

Um...Because they shouldn't be storing credit card information from their POS systems.  There's no reason to retain that data once the transaction is complete.  Target shouldn't have access to it at all.  It should go straight to the payment processor who returns the appropriate code (complete, declined, error, etc.).

They keep all that data stored at the POS level for returns.  If you don't have your receipt, you can hand them the card you think you used for the original transaction.  All the previous transactions will pop up if it has ever been used in a Target.

Convenient for returns, but a security nightmare.


There's no reason to keep that data in a form that would be of use to anyone outside of Target.  It shouldn't be a security nightmare.  It should be Security 101.  But the fact that we're talking about two entirely different types of security breaches at the same company at the same time shows that even S101 is too sophisticated for Target.  :(
 
2014-01-10 02:09:34 PM  

dittybopper: They went from 40 million victims to 70 million?  We're gonna have to upgrade them from "Stalin+Hitler" to "Mao".


It may be up to 110 million (though not likely).  This is a different set of victims from the 40 million who had their card data exposed in the earlier breach.  Though there's bound to be some overlap (Venn diagram style), this is a new breach that was exposed during the investigation of the first one.
 
2014-01-10 02:09:52 PM  

I_Am_Weasel: Target has 70 million shoppers?


No, the compromised accounts must have been stolen by Target from other retailers, proving yet again that there is no honor among thieves.
 
2014-01-10 02:13:16 PM  

lemurs: dittybopper: They went from 40 million victims to 70 million?  We're gonna have to upgrade them from "Stalin+Hitler" to "Mao".

It may be up to 110 million (though not likely).  This is a different set of victims from the 40 million who had their card data exposed in the earlier breach.  Though there's bound to be some overlap (Venn diagram style), this is a new breach that was exposed during the investigation of the first one.


Nope

This theft is not a new breach, but was uncovered as part of the ongoing investigation


The investigation is just turning up more data stolen from the original breach
 
2014-01-10 02:19:18 PM  

lemurs: dittybopper: They went from 40 million victims to 70 million?  We're gonna have to upgrade them from "Stalin+Hitler" to "Mao".

It may be up to 110 million (though not likely).  This is a different set of victims from the 40 million who had their card data exposed in the earlier breach.  Though there's bound to be some overlap (Venn diagram style), this is a new breach that was exposed during the investigation of the first one.


That's not what I heard on the news at Noon.   From my local NBC affiliate:

Target says that personal information -- including phone numbers and email and mailing addresses -- was stolen from as many as 70 million customers in its pre-Christmas data breach. That was substantially more customers than Target had previously said were affected.
...
The company told customers Friday that its ongoing investigation of the breach has shown that more personal information had been stolen than it was aware of before and more customers were affected.


That is unambiguously worded:  There are an addition 30 million on top of the 40 million it already knew about.
 
2014-01-10 02:20:15 PM  
Not saying that 70 million CCs were taken though, as it looks like this doesn't involve CCs.

I'm guessing they dealt with the CC notification but knew the database contained WAY more data but that they only needed to fess up to the CC breach.   Then someone showed them the various privacy and data breach laws from the states they operate in and they decided to come forward with "new information".  Once they figured out they couldn't get around NOT notifying people.

This has all the markings of doing nothing as far as security goes, and then trying to get around dealing with a breach.

As soon as it happened they were claiming it was "sophisticated" and it was limited to hacked POS devices.    That right there set off alarm bells.   When that shiat is brought out in the first notification it means, "we forgot to sanitize database inputs from our web forms and everything connects directly to one master DB with WAY more data than needs to be in it.  A simple SQL injection that any script kiddie could run got every piece of customer data we've ever had."
 
2014-01-10 02:21:52 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: This theft is not a new breach, but was uncovered as part of the ongoing investigation

The investigation is just turning up more data stolen from the original breach


Quite true.  I just meant "new" in the sense that it's a different set of data, and should've been more clear.  It's reportedly "names, mailing addresses, phone numbers and e-mail addresses were exposed, at least in partial form, to the hackers who accessed its data system" and not just uncovering more exposed credit cards like the headline implies.
 
2014-01-10 02:27:52 PM  

mayIFark: Nuclear Monk: I_Am_Weasel: Target has 70 million shoppers?

I suspect relatively few people actively hate and avoid the store.

I don't have any hate for them at all. Still last time I was there, was 8 years ago. I just don't see how they fit in anywhere on my buying list. Grocery? I don't think they even carry any. For everything else, there is Amazon and Costco for me. What do people exactly buy from Target?


The Super Target near me has groceries, a pharmacy, yardwork supplies, car supplies, etc.   I don't shop there weekly because it's a bit pricier and their selection isn't as good as a hardware store, for example, but sometimes it's nice to be able to get a bunch of stuff all in one place. If Colorado law would change so they could stock something stronger than just 3.2% beer, it'd be perfect.
 
2014-01-10 02:39:06 PM  
CrazyCracka420:
Also when I was single, I noticed there was always a lot of hot, young (professional/independent) type of women who would shop there.


One of the hottest women I've ever seen was a checkout girl at my local Target. Every time I went in there (about once a month) for the year she worked there, I'd be a real creepy creeper and try to end up at her register.

Wow. That sounded really creepy. Posting it anyway.
 
2014-01-10 02:42:03 PM  
Meh. Far better to be one of 70 million "victims" than one of 1,000. What are the odds that they're going to get around to your credit-card number?
 
2014-01-10 02:43:09 PM  

FarkingReading: CrazyCracka420:
Also when I was single, I noticed there was always a lot of hot, young (professional/independent) type of women who would shop there.


One of the hottest women I've ever seen was a checkout girl at my local Target. Every time I went in there (about once a month) for the year she worked there, I'd be a real creepy creeper and try to end up at her register.

Wow. That sounded really creepy. Posting it anyway.


It's only creepy if you try to hit on them. I've had checkout girlfriends for years at my local supermarket.
 
2014-01-10 02:47:54 PM  
There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.
 
2014-01-10 02:51:16 PM  

T.rex: There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.


Not sure if serious
 
2014-01-10 02:55:54 PM  
And the people that did this will never be caught. What a farking mess.
 
2014-01-10 02:59:55 PM  

farkingatwork: mayIFark: Cyclometh: There are 313.9 million people in the US, which means that 22% of Americans have had their credit card data compromised.

That's farking insane.

You are assuming everyone has a credit card. I don't think you can have one before the age of 18. Many adults don't have them either. Assuming 60% populations has CC, that's about one in every 3 persons who has cards. If we assume an average person has 4 cards, and only one got stolen, its about 1 in 12 cards in the US got stolen.

Farking Insane.

No.

You're assuming this is only credit cards. There is other information leaked, as they are identifying.

"names, mailing addresses, phone numbers or email addresses "

Any of the 4 = 70 million.

So in reality it's probably 50 million real people and 10-20 million spambots, fake numbers, etc.


I don't know how far back this data breach goes, but in the past 15 years I've probably had seven or eight different debit and credit cards. I switched banks twice, and had new cards issued a few times when the magnetic strip stopped working or if I thought my info had been stolen.

Do I count as one victim in their eyes, or seven? I'm sure I bought a game or a t-shirt or crap like shampoo at least once with each card.

/wife's card was cancelled by Chase due to Target issue, and mine hasn't been yet. I don't know why.
 
2014-01-10 03:01:17 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: T.rex: There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.

Not sure if serious


Brings up a point, though.

There are about 235 million adults age 18 and over in the US.

Thus, the Target breach would affect 29.8% of adults in the US.  I find that an implausibly high percentage.  Not impossibly high, just implausibly high.

I wonder if it is 70 million *RECORDS*, with some degree of duplicates, triplicates, quadruplicates, etc.
 
2014-01-10 03:02:09 PM  
If you think you have anything resembling privacy when it comes to personal information like that you're in denial. Target, and many other retailers, could probably figure out your daily schedule down to the minute if they applied any effort into figuring it out. I go to Target to pay for something incidental like lightbulbs and coupons magically print out for my favorite magazine, the specific brand of face wash I use, and the DVD I've been thinking about purchasing. They know everything about you already. Everything. Credit card numbers, pins, mother's maiden name, your favorite brand of cereal, what car you drive, and how many times your credit has been pulled. This is the biggest publicized breach of its kind, but face it, this data has been out there forever.
 
2014-01-10 03:05:06 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: Not saying that 70 million CCs were taken though, as it looks like this doesn't involve CCs.

I'm guessing they dealt with the CC notification but knew the database contained WAY more data but that they only needed to fess up to the CC breach.   Then someone showed them the various privacy and data breach laws from the states they operate in and they decided to come forward with "new information".  Once they figured out they couldn't get around NOT notifying people.

This has all the markings of doing nothing as far as security goes, and then trying to get around dealing with a breach.

As soon as it happened they were claiming it was "sophisticated" and it was limited to hacked POS devices.    That right there set off alarm bells.   When that shiat is brought out in the first notification it means, "we forgot to sanitize database inputs from our web forms and everything connects directly to one master DB with WAY more data than needs to be in it.  A simple SQL injection that any script kiddie could run got every piece of customer data we've ever had."


Are you saying that little Johnny Tables is responsible for all this?

/not obscure here
 
2014-01-10 03:13:13 PM  

dittybopper: DoBeDoBeDo: T.rex: There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.

Not sure if serious

Brings up a point, though.

There are about 235 million adults age 18 and over in the US.

Thus, the Target breach would affect 29.8% of adults in the US.  I find that an implausibly high percentage.  Not impossibly high, just implausibly high.

I wonder if it is 70 million *RECORDS*, with some degree of duplicates, triplicates, quadruplicates, etc.


Well that depends on if you believe this was data taken just during the dates they indicated, or if it was a database breach which contained a record on everyone who has ever used a card there.   I'm guessing the latter would have some dupes as people used multiple cards there, but probably not as many as you would think.  70 million people *could* have shopped there and used a CC in the past x amount of years.
 
2014-01-10 03:18:25 PM  

jtown: I_Am_Weasel: Target has 70 million shoppers?

Had.  Had 70 million shoppers.

And, yeah, that sounds like a preposterous number unless they've been storing the data from every transaction they've ever had since they opened for business.


Can't speak for Target, but I've heard that Sears has data sources somewhere that's 100 years old.  So if you really, really want to know what your great-grandmother bought out of the Sears catalog, they could (with some great effort) figure it out.

/Seriously, there's a LOT of money to be made in ETL.
//And everyone's been doing it forever.  It's just the rise of cheap, ubiquitous computing that actually made them any good at it.
 
2014-01-10 03:29:31 PM  

T.rex: There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.


You may want to check your count.
 
2014-01-10 03:36:29 PM  

mbillips: FarkingReading: CrazyCracka420:
Also when I was single, I noticed there was always a lot of hot, young (professional/independent) type of women who would shop there.


One of the hottest women I've ever seen was a checkout girl at my local Target. Every time I went in there (about once a month) for the year she worked there, I'd be a real creepy creeper and try to end up at her register.

Wow. That sounded really creepy. Posting it anyway.

It's only creepy if you try to hit on them. I've had checkout girlfriends for years at my local supermarket.


Now I feel better and I have a new term for it. Thanks!
 
2014-01-10 03:39:32 PM  

DoBeDoBeDo: T.rex: There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.

Not sure if serious


I'm thinking not. Or hoping not, anyway. Most Farkers aren't that epically stupid unless trolling.
 
2014-01-10 03:52:50 PM  

Cyclometh: There are 313.9 million people in the US, which means that 22% of Americans have had their credit card data compromised.

That's farking insane.


Worse than that.  I was having this conversation with a co-worker this morning.  There are about 314m people in the US as you said.  That includes infants and whatnot.  Not everyone has a CC.  The proportion of American CC holders that have been compromised is actually going to be higher than 22%!
 
2014-01-10 03:57:23 PM  

Incog_Neeto: DoBeDoBeDo: This theft is not a new breach, but was uncovered as part of the ongoing investigation. At this time, the investigation has determined that the stolen information includes names, mailing addresses, phone numbers or email addresses for up to 70 million individuals


But it was totally just a couple of hacked POS devices that were skimming cards.   We SWEAR we didn't have a database full of full track data!!!!!

Honestly, I think the brands should drop Target like a steaming turd.

I said in the other thread that I thought a POS hack was very unlikely and it was probably a database breach.   This will not change shiat about the way Target does business in any case, they make a living on targeted marketing,  They know your pregnant before your family does  http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured - out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/   and there is no way in hell they are giving that up over some trivial fine.


I think it was a back end hack as well. It has been a long time since I worked there but the POS was as secure as any other retailer if not more so. While the hypercom payment devices do not have encrypting heads, the mag stripe data is encrypted before it hits the register. It is also secure over the wire. Another tell tale sign is that the got email addresses.

Most large retailers also use tokenization where your card data is tokenized with a third party and only the token is passed around after the tokenization. (Not sure if Target has this).

As for storing of the card data in the store most only do it for offline scenarios at the register (not very often). Target is no different in the store as far as I know. It is a PCI red flag if they did. However, Target is also a bank. They issue their own cards and may have other requirements for storing card data outside of handling returns.

The sad thing with Target is they really changed how IT works internally a few years ago. From what I have heard they didn't think they needed developers that specialize in POS and they started running projects where a developer might work on POS one month and an HR system another month using some kind of "developer pool" My gut tells me that the long term cause of this breach is their adoption of the whole "IT doesn't matter" management strategy rather than their IT guys. They have some really really good people in IT but if you aren't focused you can get compromised. Good security requires a lot of constant attention.

I really like Target and I have new cards because of it, but I will still shop there.
 
2014-01-10 04:08:21 PM  

Agent Smiths Laugh: T.rex: There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.

You may want to check your count.


Maybe he's a time traveler from 1890.
 
2014-01-10 04:19:12 PM  

FatBenAffleck: The sad thing with Target is they really changed how IT works internally a few years ago. From what I have heard they didn't think they needed developers that specialize in POS and they started running projects where a developer might work on POS one month and an HR system another month using some kind of "developer pool" My gut tells me that the long term cause of this breach is their adoption of the whole "IT doesn't matter" management strategy rather than their IT guys.


That's a really, really good way to make sure that none of your IT guys are actually experts at what they do.

Stupid, stupid, stupid.  I mean, some cross-training is of course valuable, but treating programmers as interchangeable is like saying the grease monkey who changes the oil and tires at the garage is interchangeable with the factory certified master mechanic.  Some are just better than others, and of course, someone who concentrates mainly on one thing is more likely to catch problems with that one thing than a succession of people who just get a passing look at it.
 
2014-01-10 04:33:06 PM  

dittybopper: FatBenAffleck: The sad thing with Target is they really changed how IT works internally a few years ago. From what I have heard they didn't think they needed developers that specialize in POS and they started running projects where a developer might work on POS one month and an HR system another month using some kind of "developer pool" My gut tells me that the long term cause of this breach is their adoption of the whole "IT doesn't matter" management strategy rather than their IT guys.

That's a really, really good way to make sure that none of your IT guys are actually experts at what they do.

Stupid, stupid, stupid.  I mean, some cross-training is of course valuable, but treating programmers as interchangeable is like saying the grease monkey who changes the oil and tires at the garage is interchangeable with the factory certified master mechanic.  Some are just better than others, and of course, someone who concentrates mainly on one thing is more likely to catch problems with that one thing than a succession of people who just get a passing look at it.


I agree. I left because the culture didn't value IT and from all of the people I know there it only got worse after I left. Most people might not know that they also make everyone (IT included) wear a suit and tie every day. Or you can wear red and khaki, but that is a non starter career wise. If you don't have a tie you must have a jacket. If you leave your desk you must put your jacket on.

Where they came up with this I have no idea but it it not conducive to retaining talent and the BS was part of my decision to leave. I personally hate coding when I'm not comfortable. Every so often it is fine for management meetings or something but every day.

The sad part is that IT will be blamed, heads will roll, and the ridiculous management decisions that led to this won't come to light. This is just my opinion from having worked there and knowing many people that still do
 
2014-01-10 04:43:04 PM  

FatBenAffleck: dittybopper: FatBenAffleck: The sad thing with Target is they really changed how IT works internally a few years ago. From what I have heard they didn't think they needed developers that specialize in POS and they started running projects where a developer might work on POS one month and an HR system another month using some kind of "developer pool" My gut tells me that the long term cause of this breach is their adoption of the whole "IT doesn't matter" management strategy rather than their IT guys.

That's a really, really good way to make sure that none of your IT guys are actually experts at what they do.

Stupid, stupid, stupid.  I mean, some cross-training is of course valuable, but treating programmers as interchangeable is like saying the grease monkey who changes the oil and tires at the garage is interchangeable with the factory certified master mechanic.  Some are just better than others, and of course, someone who concentrates mainly on one thing is more likely to catch problems with that one thing than a succession of people who just get a passing look at it.

I agree. I left because the culture didn't value IT and from all of the people I know there it only got worse after I left. Most people might not know that they also make everyone (IT included) wear a suit and tie every day. Or you can wear red and khaki, but that is a non starter career wise. If you don't have a tie you must have a jacket. If you leave your desk you must put your jacket on.

Where they came up with this I have no idea but it it not conducive to retaining talent and the BS was part of my decision to leave. I personally hate coding when I'm not comfortable. Every so often it is fine for management meetings or something but every day.

The sad part is that IT will be blamed, heads will roll, and the ridiculous management decisions that led to this won't come to light. This is just my opinion from having worked there and knowing many people that still do


Correction. I didn't mean to imply that I left because of the dress code. I just put it out there as an example of the corporate culture and one of the strange decisions they have made and applied across the board.
 
2014-01-10 05:09:02 PM  
Did you shop at Target?
Did you get a gift card from Target?
Did somebody get you something from Target?
Have you walked by a Target?

You're screwed.
 
2014-01-10 05:30:59 PM  

FatBenAffleck: Where they came up with this I have no idea but it it not conducive to retaining talent


IT people tend to be a bit eccentric, in one way or another, especially the really good ones.  If you straightjacket them too much in to the executive manager model, you'll end up with mid-level manager types as IT guys because all of the ones with eccentricities have moved on to places where they can be, well, eccentric.
 
2014-01-10 05:35:14 PM  

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Have you walked by a Target?

You're screwed.


i39.tinypic.com


So true, so true........
 
2014-01-10 05:56:08 PM  

Aigoo: DoBeDoBeDo: T.rex: There's not even 70 million people in the US, let alone Target shoppers.

Not sure if serious

I'm thinking not. Or hoping not, anyway. Most Farkers aren't that epically stupid unless trolling.


Or, you know... exaggerating to be funny...
Not sure how you are equating intelligence with the memorization of random and useless statistics, however.   Do you think baseball stats nerds are geniuses?
 
2014-01-10 07:23:43 PM  
The fact that it's not being described as a terroristic attack is interesting, because this shiat is farked up.  

Was it all a plot by Anonymous to get America to switch to Bitcoin.
 
2014-01-10 10:04:01 PM  
The business is called Target! TARGET!
 
2014-01-10 10:29:26 PM  

SDRR: Nemo's Brother: Last time I went there, I went in to buy some cheap running shoes and some jeans.  The old nag working the register chewed me out for daring to bring clothes to an express line during lunch hours.  Just none stop nagging. I went to complain to the manager but no manager came so I left.

CSB


Clothing Story, Bro?
 
2014-01-11 05:10:25 AM  
blog.ivman.com
 
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