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(News.com.au)   ɹǝʌo sʇuıɹdǝnןq ǝɥʇ dıןɟ 'sıɥʇ pɐǝɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟı   (news.com.au) divider line 101
    More: Fail, Chile, Sebastian Pinera  
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15904 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jan 2014 at 7:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



101 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-01-10 06:22:44 AM  
Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.
 
2014-01-10 07:10:53 AM  
Hahahaha I bet they didn't hire an architect since they aren't legally required too now. Spanish engineers.
 
2014-01-10 07:13:08 AM  

AgentPothead: Hahahaha I bet they didn't hire an architect since they aren't legally required too now. Spanish engineers.


This happened in Chile, you capullo.
 
2014-01-10 07:14:50 AM  
I had the same problem when I hired some blonde landscapers to put in new sod. I had to keep yelling out the window "Green side up!"
 
2014-01-10 07:16:09 AM  
Give 'em a break.  The first time you do something, there are bound to be a few little mistakes.
 
2014-01-10 07:17:40 AM  

NicoFinn: AgentPothead: Hahahaha I bet they didn't hire an architect since they aren't legally required too now. Spanish engineers.

This happened in Chile, you capullo.


Yeah but the company is 100% spanish. I'm assuming they flew over their engineers instead of using locally sourced talent.
 
2014-01-10 07:18:07 AM  
I'm not seeing what exactly they got upside down from that video and the article doesn't say. That and I'm having a hard time figuring out how you can build something that big with such a glaring error as "Upside down". Major project like that have several layers of supervision and oversight from foremen to site supervisors to agents of the people paying to have it built at a minimum. Then there's surveyors and just the plain old common sense of the people working on it.

There must have been something very wrong with the drawings that made it look right while they were putting it together (probably off site) until they discovered that it wouldn't fit or something when they went to install it. That's all I can think of.
 
2014-01-10 07:18:09 AM  
"The only responsible party is the builder. We are going to make them answer for this," Public Works Minister Loreto Silva fumed.

Interesting. I wish my country would handle screw ups like this. But we have a airport that is several times over budget and several years late in opening with no date for opening in sight and stuff like a concert hall where the winning bid was 186 million, yet it will cost 800 million Euros and it will simply be paid. Great. That's why we have those bid system, right?
 
2014-01-10 07:20:07 AM  
What's a bluepruits?  If I see a blue Prius upside down, I'll ask them I guess.

/I could read it because I rolled my desk top
 
2014-01-10 07:23:57 AM  
Another funny headline might have been:

¿ ----- ---- ?
 
2014-01-10 07:25:15 AM  

lucksi: "The only responsible party is the builder. We are going to make them answer for this," Public Works Minister Loreto Silva fumed.

Interesting. I wish my country would handle screw ups like this. But we have a airport that is several times over budget and several years late in opening with no date for opening in sight and stuff like a concert hall where the winning bid was 186 million, yet it will cost 800 million Euros and it will simply be paid. Great. That's why we have those bid system, right?


If there are problems that the specs didn't cover then the company doing the work shouldn't have to pay for them. For example if the bidding specs say that the soil is of one type but when the work starts it's an entirely different type which needs a lot of extra work and material to get it right then whose fault is it? Whoever wrote the specs in the first place. What if they add more or change things after the bidding is over and the winner was selected? Whose fault would that be.

Now if it's because of material overruns due to either waste or the company ordered the wrong grade of material then it's certainly the builders fault as are labor problems.
 
2014-01-10 07:25:24 AM  
I would like to be the first to call Bullshiat. There is no way this can be true.
 
2014-01-10 07:25:50 AM  

Radioactive Ass: I'm not seeing what exactly they got upside down from that video and the article doesn't say. That and I'm having a hard time figuring out how you can build something that big with such a glaring error as "Upside down". Major project like that have several layers of supervision and oversight from foremen to site supervisors to agents of the people paying to have it built at a minimum. Then there's surveyors and just the plain old common sense of the people working on it.

There must have been something very wrong with the drawings that made it look right while they were putting it together (probably off site) until they discovered that it wouldn't fit or something when they went to install it. That's all I can think of.


They didn't.  They installed the traffic deck backwards so the lanes don't line up, like it shows in the preview image for the video at the top.
 
2014-01-10 07:29:46 AM  

LrdPhoenix: They didn't. They installed the traffic deck backwards so the lanes don't line up, like it shows in the preview image for the video at the top.


So not upside down but rotated 180 deg. horizontally in some way? The video isn't really working all that well for me.

Off to Google.
 
2014-01-10 07:30:20 AM  
i900.photobucket.com

Approves of this design
 
2014-01-10 07:31:54 AM  

Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.


ya dont say?
i26.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-10 07:31:55 AM  
Would love to see the shots. Wouldn't be the first time I've seen blueprints with inverted or reversed plans, or conflicting plans/elevations, I swear that architects and structural engineers have become progressively dumber since their specialties became PhDs.

/Push here, Dummy
 
2014-01-10 07:34:16 AM  

AgentPothead: NicoFinn: AgentPothead: Hahahaha I bet they didn't hire an architect since they aren't legally required too now. Spanish engineers.

This happened in Chile, you capullo.

Yeah but the company is 100% spanish. I'm assuming they flew over their engineers instead of using locally sourced talent.


Well, there's the problem.  They built it to work in the Northern Hemisphere.
 
2014-01-10 07:34:19 AM  
Look, we were just following directions.

media.log-in.ru
 
2014-01-10 07:34:22 AM  
i.imgur.com

It's a tourist trap ... Believe it ... or not
 
2014-01-10 07:38:01 AM  
Why don`t they just get some line painter in and paint the line down the middle and screw the cyclists?
 
2014-01-10 07:38:24 AM  

MythDragon: I had the same problem when I hired some blonde landscapers to put in new sod. I had to keep yelling out the window "Green side up!"


at least they never painted your porch
 
2014-01-10 07:39:49 AM  
'GREEN UP! GREEN UP!"
 
2014-01-10 07:40:49 AM  

MythDragon: I had the same problem when I hired some blonde landscapers to put in new sod. I had to keep yelling out the window "Green side up!"


*Shakes fist at kvinesknows*
 
2014-01-10 07:42:44 AM  
Ok. Not built upside down but installed backwards. Probably the hinge where it attached to the underside of the deck or was attached to the footings. I can see that happening with a bad drawing and it could also cause misalignment. Still sloppy though but not all that difficult to fix in a real sense. It'll cost them though.

All is right in my world again... for now.
 
2014-01-10 07:51:22 AM  
The blueprints were probably in english.
Even the french exchange students were better at english than the spanish ones, IIRC.

One time I had to greet a new spanish exchange student to our dormitory. He couldn't speak any english at all and we didn't know he was coming, either.
We somehow managed to throw some simple spanish sentences together with some french, and could eventually figure out he was in the wrong dorm (yeah, he just finally showed us the address he was going to)

But still, who goes to STUDY somewhere, where they can't speak neither national language nor english?
 
2014-01-10 07:52:13 AM  

Tax Boy: [i.imgur.com image 280x164]

It's a tourist trap ... Believe it ... or not


It happens sometimes

assets.inhabitat.com
 
2014-01-10 07:57:03 AM  

MythDragon: I had the same problem when I hired some blonde landscapers to put in new sod. I had to keep yelling out the window "Green side up!"


I was late to the party again. Next time I'll read the thread before posting.
 
2014-01-10 07:59:56 AM  

Radioactive Ass: LrdPhoenix: They didn't. They installed the traffic deck backwards so the lanes don't line up, like it shows in the preview image for the video at the top.

So not upside down but rotated 180 deg. horizontally in some way? The video isn't really working all that well for me.

Off to Google.


Exactly.

In the video they use the example of a road with a pedestrian/bike lane at one side.  When you get to the middle of the bridge, that lane swaps sides of the bridge, so everything is off kilter.
 
2014-01-10 08:05:02 AM  
So I guess an actual picture of the 'finished' bridge would be too much to ask for?

And I'm no engineer, but based on the pic of the construction that was included, I believe that would be a swing bridge, not a draw bridge.
 
2014-01-10 08:07:08 AM  

Radioactive Ass: lucksi: "The only responsible party is the builder. We are going to make them answer for this," Public Works Minister Loreto Silva fumed.

Interesting. I wish my country would handle screw ups like this. But we have a airport that is several times over budget and several years late in opening with no date for opening in sight and stuff like a concert hall where the winning bid was 186 million, yet it will cost 800 million Euros and it will simply be paid. Great. That's why we have those bid system, right?

If there are problems that the specs didn't cover then the company doing the work shouldn't have to pay for them. For example if the bidding specs say that the soil is of one type but when the work starts it's an entirely different type which needs a lot of extra work and material to get it right then whose fault is it? Whoever wrote the specs in the first place. What if they add more or change things after the bidding is over and the winner was selected? Whose fault would that be.

Now if it's because of material overruns due to either waste or the company ordered the wrong grade of material then it's certainly the builders fault as are labor problems.


Specs shouldn't need to cover things like "asphalt paving to be on top surfaces of all roadway sections."

How did they get the steam rollers to hold on the bottom of the bridge?

oh, wait, they mounted the hinge to the wrong end of one section?

never mind.
 
2014-01-10 08:08:38 AM  
In my best, but still incredibly deficient, pocketninja voice - This is a perfectly excusable error and is probably just the result of northern hemisphere engineers working in the southern hemisphere.  I once installed a toilet upside down for the exact same reason, so I can understand their confusion.
 
2014-01-10 08:10:22 AM  
Santiago, Chile? Was it designed by this guy?
images.starpulse.com
 
2014-01-10 08:11:57 AM  

LrdPhoenix: Exactly.

In the video they use the example of a road with a pedestrian/bike lane at one side. When you get to the middle of the bridge, that lane swaps sides of the bridge, so everything is off kilter.


Not quite. A different article said that a component was installed backwards. That graphic had to be incorrect. The way a drawbridge works won't allow for that big of a screwup no matter who was doing it. The bridge structure is made so that the unhinged side is as lightweight as possible and the hinged side has enough weight to balance off the lever action of the longer side. In other words the hinge is on the more built up side and could never even be attached to the lightweight side.

However if the hinge is designed to be offset to allow space for the hoisting gears and then it gets installed backwards (rotated horizontally 180 deg.) that offset will be off by however much that designed offset is. A bad set of drawings that don't make it clear and a structure that allows for it to be put in either way combined with the work being done off-site (as a lot of those types of thing are) can cause this to happen. The deck itself isn't rotated 180 deg. though, that's just way too obvious and you wouldn't be able to attach the hinge anyway.
 
2014-01-10 08:15:06 AM  

sno man: So I guess an actual picture of the 'finished' bridge would be too much to ask for?

And I'm no engineer, but based on the pic of the construction that was included, I believe that would be a swing bridge, not a draw bridge.


There are other articles that have a very nice promotional computer animation showing it how it's supposed to be. It's a two arm drawbridge. A nice looking one actually.

Chevello: oh, wait, they mounted the hinge to the wrong end of one section?


Not the wrong end that I could see, just spun around to face the wrong way.
 
2014-01-10 08:15:58 AM  
I once installed the top shelf upside down while building a bookcase.
 
2014-01-10 08:17:51 AM  
imgc.artprintimages.com
 
2014-01-10 08:20:14 AM  

Public Savant: The blueprints were probably in english.
Even the french exchange students were better at english than the spanish ones, IIRC.

One time I had to greet a new spanish exchange student to our dormitory. He couldn't speak any english at all and we didn't know he was coming, either.
We somehow managed to throw some simple spanish sentences together with some french, and could eventually figure out he was in the wrong dorm (yeah, he just finally showed us the address he was going to)

But still, who goes to STUDY somewhere, where they can't speak neither national language nor english?


Lots of exchange students do. A couple of years ago my brother in law's family hosted a young German high-school student, at first communicating was difficult, but everybody managed somehow. I think it helped that she was immediately treated like one of the family, including by Mrs.Capt and I and our daughters who took to her as though she was one of their cousins.

By the end of the school year she could speak fluent French. We're still in contact and it's amusing to hear her speak Québecois French with a German accent.  She has since gone on to also pick-up Parisian French, Spanish and Portuguese.
 
2014-01-10 08:22:52 AM  

twomutts: Santiago, Chile? Was it designed by this guy?


A tiny fist, shaking.
 
2014-01-10 08:28:21 AM  

capt.hollister: Public Savant: The blueprints were probably in english.
Even the french exchange students were better at english than the spanish ones, IIRC.

One time I had to greet a new spanish exchange student to our dormitory. He couldn't speak any english at all and we didn't know he was coming, either.
We somehow managed to throw some simple spanish sentences together with some french, and could eventually figure out he was in the wrong dorm (yeah, he just finally showed us the address he was going to)

But still, who goes to STUDY somewhere, where they can't speak neither national language nor english?

Lots of exchange students do. A couple of years ago my brother in law's family hosted a young German high-school student, at first communicating was difficult, but everybody managed somehow. I think it helped that she was immediately treated like one of the family, including by Mrs.Capt and I and our daughters who took to her as though she was one of their cousins.

By the end of the school year she could speak fluent French. We're still in contact and it's amusing to hear her speak Québecois French with a German accent.  She has since gone on to also pick-up Parisian French, Spanish and Portuguese.


Don't you speak English at home? Because English is mandatory (to my knowledge) to learn in Germany and you start in 5th grade at the latest.
 
2014-01-10 08:35:45 AM  

Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.



Only retards use inches and feet.

/Go metric, or go home.
 
2014-01-10 08:37:37 AM  

lucksi: capt.hollister: Public Savant: The blueprints were probably in english.
Even the french exchange students were better at english than the spanish ones, IIRC.

One time I had to greet a new spanish exchange student to our dormitory. He couldn't speak any english at all and we didn't know he was coming, either.
We somehow managed to throw some simple spanish sentences together with some french, and could eventually figure out he was in the wrong dorm (yeah, he just finally showed us the address he was going to)

But still, who goes to STUDY somewhere, where they can't speak neither national language nor english?

Lots of exchange students do. A couple of years ago my brother in law's family hosted a young German high-school student, at first communicating was difficult, but everybody managed somehow. I think it helped that she was immediately treated like one of the family, including by Mrs.Capt and I and our daughters who took to her as though she was one of their cousins.

By the end of the school year she could speak fluent French. We're still in contact and it's amusing to hear her speak Québecois French with a German accent.  She has since gone on to also pick-up Parisian French, Spanish and Portuguese.

Don't you speak English at home? Because English is mandatory (to my knowledge) to learn in Germany and you start in 5th grade at the latest.


Why would we speak English at home ?
 
2014-01-10 08:38:27 AM  
maybe it's a case of "we got shorted, but no way are we gonna take another hit for coming in late. guys, mess some stuff up."
 
2014-01-10 08:38:58 AM  

Radioactive Ass: LrdPhoenix: They didn't. They installed the traffic deck backwards so the lanes don't line up, like it shows in the preview image for the video at the top.

So not upside down but rotated 180 deg. horizontally in some way? The video isn't really working all that well for me.

Off to Google.


Yea, it seems to just be the driving surface decking put on top of the bridge.  Which was apparently pre-painted. Not that huge of a fail.
 
2014-01-10 08:39:01 AM  

Tax Boy: [i.imgur.com image 280x164]

It's a tourist trap ... Believe it ... or not


Wisconsin Dells?  That place farking ROCKS!
 
2014-01-10 08:39:27 AM  

Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.


uh... that's what she said?
 
2014-01-10 08:42:05 AM  
www.mrjumbo.com
~~Just leave it in the up position.
 
2014-01-10 08:45:25 AM  
They are below the equator; how else would they build it?
 
2014-01-10 08:48:47 AM  
WTF was that video?
 
2014-01-10 08:55:53 AM  

kvinesknows: MythDragon: I had the same problem when I hired some blonde landscapers to put in new sod. I had to keep yelling out the window "Green side up!"

at least they never painted your porch


I don't have a porch. I have a Ferrari.
 
2014-01-10 09:00:46 AM  

Radioactive Ass: sno man: So I guess an actual picture of the 'finished' bridge would be too much to ask for?

And I'm no engineer, but based on the pic of the construction that was included, I believe that would be a swing bridge, not a draw bridge.

There are other articles that have a very nice promotional computer animation showing it how it's supposed to be. It's a two arm drawbridge. A nice looking one actually.

Chevello: oh, wait, they mounted the hinge to the wrong end of one section?

Not the wrong end that I could see, just spun around to face the wrong way.


Amateur engineering analysis and reading if the brief attacks would indicate that maybe the lifting structure and the deck are separate components. The lifting structure would be lighter on the end that moves the most, but the deck, or roadway section would necessarily need to have the same structure throughout. unfortunately, the designers if the roadway section did it in such a way that it could be installed with the wrong end towards the land. If you adhere to the engineer for manufacturing 50-50/90 rule, you know not to do that. Assemblers are really smart at finding engineering flaws.

/if you have a 50-50 shot at getting it right, 90% of the time it will be wrong
 
2014-01-10 09:15:33 AM  
lucksi
Don't you speak English at home? Because English is mandatory (to my knowledge) to learn in Germany and you start in 5th grade at the latest.


7th grade.
Well, I didn't start until 7th grade; it might be different nowadays with the introduction of "Frühenglisch", but I started with Latin in 5th grade and then added English at 7th grade.
 
2014-01-10 09:18:16 AM  

Chevello: Amateur engineering analysis and reading if the brief attacks would indicate that maybe the lifting structure and the deck are separate components. The lifting structure would be lighter on the end that moves the most, but the deck, or roadway section would necessarily need to have the same structure throughout. unfortunately, the designers if the roadway section did it in such a way that it could be installed with the wrong end towards the land. If you adhere to the engineer for manufacturing 50-50/90 rule, you know not to do that. Assemblers are really smart at finding engineering flaws.

/if you have a 50-50 shot at getting it right, 90% of the time it will be wrong


If the deck is an entirely separate component that could happen as well. I just think that it would be a lot more obvious at assembly to notice that than a single hinge getting rotated by accident. That deck would have to come in several sections with a lot of lifts and a lot of bolt holes to line up while a hinge plate could have as few as half a dozen bolts to install. But of course that would depend on how it was designed. I was just spitballing while trying to figure out what the hell they meant when they said "upside down".
 
2014-01-10 09:20:25 AM  
Bridge: messed up, but fixable.
Article: beyond repair.

This article may be the greatest troll ever, what with its intentional logical fallacies and all.

10/10
 
2014-01-10 09:21:24 AM  
It happens. I was working on the building of piperack modules for an oil refinery. The steelworkers built more than 70% of the steelwork 180 degrees from the drawings. There was even a big sign in front of each module that said North, so they knew which way it was being built in relation to the drawings. I've never seen embarassment like that before firsthand. They had to disassemble most of it, including the pipe, some of which had already been welded. Thankfully most of the steel at the base was symmetrical but they had to redo all the records to show which pieces had been installed in which position.
 
2014-01-10 09:24:34 AM  

Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.


As a drafter, I have NO idea how people screw that up. 10"=254mm=25.4cm. I look at the dimensions on a drawing and I automatically know what units I'm looking at.
I've typed .03937007874016 (conversion from mm to inches) so many times it's muscle memory.

Of course, when I become emperor for life, the first thing I'm going to do is abolish/ban imperial units.
 
2014-01-10 09:25:06 AM  
"blueprints" , referring to the chemical process of reproducing drawings, is not used anymore.

Shame too. I loved that smell.
 
2014-01-10 09:26:07 AM  

SewerSquirrels: Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

Of course, when I become emperor for life, the first thing I'm going to do is abolish/ban imperial units.


Got my vote. You should win by a mile.
 
2014-01-10 09:31:48 AM  
Up here in Vermont, we have a "wrong way bridge" so called because when the state built it, they built it the wrong way, according to the plans. Now, being Vermont, everyone called it the wrong way bridge, and used it as a land mark, for directions. Even the Media called it that, even state officials. The bridge was called the wrong way bridge for so long, the when they finally decided to rebuild it years later, it was still called the wrong way bridge.
It's right next to "pumpkin harbor", so named due to a flood that washed thousands of pumpkins into a swirling orange mass during a flood during the last century.

Be careful what you screw up, it could be your legacy.
this includes kids.
 
2014-01-10 09:34:53 AM  

DerAppie: I would like to be the first to call Bullshiat. There is no way this can be true.


I'm inclined to think so as well. This is the kind of thing that gets forwarded a million time via email so we can all belive in our superiority over foreigners.
 
2014-01-10 09:35:54 AM  
They screwed up a building at PSU, too. The hallways were supposed to be elevator shafts.
Yeah, they built it sideways.
 
2014-01-10 09:36:19 AM  

LemSkroob: "blueprints" , referring to the chemical process of reproducing drawings, is not used anymore.

Shame too. I loved that smell.


Hey everyone, I found Ric Romero's fark handle.
 
2014-01-10 09:45:24 AM  
Since Chile is below the equator, their up is our down. So, the bridge was built correctly. QED
 
2014-01-10 09:47:16 AM  

LemSkroob: "blueprints" , referring to the chemical process of reproducing drawings, is not used anymore.

Shame too. I loved that smell


They still are, as far as I know? At least for plat plans (last used them on the job ~ 10 years ago) and survey plans (last used them on the job ~ a year ago). Sometimes it's whiteprints but the smell is similar. I never quite understood *why* both are still used when plotters have existed for quite a while now and have gotten more and more efficient, but yeah.

(The smell is indeed like crack, just like new computer components. Why does poison smell so great? XD )

I'm also not surprised by *anything* builders do with plans. Sometimes it's something somewhat understandable, like they tried to flip the plan themselves out in the field but still took measurements as if the plan hadn't been flipped and ended up with windows in weird places or something, but I've seen some things... just... wtf.
 
2014-01-10 09:53:55 AM  
Im sure it was paid for by the Obama Healthcare Program
 
2014-01-10 09:54:33 AM  

SewerSquirrels: Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.

As a drafter, I have NO idea how people screw that up. 10"=254mm=25.4cm. I look at the dimensions on a drawing and I automatically know what units I'm looking at.
I've typed .03937007874016 (conversion from mm to inches) so many times it's muscle memory.

Of course, when I become emperor for life, the first thing I'm going to do is abolish/ban imperial units.


Why don't you type 1/25.4  ?
 
2014-01-10 09:56:49 AM  

Inflatable Rhetoric: Why don't you type 1/25.4 ?


He's anti-imperialist and fractions are too close to imperial units.
 
2014-01-10 10:04:34 AM  

FizixJunkee: Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.


Only retards use inches and feet.

/Go metric, or go home.


I'm looking at some tape on the ground with imperial measurements written down.  This tape is for the installation of  tool the size of a very small apartment used in the semiconductor process.  For not Apple but the other guys.

Inches and feet are fine.
 
2014-01-10 10:05:54 AM  
Jesus, when I get off shift I just forget to add words in sentences sometimes.  Now I'm reading that as Incest and Feet are fine.

time for bed.  Sheesh.....
 
2014-01-10 10:08:01 AM  

safeforwork: I'm also not surprised by *anything* builders do with plans.


The odd time that goes the other way, the first full gut reno project I was ever on back as a teenager, the plans and permit showed up, and for giggles I was looking at them over lunch.  I proudly announce the stairs wont work, much to the surprise of everyone there... long story short, the ceiling height at the landing would have been about 4'-2".  The Architect, guy at the permit office and GC all missed it.
 
2014-01-10 10:13:20 AM  

sno man: safeforwork: I'm also not surprised by *anything* builders do with plans.

The odd time that goes the other way, the first full gut reno project I was ever on back as a teenager, the plans and permit showed up, and for giggles I was looking at them over lunch.  I proudly announce the stairs wont work, much to the surprise of everyone there... long story short, the ceiling height at the landing would have been about 4'-2".  The Architect, guy at the permit office and GC all missed it.


Some people STILL design houses without 3D modelling so this doesn't surprise me at all.
 
2014-01-10 10:24:00 AM  

Russ1642: sno man: safeforwork: I'm also not surprised by *anything* builders do with plans.

The odd time that goes the other way, the first full gut reno project I was ever on back as a teenager, the plans and permit showed up, and for giggles I was looking at them over lunch.  I proudly announce the stairs wont work, much to the surprise of everyone there... long story short, the ceiling height at the landing would have been about 4'-2".  The Architect, guy at the permit office and GC all missed it.

Some people STILL design houses without 3D modelling so this doesn't surprise me at all.


I'm old, this was way before 3-D modelling.  These drawings would have been prepared by hand (...which was the style at the time). Unless each floor was drawn by someone else in the Architect's office, the one pushing the pencil should have caught it.
 
2014-01-10 10:25:12 AM  

sno man: safeforwork: I'm also not surprised by *anything* builders do with plans.

The odd time that goes the other way, the first full gut reno project I was ever on back as a teenager, the plans and permit showed up, and for giggles I was looking at them over lunch.  I proudly announce the stairs wont work, much to the surprise of everyone there... long story short, the ceiling height at the landing would have been about 4'-2".  The Architect, guy at the permit office and GC all missed it.


Oh heck yeah; that happens too. Usually when one of the 'designers' that has NO idea how this stuff works gets hold of it and *has* to make it look 'pretty'. After the 4th or 5th time you try to explain to them it *won't fit* how they want it, you give up and send it out and hope the engineers catch it.
 
2014-01-10 10:37:13 AM  
Inflatable Rhetoric:  Why don't you type 1/25.4  ?

Because people get insulting when I mix fractions and decimals.(grin)

Really it's because the ancient G code generator doesn't know how to deal with an equation as a scaling factor. The really dumb part is that the software was created in Italy and it requires units in inches????
 
2014-01-10 10:37:29 AM  
Many, many years ago, when they were building MARTA train lines in Atlanta, they mis-built two LARGE concrete piers. I remember going by there seeing the piers gradually go up. A couple of weeks later, they are jackhammering the concrete, and I am wondering, "what the fark." Two days later I see a news story, they had built them rotated the wrong way and had to tear them down and start over.

As far as this particular article, yes, I'd like a more clear report on what actually happened
 
2014-01-10 10:57:45 AM  
In their defense, the engineer's wives were probably coming in every few hours asking when it was going to be done and why they had extra parts all over the floor.
 
2014-01-10 11:00:48 AM  
SewerSquirrels:Of course, when I become emperor for life, the first thing I'm going to do is abolish/ban imperial units.

The King's units will no longer be the King's units. Long live the King's unit.
 
2014-01-10 11:06:01 AM  

dangelder: Another funny headline might have been:

¿ ----- ---- ?


smart AND funny, you win!
 
2014-01-10 11:11:43 AM  
albertgascon.com
 
2014-01-10 11:26:24 AM  

JH3675: [albertgascon.com image 850x521]


That's the military for you. We had to be "Told" not to take a power drill to the exploder on a torpedo warhead. You know, the one with all of the red tags warning us about all of the RDX inside of it... And that it was named the EXPLODER!
 
2014-01-10 11:45:49 AM  
ǝuılpɐǝɥ sıɥʇ ɥʇıʍ pǝssǝɹdɯı ʎɹǝʌ ɯ,ı
 
2014-01-10 11:54:07 AM  
Uh Oh!

i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-01-10 12:05:09 PM  

Radioactive Ass: Chevello: Amateur engineering analysis and reading if the brief attacks would indicate that maybe the lifting structure and the deck are separate components. The lifting structure would be lighter on the end that moves the most, but the deck, or roadway section would necessarily need to have the same structure throughout. unfortunately, the designers if the roadway section did it in such a way that it could be installed with the wrong end towards the land. If you adhere to the engineer for manufacturing 50-50/90 rule, you know not to do that. Assemblers are really smart at finding engineering flaws.

/if you have a 50-50 shot at getting it right, 90% of the time it will be wrong

If the deck is an entirely separate component that could happen as well. I just think that it would be a lot more obvious at assembly to notice that than a single hinge getting rotated by accident. That deck would have to come in several sections with a lot of lifts and a lot of bolt holes to line up while a hinge plate could have as few as half a dozen bolts to install. But of course that would depend on how it was designed. I was just spitballing while trying to figure out what the hell they meant when they said "upside down".


yuuuuup. Awesome screwups are still awesome. My first thought was a guy on a steamroller hanging on for dear life to the underside of the deck.
 
2014-01-10 12:28:56 PM  
i187.photobucket.com
 
2014-01-10 12:33:25 PM  

Tax Boy: [i.imgur.com image 280x164]

It's a tourist trap ... Believe it ... or not


It sure looks like it could trap a lot of tourists.
 
2014-01-10 01:32:31 PM  
autodesk.blogs.com

Yeah, you hafta be careful with drawings. Above is what happens when your electrical contractor isn't fully aware of the fact that a revision cloud on a drawing is not intended to be an actual detail.
 
2014-01-10 02:04:57 PM  
thanks for the autoplay video with no pause button.

My entire office is now wondering why I had Spanish babbling out of my computer.
 
2014-01-10 02:15:53 PM  

LemSkroob: "blueprints" , referring to the chemical process of reproducing drawings, is not used anymore.

Shame too. I loved that smell.


You mean diazo.  I hate the stench of anyhdrous and aqueous ammonia.  Before I landed my first architecture job I worked in the print shops.  There's nothing like smelling the fumes of 550 D sheets per hour coming off of three machines for 10-12 hours a day.  Thankfully with the adoption of the Oce 9800 and the various piece of shiat Kip machines the old diazo machines are gone.

You know it and I know it but the unwashed masses don't know it hasn't been blueprints for generations.  Blueline, blackline and the occasional pinkline prints were the way to go.  Then there was sepia (the most hated media) or the solidified static more commonly known as mylar.  Or the worst for static, the nightmare known as silver slicks.

Fark diazo.
 
2014-01-10 02:28:20 PM  

SewerSquirrels: Peki: Need to watch your UOMs too.

/friend of mine is an engineer who works with China. 30cm is much different than 30 inches.

As a drafter, I have NO idea how people screw that up. 10"=254mm=25.4cm. I look at the dimensions on a drawing and I automatically know what units I'm looking at.
I've typed .03937007874016 (conversion from mm to inches) so many times it's muscle memory.

Of course, when I become emperor for life, the first thing I'm going to do is abolish/ban imperial units.


Units weren't labelled; they'd get a blueprint that would have a 30x20x30 cube, and the Chinese customer intended cm, while the American engineers would read inches.
 
2014-01-10 02:38:18 PM  

durbnpoisn: thanks for the autoplay video with no pause button.

My entire office is now wondering why I had Spanish babbling out of my computer.


Just tell them you were watching 8th Street Latinas.
 
2014-01-10 02:46:08 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: LemSkroob: "blueprints" , referring to the chemical process of reproducing drawings, is not used anymore.

Shame too. I loved that smell.

You mean diazo.  I hate the stench of anyhdrous and aqueous ammonia.  Before I landed my first architecture job I worked in the print shops.  There's nothing like smelling the fumes of 550 D sheets per hour coming off of three machines for 10-12 hours a day.  Thankfully with the adoption of the Oce 9800 and the various piece of shiat Kip machines the old diazo machines are gone.

You know it and I know it but the unwashed masses don't know it hasn't been blueprints for generations.  Blueline, blackline and the occasional pinkline prints were the way to go.  Then there was sepia (the most hated media) or the solidified static more commonly known as mylar.  Or the worst for static, the nightmare known as silver slicks.

Fark diazo.


Hrm... the blueprints I speak of are actually blue - with black or white lines. Thought those WERE blueprints? Then the ones with a similar feel and smell but were white with blue lines were whiteprints?

I worked in a print shop too, which is how I got into the architecture field, but it was just modern plotters and printers. I did work with blue and white prints though - rolls and giant folder files, and I *loved* the smell when I'd get into them though I always quickly moved to fresh air. These weren't even old prints: worked at the home building company - which had its own print shop and architecture department, though plats and surveys were sent from an outside company - from 2003 to 2008, and both blue and white prints were used and none of the plats were older than 1999. At the current place, we only do a few surveys a year and work with an outside surveying company, which sends us whiteprint originals as well as laser-printed plots for field use, and the occasional odd - what I thought were - blueprints.
 
2014-01-10 03:19:49 PM  

Peki: Units weren't labelled; they'd get a blueprint that would have a 30x20x30 cube, and the Chinese customer intended cm, while the American engineers would read inches.


Not to disparage your engineer friend, but I've never seen imperial units on any drawing or CAD that didn't originate in the US. Everybody else seems to be on board with metric (the only exception being pluming for some reason).
 
2014-01-10 03:23:08 PM  

capt.hollister: lucksi: capt.hollister: Public Savant: The blueprints were probably in english.
Even the french exchange students were better at english than the spanish ones, IIRC.

One time I had to greet a new spanish exchange student to our dormitory. He couldn't speak any english at all and we didn't know he was coming, either.
We somehow managed to throw some simple spanish sentences together with some french, and could eventually figure out he was in the wrong dorm (yeah, he just finally showed us the address he was going to)

But still, who goes to STUDY somewhere, where they can't speak neither national language nor english?

Lots of exchange students do. A couple of years ago my brother in law's family hosted a young German high-school student, at first communicating was difficult, but everybody managed somehow. I think it helped that she was immediately treated like one of the family, including by Mrs.Capt and I and our daughters who took to her as though she was one of their cousins.

By the end of the school year she could speak fluent French. We're still in contact and it's amusing to hear her speak Québecois French with a German accent.  She has since gone on to also pick-up Parisian French, Spanish and Portuguese.

Don't you speak English at home? Because English is mandatory (to my knowledge) to learn in Germany and you start in 5th grade at the latest.

Why would we speak English at home ?


Okay from now one when I read your posts it's going to be in a French accent. BTW can you recommend a good wine pairing for a grilled porterhouse?
 
2014-01-10 03:26:49 PM  

alice_600: can you recommend a good wine pairing for a grilled porterhouse?


I got this one. MD20\20
 
2014-01-10 03:36:07 PM  
The blue paper with white lines is indeed true blueprints.  I hadn't seen any of those made since about the 60's.
 
2014-01-10 05:35:50 PM  

SewerSquirrels: Peki: Units weren't labelled; they'd get a blueprint that would have a 30x20x30 cube, and the Chinese customer intended cm, while the American engineers would read inches.

Not to disparage your engineer friend, but I've never seen imperial units on any drawing or CAD that didn't originate in the US. Everybody else seems to be on board with metric (the only exception being pluming for some reason).


My friend is the one who got stuck designing the fix once the error was discovered. He had several not-nice things to say about his coworkers. My feeling was they were just idiots who weren't paying attention.
 
2014-01-10 05:38:34 PM  
Yeah well the orientation coordinator told us that the undergrad library was built facing the wrong way too, and they didn't account for the buoyancy of the air inside and so the building floats 1 inch higher off its foundation every year
 
2014-01-10 05:44:21 PM  
So they built a boat ramp...
 
2014-01-10 06:36:41 PM  

Peki: My friend is the one who got stuck designing the fix once the error was discovered. He had several not-nice things to say about his coworkers. My feeling was they were just idiots who weren't paying attention.


Then please pass along my condolences; I once spent a good chunk of 6 years fixing all of my predecessors screw ups. Although that aspect of the job sucked, his bork ups were the reason I got that job. I later saw him working in Wal Mart. Schadenfreude is not something I experience often.
 
2014-01-10 11:33:50 PM  

alice_600: capt.hollister: lucksi: capt.hollister: Public Savant: The blueprints were probably in english.
Even the french exchange students were better at english than the spanish ones, IIRC.

One time I had to greet a new spanish exchange student to our dormitory. He couldn't speak any english at all and we didn't know he was coming, either.
We somehow managed to throw some simple spanish sentences together with some french, and could eventually figure out he was in the wrong dorm (yeah, he just finally showed us the address he was going to)

But still, who goes to STUDY somewhere, where they can't speak neither national language nor english?

Lots of exchange students do. A couple of years ago my brother in law's family hosted a young German high-school student, at first communicating was difficult, but everybody managed somehow. I think it helped that she was immediately treated like one of the family, including by Mrs.Capt and I and our daughters who took to her as though she was one of their cousins.

By the end of the school year she could speak fluent French. We're still in contact and it's amusing to hear her speak Québecois French with a German accent.  She has since gone on to also pick-up Parisian French, Spanish and Portuguese.

Don't you speak English at home? Because English is mandatory (to my knowledge) to learn in Germany and you start in 5th grade at the latest.

Why would we speak English at home ?

Okay from now one when I read your posts it's going to be in a French accent. BTW can you recommend a good wine pairing for a grilled porterhouse?


You can do that if you like, but you would be wrong as I speak English with a very standard English-Canadian accent.

/May hi recommend de Cabernet Sauvignon to haccompanee de Porrterr'ouse
 
2014-01-11 03:25:46 AM  
WHO WOULD HAVE GUESSED AWARDING THE CONTRACT TO THE LOWEST BIDDER WASN'T THE BEST IDEA?
 
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