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(About.com)   Fark Food Thread: Dried herbs and spices are convenient, but fresh ones are preferred.. right? Do you go through herbs quickly enough to always keep fresh ones on hand? Other ways to make fresh herbs last? Grow your own?   (cookingfortwo.about.com) divider line 154
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1761 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jan 2014 at 5:00 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-01-09 06:52:56 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: Not so fast, Freshy Fresh Subby.

Dried parsley has its place. So does granulated onion. The fresh items of these two are too overpowering (I guess it can be blamed on oils and other liquids in them) for lots of recipes. Additionally, I think dried parsley tastes completely different than fresh parsley. No high notes like fresh, just a nice earthy layer underneath every other taste.

/I am worried about the amount of dried parsley and granulated onions I use and how often I use them.
/don't get me started on bay leaf


I make an old-school bread (baked in the oven in le creuset or similar pots) that uses TONS of granulated onion and a spicy spaghetti mixture of herbs.  It's fantabulous.  Try it with fresh herbs and you get....meh.

We get tons of sun in the summer, and grow some herbs then, but bulbs NEVER grow for me.  Onions, garlic, radishes...I never get anything.  Mint will take over my farking garden if I let it.  I grow it so the kids can eat it, but even with all the kids I have, they can't keep up.  ;)   Plus, that root ball mint makes takes up a ton of space and leaves my other stuff wanting.

You people grow saffron?  Seriously?  I want to know how you do this.
 
2014-01-09 06:53:03 PM
www.growyourownstone.com
 
2014-01-09 06:57:05 PM

voodoomedic: semi-threadjack, but also herb related: I have a Costco-sized bag of pine nuts...besides making ten years' worth of pesto, any ideas what else to do with it?

Basil pesto pine-nut bread.
Not kidding.
 
2014-01-09 06:59:53 PM

praxcelis: My rosemary plant started out as a 6" cutting from a relative's garden, now it's a small tree.  I found out the hard way to put some herbs in pots rather than plant them directly in the ground--it turns out oregano is Italian for "invasive ground cover".  Last couple years my thyme has returned every spring so I've always got some around when it's time to grill fish.

Basil, however, must be grown indoors.  I usually get one or two of those "live basil" rootballs in the produce section and keep it in a glass of water for months, or until I get tired of it and make enough pesto to drown a horse.  If I try to grow it outside it sends out an invisible Deer Signal and they'll trample every other living thing in the yard to get to it.  Every time, eaten to the ground.  I'd try and rig some sort of Rube Goldberg taser device if it weren't for neighborhood cats, kids, etc.  (sAaaayyyy....)

Made the mistake of planting the chives next to the onions one year, now we have onion-flavored chives forevermore (not that this is a bad thing, necessarily).



That reminds me of the mistake I made one year- I planted the green bell peppers next to the jalapenos and ended up with spicy green bells and really lame jalapenos. I was pretty new at the gardening thing and didn't know about cross pollination altering the flavors of some veggies.
 
2014-01-09 07:05:25 PM

praxcelis: Basil, however, must be grown indoors.


i50.photobucket.com

Nah, you want to grow it outdoors, in a DWC bucket.

/The plants in soil were the mothers
//The tomato in hydro was 9 feet down over the railing, downstairs neighbors could just pick from that section and I picked from the top. Still had leftovers.
//Basil OOZED oil from the leaves.
 
2014-01-09 07:19:57 PM

khyberkitsune: praxcelis: Basil, however, must be grown indoors.

[i50.photobucket.com image 850x636]

Nah, you want to grow it outdoors, in a DWC bucket.

/The plants in soil were the mothers
//The tomato in hydro was 9 feet down over the railing, downstairs neighbors could just pick from that section and I picked from the top. Still had leftovers.
//Basil OOZED oil from the leaves.


See, I'd love to have that kind of healthy plant.  Especially now--it's time for me to make red sauce again and I can't do anything small, so it's 20 quarts or so.  You appear to have a fenced balcony on an upper floor, so the aforementioned deer problem wouldn't be an issue for you. :)   I have an unfenced yard (I know, I know, "build a fence".  I live on a small side street where the easement for all the underground utilities would have a fence about four inches from the house in spots.  Besides, I like the view.)
 
2014-01-09 07:25:01 PM

trippdogg: [www.growyourownstone.com image 850x565]


s12.postimg.org

Herbs?
 
2014-01-09 07:25:04 PM
when i was a younger man I'd go through about an ounce a week but then I got old
 
2014-01-09 07:29:55 PM
I prefer fresh for pastas or any sauce I may be making to stuff meet or top the meat.....Dried is/am/are good for Dry rubs...I'll be darned?

8 beers in.
  Short ribs are in the oven
     Slashy button broke during a feverish battle with a porn site, It was a mess!
 
2014-01-09 07:31:56 PM

praxcelis: khyberkitsune: praxcelis: Basil, however, must be grown indoors.

[i50.photobucket.com image 850x636]

Nah, you want to grow it outdoors, in a DWC bucket.

/The plants in soil were the mothers
//The tomato in hydro was 9 feet down over the railing, downstairs neighbors could just pick from that section and I picked from the top. Still had leftovers.
//Basil OOZED oil from the leaves.

See, I'd love to have that kind of healthy plant.  Especially now--it's time for me to make red sauce again and I can't do anything small, so it's 20 quarts or so.  You appear to have a fenced balcony on an upper floor, so the aforementioned deer problem wouldn't be an issue for you. :)   I have an unfenced yard (I know, I know, "build a fence".  I live on a small side street where the easement for all the underground utilities would have a fence about four inches from the house in spots.  Besides, I like the view.)


No, don't build a fence. Put the basil in a sunny area behind some other plants the deer doesn't like. Citronella is a good one to use, and it can tolerate hydroponics pretty well, so it can become pungent and stop the deer (and repel mosquitoes to some degree!)
 
2014-01-09 07:33:28 PM
SF Bay Area.

Rosemary grows like a hedge. You can cut fresh rosemary year-round. Bay laurel (Bay Leaf) is available within a block or two where ever you are, if you know what it looks like. Mint is a weed and it grows everywhere here. Parsley is a pain to grow, but "fresh" is cheap at the grocery. That pretty much covers all my needs except for Basil and Sage which grow in a planter box.
 
2014-01-09 07:36:20 PM
Just saw the headline, so I going to quickly respond to the headline before I read the thread itself.. between spring and fall harvest I grow massive amounts of fresh herbs in the gardens. use fresh during the season, dry and store excess for the winter and sell/give away various stocks, over winter I use a lot of fresh evergreen herbs like rosemary which I feel is usually more seasonal specific for flavoring anyways.I have two bay laural trees for bay leaves, and they evergreens as well.
Where I live..the oregano plants never fully die back, as well as sage, thyme and chives. mint is good as well Basil?too tender to survive even Virginia's mild winters but I have rooted cuttings on the kitchen window sill, and of course all the dried reserves.
 
2014-01-09 07:46:39 PM
also, it's harder than hell to grow cilantro in iowa

mexican guy I know says it'll bolt with weather fluctuations and Iowa ain't nothing but that

damn I love cilantro
 
2014-01-09 08:05:33 PM

Omahawg: also, it's harder than hell to grow cilantro in iowa

mexican guy I know says it'll bolt with weather fluctuations and Iowa ain't nothing but that

damn I love cilantro


If you let it seed you'll get coriander, which is nice.
 
2014-01-09 08:05:39 PM
All I know is rosemary get way out of control if left unchecked. I can only eat so much lamb.
 
kth
2014-01-09 08:09:58 PM
I am terrible at growing herbs. Basil in the ground excepted. We had pounds of that stuff this summer. I am hoping to get a raised bed that I can move around for herbs. I also got a greenhouse for christmas, so I'm hoping that I can keep some going in there.
 
2014-01-09 08:13:42 PM

exvaxman: I have half a dozen aero gardens, picked up for $10 each from a bankruptcy sale. Great for fresh herbs throughout the year. It is also very easy and cheap to build your own version with styrofoam coolers, thrift store aquarium pumps, air stones, and some cheap items from your local hydroponics store. I keep four large units outside in growing season.


i got one of the aero gardens at a garage sale for like $10. i was pretty excited about it, and its ok if you only need a smale amount or herbs occassionally. my overall experience was the herbs grew much smaller than outside and it could be difficult to have enough. also outside herbs generally grow together just fine. I found things like basil would monopolize the space inside while the tyme would barely grow. it also is farking loud. my bulbs burned out and I didn't think it was worth 30 or whatever to buy new ones.

//grows a few kinds of basil, chive, garlic chive, tyme, oregono, chocolate mint, spearamint, sage, and a half dozen other things in the summer. I really miss them in the winter. the aero garden just seemed like it didn't do much for me.
 
2014-01-09 08:22:06 PM

theorellior: Omahawg: also, it's harder than hell to grow cilantro in iowa

mexican guy I know says it'll bolt with weather fluctuations and Iowa ain't nothing but that

damn I love cilantro

If you let it seed you'll get coriander, which is nice.


I know. and it is.

but cilantro!
 
2014-01-09 08:37:24 PM
I've got mint, parsley and chives in pots that I brought in from Mom's back patio.  I'll put in basil and rosemary in the spring.  The chives and parsley are on their last legs but mint is impossible to kill.  I just put the pots in the south window.  There's no real work to it.
 
2014-01-09 08:42:12 PM
So since we're talking about growing fresh herbs and all -- I'm moving from Texas (where I can't keep a single thing alive for more than a week) to a village in Derbyshire, England in six weeks. Does anyone here live in the East Midlands who could give me a clue or two about my chances of successfully keeping herbs alive there? There's no yard, but an east-facing patio (I'm really better with container gardening anyway), and also a nice deep window well, also east-facing, in the kitchen. There's also a very narrow fenced bit along the front of the house (west-facing) that currently has a couple of scruffy-looking potted evergreens of some sort and might also be usable for potted herbs.

Any advice would be extremely welcome. I prefer to start with 4" potted herbs rather than seed -- when's best to plant them? How often will I need to water? Is there anything I can leave outside in the winter, or will everything need to come inside? The only place I've ever kept things alive consistently before was an apartment balcony in a foggy suburb on the coast just south of San Francisco, and I really have no idea what to expect in England other than "cool and damp". Which is encouraging, but may not be the same kind of cool and damp as Pacifica CA.

I throw myself upon your mercy.
 
2014-01-09 08:43:51 PM
There's a few herbs that are better fresh, but most spices (and some herbs like tarragon) have a better flavour when they've dried.
I freeze herbs into little ice cubes or use dry in the winter, except cilantro which I can get fresh at the grocery store.
 
2014-01-09 08:45:42 PM

Igor Jakovsky: All I know is rosemary get way out of control if left unchecked. I can only eat so much lamb.


Rosemary's nice with pork (roast or chops) and chicken (marinate in lemon juice and rosemary) too. The blossoms are beautiful and delicious sprinkled on a salad. And it takes well to pruning... if you have more than you can use, take the extra to work and share.
 
2014-01-09 08:48:11 PM

La Maudite: So since we're talking about growing fresh herbs and all -- I'm moving from Texas (where I can't keep a single thing alive for more than a week) to a village in Derbyshire, England in six weeks. Does anyone here live in the East Midlands who could give me a clue or two about my chances of successfully keeping herbs alive there? There's no yard, but an east-facing patio (I'm really better with container gardening anyway), and also a nice deep window well, also east-facing, in the kitchen. There's also a very narrow fenced bit along the front of the house (west-facing) that currently has a couple of scruffy-looking potted evergreens of some sort and might also be usable for potted herbs.

Any advice would be extremely welcome. I prefer to start with 4" potted herbs rather than seed -- when's best to plant them? How often will I need to water? Is there anything I can leave outside in the winter, or will everything need to come inside? The only place I've ever kept things alive consistently before was an apartment balcony in a foggy suburb on the coast just south of San Francisco, and I really have no idea what to expect in England other than "cool and damp". Which is encouraging, but may not be the same kind of cool and damp as Pacifica CA.

I throw myself upon your mercy.


You might wish to look up Adam Jensen, who is I think in that area. He's the host of CountryFile on the BBC.

As a born and raised Texan, and having done horticultural work in the UK, you will have a much easier time growing herbs. Freezes aren't very common in the area you're moving to, though it can get chilly. Herbs do well outdoors, especially garlic.
 
2014-01-09 08:49:57 PM
I should note, you can do all of those in containers, outdoors on a patio or balcony. Most will be okay indoors during the really cold times.
 
2014-01-09 08:56:04 PM
Great info from you Farkers. Much appreciated.

After 25 years on the road, I came home to SoFla and have a new (2 y. o.)herb garden. Much success with a plot on the NE side of the house- sun in the AM and shade in the hot PM hours. The plot consists of basil (which happily reseeds itself), rosemary (perennial), chives, pineapple, bird peppers (very hot, small native shrub) and marigolds (nematode prevention).

I always keep a few pots on the east side of the house with the annual herbs. Slow-bolt cilantro seeds can be found at Lowes now. For the potted herbs, I use 1/3 bagged topsoil, 1/3 compressed peat moss and 1/3 composted horse manure, of which I have a never-ending supply. Water lightly daily, Miracle-gro once a week in the early stages of growth. I pot curly parsley, sweet mint and cilantro. On the side of the house I have perennial oregano, some chocolate mint (OMG, that's some good tea right there)- and out in the yard there are what we call "river bay" trees. They are weedy shrubs which grow down here, and smell heavenly. I use them like bay laurel.

For those of you who have an actual dirt garden in the backyard, I highly recommend "Carrots Love Tomatoes," a book about companion gardening. It has been a real help. Following the book's recommendation, I had championship lettuce and radishes last spring. Also green onions, snow peas and 400 tomato plants.

/went overboard, but I love me some fresh tomato puree.
 
2014-01-09 08:56:39 PM
Derbyshire is too cold for basil in the winter but the perennial herbs like oregano, thyme, sage, rosemary should be OK. You might need to bring the rosemary in for a couple of months.
 
2014-01-09 09:00:17 PM
Growing your own can be fun.  Many of them are pretty resilient to the extent that they take over.  Mint for instance.  Don't plant mint.  Cilantro you have to pull and replace after it bolts.
 
2014-01-09 09:00:34 PM
My trick: store ginger root in a little jar filled with sherry. The ginger keeps forever, plus you can cook with the ginger-flavoured sherry.
 
2014-01-09 09:03:24 PM
If you are going to freeze fresh herbs in olive oil cubes, you can save a ton of time by "cube cooking".  As long as the cubes are kept in their own freezer bag, you are good to go.  Just toss a cube into your pot when you want one.  Other things to freeze include:

Red and white wines, not just for cooking, but to cool liquid wine in glasses without watering it down.

The same with coffee ice cubes to make iced coffee.

Blond (colored), caramel (colored) and chocolate (colored) quick roux.  Turn good food great with roux.

Whipping cream, liquid or whipped into divinity-like meringue drops before freezing.  Buttermilk, too.

Tomato paste and tomato sauce.  A normal ice cube is 1 ounce, or 2 tablespoons.

Mashed potatoes, as well as other mashed vegetables, like cauliflower, celery root, beets, parsnips, carrots, avocado, and squash will really liven up a soup or stew.

Pesto.

Fruit juices.
 
2014-01-09 09:10:11 PM

whatshisname: Derbyshire is too cold for basil in the winter but the perennial herbs like oregano, thyme, sage, rosemary should be OK. You might need to bring the rosemary in for a couple of months.


I figure the kitchen window well should be fine for basil as long as my cat doesn't go after it. (A previous cat, allowed out on the balcony where I was growing catnip and basil among other things, ate half the basil plant before I noticed, ignoring the catnip completely. My furry little gourmand... I miss him so much. Here's a pic of Daddy-O eating the chiles I'd left in a plate of Thai curry (substituting homegrown Hungarian hot wax peppers because I was out of Thai).)

www.merde.org
 
2014-01-09 09:10:24 PM
TheWriteGirl:

They're good in hummus, and make a really good crust for chicken breasts.

Aslo, saute spinach with garlic and top with toasted nuts


just toast the nuts and put them in salads, or whatever.  they are very versatile. 

TYVM
 
2014-01-09 09:11:37 PM
I have an herb garden in the back yard. I usually have 12-16 basil plants, oregano, thyme, rosemary, garlic bulbs, mint, chamomile, cilantro, and chives. I also have several jalapeno, habanero, and thai chile plants. The local farmer's market supplies me with almost all our meat, eggs, milk, and veg. Usually only go to the grocery store for limited canned goods, plastic bags etc...
 
2014-01-09 09:19:32 PM

La Maudite: So since we're talking about growing fresh herbs and all -- I'm moving from Texas (where I can't keep a single thing alive for more than a week) to a village in Derbyshire, England in six weeks. Does anyone here live in the East Midlands who could give me a clue or two about my chances of successfully keeping herbs alive there? There's no yard, but an east-facing patio (I'm really better with container gardening anyway), and also a nice deep window well, also east-facing, in the kitchen. There's also a very narrow fenced bit along the front of the house (west-facing) that currently has a couple of scruffy-looking potted evergreens of some sort and might also be usable for potted herbs.

Any advice would be extremely welcome. I prefer to start with 4" potted herbs rather than seed -- when's best to plant them? How often will I need to water? Is there anything I can leave outside in the winter, or will everything need to come inside? The only place I've ever kept things alive consistently before was an apartment balcony in a foggy suburb on the coast just south of San Francisco, and I really have no idea what to expect in England other than "cool and damp". Which is encouraging, but may not be the same kind of cool and damp as Pacifica CA.

I throw myself upon your mercy.


You can't go wrong with thyme, rosemary and parsley.  I live in the Seattle area and our weather is similar.  Be careful about mint- it'll spread like wildfire, but it gets purple, lavender like flowers which the bees love!  I wish I could taste that honey!
 
2014-01-09 09:23:43 PM
I grow about six fresh herbs all year round, they do great in the house during winter and nice décor as well.  But if I didn't want to deal with live plants I'd use the freeze dried herbs, and I do on occasion.  They retain all their flavor and are already chopped up.
 
2014-01-09 09:38:46 PM

peacheslatour: You can't go wrong with thyme, rosemary and parsley.  I live in the Seattle area and our weather is similar.  Be careful about mint- it'll spread like wildfire, but it gets purple, lavender like flowers which the bees love!  I wish I could taste that honey!


Oh god, you're reminding me of the farmer's market I used to go to in San Francisco. There was a local honey seller who generally had at least 10 different single-sourced varieties on sale. My favorite was her blackberry honey, which was very dark and had a deep, musky flavor that really stood out, even in small amounts. I used to make a whole wheat loaf with chopped walnuts and blackberry honey that was absolutely divine. The sage honey was also very special.

Mint really is easy -- it grew like a weed around the house I grew up in. I remember my mother frequently sending me out to pick a few stalks to put in iced tea, and there's nothing like a homegrown mojito to cap off a beautiful summer day. Good to know I'll be able to grow thyme, since lemon thyme is never available at groceries and the flavor is impossible to duplicate by cheating.

One of the things I'm most excited about is that the new house is half a mile from a farm store that sells only things they grew/raised/butchered themselves, and a 15 minute drive from one of the biggest and longest-running open-air markets in England, which is open three days a week. For the first time in my life, I'm going to be able to know exactly where the vast majority of the food I eat comes from!

I think my fiancé is a little bewildered by the extent of my enthusiasm, but between that and the fact that there is absolutely no fast food or crappy pizza/chinese delivery to be had anywhere in the village, I'm confident that we'll both be vastly healthier in the space of a year. Not to mention spoiled rotten...
 
2014-01-09 09:45:20 PM
I'm moving to Colorado for adequate fresh herb.
 
2014-01-09 10:03:32 PM
I use both and will never ever plant any kind of mint again!

/waiting on my St. John's Wort plant to get bigger
 
2014-01-09 10:11:10 PM

Eutamias21: I always have parsley. It keeps for a long time in the fridge. Cilantro and basil I'd like to have but I can't keep them from rotting so fast.


I discovered a cilantro paste in the vegetable section of the store. Not as good as fresh but it keeps in the fridge for a lonnnnnng time and tastes pretty good.
 
2014-01-09 10:25:29 PM
Any herbs I use often that are perrenial, I just grow them. Mints, dill, oregano, basil, lemon thyme, and rosemary. Other herbs I might buy fresh for special occasions, but for daily use of herbs I don't grow, I get freeze-dried.

Garlic is great, though, in that you can get jars of it minced.
 
2014-01-09 10:27:12 PM

canavar: grow your own  and then you can make herb pastes and freeze them...have them on hand all year long


snip the herb, throw into a food processor with a little olive oil and puree it up.  scrape it into a zip lock AND LABEL IT---herbs tend to look all the same when you do this---then put it in the freezer.  fresh herbs all the time.


I do that in covered ice cube trays. A tablespoon of olive oil with an herb selection (such as an Italian or French mix) in each cube, freeze them, pop them out and then bag them. My garden grew giant basil, sage, and rosemary plants this year.
 
2014-01-09 10:27:14 PM

Honest Bender: FYI, most herbs grow crazy fast. I'd be surprised if you could use all of, say, basil before more grew.


Yeah, I've had to prune my basil and dry it often because of that. Dill also grows retarded fast, I usually just trim it and give it to coworkers since dry dill has almost no flavor.
 
2014-01-09 10:28:47 PM

LincolnLogolas: Garlic is great, though, in that you can get jars of it minced.


Convenient, but bitter and nasty, with a unique flavour all its own. Try a garlic press.
 
2014-01-09 10:31:21 PM
I keep trying to grow fresh herbs all year, but I clearly have a black thumb when it comes to indoor growing. Nevertheless, I'll pick fresh over dried when I can and I'll keep trying to grow (they're so cheap to but potted that I'm willing to keep at it) them. Having said that, I keep good dried options on hand, usually ones that I dehydrate from my garden.
 
2014-01-09 10:41:28 PM

Eutamias21: Cilantro and basil I'd like to have but I can't keep them from rotting so fast.


Cilantro is a must have fresh herb for me (the dry or frozen just will not work in Asian and Latin American food). I use it in nearly everything I make and it still occasionally rots on me. A good way to keep it longer is to immediately unband it when you get home and spread it out on a thin towel (paper towel works in a pinch). Since it usually comes soaking wet, let them dry out a bit. Then wrap them up in the same towel and stick it in the fridge. When it does start to rot, you can still blend up into salsa verde or Indian chutney.
 
2014-01-09 10:43:18 PM

sboyle1020: ALWAYS have fresh basil.  The rest I can deal with dried.  If I'm planning a meal in advance I'll buy all fresh.


But how do you keep it alive in the winter when there's hardly any sunlight?
 
2014-01-09 10:43:27 PM
All Penzey's, all the time.

http://www.penzeys.com/


/Unless the wife happens to grow something in summer.
//Yes, that was across the plate--leave it alone.
 
2014-01-09 11:24:36 PM

Jekylman: eyeoftheaxis: Jekylman: tricycleracer: Basil is the easiest thing to grow.  It gets real sad looking and screams at you to water it days before it will actually croak.

Here in Southern California, cilantro and mint are the easiest things to grow. You can't get rid of mint and cilantro will sprout despite your best efforts.

Also in the garden:
sage
vast swaths of rosemary
chives/onions
marjoram
thyme
basil
rue
lemongrass
Also use lime tree leaves in an herb-like manner.

keep mint in pots or it will take over.
/the hard way.
//would you like some tea

Makes for a fantastic mint-chip ice cream.


Thanks, I'm going to try it. We did blend and freeze some into ice cubes to use in mint juleps.
 
2014-01-09 11:35:49 PM
I'd grow my own, but it's not legal in this state.
 
2014-01-10 12:34:23 AM

granolasteak: TheShavingofOccam123: Not so fast, Freshy Fresh Subby.

Dried parsley has its place. So does granulated onion. The fresh items of these two are too overpowering (I guess it can be blamed on oils and other liquids in them) for lots of recipes. Additionally, I think dried parsley tastes completely different than fresh parsley. No high notes like fresh, just a nice earthy layer underneath every other taste.

/I am worried about the amount of dried parsley and granulated onions I use and how often I use them.
/don't get me started on bay leaf

I make an old-school bread (baked in the oven in le creuset or similar pots) that uses TONS of granulated onion and a spicy spaghetti mixture of herbs.  It's fantabulous.  Try it with fresh herbs and you get....meh.

We get tons of sun in the summer, and grow some herbs then, but bulbs NEVER grow for me.  Onions, garlic, radishes...I never get anything.  Mint will take over my farking garden if I let it.  I grow it so the kids can eat it, but even with all the kids I have, they can't keep up.  ;)   Plus, that root ball mint makes takes up a ton of space and leaves my other stuff wanting.

You people grow saffron?  Seriously?  I want to know how you do this.


You have to plant garlic the season before in the fall. For any bulb you have to have rather loose soil. Onions need to be planted quite early in the season- the moment your soil is workable, plant them. Same with radishes. Also radish seeds are tiny - sow thickly and then thin out as the seedlings appear.
 
2014-01-10 12:37:06 AM

voodoomedic: semi-threadjack, but also herb related: I have a Costco-sized bag of pine nuts...besides making ten years' worth of pesto, any ideas what else to do with it?


pine-nut brittle?
 
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